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Meaning of "minor" on a UK 1852 marriage certificate?

Replies: 19

Re: Meaning of "minor" on a UK 1852 marriage certificate?

Posted: 6 Nov 2008 5:57PM GMT
Classification: Query
Forgive me if I am in error again , but I think maybe you are possibly misreading what it actually says? which is...
Quote="The age at which a person could marry and at which they would require consent has changed since 1837. Then marriage could be at 12 for a girl and 14 for a boy, but consent of parent(s) was required for both up to the age of 21. In 1926 the age of marriage for both parties was raised to 16 but consent for both was still required until 21. Now, the age at which people can marry is still 16 but the age for consent has been lowered to 18."
So it is clear that legal marriage could take place at age 14 with parents consent only (I didn't know a girl could be married at 12 with parents consent, nor did I know that it was actually earlier than 1930 when the law changed to 16) If you look into this further you will see that any person under the age of 18 was considered and regarded as a "minor", certainly from 1852, if not some time before. I was married at age 18 in 1965 the age of consent was then 21 and I needed my parents consent to marry. We wanted to marry at 17, but that would have meant having the word "minor" on my marriage certificate, so we waited till I was 18. That is a fact, and that is what the word "minor " meant, to be under the age of 18years.
Definition from Miriam Webster dict.----under full legal age (usually either eighteen or twenty-one years)
SubjectAuthorDate Posted
higgy1608 30 Oct 2008 9:38AM GMT 
ELLinSpain 31 Oct 2008 10:34PM GMT 
winifredadams... 5 Nov 2008 3:47PM GMT 
tecwynsavage 5 Nov 2008 10:03PM GMT 
winifredadams... 6 Nov 2008 12:48AM GMT 
higgy1608 6 Nov 2008 7:57AM GMT 
jlester1581 7 Nov 2008 12:22AM GMT 
winifredadams... 7 Nov 2008 12:57AM GMT 
jlester1581 7 Nov 2008 1:36AM GMT 
winifredadams... 7 Nov 2008 2:31PM GMT 
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