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Gibson/Gipson Family Information

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Gibson/Gipson Family Information

Posted: 10 Jan 2002 4:13PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 12 Apr 2002 8:52AM GMT
Surnames: Gibson, Gibson, Burch, Anderson
From the book, Old Sparta and Elba Land Office Records and Military Warrants, 1822-1860, by Maryilyn Davis Hahn, 1983, Southern Historical Press, Easley, South Carolina:

Gibson:
GIBSON, Delany received land in Township 8, Range 21, Section 4 on March, 4, 1853 by Military Warrant # 76017.
GIBSON, Edwin L., a resident of Pike County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 9, Range 21 on February 15, 1836.
GIBSON, Edwin L., a resident of Pike County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 9, Range 21 on November 29, 1837.
GIBSON, James M., a resident of Pike County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 3, Range 21 on November 15, 1852.
GIBSON, John, is listed in the land book on January 1, 1851. However, there is no location of the land or where John Gibson was living at the time of purchase.
GIBSON, Joseph, a resident of Covington County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 3, Range 18, on November 16, 1854.
GIBSON, Obadiah C., a resident of Barbour County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 11, Range 29 on May 6, 1836. [This land is in today’s Dale County--2002.]
GIBSON, Phineas J., a resident of Pike County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 9, Range 21 on August 8, 1836.
GIBSON, Ransom C., a resident of Dale County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 4, Range 26, on January 27, 1853.
GIBSON, Samuel K., a resident of Pike County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 9, Range 21, on February 25, 1837.
GIBSON, Samuel R., a resident of Pike County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 8, Range 21, on October 1, 1835.
GIBSON, Samuel R., a resident of Pike County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 8, Range 21 on October 15, 1840.
GIBSON, Sampsom, a resident of Dale County purchased land in Township 6, Range 23, on November 11, 1848. [This land is in today’s Dale County—2002.]
GIBSON, Shadrick A., a resident of Columbia County, Georgia, purchased land in Township 1, Range 30 on May 22, 1855.
GIBSON, William A. C., a resident of Pike County, Alabama, purchased land in Township 8, Range 21, on November 25, 1852.

All names are spelled with a “b” as in Gibson. There are no entries in the records using a “p” as in Gipson.

United States Census of Henry County in 1820:
GIBSON, Miss
GIPSON, Allen

United States Census of Henry County in 1830:
GIBSON, Michael 2 males under 5; 2 males 5-10; 1 male ages 40-50
1 female under 5; 1 female 5-10; 1 female 10-15; 1 female 15-20;
1 female 30-40. No slaves.

GIBSON, William 1 male 5-10; male 10-15; 1 male 15-20; 1 male 50-60
1 female 50-60. No slaves.


United States Census of Henry County 1840
GIBSON, Edward 3 males under 5; 2 males 5-10; 1 male 10-15;
1 female 20-30. No slaves.
(Found on page 149 of Census)

GIBSON, Michael 1 male under 5; 1 male 5-10; 1 male 20-30
1 female 20-30; 1 female 30-40. No slaves.
(Found on page 168 of Census)

GIBSON, Michael 1 male under 5; 2 males 10-15; 1 male 30-40
1 female under 5; 2 females 5-10; 1 female 15-20; No slaves.
(Found on page 171 of Census)

[There were no Gipsons listed on the Census Record.)


United States Census of Henry County 1850
Household # 401
GIBSON, Edward M 43 born in Georgia Farmer
GIBSON, Nancy F 37 born in Georgia
GIBSON, Seabron S. M 17 born in Alabama Farmer
GIBSON, Allen A. M 14 born in Alabama
GIBSON, John A. M 11 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Gordon M 7 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Sarah F 6 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Fanny F 5 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Elizabeth F 4 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Elvy F 3 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Sidney M 1 born in Alabama
[Edward Gibson and Nancy LOWERY were married January 4, 1854. Marriage Book 1821-1868, page 19, Henry County Courthouse, Abbeville, Alabama.]

Household # 137
GIBSON, Henry M 34 born in Georgia Farmer
GIBSON, Nancy F 32 born in Georgia
GIBSON, Rachel F 13 born in Alabama
GIBSON, William B. M 10 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Harriet E. F 9 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Martin R. M 7 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Mary F 5 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Shadrick M 3 born in Alabama
[Henry Gibson and Nancy SIMMONS were married August 9, 1838. Marriage Book 1821-1868, page 35, Henry County Courthouse, Abbeville, Alabama.]

Household # 1103
GIBSON, John M 28 born in Georgia Farmer
GIBSON, Kitsy (?) F 19 born in Florida
GIBSON, Rebecca F 7 born in Florida
GIBSON, William M 5 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Nancy F 3 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Mary F 1 born in Alabama

Household # 392
GIBSON, Josiah M 23 born in Alabama Farmer
GIBSON, Debly F 24 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Manderson M 1 born in Alabama
[Note that this household is not far from that of Henry Gibson, Household # 401]

Household # 382
GIBSON, Martin M 42 born in Georgia Farmer
GIBSON, Sarah F 23 born in Georgia
GIBSON, Thomas M 9 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Henry M 7 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Samuel M 5 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Leah Mourning F 4 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Lewis T. M 1 born in Alabama
{Note this household is near that of Henry Gibson # 401 and Josiah Gibson at # 392.]

Household # 402
GIBSON, Mouring M 85 born in North Carolina Farmer
BURCH, Darcus F 13 born in Florida
[Note this household of an elderly Mouring Gibson, very, very old at age 85 in 1850, is near that of Henry Gibson # 401 and Josiah Gibson # 392. The young Darcus Burch is possibly a granddaughter or laborer that is in the home of the elderly Mouring Gibson as a helper to the older man’s needs. I stress again, that to reach the age of 85 in 1850, is quite a feat for the year 1850.]

Household # 393
GIBSON, William M 21 born in Alabama Farmer
GIBSON, Mary F 22 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Henry M 3 born in Alabama
Not named M 9 months born in Alabama
[Living in household #393, we are seeing a “settlement” of the Gibson family in the households of William, Mouring, Henry, and Josiah.]

Household # 1104
GIBSON, William M 23 born in Alabama Farmer
GIBSON, Mary F 30 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Henry M 3 born in Alabama
GIBSON, Elizabeth F 1 born in Alabama
ANDERSON, Mary F 80 born in South Carolina
[Mary Anderson could be the mother of Mary Gibson or the grandmother of William Gibson. Her birth in South Carolina gives us a possible link with the migration of the family to Henry County. Mary’s birth in South Carolina could be the state from which this group moved from to Henry County. Mary Anderson’s age of 80 is even MORE unusual than that of Mouring Gibson. Many women died young on the frontier of Alabama. The hardships of regular life, lack of proper medical care, and the many possible problems with childbearing claimed many female lives. It was not at all unusual for a man to have as many as three (3) wives, being widowed twice. When we look at marriage records of this period, it is always possible that the bride’s surname name given for the marriage license could be a married name and not a maiden name. Just another stumbling block for the genealogist!]

There are no Gipsons in this Census of 1850. The spelling of Gibson-Gipson was interchanged in Henry County for many years by the clerks of the courts because the phonics of the names sounding do much alike and the low are of literacy in the State of Alabama.


United States Slave Census of 1855 in Henry County, Alabama

There were no families by the name of Gibson/Gipson listed as owning slaves in the County of Henry in 1850.


United States Census of 1855 of Henry County, Alabama

Page 8
GIBSON, E. 5 males under 21; 1 male over 21
5 females under 21; 1 female over 21 Total: 12
Page 8
GIBSON, M. 4 males under 21; 1 male over 21
2 females under 21; 2 female over 21; Total 9
Page 8
GIBSON, W. 1 male over 21
1 female under 21; 2 females over 21; Total: 4

[No GiPsons in this Census.]

[Since all of the Gibsons in this Census of 1855 were on page 8 of the Census Record, here is a list of other households on page 8 that were very likely neighbors of the community I which the Gibsons lived in 1855:

W. Fennel, R. A. Fewel (?), Yancey Flemmings, T. Fondren, Mr. Fountain (very possibly a teacher), James B. Fox, Jacob Free, James Free, Friend Freeman, J. J. Gallaway, J. H. Gamble, Mrs. Rachel Gamble, Thomas Gamble, Thomas B. Gardner, John Garner, Henry Gissendanner, John F. Gissendanner, E. Gibson, M, Gibson, W. Gibson, Enoch Godfrey, D. Godwin, Ambrose Going, Mrs. Nancy Granger, V. Granger, Willis Granger, James Grantham, Joel Grantham, Mrs. P. Grey, Thomas Grimes, M. Grimsley, John Guilford, Jr., Mrs. A. Guy, Peter Guy. As a Henry County historian, for this time period, these names appear to be in the northeast corner of the county from the old settlement of Otho now under the waters of Lake Eufaula due to the construction of the Walter F. George Lock and Dam at old Franklin, Alabama/Fort Gaines, Georgia in the late 1950s. The names run down into the present area of the unincorporated “town” of Shorterville on Alabama Highway 10 a few miles before reaching the “Plains of Franklin” and the site of the bustling antebellum town of Franklin. When Henry County was settled in the years 1817-1861 (stopping at the beginning of the War of Yankee Aggression, called by the less informed, the American Civil War 1861-1865.) Looking at a present map of Henry County to the north and Houston County to the south, all under the name of Henry County until Houston was formed in 1903, the settlement of the county was in an inverted “L” shape. The Jackson Brothers, Daniel and Matthew, cut the first road from old Franklin on the west banks of the Chattahoochee River, then the third swiftest river in the world, along the Indian Boundary Line on the north to the land office in Sparta, Conecuh County, Alabama. This included the communities (no date specified) of Franklin, Otho, Scottsboro, Hilliardsville, Judson Church Community, Screamer, Lawrenceville, and Ray’s Crossroads, all along the northern tier of the county from Abbeville north. The Jackson Brothers built the first hut or shack for habitation in what would become Abbeville in 1823 at the crossroads of two Native American trading routes that ran from the Chattahoochee into the interior of the state and from the present Town of Columbia in a northward direction. This latter trail would become the Old Columbia to Abbeville Road cleared into a forest path by the Jackson Brothers. A “road” in these times was a forest path wide enough for a mule team and a wagon to traverse the “piney woods” or the densely timbered region yet unsettled or sparsely settled. There were stumps left in these roads that were cut down low enough to clear the axle of the common wagon. As time went by, these “roads” were cleared and widened somewhat so that it was easier for people to meet and pass one another. Another area of settlement in antebellum Henry County was from Franklin southward on the west banks of the Chattahoochee River for about a mile to two miles into the interior. Here men of money came out of the piedmont of South Carolina and cleared large plantations. From Shorterville going south on the Old River Road or the Franklin/ Columbia Road were the plantations of Irwin, Bennett, Chitty, Chambers, Dees, Smith, Espy, Purcell, Alford, Wood, and then the port city of Columbia.

After the War Between the States, largely called by non-Southerners as the American Civil War 1861-1865, pioneers, veterans of the war for Southern independence, moved more into the “piney woods” of the county. By the late part of the 19th Century, towns began to pop up as first the turpentine industry was a boom industry and later the stripping of the land of the Yellow Long-Leaf Southern Pine from the land leaving open spaces. Here, “wiregrass” sprang up from where the trees once stood. From this unusual grass native to Southeast Alabama, the area has since been known as “The Wiregrass Area of Southeast Alabama.” Some of the towns to spring up were Hilliardsville, Dewitt, Edwin, Shorterville, Bakerville, Grayson, Smithville, Zornville, Capps Station, Doswell, Little Rock, Graceville, Stanford, Cureton’s Bridge, Hardswicksburg, Abba, Halesburg, Metropolis, Balkum, Meeks, Millgrove, Headland, Brackin, Wells, later Newville, Midland City, Cawthorn and Popular Head which later became Dothan, Kinsey, Webb, Ashford, Cottonwood, Cowarts, Ardilla, Avon, Pansey, Gordon, Harmon, Grangerburg and many others. All of these little crossroad “towns” had a post office until the offices were consolidated in the years around 1904-1905 when the post offices in Henry County fell back to Abbeville, Shorterville, Haleburg, Newville, Headland, and Dothan. Today these or fewer and the four municipalities in the rural county of Henry are Abbeville, Headland, Newville, and Haleburg, also called Halesburg.

The Gipson/Gibson family apparently moved from the broad area around Franklin and Shorterville in antebellum days to the “piney woods” settlements of Balkum, Brown’s Crossroads, Haleburg, and Balkum. Here we will look at the burial of latter day Gipsons and Gibsons in this area now in present day south Henry County, with the exception of Columbia, a very old antebellum cemetery that has no Gibson/Gipsons buried there.

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