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TENNESSEE COPPER COMPANY - NOV 1953 NEWSLETTER

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TENNESSEE COPPER COMPANY - NOV 1953 NEWSLETTER

Bonnie (Phillips) (View posts)
Posted: 19 May 2001 6:00AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: PHILLIPS, BRADBURN, ROSE, GADDIS, GILLIAM, SUIT, MANY OTHERS
T/C Topics
Published monthly by and for Employees
of the Tennessee Copper Company

___________________________________________________________
Vl. 2, No. 8 Copperhill, Tennessee NOVEMBER, 1953
___________________________________________________________

The company mines and processes suiphide ores, producing:Copper, Copper Sulphate, Iron Sinter, Sulphuric Acids, Fungicides, Zinc Concentrates, Slag and Liquid Sulphur Dioxide.
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Miners Share In Coffee Award
For Plantwide Safety

Scenes like the one above at Boyd Mine Change Housecould be observed throughout the Tennessee Copper Company on October 26. The occasion was the year's eight plant-wide award of coffee to employees for working 30 consecutive days without a lost-time accident.

(Sorry photo not available yet)

The miners in the photo are typical of the 2,000 TCC employees who cooperate to achieve the ever improv-
ing safety records in the Company. They are from left to right): Drag Operators - C.W. BRADBURN and WILMER ROSE; Drillers OLINE TOWE, (Not sure if Oline Towe is a name or is an occupation title- Drillers Oline Towe)
MARVIN GADDIS, HERSCHEL GILLIAM, and C.A. SUIT.

History of Awards

Awards of coffee to TCC Employees to signalize records for specified periods in the entire plant and in occupational groups were started in January 1949.

Since that time more than 100,000one-pound cans of the brew have been distributed. Many of the awards inthe past five years have been for safety periods achieved by the entireplant, while others have been for records set by groups within departments.The number of accident-free workdays a group must go to be eligible for a special award is based on the hazards of that particular group's kind of work, and its long-time group accident experience. Gifts of coffee at the rate of about 20,000 pounds a year make up only one of the Tennessee Copper Company's efforts to assist employees in maintaining good personal safety records.

Many Safety Aids

Other aids to safety include crewmeetings to discuss safety at regular intervals, safety bulletin boards,
publication of periodicals and special safety messages, messages, use of safety motion pictures. In addition, there are departmentalsafety rallies, supervisory conferences on safety, labor-management safety committee meetings, and plant wide safety inspection by committees. Besides the educational and informational safety work, there is of course an unceasing effort by management and supervision to improve operating methods in the interest of safety.

(This stated under a pic which I will add later)

COFFEE AT ISABELLA ACID PLANT in October safety award. Pictured: KERMIT HELTON, W.A. VANDEMARK, HOYT RAY, REED DAVIS, CLARENCE COCHRAN, E.R. CHASTAIN, WADE COLLINS, J.D. PICKLESIMER, HOYT EARLY, MILES MCDOUGAL, WINFRED STYLES.

Mail Brings Photos Of 3 TCC
Men in Military Service

During a recent checkup of the correct military addresses of TCC employees now in service a letter went out to the nearest relatives of the servicemen.
Verifications and corrections for our mailing list came back promptly, for which the TOPICS is grateful. We're also grateful for several photos which came with the replies.
Pictures of three of the men, all employees of the Mining Department when they entered military service, are printed below. MAYNARD LOUDERMILK, was a Trammer when he left for army duties in December 1952. BILL D. DILLARD, who left TCC in September 1952, was also a Trammer. A.B. JOHNSON was a Drag Operator at the time of leaving Tcc in July 1952.
A Bronze Star Medal was recently awarded MAYNARD LOUDERMILK for heroic achievement in military operationsin Korea. The medal was presented for Pfc. LOUDERMILK' leadership and actions in a battle that occurred in June 1953.

(Pic of these 3 men in Military Service comingsoon)

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Progress In Plant Additions Is Noted

Visible signs of progress inconstruction of new TCC plant units are being observed these days by employees, as work continues on the London mill addition, a new Copperhill Sinter Plant.
Pictured at the right (pic coming soon) are the recently completed silos and feeder room at the new sinter plant. Below a TCC carpenter crew is shown at work on the foundation of the main part of the new plant.

Silos for Material

The large silo at left, in the top photo, is for storage of calcine (roasted iron concentrate) that will be burned on sintering machines in the new plant to produce sinter sold to iron and steel mills. The calcine will be fed from the bottom of the silo by gravity onto a revolving table, which will feed it to a conveyorbelt taking the calcine into the plant for processing. The silo at right is for storage of "green" (unroasted) iron concentrate received from TCC mills and combined with calcine in sinter production.

How Fuel Is Supplied

The calcine has about 10 percent sulphur, which furnishes part of the fuel needed to make sinter on a sintering machine. For the material to continue burning after it is ignited, the sulphur content of the "feed" must be raised to about 13 percent. This is done by adding to the calcine some unroasted iron concentrate, which contains about 40 percent sulphur.
___________________________________________________________

Pipe Arrives For Basin Hospital Waterworks

Arrival of a truckload of 4-inch iron pipe in the Basin on November 19 signalized the progress that is being made in preparations to commence construction of the new Copper Basin General Hospital. The pipe, shipped by a Birmingham, Alabama, manufacturer is for the main water supply line to the hospital. The material is temporarily stored at Five Points, near the hospital site.
Ditching Started Actual work on the water system for the hospital got underway early in November, when bulldozing of some of the waterline ditches commenced. Arrival of the 4-inch pipe will be followed soon by a shipment of smaller pipe necessary to complete the water system.

(This info in under Two Pictures I will addlater)

SILOS FOR STORAGE OF MATERIALS
At the new Copperhill Sinter plant loom tall and white on the plant skyline. Supporting the silos is a clean-lined concrete foundation in which part of the equipment for handling materials will be housed.

A TCC CARPENTER CREW

Sets foundation forms at the new Sinter Plant. Pictured below" THOS MCGILL, WM. BEAVERS, R.L. PRINCE, FRED KILPATRICK, J.C. CARPENTER.

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McPherson Scenes Show
Last Mining On 24th Level

The mining photos shown here could not be taken today. The place where they were taken, the 24th or bottom level of McPherson mine, is now under more than 150 feet of water. Mining operations in the three lowest levels of McPherson were completed in midsummer of 1953, in accordance with a long range plan. After the ore was got out, the pipes that supplywater, and air for machines, were removed. The electric wiring was takenout, the mine cars hoisted to the surface, and the tracks were taken up; the pumps were removed. The Plan McPherson is a part of the BurraBurra ore body. For a long time, Burra ore was hoisted from two shafts-Burraand McPherson. The McPherson shaft went down on the 24th level of the ore body, while the Burra shaft went only to the 16th level. A part of all of that planning,which was done about 10 years beforehand, involved the completion of mining on the Burra ore body's three bottom levels, called the McPherson 18th,20th, and 24th.
Hoists Transferred

With the closing of operations on the lowest levels of McPherson, the McPherson hoist, a fairly largesized one, was moved to Eureka Mine for ore lifting. The Eureka hoist, a smaller one, was taken to McPherson shaft, which will now be used onlyas a manshaft and for handling lightweight equipment.

Home to Some
Sometimes there's a good deal of sentiment attached to the last days of a mine level that has been the scene of work by a number of miners for many years.

That was the case at McPherson. And probably nobody felt it more deeply than HORACE MCNABB,
TCC Motorman.

When Horace pulled his lastloads of ore along the tracks in the 24th level he was traveling a route he had been on for about 13 years. That deepest level in McPherson was a second home to Horace. He was there so long that when he occasionally visited in Murphy he was born and raised in Cherokee County, friends would stop him on the street and ask. "You still working on the 24th level of McPherson, Horace?" He was.

Men Transferred

After the closing, the men on the deep levels at McPherson were transferred to other mining operations. HORACE MCNABB is now motoring on the 6th level at Burra. It's ok, but not the same. He misses the motor he ran for so many years. The grades on the tracks are different, the curves are different, Everything's different. But he's motoring-with his usual carefulness and skill. (Pic- is of) Driller H.L. MERRYMAN on McPherson 24th level uses a drill called "a moose." A driller since 1941, Merryman is typical of the experienced miners who are assigned to operations like the closing out of a mine level. here, skill and watchfulness of an employee pay off inproductivity and good personal safety records.

(Two Pics on this page will add pics later)-

Shovelman FLOYD NICHOLSON loaded last ears on McPherson Mine 24th level. The underground loading machine shown aboveis a air-operated mechanical shovel. Motorman HORACE McNABB makes one of his last haulson the 24th level.

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Safety Clubs

October was Safety AnniversaryMonth for 20 long time TCC employees. Grouped into three Safety Clubs, the employees are named below, together with the number of years each man has worked without a lost-time accident.

Forty Year Club
43 H. A. HELTON

Thirty Year Club
35 AMOS BALLEW
35 F.J. LONGWORTH
33 W.H. ODOM
32 R.E. CUMMINGHAM
31 J.D. REYNOLDS
31 LAMAR WEAVER

Twenty Year Club
29 W.H. MULL
28 J.A. SMITH
27 J.C. SIMONDS
26 C.F. MORGAN
26 JOHN DILLARD
26 BUNYAN PARRIS
26 W.M. HARPER
26 R.A. ROGERS
25 RALPH DAVES
25 T.C. BOLING
25 CLAUDE HUMPHREYS
24 W.H. RITCHIE
24 W.J. WHISMAN

The Weather
TCC Acid Department weather summaries for October 1953 show that the highest temperature of the month was 88 degrees on October2. From that summery condition the temperature sank to a low of 27 degrees on October 31. Average temp for the month was 55.4 degrees. We were shy on rain, having only 1.40 inches during the month.
______________

Bloodmobile Q & A
Here are some Questions and Answers about an event of importance to TCC employees-an impending visit of the Red Cross Bloodmobile to Copperhill to collect blood from donors.
Question: What is the date of the Bloodmobile visit?
Answer: December 7 (Pearl Harbor Day), between

1 p.m. and 9 p.m.
Question: Where will it be?
Answer: At the YMCA Building in Copperhill.
Question: Who can I notify of my intention to

domate a pint of blood that day?
Answer: Your foreman, or Ernest Simmons, at the

TCC Service Office, Copperhill.

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THE last page of the TCC Newletter is My Grandfather,
Melvin Eugene Phillips's oldest brother Nathaniel
(I will also add this pic late-BRW)

TCC Family: N.T. Phillips, 5 Sons are Employees

A line from and old song, "On A Sunday Afternoon," could well be the title for this picture which shows the Phillips boys visiting with their dad, NATHAN, at his home in Harpertown. Although it's a family visit of the kind that takes place often at Nathan's home, in some ways it resembles a TCC departmental meeting, for Nathan and five of his sons are TCC employees. At the left, in the picture, is EARL, a Leadburner. Then there's ROBERT, a Boilermaker, and JAMES, a Blacksmith. Sitting on the lawn swing are FRANK, a Painter in the Railroad Department, and NATHAN. Behind them are JOE, HERDIS (a Machinist in the Mining Department) and GENE. JOE and GENE are still in high school at Epworth, Georgia. We don't know what their occupational plans are, but we do know that their mother points out there is still a craft or so that is not represented by the men in the family. She very much would like to have a brick mason around the house. And JOE has a talent for drawing...Wonder if he might be interested in becoming a draftsman someday?

A Remarkable Family

The work accomplishments of the men in this TCC family are like the phrase in an auction handbill-"too numerous to mention." For example, NATHAN is the oldest employee in point of service at the Tennessee Copper Company. His work record goes back to 1905-48 years, most of it as an Acid Loader. In 1930 NATHAN was awarded aCompany gold medal for long service. In 1947, still long er service caused him to be presented with a gold watch.
Long service is not the only thing that has brought NATHAN tokens of appreciation. His safety record is just as impressive, and in July 1953 he received the rare Joseph A.Holmes individual safety Award for more than 40 years of work without alost-time accident.

Sons' Military Records

While part of the PHILLIPS family was helping to keep up production at TCC during World War II, another part of it was serving in the Armed Forces.They distributed their abilities in the military just as they do at TCC: ROBERT was in the Army, HERDIS in the Navy, and JAMES in the Air Corps.

The Family Characteristic

"Determination" is the word forthe PHILLIPS men. It's been quite a feat, for NATHAN to achieve that work and safety record, and for all five of the sons at TCC to become craftsmen.They had to "stay with it" to get an opportunity for apprenticeships. But stay with it they did, and today the men of the PHILLIPS family have a record of about 120 work-years with the Tennessee Copper Company.

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This is a orginal copy ot the TCC Topics Newsletter from Copperhill, Tennessee copied by Bonnie (Phillips) of
Rome, GA. Sorry I don't have the pic's from this newsletter posted yet, but I will have them on file and can send them to you upon request.
EMail- Bonnie at
FlaminStorm@aol.com
or
FlaminStorm@Yahoo.com
@BRW 8:58 P.M. Saturday May 19, 2001-

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Hope these names help others with their research too.
also, any of these Phillips descendants connected to Nathan Phillips and his sons please email me.
Thanks
Bonnie
SubjectAuthorDate Posted
Bonnie (Phillips) 19 May 2001 12:00PM GMT 
Bonnie 15 Aug 2005 10:53PM GMT 
CoHyde 16 Jul 2006 3:17AM GMT 
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