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Bio of Pasco B. Carter

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Bio of Pasco B. Carter

Posted: 1 Jul 2013 2:06PM GMT
Classification: Biography
Surnames: Carter, Eccleston
From "History of Idaho, The Gem of the Mountains," Vol. III. The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. Chicago, 1920. (page 14)


Pasco B. Carter, attorney at law of Boise was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on the 28th of November, 1880. His father, Henry Carter, was a leading business man of that city and married Wilhelmina Eccleston, who was born in Virginia. They became the parents of six children: Charles Allen, John Slade, Henry B., Mary Deria, Wilhelmina E., and Pasco B.

In the acquirement of his education Pasco B. Carter attended the East Liberty Academy at Pittsburgh and after his graduation there entered Princeton University in the fall of 1901. A four years' course brought him the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1905 and he then entered upon the study of law in the Pittsburgh Law School of the University of Pittsburgh, from which he was graduated in 1908 with the LL. B. degree. He was admitted to practice in both the county and supreme courts of Pennsylvania and entered upon the active work of his profession in Pittsburgh but in the fall of 1908 was attracted by the opportunities of the growing northwest and came to Boise, where he has since followed his profession. He was associated with Samuel H. Hays, a connection that was maintained for over ten years, and in 1920 he became associated with A. A. Fraser, a well known and prominent member of the Boise bar. Mr. Carter has been connected with much important litigation and enjoys a merited reputation as an able advocate and counsellor. He is ever actuated by a laudable ambition for professional success and his devotion to his clients' interests is proverbial, yet he never forgets that he owes a still higher allegiance to the majesty of the law.

Mr. Carter is a Presbyterian in religious faith and his political belief is that of the republican party. He stands stanchly in support of every cause or measure in which he believes and his position upon any vital question is never an equivocal one. He is a man of pleasing personality, genial and courteous at all times, and his strongly marked characteristics are those which make for personal popularity.

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