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Biography of James Scott

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Biography of James Scott

Wells CC (View posts)
Posted: 17 May 1999 6:00AM GMT
Classification: Biography
Edited: 23 Jun 2001 9:50AM GMT
Surnames: SCOTT, McCORKLE, HARRIS, WILSON, HORN, WOLFCALE, WRIGHT, FLEMING
Biographical sketch extracted from:

Biographical and historical record of Adams and Wells counties, Indiana. Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1887. pp. 750-751.

JAMES SCOTT, one of the early settlers of Union Township, was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1825, son of John and Debby (McCorkle) Scott, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Youngstown, Ohio. They were married in Ohio and became the parents of six children—James, Isabella, Andrew, John, William and Calvin. All were born in Ohio. Our subject came to Wells County in 1849, in company with John Wilson and family, James Harris, and Nancy Horn, all of whom were in one wagon. James, then a young man, had money enough to purchase 160 acres of land on the Indian Reserve, which had only been open for settlement but a short time. His first log cabin was built a few feet east of his present fine house, and the tall elm which stands in his yard has grown from a small sprout that came up near the walls. He kept "bachelor's hall" in his pole shanty for eighteen months while he made the first clearing on his land. Not a tree had been felled nor a road opened in the neighborhood. Game was plenty, and James fried his own venison and baked his own johnnycake; he ate it, too. The Wolfcale family came to the township about the same time that Mr. Scott came, and located a mile east of his land. They had eight children, four sons and four daughters; one of the latter, Belinda, became the wife of our subject in June, 1851. The cabin that was to be her home had neither floor nor mud between the logs. But the young couple laughed at the prospect before them, as the future promised better things. After four years of happy married life, and during the sickly year of 1855, while her husband was ill with typhoid fever, she sickened and died with that dread disease, leaving one child, Eliza J., now wife of Thomas Burnan. She was sixteen months old at the time of her mother’s death. In the autumn of 1856 Mr. Scott was married to Miss Elizabeth Wright, daughter of Ira and Jane (Fleming) Wright. Her ancestors were Irish. Her mother was reared in Vigo County, Indiana, to which State her parents had removed from Maryland. Her father disappeared very mysteriously when she was seven years of age, and was supposed to be murdered for his money, as he went to the village of Rossean, drawing the money for his tobacco crop, and was never seen by his family again. His wife afterward married Joseph Shipley, and they had five children— George W., Rachel S., John L. (deceased), Henry M. and Sarah J. (deceased). To her first marriage eight children were born - Mary, Aurelia, Hannah, Elizabeth, Rebecca, Amanda, Eliza J. and William T. Ira Wright was an excellent scholar, and his daughter, Elizabeth, taught school prior to her marriage. Many happy and prosperous years have been passed in the Scott homestead, and the thirty-one years of wedded life have sat lightly upon her brow. She used to rake the wheat after the sturdy arm of her husband had cradled it away from among the stumps. They shared each other’s trials as well as labors. After her husband had bound the sheaves, she placed them in shock. While he did the night chores, she prepared the frugal supper; and their lives, which began with such sympathy, are to-day bound by much stronger ties of love. She was one of the brave, pioneer women who helped to reclaim the forests and cause them to produce fields. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have had four children — Clark I., who married Ida M. Knaus, now a resident of Fayette County, Illinois; Alva C., deceased; William P., who married Emma Allen, and Alma B. They have reared and educated David Scott and Norah B. Fults, who now reside with them. Mr. and Mrs. Scott are hospitable people, and the stranger always finds a welcome. Their larder is always full of delicacies. Their broad acres are finely cultivated, and each year brings an income which makes a snug bank account. Mrs. Scott is a member of the Disciple church. Mr. Scott is a member of no church, but is liberal in supporting all churches.
SubjectAuthorDate Posted
Wells CC 17 May 1999 12:00PM GMT 
gene yoquelet 14 May 2003 6:27PM GMT 
bassettgeneal... 2 Nov 2004 2:40PM GMT 
bassettgeneal... 2 Nov 2004 2:41PM GMT 
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DoloresBS 29 May 2010 10:24PM GMT 
JReedGermany 21 Aug 2010 2:58PM GMT 
cybookz 28 Feb 2013 3:55AM GMT 
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