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Gabriel Wheldon and spouse Margaret Diguina(?) 1620's

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Re: Gabriel Wheldon and spouse Margaret Diguina(?) 1620's

Posted: 20 Dec 2007 4:29PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Wheldon,
I am a direct descendant of John WHELDON, son of Gabriel & wife Margaret. Her last name is unknown.Some people believe she was an Indian and her father was Quadaquina a well known Native American. No record found.
Theories that exist:
Gabriel WHELDEN is another who was alleged to be a native American. This is a little complicated for he would have had to import his Indian maiden wife to England [ where all his children were born] in order for this legend to hold water. His wife was Margaret at his death; She was NOT the mother of his children, and it's possible she was a native.
Theories re Indian ancestry
1. Gabriel married in England [ supposedly a Native American who for some reason had been captured and imported to England [ sometime by an earlier explorer to Cape Cod] where he proceeded to have his children, and then abandoned his wife [ or she died]. bringing his children to Cape Cod where he married a woman named Margaret.
2. Gabriel married his Indian on Cape Cod [ in the usual pagan ceremony] where he proceeded to have his children. Only trouble with this is that Caterine WHELDEN was born ca 1623 or earlier [ she marr. Gyles HOPKINS 1639] and Ruth was b. ca 1626 [ she marr. Richard TAYLOR 1646] John ca 1632, the births occuring long before Gabriel was alleged to have arrived on Cape Cod [1638'
3. Gabriel's second wife [ Margaret] was the Indian, but NOT the mother of his children.

Research Note: Gabriel Whelden probably came from co. Nottingham, England. He owned land there. The name Whelden is associated with a location in Nottinghamshire. Also according to Pope's "Pioneers", Katherine Whelden, eldest daughter of Gabriel, wrote to a John Shanvat of Nottingham concerning the death of Martha Weelden of Dedham in 1639.19 He lived at Basford, Nottinghamshire, England, on 4 April 1617. Record shows that the First Party: William Stanford, tailor of Somercoates [Somercotes] in the parish of Alfreton, Derbyshire and Marie his wife, leased a close of land in Basford to the Second Party: Gabriel Whelden, blacksmith of Basford, Nottinghamshire. Lease from (1) to (2) of a close of pasture or arable land in Basford, known as 'William Stanfordes greate close' with all appurtenances for the term of 40 years, or until the death of Thomas Tipping; rent to be paid twice yearly at named feast days; lease further extended for 21 years. Rent: 10s, Consideration: £7, Dated 4 Apr. 15 James [I].20
Records of documents that detail the property and land held by Gabarell [Gabriel] Wheelden; quantities and state of cultivation of the land are provided; refers to a close of land with a lease for almost 3 persons [presumably for three lives] and worth £3; notes that Henry Boote says that he can let the house and ground and the 7 roods of land besides the close in Lees for £3.6.8. a year; quotes his price as being £55. Notes at the end of the particular that he [Henry Boote] desires a speedy answer as he needs to prepare for New England. Note in margin of document saying that the land must be attended to soon, as this is the year to be ploughed. In February 1637 at Basford, Nottinghamshire, England.21 He lived at Basford, Nottinghamshire, England, on 5 August 1637. Deed of exchange of land at Basford, Nottinghamshire between John Hutchinson and Gabriel Whelden and his wife; 5 Aug. 1637
First Party: John Hutchinson, gentleman of Basford, Nottinghamshire; Second Party: Gabriel Whelden, husbandman of Basford, Nottinghamshire and Jane his wife. Grant from (1) to (2) of several parcels of land at Basford; in exchange (2) grants to (1) several parcels of land at Basford as outlined in the attached schedules. The two attached schedules detail the lands of (1) in Quarry Field, Middle Field and Neather Field, and the lands of (2) in Bagthorpe Field. Recitals: (1) is lawfully seized in fee of certain parcels of land specified in the attached schedule, lying in Basford, in the tenure of (2); on the day of sealing and delivery (2) is seized in fee of parcels of land specified in the attached schedule, lying in Basford, in the tenure of (1). Dated 15 Aug. 13 Charles [I].22 He sold land 1638 Basford, Nottinghamshire, England. Bundle of deeds relating to a messuage and land in Basford, Nottinghamshire purchased from Gabriel Wheldon in 1638; 1590-1638. Deeds relating to a messuage and lands in Basford purchased by John Holles, 2nd Earl of Clare; purchase consists of Kiln House and kiln, Horse Mill House and horse mill, another dwelling house, an enclosed close estimated at 1 acre and several parcels of meadow and pasture estimated at two acres.23
A letter of attorney of John [2nd] Earl of Clare; 10 Mar. 1638, appoints John Hooper to be his lawful attorney and to enter a messuage and lands in Basford, Nottinghamshire, in the tenure of Gabriel Whelden taking seizin and possession, dated 10 Mar. 13 Charles [I], 1637.
Additionally, a bond from Gabriel Whelden to John [2nd] Earl of Clare for the performance of covenants; 10 Mar. 1638. First Party: Gabriel Whelden, yeoman of Basford, Nottinghamshire, Second Party: John, [2nd] Earl of Clare. Bond from (1) to (2) in £120 for the performance of covenants as set out in a feoffment of even date. Dated 10 Mar. 13 Charles [I], 1637. On 10 March 1638 at Basford, Nottinghamshire, England.24 He sold land 10 March 1638 Basford, Nottinghamshire, England. Feoffment from Gabriel Whelden to John [2nd] Earl of Clare of a messuage and land in Basford, Nottinghamshire; 10 Mar. 1638, First Party: Gabriel Whelden, yeoman of Basford, Nottinghamshire; Second Party: John, [2nd] Earl of Clare. Feoffment from (1) to (2) of a messuage or tenement, one horse mill, one kill house, one close of enclosed ground [acreage given], and various other parcels of arable, meadow and pasture land [acreages given], with appurtenances, all in Basford; property to be held in fee; usual covenants apply. Consideration: £55.0.5, Endorsed that livery of seizin took place. Dated 10 Mar. 13 Charles [I].25
Assignment of the lease of Gabriel Whelden to John, [2nd] Earl of Clare of a close in Basford, Nottinghamshire; 24 Mar. 1638, First Party: Gabriel Whelden, yeoman of Basford, Nottinghamshire, Second Party: John, [2nd] Earl of Clare. Assignment of the lease by (1) to (2) of a close of arable or pasture land with appurtenances in Basford for the residue of the term. Consideration: 20s. Recitals: see Ne D 786 for lease recited. Dated 24 Mar. 13 Charles [I]. On 24 March 1638 at Basford, Nottinghamshire, England.26
He lived at Mattacheese, Cape Cod, Barnstable Co., Massachusetts, on 3 September 1638

Emigration-
Plymouth Colony Records 2:21- Gabriel WHELDON a fisherman came to Salem in 1629 on the ship " Lyons Whelp", later removed in 1638 to Yarmouth, MA.
The Lyons Whelp left Gravesend, England 24 April 1629, along with 5 other ships, the George Bonaventure, The Four Sisters, The Lyon, the Mayflower and the Talbot. Commanding was Master John GIBBS. The ship arrieved in Salem, MA in late July 1629.
see article below. This ship was # 10 Lyon's Whelp
Information on several ships named the Lyon's Whelp
The Lyon's Whelp was the name of several British naval ships dating back to the 1600s, the tenth of which was an importan part of the pre-Great Migration flow of immigrants into New England.
The name is possibly from the biblical quotation from Genesis; Judah, the fourth son of Leah, is described with these famous words: "Judah is a lion's whelp; On prey, my son, have you grown. He crouches, lies down like a lion, like the king of beasts, who dare rouse him? The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor the ruler's staff from between his feet…." (Genesis 49:9-10 )
The following is based on a "note" published in the "Mariner's Mirror" Vol. 63 (1977) p.368 in response to an earlier "note" (p.128) concerning the name given to ten small English warships built in 1628 originally for the Duke of Buckingham.
George Villiers (1592-1628), created Duke of Buckingham by King James, had a precedent for naming the ten new ships lion's whelps. A ship called Lion's Whelp was owned by Charles, Earl of Nottingham who was Buckingham's predecessor as Lord Admiral of England. This ship was loaned to Sir Walter Raleigh for his 1595 expedition and was sold to the State in 1602 and repaired at Chatham by up-and -coming shipwright Phineas Pett.
Buckingham received her as a gift from King James just before James died in 1625. She was to be the Duke's contribution to an expedition under William Hawkridge to find a North-West passage. As this gift was not ratified when James died, the whole procedure had to be repeated with Charles, the new King. I have not traced the fate of this ship.
Although masted and armed from Royal Navy stores, the 10 Whelps were built at the Duke's expense. As the Duke's private fleet, they were used to prey on French shipping (with the proceeds going to the Duke's war-chest) before joining the rest of the English fleet for the final attempt to relieve the siege of La Rochelle. They were taken into the Royal Navy after the Duke was assassinated and in 1632 the State reimbursed his estate with £4,500. The accounts of Captain Pennington (who supervised their construction) show that the Duke spent almost £7,000 on them. Had he lived he would probably have recouped his expenses by selling them to the State (following Nottingham's precedent) - at a better price than that paid to his estate!
The coat of arms of the Villiers family was a lion rampant- no doubt the Duke appreciated the allusion in the name!
FIRST LION'S WHELP
Built by William Castell of St. Saviour's (Southwark). Converted into a chain ship for the Chatham "Barricado" c. 1641. Sent to Harwich as a careening hulk in August 1650 and not mentioned further, but was probably the hulk at Harwich ordered to be sold October 1651.
SECOND LION'S WHELP
Built by John Taylor of Wapping. Converted into a chain ship for the Chatham "Barricado" c. 1641. Ordered to be sold in August 1650 together with the Defiance and the Merhonour as being too rotten for service. She was to have been sent to Harwich as a careening hulk but was found to be "too decayed" even for this.
THIRD LION'S WHELP
Built by John Dearsley of Ipswich at Wapping. Listed as unfit for service in Batten's survey of 1642 and "cast" before February 1643.
FOURTH LION'S WHELP
Built by Christopher Malim of Redriff. Used for experiments on the "project of a Dutchman" c. 1633. Works in the hold were ordered to be removed in March 1634 as they were of no use in a man-of-war. I have not found any details of these works, which were probably carried out by Cornelis Drebbel, who died in 1633. Struck a rock in St. Aubin's Bay, Jersey on 4 August 16361 and sank, without loss of life.
FIFTH LION'S WHELP
Built by Peter Marsh of Wapping. Spent most of her service life based in Ireland. Foundered in the North Sea on 28 June 1637 (Capt. Edward Popham commanding) with the loss of 17 men. The blame was placed on her construction of "mean, sappy timbers".
SIXTH LION'S WHELP
Built by Peter Pett of Ratcliffe. Captained by Phineas Pett's son John and lost with all hands off the coast of Brittany while returning from La Rochelle in 1628. Pett lost other relatives in the wreck and there were Army casualties too- A Captain James Whitehead of Colonel Greville's regiment was lost.
SEVENTH LION'S WHELP
Built by Matthew Graves of Limehouse. Blown up on 25 October 1630 and lost. She and the Mary Rose were involved in a dispute with a Dutch warship from Enkhuizen over a Dunkirk privateer captured off the Suffolk coast. Only 10 men survived the explosion, which was caused by negligence in the powder store as the ship set about the Dutchman. Captain Dawtrey Cooper survived but lost both a son and a nephew.
EIGHTH LION'S WHELP
Built by John Graves of Limehouse. Used to transport gold to the Scottish parliament in 1644. By July 1645 was considered too rotten to be worth repairing and was ordered to be laid up on shore at Woolwich.2
NINTH LION'S WHELP
Built by John Graves of Limehouse. Spent her service based in Irish waters. Captained by Dawtrey Cooper in 1632/33, during which time there were constant disputes and near-mutinies on board. These seem to have resulted from Cooper's actions- perhaps the loss of the Seventh Whelp affected his reason. The Ninth was wrecked in the river Clyde with the pinnace Confidence while taking supplies from Ireland to Dumbarton Castle (on the Clyde near Glasgow) in April 1640. She may be the ship referred to in a warrant of 1642 authorising the Marquis of Argyle to use "four of the best " of the cannon lying near Newark Castle which had come from the "English ship" cast away there3. The Eighth and Ninth are noted in some records as having been sunk in 1628. This arises from a misreading of a letter in the State Papers, Domestic stating that they were "lost to the fleet" in the bad weather that wrecked the Sixth Whelp. In fact they were separated from the fleet and returned to Portsmouth later.
TENTH LION'S WHELP
Built by Robert Tranckmore of Shoreham. Went over to the Royalists after the fall of Bristol in 1643 and was recaptured by Parliament's forces in 1645. Was at Helvoetsluys with the Earl of Warwick's fleet in 1648 (see below) and was fitted out as a fireship for Blake's pursuit of Prince Rupert to Lisbon in 1650. She was used for convoy work and despatches during the first Dutch war. Sold "by the candle" (a form of auction- a pin is stuck in the side of a candle and the last bid made before the pin falls, wins) on 19 October 1654 to Jacob Blackpath for £410. (SP18.89)
A ship by this name brought William Dodge along with the Sprague family, Thomas Miner and others to Salem, Massachusetts in 1629. The Lyon's Whelp left Gravesend 24 April 1629 and arrived in Salem mid-July 1629, under Master John Gibbs/Gibbon. It was one of six ships; the others including the Talbot, George Bonaventure, Lyon, and a ship called the Mayflower (though not the Mayflower of the Pilgrims).
The WHELDEN residence-
The location of the WHELDEN homestead was on the north bank of FOLLINS Pond on Bass River near the intersection of Setucket Rd and Mayfair Rd. It straddles the Yarmouth, Dennis line and the neigborhood is sometimes referred to as " The Head of the Point." His descendants have resided on that property until 1960.
Richard the "Taylor" TAYLOR & Thomas FOLLAND also " firstcomers' and future relatives by marriage settled next to Gabriel.
Gabriel WHELDEN, sometimes written WHELDING on the records had received permission of the Plymouth officials on 3 Sep 1638 to come to Yarmouth with the proviso that he have--- " the consent of the committees of that place." The committees were men " committed " to organize the new plantation. The condition attached to Mr WHELDEN'S grant indicated that men had already been selected to be the land committes for Yarmouth.
One of the first settlers in what is now the township of Dennis.
Granted permission 3 Sep 1638 by Plymouth officials to settle on Cape Cod which included a land grant. At this time the area was called " Mattacheeset." It became Yarmouth in 1639. Gabriel established a homestead on the north shore of Bass River. His land was very close to the present day line between Dennis & yarmouth in the neighborhood sometimes called, The Head of the Pond."

17 June 1641
Involved in a lawsuit over a skiff he owned in partnership with William LUMPKIN & Hugh TILLEY. The court ordered them to pay 15 shillings for Gabriel's damages " in want thereof" of fish and to transport his corn [from Yarmouth across Cape Cod Bay to Plymouth.

1641-42- Surveyor of highways- Yarmouth

1643-In 1643 there were growing problems with the Narrangansett Tribe[ Indians] under their chieftain Ningret. This drove Mass Bay Colony, Connecticut Colony, Plymouth Colony and New Haven Colony to form the United Colonies of New England and to discuss preparedness for war. Rhode Island was excluded from this union since they harbored dissenters and others who did not accept the tenents of the orthodox church. The immediate result in Yarmouth was a listing of all men between the age of 16 & 60 to serve in the militia. 53 names were on the Yamouth list. Gabriel WHELDEN was not listed. His son Henry was. This seems to indicate that Gabriel was over 60 and Henry over 16.

1646-Sued by his future son-in-law in 1646 for adamantly refusing permission for Richard to court his daughter Ruth. Plymouth Colony considered marriage a civil contract rather than a religious sacrament. Richard TAYLOR settled next door to the WHELDENS. The court in its widom apparently convinced Gabriel to reconsider and finally he relented. The couple were married very soon after.

The court record reads:" In the case betweene Gabriell WHELDING and Richard TAYLOR, about his daughter Ruth, the said Gabriel pomiseth his free assent and consent to their marriage

Before 14 May 1648-Sold his land in Yarmouth before 14 May 1648 to Edward STURGIS. He removed to Lynn, Essex County and then to Malden Middlesex county just outside of Boston. The last record of him is apparently the sale of his lands in Nottinghanshite to William CROFTS of Lynn.

(Pope, 489; 1 Essex deeds, 24). After the death of Gabriel Whelden, his two sons, Henry and John, initiated a process to divide his goods (1655).

It appears that before May 14, 1648, he had sold land in Yarmouth to Edward Sturgis. (g)

Oct. 21, 1653, Gabriel Whelden and his youngest son John sold lands in Arnold and elsewhere in Nottinghamshire, England, to William Crofts of Lynn, New England. (gi) After Gabriel's death his sons Henry and John in 1655 brought suit for their portions of his estate. (h)

Pg 158 The History of Malden, Massachusetts, 1633-1785

12 Jan 1653-Written Maulden 1653, 11,12 [ this can be read as 12th day of the 11th month. Since 1 March was considered the New Year, the date would be 12 Jan 1653]:In the name of God and in obedience to his command[ according to my bounden duty]I. Gabirell WHELDING, of the Towne of Maulden, being weake and sicke in body, do make my last will. My body to be layd asllepe in the bed of a grave, in the Comon buriing place for the Inhabitants of the Towne. I give 10 s as a Small testimony of my true Love to the Church of Maulden, to be payd into the hands of the Deacons within a month after my decerase. I give all my estate in Maulden, consisting of a house, frmae,[? farm] Lands, cattle, and corne [togetehr with] what money is due vnto me from Wiliam CROFFTS of Linne to Margaret WHELDING, my wife, whom I appoynt my sole executors. signed Gabriell WHELDEN
In the presence of Nathaniell VPAHEME, James LARNED, Michaiah Mathews, with others.
4[2] 1654 Jn VPHAME and Nanthaniell Vpaheme deposed,. Inventory of goods, Chattels and Chatell of Gabriell WHELDON late of the Towne of maulden, prized by Edward CARRINGTON & John VPHAME. Amt L40.11.08. Mentions William CROFTS.

Actual will reads:
In the name of God & in obedience to his command [according to my bourden]I Gabriell WHELDING of ye toune & church of Maldon being weake & sicke in body [ but shewing mercy] of good judgment & right remembrance for ye putting my house in order:do make my last will & testament in this forme,& manner following:
First of all I doe humbly & heartily Give my soule to God my faithfull creator & redeemer to be erfectly sainctified & everlastingly saved, by him to ye priase of his glorious Grace.
Secondly I give my body to be lays asleepe in ye bed of ye grave, in ye common burying place for ye inhabitants of their toune, untill it be raised, by ye sound of ye last trumpet of ye Archangell in ye great day of ye generall Judgement.
Thirdly I give ye Summe of tenne shillings [as small testimony of my true love ] to ye church of Maldon, to be payd into ye hands of the Deacons, within a month after my decease.
Fourthly and astly I doe give all my estate [ in Maldon] consisitng of hose frame, lands, Cattle & corne[ together wth what money is due unto mee from wiliam CROFFTS of Linne] to Margaret WHELDING my wife, whom I doe appoint and constitute, my sole administratrix & executrix for the disposing thereof. According to God who gggave, ye same unto mee.
In witness whereof I putt hereunto, my hand, the day and yeare above mentioned."
Inventory shortly after his death and contained the following items:
Imprs An house lott prised at [L] 4.00.00
An house frame at L 5.00.00
A debt from Wilkliam CROFFTS L 2.03.00
Three cowes & one calfe[L 14.00.00
One heifer & 1 yearling One sow with 3 suckling pigges, Boards a chest & a cubbard, linnen, a rugge a coverlett & blanketts, Wearing cloathes, 8 bushels of Indian corn, a bed tike bolsters & pillowes, a ketell, 2 skiletts, & hangers. A pott a frying pan, & wooden platters, with table, wheate, Cotton, a wheele a chayre & a stoole. 2 barells an handsaw iron howes.
Total value was a rather modest : 40.11.08. Note the respective values of his house and land and that of his cows.
Children apparently displeased with the distribution, because in 1655 Henry and John brought suit for their portions.

Gabriel Wheldon was buried in Bell Rock Cemetery, Malden, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

The earliest recorded interment at "Sandy Bank" is found in the will left by Gabriel Wheldon or Welding who died Jan 1654 in which he says: "I give my body to be layd asleep in the bed of the grave in the common buring place of this "Towne'."

'Gabriel Whelden (written also Welden or Whelding, according to documents consulted) was born in England and was a party in the Plymouth Colony in 1638. The date and place of his arrival in America remain unknown. He probably came from Nottinghamshire. There is no doubt that all his children were born in England, and probably, from his first
marriage. When he died in 1654, his wife was Margaret. This Margaret was his second wife; she was not in any case the mother of his children. It seems that he arrived in Yarmouth around 1639, accompanied by his children, already adults or almost adults. He left Yarmouth around 1648
Gabriel Wheldon was buriedin Bell Rock Cemetery, Malden, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

The earliest recorded interment at "Sandy Bank" is found in the will left by Gabriel Wheldon or Welding who died Jan 1654 in which he says: "I give my body to be layd asleep in the bed of the grave in the common buring place of this "Towne'."

'Gabriel Whelden (written also Welden or Whelding, according to documents consulted) was born in England and was a party in the Plymouth Colony in 1638. The date and place of his arrival in America remain unknown. He probably came from Nottinghamshire. There is no doubt that all his children were born in England, and probably, from his first
marriage. When he died in 1654, his wife was Margaret. This Margaret was his second wife; she was not in any case the mother of his children. It seems that he arrived in Yarmouth around 1639, accompanied by his children, already adults or almost adults. He left Yarmouth around 1648.

'According to Pope (Pioneers of Massachusetts, 489) he moved to Lynn and then to Malden, where he died between Feb 11, 1653/4 (date of his will) and April 4, 1654 (date of its execution). He gave 10 shillings to the church of Malden and the rest of his goods - at Malden, a house, some
land, cattle as well as the sum of money owed him by William Crofts - to his wife Margaret. In his will he didn't mention his children. The inventory of his goods and cattle reached the sum of 40 pounds, 11 shillings, 8 pence (Pope, 489; 4 Savage, 504; 16 NE Reg, 75).

Abstract of Gabriel Whilden's will:

Maulden 1653, 11, 12. In the name of God, and in obedience to his command (according to my bounden duty), I, Gabriell Whelding, of the Towne and Church of Maulden, being weake and sicke in body, do make my lastwill. My body to be layd asleepe in the bed of the grave, in the Comonburiing place of the inhabitants of this Towne. I give 10s as a Small testimony of my true Love to the church of Maulden, to be payd into thehands of the Deascons within a mo after my decease. I give all my estate in Maulden, consisting of house, Frame [farm] Lands, cattle, and corne, (together [with]] what money is due unto me from William Crofts, of Linne) to Margaret Whelding, my wife, whom I appoynt my sole executrix.Gabriel Wheldon.
In the presence of
Nathaniell Uphmae, James Larnared,
Michaiah Mathews, with others.

Will - abs: 11 Dec 1653 Maulden, Middlesex Co., MA
4 Inventory: 02 Apr 1654 Maulden, Middlesex Co., MA

Death-He died in Malden between 11 February 1653 when his will is dated and 4 April 1654 when it was proved.
Earliest recorded interment at " Sandy Bank" is found in the will of Gabriel WHELDEN which reads: I give my body to be layd asleep in the bed of the grave in the common burying place of this towne [ Malden]

Would very much like to compare information.

Marge [Howes] PERRY






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