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McCumbee Clan

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Re: McCumbee Clan

Posted: 30 Jan 2013 2:53PM GMT
Classification: Query
12. Cannon2 Cumbo, born say 1735, was taxable with his wife in Bladen County from 1768 to 1776 ("Molatoes"), taxable on a female slave and a male slave under 16, and head of a household of 8 "white" males under 21 or over 60, 4 "white" females, and 1 "Black" in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:5, /14, 34, 60, 78, 95, 123, 134; II:55, 74, 162]. He was granted a patent for 100 acres in Bladen County on the southwest side of Drowning Creek on 22 January 1773 [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:319]. He was taxable in Bladen County on this 100 acres and a free poll for himself and a slave poll in 1784 in Captain Regan's District. He entered two tracts of land of 100 acres each in what was then Robeson County on the north side of Jacob Swamp and Drowning Creek on 19 January 1789 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:21] and sold 100 acres of this land to Horatio Hammond on 17 May 1804 [DB N:216]. He transferred land to his sons Aaron and Elisha by deeds proved on 8 July 1800. On 22 May 1801 his slave, Caesar, was convicted of stealing two pairs of shoe bolts and a trunk from John Peter Martin and was given thirty-nine lashes at the public whipping post. He purchased two tracts of land in Robeson by deeds proved on 5 April 1802 [Minutes 1797-1806, 112, 152, 191]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50] and 6 "other free" and one slave in 1800 [NC:372]. His children: John, Stephen, Gibion, Elijah, and Aaron were ordered to work on the road from Raft Swamp to Gibion Gibson's Landing by the 6 October 1801 Robeson County court [Minutes 1797-1806, 173]. He and his descendants must have been very light-skinned since Robeson County residents thought they were Portuguese [Norment, The Lowrie History, 7]. Cannon's 19 March 1817 Robeson County will, proved in November 1823, named his children [WB A:204]. They were

i. Gideon2/ Gibion, born say 1755, called Gilbert Cumbo in 1784 when he was taxable in Captain Regan's District of Bladen County on 250 acres and one poll. He was head of a Bladen County household of 1 "white" male from 21 to 60 years old and 3 "white" females in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:162], head of a Robeson County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50], 5 in 1800 (called Gibby) [NC:372], and 6 in 1810 (called Gibby) [NC:231]. He made a Robeson County nuncupative will on 1 November 1837, proved May 1838, leaving all his estate to Mary Cumbo. Elizabeth and Jemima Cumbo were witnesses [WB A:327].

ii. Stephen2, born say 1758, head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 and 4 "free colored" in New Hanover County in 1820 [NC:227]. He married Sarah Broom, 23 October 1799 Robeson County bond with (his brother) Aaron Cumbo bondsman. He was exempted from paying poll tax on 5 July 1808 [Minutes II:96]. He sold land by deed proved in Robeson County court in February 1827 [Minutes III:142].

iii. ?Nathaniel, born say 1761, not mentioned in his father's will, perhaps deceased or left the county before then. He was taxable on one poll in Captain Regan's District of Bladen County in 1784 and entered 100 acres on the east side of Drowning Creek on 5 May 1791 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:45]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50].

iv. John4, born say 1765, head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50], 4 in 1800 [NC:372], and 3 in 1810 [NC:231]. He made a nuncupative will witnessed by his brother Gibson in Robeson County on 20 May 1814 leaving all his estate to his wife Mary [WB A:153]. His father Cannon left "Daughter Mary Cumbo, widow of John Cumbo 200 acres where she now lives." Mary was head of a Robeson County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:304].

v. Aaron, born say 1775, head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1800 [NC:372]. The 6 July 1803 Robeson County court attached seven of his cattle for a debt to Mitchel Biggs [Minutes 1797-1806, 255]. He sold land to his brother Elisha by deed proved by their brother Stephen in Robeson on 27 August 1811 [Minutes 1806-13, 282]. Aaron was head of a Georgetown, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:219].

vi. Elisha, born say 1777, head of a Robeson County household of 3 white males and 2 white females in 1800 and 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:231]. In 1805 one of Elisha's brothers was convicted of larceny on complaint of a white man named William Townsend. Soon afterwards, Townsend's horse was shot dead. He felt certain that Elisha had done it but was unable to obtain a warrant because he had no evidence. He prevailed upon Major William Odom and five other whites to arrest Elisha without a warrant for which Elisha brought a bill of indictment against them. In October 1805 the Superior Court of Fayetteville District fined Major Odom 15 pounds and the other six 10 pounds each for riot. They appealed to the North Carolina General Assembly, describing the Cumbos as "Mulattoes who are well known as Infamous Characters," but their petition was rejected [Schweninger, Southern Debate over Slavery, vol. 1: Petitions to Southern Legislatures]. Elisha purchased land from his brother Aaron by deed proved by their brother Stephen in Robeson County on 27 August 1811 [Minutes 1806-13, 282].

vii. Elijah, born say 1780, head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:231].

viii. Solomon4.

ix. Moses.



SubjectAuthorDate Posted
chrisdwill 30 Jan 2013 9:53PM GMT 
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