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CAMPBELL/SMITH Early 1800's

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Re: CAMPBELL/SMITH Early 1800's

Posted: 11 Feb 2006 11:23AM GMT
Mr. Smith,

I think I may have found the connection you are seeking. Elder David CAMPBELL and Jane LOCKHART had five sons, of whom three married SMITH girls, though I do not know if or how the SMITH girls were related.

“Elder David” CAMPBELL (Aug 1762 Augusta Co., VA - Apr 1813 Knox Co., TN) and Jane LOCKHART (1768 - 17 Jan 1842 Concord, Knox Co., TN) had three sons who married three SMITH girls. “Elder David” CAMPBELL and his two brothers, Alexander CAMPBELL and James "Big Jimmy" Rogers CAMPBELL took part in the Battle of King’s Mountain on 7 October 1780 in the Regiment of Col. John Sevier under the overall command of Gen. William CAMPBELL. There is a lot of available information on Elder David CAMPBELL, and his house still stands near Campbell’s Station.

Jane LOCKHART was the daughter of James LOCKHART and Mary CAMPBELL, and the granddaughter of Col. David "White David" CAMPBELL. David CAMPBELL was called “White David” because of his yellow hair, blue eyes and fair complexion, to distinguish him from his cousin, “Black David" CAMPBELL, who had dark hair, eyes and complexion. The relationship between the two David Campbells was furthered when White David CAMPBELL married Mary HAMILTON who was the half-sister of Jane CONYNGHAM who married “Black David” CAMPBELL.

The three sons of “Elder David” CAMPBELL who married the SMITH women were James "Little Jimmy" CAMPBELL, John Steele CAMPBELL, and David CAMPBELL, Jr. of Grassy Valley.

1. DAVID CAMPBELL, JR. OF GRASSY VALLEY (1 Jan 1800 Knox Co., TN - 16 Dec 1867 Texas) married Jane SMITH on 4 Dec 1823 in Knox Co., TN. “David CAMPBELL, Jr. (b. Jan. 1, 1800), son of David and Janet (LOCKHART) CAMPBELL, was only thirteen years of age when his father died and he was willed a tract of land. He married, December 4, 1823, Jane SMITH, daughter of William SMITH. John T. SMITH was bondsman and the Rev. R.H. King performed the ceremony. David, Jr., went to Illinois; returned to Cleveland, Bradley County, Tennessee, and later removed to Texas where he died. Their children were: (6) John, William, David LOCKHART, Samuel, Robert, Jane, Mary, Elizabeth, and Sallie.” Source: “Some Founders of Campbell’s Station, Tennessee: A Genealogy of Alexander, David, and James Campbell”, compiled by Laura E. Luttrell. In The Book, "Tennessee Settlers and their Descendants" published by the Tennessee Genealogical Society in 1994 page 53 it is claimed that David was born 14 Jan 1800.

2. JAMES "LITTLE JIMMY" CAMPBELL (21 Jun 1795 Campbell’s Station, Knox Co., TN - 12 Oct 1876 Knox Co., TN) who married Sarah SMITH (8 Jan 1806 Virginia - 13 Aug 1874) on 20 Mar 1824 in Knox Co., TN. James was called “Little Jimmy” Campbell to distinguish him from his uncle, “Big Jimmy” Campbell, who according to Laura Luttrell, “James was very large man --said to have weighed nearly four hundred pounds……Not only was he of gigantic size but was correspondingly strong; he outlived his brothers. Tradition is that Indians would gaze upon him --some with laughter --others with evident fear of the huge man.” Little Jimmy CAMPBELL was married to Sally SMITH by R. H. King, MG 20 March 1824. Source: “Knox County, Tennessee, Marriage records: 1792-1900” Compiled by Roscoe Carlisle d’Armand and Virginia Carlisle d’Armand, Family Record Society, 709 Empire Building, Knoxville, TN 1970, pg 159. “ James CAMPBELL (June 21, l795-Oct. 12, 1876), farmer, livestock dealer, church elder, was born at Campbell’s Station. The Indian troubles were not so much dreaded when James was born eight years from the beginning of the settlement in the wilderness. The family had moved from the fort to the cabin on the plantation. When James was six years old he attended the school and the Presbyterian Church that had been established on land deeded by Colonel David CAMPBELL for such purposes. He was elected an elder of Pleasant Forest Presbyterian Church in 1833 and served many years. He married, March 20, 1824, Sarah SMITH (Jan. 8, 1806-Aug. 13, 1874) who was born in Virginia. He received by will of his late father, one half of the home plantation to be his upon the death of his mother. When he died, as his will shows, he was possessed of a large number of acres. His children were: (6) Nancy L., David S., Jane L., Eliza H., William Moffet, James Alexander, John G., Robert Walker, Sarah Emeline, and Edward Moore.” Source: “Some Founders of Campbell’s Station, Tennessee: A Genealogy of Alexander, David, and James Campbell”, compiled by Laura E. Luttrell. In 1833 James CAMPBELL was an Elder in the Pleasant Forest Presbyterian Church. Source: "Tennessee Settlers and their Descendants" published by the Tennessee Genealogical Society in 1994 page 54


3. JOHN STEELE CAMPBELL 23 May 1808 Boyd place, Knox Co., TN - 20 Jul 1897 Knox Co., TN and buried in Pleasant Forest Presbyterian Church, Concord, Knox Co., TN. “John S. CAMPBELL to Nancy SMITH by William Eagleton, MG, 7 February 1828; bondsman John T. SMITH.” Source: “Knox County, Tennessee, Marriage records: 1792-1900” Compiled by Roscoe Carlisle d’Armand and Virginia Carlisle d’Armand, Family Record Society, 709 Empire Building, Knoxville, TN 1970, pg 159. Nancy SMITH was born in 1808 and died 8 Jul 1856. “John Steele CAMPBELL (May 23, 1808-July 20, 1897), farmer, church officer, son of David and Janet (LOCKHART) CAMPBELL, was one of the original elders of time Pleasant Forest Presbyterian Church and was interred in the Cemetery there. He lived at Concord, Knox County, Tennessee.” Source: “Some Founders of Campbell’s Station, Tennessee: A Genealogy of Alexander, David, and James Campbell”, compiled by Laura E. Luttrell.


* * * *
Here is some more information concerning Elder David CAMPBELL.

“Elder” David CAMPBELL (1763?-1813), farmer, Revolutionary soldier, co-founder of Campbell’s Station, church officer, was born in Augusta County, Virginia; died in Knox County, Tennessee,” and was buried in Pleasant Forest Cemetery, noted as the burial place of Archibald Roane, governor of Tennessee, 1801-1802. This man was the brother of Alexander and James CAMPBELL, all sons of (3) Robert CAMPBELL (born in Ireland) ; grandsons of (2) William CAMPBELL, of Scotland, Ireland, and Virginia, and great-grandsons of (1) Alexander CAMPBELL, of Scotland. (*****I do not believe Robert was the son of William who married Mary Byers, but was his brother. I believe he was the son of Alexander, who was the son of Dougal and Mary McCoy Campbell -GCB*****)

(3) Robert CAMPBELL, who was living with his family in Augusta County, Virginia, moved to Washington County in that state, then, during the Revolutionary War to Washington County, North Carolina (later Tennessee). While living in that county, “Elder” David volunteered under Colonel John Sevier and, with his brothers, served in Sevier’s regiment in that memorable battle of King’s Mountain, 1780. After 1783 he was living in Greene County and, on December 11, 1785, married Janet (also called Jean or Jane) LOCKHART (1768?-Jan. 17, 1842),” daughter of William and Mary (CAMPBELL) LOCKHART and sister of Mary LOCKHART, wife of Alexander CAMPBELL.

In March, 1787, “Elder” David CAMPBELL, with his wife and infant son, William L., and with his brother Alexander and family, joined Colonel (Captain) David CAMPBELL and Archibald McCaleb (who had gone with their families the week before) in settling in the Grassy Valley of what is now Knox County, Tennessee. A short time later, Jonathan Douglass and family were added to the pioneers at Campbell’s Station.”

These five men and also their wives had laborious work to do. In addition to felling trees, building cabins, clearing land and planting crops, the men were ever on the alert to protect their families from unfriendly Indians. They were often called out for military duty and to attend “musters.” The enemy would fire at the men while they were plowing and hoeing in the fields and would steal their horses.

These families were moved twice for safety to other forts, the first time to Amos Byrd’s Station east of them on the Holston River, and the second time to White’s Fort (site of Knoxville) fifteen miles east. Reports of Indian depredations and rumors of warlike movements kept these Pioneers constantly alarmed. However, they were determined to establish homes in this beautiful valley so pleasing in every prospect. Early in the spring of 1788 James (“Big Jimmie”) CAMPBELL and Robert Blackburn with their families came to the Station.17 All were busy with farm work when, in May or June, the family of John Kirk, living nearer than any other to the Indian towns, was killed. David CAMPBELL was one of the men who joined a group of men in an attack on the Indian town of Coyatee.

When the Territory of the United States South of the River Ohio was organized and Governor William Blount made a treaty the next year with the Cherokees, there was a fair prospect of peace. But such a hope was short-lived for in April, 1792, one of the guards brought the news that two of Mr. Wells’ boys who were picking strawberries in sight of their home in Hinds’ Valley had been killed by Indians.

Another event the same year that caused them apprehension was an attack on the family of Ebenezer Byram whose place was about ten miles west of Knoxville. This occurred on November 12, 1792. Then in April, 1793, the house of Robert Blackburn, only two or three miles from the Station, was burned22 after the family had taken refuge in the fort. “Elder” David CAMPBELL had built a cabin on his plantation in the vicinity and was preparing to clear more land to plant farm crops. However, the depredations of the savages forced all the families to take refuge in the fort.

In September of the same year a large army of Cherokees and Creeks, intent upon attacking Knoxville, passed in the night not far from the Station but so silently that the families within (now about fifteen or twenty), did not hear them. When, in the early morning, their trails were discovered and it was thought that about two thousand red men had gone by, they concluded that the savages had gone to destroy the inhabitants of Knoxville, and, upon their return, would take Campbell’s Station. So they immediately began to prepare for defense. Two of the men were sent on horses to notify General Sevier, who with about six hundred men was encamped “on the south side of Holston River about five miles from Campbell’s Station.” Every vessel was filled with water for fear their cabins might be set on fire. The men in the fort were experienced soldiers, and expert gunmen. The women also had been instructed in the use of firearms. Upon two occasions Mrs. Margaret CAMPBELL had shown that she was prepared to shoot down attackers. They waited with apprehension; such fear they had never known. They listened intently for the sound of the war whoop and the attack to begin - not knowing that the Indians had abandoned their plan to attack Knoxville and had gone to their homes.

Late in the day some men who had heard of the savage massacre at Cavitt Station rode to see what the savages had done at that place; then rode on fearing that a like fate had befallen the People at Campbell’s Station. What a relief to those families to see friends - not foes! What horror and sadness they felt to hear that the Cavitt had been killed.

After about nine years since their coming the settlers were free to live on their own farms. General Sevier had effectively quelled the Cherokee by a raid upon their towns. The people of the Station could now give attention to the education of their children and to the establishment of a church.

By 1798, or earlier, a small school house and a church were erected upon the land of Colonel David CAMPBELL. The Grassy Valley Presbyterian Church was organized by the Reverend Samuel Graham Ramsey and he was installed as pastor in 1798. At the same time David CAMPBELL was appointed one of the elders and held that office as long as he lived. On May 1, 1800, Colonel David CAMPBELL made a deed of the land to the pastor and officers of the church. He conveyed two and a fraction acres in these words:
……whereas the said congregation [Presbyterian] with the free will and consent of the said David CAMPBELL have erected an house for public worship on his lands - therefore, in order to secure to the said congregation free and peaceable use and enjoyment thereof, he, the said David CAMPBELL, hath . . . given and granted . . . to . . Samuel G. Ramsey, and Robert Gamble, Joseph Cowan, and David CAMPBELL, elders of said congregation and their successors . . . two acres and sixty poles.”

It is not known who were the early teachers in this first school, but in when the Colonel’s daughter, Margaret Lavinia CAMPBELL, was sixteen years of age, she taught school there and also organized a Sunday School. Miss Phoebe Hunter was the teacher about 1835-1837.

“Elder” David CAMPBELL was well known for his interest in promoting religion and education in the community. He was devoted to his family; and a friend to all. Two of his sons, James and John Steele, served many years as elders in the Pleasant Forest Presbyterian Church; also a grandson James Alexander CAMPBELL, held the same office.

His will, dated June 6, 1812, was probated in April, 1813. He named wife, Jean, and his five sons and four daughters. He had in addition to his home plantation a tract of land purchased of Thomas C. Clark, and he stated that he already had given some property to his son Alexander. He had several slaves. He appointed as executors his brother, James CAMPBELL; William, son of his brother James; and “my son,” William L. CAMPBELL. Witnesses were John SMITH, Robert and James CAMPBELL.

The children of David and Janet (LOCKHART) CAMPBELL were: William LOCKHART, Alexander, Mary L., Margaret M., James, Jeany, David, Jr., Betsy, and John Steele.

Source: “Some Founders of Campbell’s Station, Tennessee: A Genealogy of Alexander, David, and James Campbell”, compiled by Laura E. Luttrell.




KNOX COUNTY, TN - 1811-1815 Wills.
p.48 David CAMPBELL will wife, Jean; Sons William, David Alexander; daughters: Mary & Margaret. Son, James; son, John; daughter Jenny; Daughter Betsy; brother James CAMPBELL, executor with his son William CAMPBELL and my son William L. CAMPBELL. June 26, 1812 Source: Submitted by: John W. Campbell, 59 Cleopatra St., Queen Valley Est., Apache Junction, AZ 85220, as published in "Campbell Contacts" Vol. III, No. 2, whole number 10, Aug. 1981. pg.321-322.



WASHINGTON COUNTY LISTS OF TAXABLES 1778-1801
This Washington County Tax List is taken from Washington County, Tennessee, Records, as transcribed by Mary Hardin McCown, Vol. 1. The Washington County Lists of Taxables 1778-180 1 was privately published in 1964, Johnson City, Tennessee, by Mrs. McCown.

1778. Valentine Sevier, Sheriff, Dr. to the County Court of - The Following Taxes Collected from the several- (torn)-The County Aforesd. 1778. (To wit.)

Assest, name unlisted, Returned to Jacob Womack, Esquire.

CAMPBELL, Alexr.
CAMPBELL, David
CAMPBELL, William

Source: “The Overmountain Men” by Pat Alderman. The Overmountain Press, Johnson City, TN. 1970 ISBN: 093280716X. Pages 58-59.



FIRST TAX LIST FOR THE COUNTY OF GREENE, STATE OF TENNESSEE, 1783
This Greene County Tax List of 1783 was compiled by Louise Wilson Reynolds and published in the D.A.R. Magazine April 1919 Issue.

CAMPBELL, Alexander
CAMPBELL, David
CAMPBELL, James
CAMPBELL, John
CAMPBELL, Robert
CAMPBELL, William

Source: “The Overmountain Men” by Pat Alderman. The Overmountain Press, Johnson City, TN. 1970 ISBN: 093280716X. Pages 239-242.



KNOX COUNTY, TN - 1811-1815 Wills. p.48 David CAMPBELL will wife, Jean; Sons William, David Alexander; daughters: Mary & Margaret. Son, James; son, John; daughter Jenny; Daughter Betsy; brother James CAMPBELL, executor with his son William CAMPBELL and my son William L. CAMPBELL.
June 26, 1812

p.241 DAVID CAMPBELL, b. c1762 Augusta Co., VA; d. April 1813 Concord, Knox County, TN; married 11 Dec 1785 Janet Lochart, Green Co., TN, who died 17 Jan 1842 Concord, Knox County, TN. David CAMPBELL (1763-1813) was a farmer, Revolutionary Soldier, Co-founder of Campbell’s Station, and a church officer. Buried Pleasant Forest Cem. This man was the brother of Alexander and James CAMPBELL, all sons of Robert CAMPBELL who was born in Ireland, grandsons of
William CAMPBELL of Scotland. Great-grandson of Alexander CAMPBELL of Scotland. The three brothers: Alexander, David and James took part in the Battle of King’s Mountain on 7 October 1780 in the Regiment of Col. John Sevier under the overall command of Gen. William CAMPBELL.

Children of David CAMPBELL

Claimant File # Assignee: County Acres Grant Grant Date Entry Entry Date Bk: Pg: Location by Stream Name

CAMPBELL, David 224 Wash. 143 92 23Oct1782 574 6Nov1778 47: 44 East side of Mirey Branch
CAMPBELL, David 43 Estrn. Dist. 500 43 11July1788 67: 356 On Turkey Creek &c.
CAMPBELL, David 434 Wash. 200 426 13Oct1789 178 7Nov1778 52:278 On the Reedy Fork of Sinking Creek
CAMPBELL, David 464 Wash. 200 456 13Oct1782 575 2Nov1779 52: 292 On the head of Stone’s Creek
CAMPBELL, David 56 Green 640 14 1Nov1786 59: 375 On Waters of Notachuckey River
CAMPBELL, David 583 Hawkins 640 457 29Jul1793 80: 291 On the E fork of Turkey Creek
CAMPBELL, David 59 Green 270 17 l Nov1786 12Mar1784 59:378 Upon Flat Creek
CAMPBELL, David 60 Green 600 18 l Nov1786 69 21Oct1783 59:379 Beg at a stake on John Beard’s line

Source: “Earliest Tennessee Land Records and Earliest Tennessee Land History” by Irene M. Griffey. Clearfield Co., April 2000. 506 pages. ISBN: 0806350415 pgs., 127-129, 400. Orlando Lib.



DESCENDANT OF FOUNDING FATHERS STILL LIVES IN AREA
Found in newspaper, Press Enterprise, Wednesday, November 11, 1992 page 4C.

Out Harvey road, not far from the Loudon county line, sits a white clapboard house that looks as if it were painted by Norman Rockwell. This has been home for the CAMPBELL family, direct descendants of Colonel David CAMPBELL, founder of Campbell Station. The state of Tennessee awarded David CAMPBELL 700 acres sometime around the beginning of the 1800s. Elder David CAMPBELL erected a substantial log building in 1810, using lumber from the property. Too large to be considered a cabin, this building served as home for the family for about 100 years. During this time, the original 700 acres were divided into tracts among the three grandchildren. One of whom, Andrew L. CAMPBELL, sold his tract to fund his college education. He eventually returned to the area care for his aging grandparents and was given eight acres. He bought back 79 acres from the other CAMPBELL heirs to complete the tract.

In 1916, the log home was torn down to make room for a new, white house. The wood frame home was built from native wood, just as the log home had been. Heated with a fireplace in each room, the house was originally a bit under 1600 square feet. Andrew and his wife, Anna, had seven children, the last of whom was born in the new family home. Although he had his degree in law, Andrew spent less time on legal matters than postal affairs. Unlike today, the need for lawyers was not so great in the early 1900s, and Andrew taught at a number of area schools, including the Concord and Virtue schools. In addition, he spent 28 years, much of it on horseback or in a buggy, delivering mail in the Martel area.

In 1959, Andrew's son, John, married and brought his bride, Elsie, to live in the family home. Together, they updated the house in 1969, adding central heat and air and a room in the back. Most of the acreage has been sold. The home now sits on the original 8 acres and is the site of the CAMPBELL family reunions.

Source: Campbell Family Papers in the McClung Collection, East Tennessee Historical Center, Knoxville, TN.



Sincerely,
Glen Beckwith
SubjectAuthorDate Posted
William H. Smith 2 May 1999 12:00PM GMT 
GlenBeckwith 11 Feb 2006 6:23PM GMT 
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