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Franklin, Charles G.

Replies: 11

Re: Franklin, Charles G.

Posted: 1 Mar 2013 1:50PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Franklin, Birdsall, Brand, Hovey
RuthAnn -- I've got the below article from my family (CGF was my GGG Grandfather, son of Enos W. Franklin & Harriet Hovey. Would love to know more about their background & also CG's brother Enos E.

Beloit Paper - December 1909:
CELEBRATE HALF CENTURY OF LIFE
Mr. and Mrs. C.G. Franklin Observe Fiftieth Wedding Anniversary at Home Today
HONOR GIVEN BY RELATIVES
Many from Out of Town Gather Here for the Occasion
BOTH IN GOOD HEALTH
Many More Years Together Seem in Store for Couple -- Practically All Married Life is Spent in Rock County
Fifty years ago -- December 11, 1859 -- marked an epoch in the lives of Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Franklin, 724 Vine street. For half a century they have been man and wife and all but three years of that period has been spent within a radius of ten miles of Beloit. And in the early days when they were living in Clinton, Wis., where the ceremony was performed by a Rev. E. Hatch, they looked to Beloit as the place for supplied and the place where lay their civic interests.
Today, surrounded by their children and some of their grandchildren, they are celebrating in a quiet way this eventful occasion.
Both in Good Health.
Mr. and Mrs. Franklin have enjoyed unusually good health, which is probably due to the fact that both spent their younger days in the open air of the country on their parents farms.
In fact, Mr. Franklin is still able to do a day's work at 76, when most men of those years find it necessary to give in to the infirmities of senility. And the bright, congenial disposition of Mrs. Franklin is more than is usually found in one of 72 years.
They are the parents of five children, Nora E.; William G.; Susie M.; Elmer C.; and Herbert O., all of whom, excepting William, who died fifteen years ago, are still living, Miss Susie having taken it upon herself to stay by her aged father and mother to cheer them in their advanced age.
Comes West Early
Mr. Franklin is a New Yorker, having been born in Morristown, St. Lawrence county, on March 6, 1833. When he was ten years old his parents came west by way of the Great Lakes to Milwaukee, from whence they made their way with oxen teams to the town of Roscoe, settling on the Cooper farm. Here he lived, helping his father with the work of the farm, till he was 16 years old, when his parents again made a change, this time moving to Clinton, Wis. It was here that he first met his future wife, who was then Miss Ellen Brand.
The early life of Mrs. Franklin was marred with several remarkable incidents. The first was one which almost made her a woman "without a country", she having been born on a vessel which was three days from New York while her parents were on their way to this country from England, May 27, 1837.
Nearly Loses Life
The second, which occurred only two days later, came within a hair's breadth of snuffing out her young life. It seems a heavy storm arose when they were about a day's journey from the port, and the huge waves broke over their craft threatening at any moment to swamp it. Meanwhile their cabin in which her parents were staying became flooded completely overcoming the mother and her babe. The mother was soon rescued, but it was several minutes before their infant daughter could be extracted from her watery bed.
Oneida county, New York, was Mrs. Franklin's home till she was 19, when her parents emigrated west, locating on what is known as the Milner farm, three miles north of Clinton Junction. Having here met and married Mr. Franklin, they settled on a farm near Clinton, where they made their home for forty-three years following the "call of the soil". It was here that all their children were born and reared.
Move to Iowa
Thinking they would prefer to spend the remainder of their days nearer some of their children, they decided in 1902 to remove to Perry, Iowa, the home of their daughter, Mrs. W. G. Birdsall; but after living there for three years a change of heart led them back to the scenes of their earlier days, and as a result in 1905 they returned to Rock county and took up their residence in Beloit, where they have lived ever since. Mrs. Franklin says she is perfectly satisfied to live and die in Rock county.
May Guests Present
Fifty invitations were issued to a wide circle of relatives and friends, but, owing to sickness and other reasons, but forty were able to be present. Among the guests are Enos Franklin of Sioux City, brother of Mr. Franklin whom he has not seen in thirty years; Mrs. Kitty Davis, Moeville, Iowa; Mrs. Flora Flint, Davenport, Ia; Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. Franklin, Mr. and Mrs. Lou Franklin, Mr. and Mrs. F.A.Franklin, Mr. Fred Franklin, Mr. and Mrs. B. Courtier, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Franklin all of Evansville, Wis; Mrs. Emma Smith of Harvard, Ill., and daughter, Mrs. Clarence Bilyea of Walworth, Wis.; Mrs. Harry Stafford and sons, Earl and Edwin of Harvard, Ill.; Mrs. John Ronk, sister of Mrs. Franklin, Delavan, Wis.; Mr. and Mrs. B.W.Christian, Delavan; Johnson Mattison, Darien, Wis.; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Fish and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Mattison, both of Darien, Wis.; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Chesebro, Rarien; Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Franklin and daughter Dorothy of Milwaukee; Mrs. Nellie Franklin and daughter Gladys of Janesville. In addition to the above, a son, C.E. Franklin, of Chicago, is expected later in the day, and also a number of relatives from Milwaukee and Darien. Mrs. W.G.Birdsall of Iowa, was prevented from being present by sickness.
An elaborate dinner in honor of the bride and groom was served at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Walker, who live nearby. Mrs. Walker is Mrs. Franklin's niece. The large number to be served made it advisable to do this. Two tables were set for the forty guests. The dining rooms were prettily decorated for the occasion. A large bell, created of yellow crepe paper, was suspended from the ceiling over each of the tables, from which radiated a ribbon of the same color to each corner of the tables. The effect was very pleasing. Potted chrysanthemums also adorned the rooms.
Friends of Mr. and Mrs. Franklin joined in wishing them many more years of happiness. This was also the occasion of the reunion of the family and the meeting of parts of the family which had not met before. It was a happy event and one which will leave a lasting impression with all who were present.
SubjectAuthorDate Posted
RuthAnnMontgo... 28 Jun 2010 9:32PM GMT 
brenton_buxto... 1 Mar 2013 8:50PM GMT 
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