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Surnames

Replies: 6

Re: Surnames

Posted: 8 Nov 2013 11:22AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 8 Nov 2013 12:00PM GMT
deslauree3: Is this what you are looking at - I found it online:

HUSBAND
Tobias Larsen Tunheim
Born: 22 JAN 1867 - Bjørheim, Haa, Rogaland, Norway
Marr: 4 AUG 1897 - Nærbo, Hå, Rogaland, Norway
Died: 5 JAN 1946 - Varhaug, Rogaland, Norway
Father: Lars Abrahamsen Aanestad
Mother: Elisabet Pedersdatter

WIFE
Wife
Anne Justina Tønnesdatter Sørskoug
Born: 15 SEP 1869 - Ogna sogn, Egersund, Rogaland, Norway
Died: 31 JUL 1939 - Varhaug, Rogaland, Norway
Father: Tønnes Andreas Olsen
Mother: Elen Ommundsdatter

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Parents to Tobias Larsen Tunheim born 1867 (the Norwegian letters didn't carry over):

HUSBAND
Lars Abrahamsen Aanestad
Born: 10 OCT 1834 - Bø, Haa, Rogaland, Norway
Marr: -
Died: -
Father: Abraham Olsen Kvie
Mother: Ingeborg Salvesdatter

WIFE
Elisabet Pedersdatter
Born: 15 SEP 1840 - Bjørheim, Haa, Rogaland, Norway [mangled word =Bjorheim]
Died: 25 JUL 1885 - Haa, Rogaland, Norway
Father: Peder Jonsen Heigrestad
Mother: Ingeborg Abrahamsdatter

====================================================================

thoraway gave a good explanation of Norwegian naming practices to start, and it may be useful then for you to read about Norwegian naming practices in more depth, as suggested. Also remember that when we run into something new, outside our comfort zone, it seems strange to us. I hope you'll allow yourself some time to work with Norwegian genealogy and be helped with it, and after a while, you'll notice yourself getting more comfortable with the naming system. Below is an idea that maybe can help you see the sense of the naming system (?)

You say a son should have the same last name as a father, right? No, not in Norway in the old days.

A Norwegian father in past times gave his FIRST name to his child. Then "sen" or "datter" was added (son or daughter). That's a patrynomic name. Based on a man's first name, it naturally changes with individuals and with generations. In places where families use permanent surnames, a father gives his LAST name to his child.

Tobias had a father named Lars, so Tobias is LARS'S SON - Larsen.
Lars had a father Abraham, so Lars is ABRAHAM'S SON - Abrahamsen.

In North America we look for a father with the right last surname. In traditional Norway, we look for a father with the right first name. Maybe if you think of it that way, it's not all that different.

There could be more than one person named Ole Jensen or Tobias Larsen or whatever. Therefore, Norwegians had a practice (as with other Scandinavians) of adding an additional "identifier" name. Usually this name was a place name. Imagine that you are in a rural area in Norway in the old times, with a number of very small villages and farms scattered about. There's an Ole Jensen living on three different farms in the area. How to tell them apart? With so few people and just a simple way of living, it was easy to say:

Ole Jensen on the Kvie farm
Ole Jensen on the Tunheim farm
Ole Jensen on the Aanestad farm

Big bother to say all that, so it gets shortened. Ole #1 becomes "Ole Jensen Kvie."
People will know who you mean - OH, THAT Ole Jensen, the one who lives at Kvie.

Now imagine Ole moves. Whoops. That could get confusing if you call him Ole Jensen Kvie.
He moved to Tunheim, so now you refer to him as the Ole Jensen who lives at Tunheim, This is shortened to "Ole Jensen Tunheim."

That's an overly simplistic and not very scholarly explanation, but might help you see the sense in these "name changes." Actually, the person's name never changes. He is Ole Jensen for life. Only his "address" might change, as he moves around.

You can see that there can be people living at the same place who are not family. If they are carrying the name "Kvie" or "Tunheim" or "Aanestad" this does not mean they are related, but rather, that they live at the same place. Again, we're talking about traditional Norway, not modern times.

When entering your Norwegian family names in your family tree, you might bear all this in mind.

LINK with Aanestad, Tunheim, and Kvie:
http://clubweb.interbaun.com/~elien/family/gp920.htm#head1

It's good you brought this up, and titled your query "SURNAMES," because a lot of people have the same question as you.

:D

=====================================================================

Below is a quote of another researcher of this family, talking about Tobias:

"Here is what is in the Time Bygdebok. Page 344 lists the following: My translation.
Entry #67. Tobias Larsen Risa b. in Varhaug 22 Jan 1867, son of Lars Abrahamsen
Aanestad and Elisabet Pedersdtr Bjørheim, m. 1897 to Ane Junstine Tønnesdtr,
Sørskog, b, in Ogna 1869
Children:
Tønnes Andreas, born at Risa 1 Mar 1898
Jonas, born 5 Dec. 1899
Emelia, born 13 Feb 1901
Erling, born 5 June 1903"

http://newsarch.rootsweb.com/th/read/NORWAY/2003-07/10573388...

More about Tobias, from "Gards og ættesoga" for Hå II, Varhaug og Vigrestad by Torgeir Edland:
(a gard is a farm):

Page 25, farm name Sæland, familie 25.
Tobias Larsson Tunheim født 22.01.1867, død 1946, gift 08.04.1897 med Anna
Justina Tønnesdatter Sørskog, født i Ogna 15.09.1869, død 1939, datter av
Tønnes Andreas Olson Sørskog (Lindal, Nærbø 21h) og Elen Omundsdatter født
Hetland i Ogna. Tobias Larsson bodde ei tid på Tunheim i Time. I 1917 kjøpte
han bnr. 2 på Sæland av Ole Nærbø. 8 barn, 2 født på Risa og 6 på Tunheim:
25a- Tønnes Andreas, født på Risa 01.03.1898, død.
25b- Jonas, født 05.09.1899, gift i Amerika.
25c- Emilie, født på Tunheim 13.02.1901, gift 1923 med Jonas Øvestad
(Auestad 47i).
25d- Erling, født 05.06.1903. gift 17.10.1929 med Virginia Buckman i
Amerika.
25e- Alma Theoline, født 16.04.1905, gift med Sven S. Bratland (Bratland
36).
25f- Elen, født 03.08.1907, gift 1935 med Johan Bernhard Gabrielsen, født i
Stavanger 16.09.1906, sjåfør på Varhaug.
25g- Magnhild, født 15.12.1909, gift med Karl Håland (Store Håland, Nærbø
41)
25h- Torleif, født 11.10.1913 (26).


født = born
gift = married
å can also be written aa
and so on. There are several good Norwegian dictionaries that pop up if you google them.

As I hastily read the information on Tobias, it seems to me that there are some contradictions about where he is born and maybe more...but I'll leave it to you to sort out each fact to find the truth - either yourself or with the help of the wonderful researchers in this forum. Remember, inconsistencies and mistakes happen in records and in family histories, no matter where in the world.
SubjectAuthorDate Posted
deslauree3 3 Nov 2013 4:17PM GMT 
thoraway 3 Nov 2013 9:25PM GMT 
deslauree3 4 Nov 2013 1:09AM GMT 
thoraway 4 Nov 2013 3:27AM GMT 
falsterden 8 Nov 2013 6:22PM GMT 
thoraway 8 Nov 2013 8:42PM GMT 
falsterden 9 Nov 2013 7:01PM GMT 
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