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Bio: Asahael Allen Crosse

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Bio: Asahael Allen Crosse

Posted: 8 Apr 2010 4:24AM GMT
Classification: Biography
Surnames: Crosse, Walker, Post, Pelton
From "The Biographical Encyclopedia of Ohio of the Nineteenth Century" [Galaxy Publishing Co., Columbus, OH, 1876]:

ASAHAEL ALLEN CROSSE, Physician and Surgeon, was born at Cincinnatus, Cortland county, New York, on the 22d of August, 1824. His parents were in moderate circumstances, and he early learned the lesson of self-dependence and self-help. At the age of thirteen years he left home to make his own way in the world, and henceforth relied entirely upon his own resources. He went to work on a farm, and such school education as he obtained was by going to a district school during the winter months, his summers being too much occupied in farm labor to give him any opportunity for summer study. Not long after leaving home he went to Ashtabula, Ohio, and there, in addition to the opportunities afforded by the district schools, he for a time enjoyed the advantage of attending the Ashtabula Academy. From thence he removed to Mentor, Lake county, Ohio, where, at the age of sixteen, he commenced the study of medicine. After having attended three full courses of medical lectures he graduated at the Willoughby University, in Lake county, Ohio, in the year 1842, and went at once to Amherst, Lorain county, Ohio. He had, when he arrived in Amherst, fifty dollars, and on the day after his arrival he made the uncomfortable discovery that forty-six dollars of his little fortune consisted of bills of a bank known as the Ohio Railroad Bank, located at Cleveland, Ohio, which had failed the day before, and were perfectly worthless, so that his available assets amounted to just four dollars. Fortune was not stubborn against him, however, for almost immediately he formed a partnership with Dr. Luman Tenny, an old physician of the place, and so was introduced to a practice that speedily became large and lucrative. His partner died at the end of three years, and then he took the entire charge of the practice. His diligence, ability and skill, added to the high reputation he had already earned, made him well known as one of the most successful physicians in the county. As a citizen, no less than as a physician, is he appreciated in the community, and from time to time that appreciation has been shown by placing him in several of the elective offices of the township of Amherst. He has successively held the offices of Township Assessor, Township Clerk, Justice of the Peace, and was the first Mayor of the incorporated village of North Amherst. He was Postmaster of Amherst during President Johnson's administration. Politically he is a Democrat, and, although the requirements of his profession do not leave him much leisure to devote to politics, he is nevertheless one of the leading spirits of his party in the community where he lives. Although he has acquired a fair competence, his experience has not been one of unmingled prosperity. On the 1st of March, 1858, he was thrown from his carriage, and his right leg was broken at the ankle. Being a heavy man, the ends of the broken bones were forced through the skin and boot-leg, and were driven three or four inches into the ground by the violence of his fall. It was found impossible to save the limb, and it was amputated below the knee by Professor Horace A. Ackley, his former preceptor. He has been three times married. His first wife, Diantha Walker, he married in 1844, by whom he had four children, three daughters and one son, one of whom, Mrs. H. W. Barnard, is now living. His wife, Diantha, died in 1855. On the 16th of September, 1859, he married Sarah E. Post, by whom he had one son, now living. His second wife died in 1866, and on the 18th of November, 1875, he married Ella G. Pelton, of Vermillion, Ohio. The doctor has a vigorous constitution, and from present appearances he has from twenty to twenty-five years of good practice left in him yet; that is, he is hale and hearty, and the youngest in the community always find him a pleasant social companion.

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