Search for content in message boards

Letters between John Doyle and wife Sarah Ann (Parker) Doyle abt. 1868

Replies: 0

Letters between John Doyle and wife Sarah Ann (Parker) Doyle abt. 1868

Posted: 23 Mar 2013 1:26AM GMT
Classification: Biography
Surnames: DOYLE / PARKER
While researching my "Doyle" family I stumbled across these notes and letters...maybe some researching this Doyle will be able to use them.
Good Hunting
Tara-Leigh Doyle


Notes

N140The Papers of US President Andrew Johnson, April-August 1868These letters describe the turmoil between John Doyle and his wife Sarah Ann Doyle (Parker)and the pursuit of monies from a Pension of theirson Frank..who was killed in the Civil War 1862.Lori Faultless sent the web site link to me via email. Oct 2010 I have scanned the images on the web site that contains this book and have endeavored to transcribe the text here as written.Paul CockrillFrom John DoyleSweaburg Post office Oxford Co., Ont.July 3rd 1868For two reasons I am prompted to respectfully ask for a few momentsof your valuable time. First you have felt the painful anguish of cruelinjustice having been practiced on yourself therefore can pitty a poorman void of power to do himself justice.Again I have been informed you are an obligated Mason. I amalso, but can not write anything received. The Lodge in which I wasrai[sed] was closed by means of a Print from York State many yearsago. Have not lived in the locality of any Lodge since, so am notnow a member of any, yet our obligations are for life.Therefore I feel I am putting myself into the hands of a friend inopening my case to you Which is On 30th Aug last I applied to the Pension office atWashington for a Pension on account of the services of my son FrankN Doyle, lst Lieutenant in the Iowa 16th who was killed at PittsburgeLanding April 6th A D 1862.I furnished proof on every point required except death of MotherPrior to that of officer. On this point I had said in a letter she wasdead since A D 1860. But proof was demanded. As the word Deathwhether used figuratively or literly means separation, I then openedall the facts of the case (viz) that she had Eloped in my absencetakeing my Children with her to the stare of Wisconsin to her Brother.This quite proterated me both body and mind. Some two years afterlearning my children were in want I went to care for them. Hersacred pledges that she would reform, inclined me to again try lifewith her. For nearlytwo years by constant labour with aid from myson Frank N I maide them comfortable. Her disposition was to en-joy the good things of this life, mine to live on my own means. Thisdifference put us often in each other’s way. Again she Eloped tookone child. l persued, recovered my child. Two weeks after she re-turned in the night with a Mob of five, robbed my house violentlytore my Children from me, broke two of my ribs and all but mur-dered me. Have never seen nor heard of any of them since that memo-rable night, did not know weather she was on the earth or under theearth untill informed by the Pension Office she had applied in A D1862 for her son's back pay.This Sir was seperation as compleat and more bitter than any lit-eral death. Your law says the Mother is a lawful claiment if Fatherdied prior to death of Officer or if he had permemently abandoned herthat is to forsake wholly. You see Sir your law can not be a good ruleof life unless it works both ways for what is peper for the goose issauce for the gander.july 1868P S The inclosed shows why my claim was rejected4. In December 1875 Sarah Ann Doyle wrote to thc pension ofiice giving her version ofthe story. "ln consequence of trouble and difficulties which accrued he [John Doyle] becamemelancholy, excited & violent by turns and sometimes fancied his life was in danger." He lefttheir home in Ontario, Canada. and went to staywith friends, leaving his wife and childrenwith no means of support. Sarah Ann contacted her brother who took them to his home inWisconsin. After about a year Doyle joined them there. `but soon [he] was . . sometirnes soviolent that it was impossible to safely live with him. She therefore took their youngestchild and went to her brother`s. John Doyle sold many of their possessions and went toCanada with the money, leaving her with no funds. Ibid.5. The letters of recommendation from Lima, Wisconsin, neighbors. Baptist churchoflicials. and four justices ofthe peace, were all dated in August 1860 and supported JohnDoyle's verson of the story, blamming Sarah Ann's relatives for the couples problems. Ibid.6.the rejection letter said that Doyle`s papers could not be returned "as it is against therule of the office to return papers after having been filed with the case."]ames A. Morgan to John Doyle. May 6. 1868. Patents and Misc. Div., Lets. Recd.. RG48. NA.7. Probably meaning Master Mason.8.The enclosure was the rejection letter.When about to leave Grant Co Wisconsin for Canada l was pre-sented with letters of Character, one signed by all my near neighbours,one by four Magistrates, and one by the Church of wich I was amember, all of which refered to the facts stated above.5When required by the Pension Office to explain her death I openedall, and to confirm my statements sent on those documents request—ing their return but they refused to do so, and have rejected my claimfor reason the Mother is yet Living.Though I might be yer living if had brought on a Mob who hadall but murdered her and had forever forsaken her in 1S6U (Date?) her claimwould not have been rejected for the reason l yet lived, surely justlaws treat every human being alike under the same circumstances.Grief Sc hardships have left me but the wreck of my former self,my age is 60 Aug next, by extream corpolence my weight is 268 lbs,ruptured on the right side, Asthma, and general weakness of thelungs, and partial loss ofthe use of M my limbs by rheumatism, noproperty, and unable to do much.While able to labour and support myself l did not ask for Pensionbut now in my extremity to have my applicationrejected appearsvery cruel knowing my dear son who succored me would do so nowhad he not dieded defending your Government, and knowing thatnever was a father`s claim more just.As God in his wisdom has delivered your Excellency, from theinjustice and cruel deigns ofthose who intended your ruin you willnow pitry and I hope interfear on my behalf Your hand to my back,that through your Excellence I may also obtain justice, as a poor oldman, a M— M---? in distress.If` in your high position you should have no direct control: overthe Pension Office, you may have indirectly. I once heard a lawyertell a Judge “there are many ways to kill a cat."Should there he no other door open could there not be an Actpassed granting the Abandoned father the same right as that nowenjoyed by the Abandoned mother?Your Excellencys help in this matter and at the present time willbe received with gratitude and I will ever pray that the God of allgrace will stand your friend in time and in Eternity.John Doyle
ID Number: MH:N1027
MH:I794
N141Reuben ButchartThe Disciples of Christ in Canada Since 1830 (1949) Chapter TenBIOGRAPHIES OF SPIRITUAL LEADERSJohn Doyle, Maritime Shepherd-Heart Not much can be told of the career of this spiritual leader in Hants County, Nova Scotia. He is first known as a Baptist pastor who by his own study became willing to embrace what he believed was a more scriptural faith, along with John McDonald,also of his congregation. Being excluded they had to begin a Reform movement themselves. This rare example of courage of conviction caused him rebuke at times, for his uncompromising preaching, and he was denied a place to preach in buildings that being community-built for the purpose should have been open to him. He seems to have been of the type which holds and expresses its convictions with the utmost certainty. Moreover, he is seen as one anxious that others should be sound in the faith, a not too prevalent type at present when perhaps tolerance in every department may be over-exercised. It is about his concern for the purity of the faith of the Churches of the Reformation that these paragraphs deal. After being in the new faith for a term of three or five years, on August 29, 1840 he writes a letter describing the River John church (perhaps our first in Canada) and as a comment adds what follows: "I have seen in the New Testament a church that fully pleases me and nowhere else. There are yet many things wanting. We are in it in part, and in our order in part; and this makes us the greatest mongrels in the land and the most inconsistent of all men: to recommend one thing and to practise its opposite . . . (it is) scandalous to any man wearing the Christian name. There are, however, some among us who live a life of faith in the Son of God; if they continue to showforth the same diligence . . . they shall walk with Him in white." (The Christian, Sep. 1840.) This language coming from an iconoclast for the truth, caused something of a sensation and enquiries for its meaning were made, which were explained in the February issue, 1841, page 198. With almost apostolic fervidness he explains: "The force of the truth in the first position of the sentence I still feel: We are not in the apostolic order yet, only in part. But, let us prove all things and hold fast the good. The apostolic order is, that we should not only believe truth, but also possess and cherish the spirit of that faith; that [130] we should not only fear the Lord, but also possess the spirit of the fear of the Lord; not only pray but have the spirit of prayer. Nor is it sufficient that we should have a knowledge of the first principles of the gospel, but also have the spirit of wisdom and of a sound mind. The 'spirit of adoption' is as necessary as any of the above. The spirit of meekness also and the spirit of life in Christ Jesus make the possessors of the above divine influence free--free from the law of sin and of death. Freedom--precious word: apostolic standard, God's delight, and the Christian's glory." Here John Doyle pointed a penetrating finger at the faults of some of his brethren, but in such a manner that they themselves were to apply the rebuke, if any. Such pastoral writing at least, does not figure in our periodicals. In the early days John Doyle was about the only Maritimer coming West to Ontario to evangelize. In the Co-operation meeting in Everton, June, 1857, he was in the chair. In the summer of 1853 he engaged in Co-operation evangelism, laboring in Esquesing and Erin. In 1855 he was appointed to travel and preach as a missionto the townships of King, Pickering, Wawanosh in Ontario. In March, 1855 he reported that his labors for the Co-operation were three months lacking one week; he had travelled otherwise four weeks; had added by baptism 33 and two by letter. (Christian Banner, March, 1855). He referred also intimately to Bowmanville, where he likely lived and may have been pastor; also to Meaford, Owen Sound where he held meetings. W. W. Eaton refers to him as practically the head of the work at Rawdon, in the year 1839. On March 2, 1840 he with B. Howard was appointed to travel for one year from May 1 in the Maritime provinces. They were practically to raise their own support from the churches, in this which was apparently the first local co-operation in Nova Scotia. (The Christian, p. 23, June, 1840.) Some of his letters in The Christian exhibit a gift of rugged language, typical of the man. He was a rare type which may be called the shepherding leader.John McDonald, Nova Scotia Early Leader This still-remembered man left few traceable records, though some effort was made to secure an autobiography of his but without avail. The pioneer and early leaders were not given to recording. In the Ontario Christian Banner and the Maritime Christian he is known as an active evangelist. He apparently was a very substantial man in his religious character and efforts. He was preceded in Hants Co.by Benj. Howard and John Doyle, who likely assisted him in establishing the cause at West Gore and Rawdon, where McDonald seems to have been local minister, by reference to phrases of W. W. Eaton. Men who were capable speakers were eagerly sought to leave their base and hold meetings leading to the opening up of new causes. Men of such abilities also were attracted to that type. In the year 1853 John McDonald was considered important enough for Donald Crawford to mention that he had spent a night with him in St. Croix in September, but that owing to poor health he had not spoken since May. InJuly, 1856 there is record that John McDonald and Donald Crawford were the "laborers" for the year just closed. Each had been remunerated by the sum of sixty-eight pounds, one shilling, fourpence (which the evangelists had raised on the field.) In July, 1857 McDonald had served but little, but he occupied the chair at the Co-operation meeting at Newport, which indicates much. Here is more to the point, written by Geo. E. Barnaby, in Banner of the Faith, Sept.-Oct. 1860. It occurs in an account of the Co-operation meeting held at Douglas (W. Gore) in Hants Co. June, 1860. Among others present he referred to "elder John McDonald, who for many years has been and now is a well known, tried and faithful laborer among the brethren in Cornwallis, Newport, Rawdon, Douglas and elsewhere in Nova Scotia." Five were baptized at the meeting, won by Bro. McDonald. M. B. Ryan, of West Gore has informed me that McDonald was known as a good speaker, a companionable man and an earnest 'disciple'; that he ministered to the Cornwallis church for a time and probably spent his last pastoral laborers with the River John church. He also assisted Michael Wallace and his son, Hiram, at a notable meeting at West Gore. By reference to Milton, Queens Co., it will be noted that he was their preacher at one time. [133] We are now privileged to learn some intimate facts about McDonald from representatives entries in a diary of his movements kept by his wife whilst they were on tour for the cause of Christ. (This lady was one of the two grandmothers of E. M. MacDougall, of West Core who were among Howard's first converts in Hants Co.) But, preceding it, some few geographical hints may be useful. In Nova Scotia the counties of King's and Hants are central, the former bounded on one side by Bay of Fundy and at the end of that, the Minas Basin extends into Hants. Roughly in this region (which also includes the Grand Pré-Evangeline country) occur the earliest churches in the province, that is, Cornwallis (Port Williams), Falmouth, Windsor, Newport, Rawdon, Shubenacadie and West Gore. Northerly in Pictou county, on the north shore, lie Pictou and our famous (perhaps) oldest church, RiverJohn. "May 26, 1874--Travelled to Nine Mile River to David McDonald's; made short visit there, then on to Shubenacadie; preached twice and visited four days with the brethren." [This all by horse and buggy, across hill and dale]. "Train from Shubenacadie to Truro, then on by way of Pictou to River John. Reached there in early June, remaining until August 2nd week, then shortly after returning home. People came to hear some new or strange thing, but nothing new or strange." [This first trip was spent getting acquainted with the district and preaching to good congregations.] "May 23, 1875. Began summer trip; Nine Mile River, Shubenacadie. Preached at North Salem in the morning and visited among brethren. On to River John, arriving May 29 . . . Bro. Long drove us to the mountain tovisit families and 15 miles to see the county. "June 20, 1875. We had quite an assemblage of Adam's race to witness the death of the old man and the resurrection of the new man to walk in newness of life. The amazed crowd gazed with silence and listened with profound attention to the truth poured forth from the venerable preacher of the Ancient Gospel, and seemed to say "Thou bringest certain strange things to our ears." [Immersion was not common around there.] "June 29. Mr. McDonald had to go 20 miles to the mountain to see and preach to a man who sent for him and who has been trying to wade out of the labyrinths of sectarianism. Oh that more might have their eyes annointed with eyesalve that they might see and their hearts opened that they might understand." "July 2, 1875. Alone two days while Mr. McDonald is up the [134] mountains preaching to the people who have never heard the primitive gospel as it is in truth." "July 3, 1875. McDonald arrived home Saturday after a 40 mile trip and quite interesting interviews with some families to whom he presented the gospel of the kingdom." "July 5. "Just arrived from the Brook section after preaching to an audience of ignoramuses." "Just got home after three days calling on the brethren. Last Lord's day quite a large audience and they had to listen to the Ancient gospel. The text was 'Good Master, what shall I do that I may attain eternal life'. And in the evening, the Sower and the different kinds of soil . . . It rains and is lovely growing weather. Oh how much more the Lord can do for us than we can do for Him. 'He openeth His hand and satisfieth the desire of all living and sendeth his rain on the just and the unjust, the evil and the good. He doeth all things well, give thanks and sing'." "July 22. We had a lovely trip to the Dalhousie mountains, hills and hollows. Visited five days and Mr. McDonald preached four times to the Highland mountaineers. They said they never heard such plain preaching before". "We have to leave River John on 20 Sept. after four months visit, spent pleasantly and I trust profitably. Arrived home 26 September." "September 28. This is [the day of Mr. Wallace's funeral. Dear old venerable elder. His sickness was nine days." Death of the pioneer leader, Michael Wallace, of West Gore.] "October 25. just one month tomorrow since we arrivedhome from River John and the Lord has blessed us with health and every needful blessing thanks to his holy name. Last evening we had a very interesting prayer meeting; 7 or 8 of the young brethren spoke of the goodness of the Lord and their determination to serve him, and last Lord's day we had a splendid discourse by Mr. McDonald on the words 'The Spirit and Bride say come, and let him that heareth say Come." "May 26, 1876. Arrived safely at River John in tolerable good health and have much to be thankful for. Found kind friends all along. Oh that they were all the friends of Jesus." "Sept. 5, 1876. This forenoon five in our family came to obey their Lord and Saviour's last charge to be baptized for the remission of sins: a young man, his wife, and three sisters." [135] "Sept. 7. We leave River John tomorrow, the Lord willing, for East River to baptize and preach the gospel." "Sept. 29, 1876. Kentville, here at Andrew Woods. We have had a fortnight in Kings Co. [Cornwallis--Pt. Williams section.] and a lovely time. Heard bro. Potter preach. He is splendid. He can read the scriptures in eight languages." The diary of Mrs. McDonald is copiously woven with similar sentiments couched in Scripture language. It probably is a reflection of her husband's Christian culture and attitude; and they are both revealed here as intelligent and faithful servants, making all things converge in their lives toward the one desirable end, that of winning fresh converts to the Ancient Gospel. John McDonald passed into eternal keeping in 1881, in his 75th year of this life.
ID Number: MH:N1028
MH:I794
N142Rawdon Baptist Church Extracts 1859 concerning Elder John Doyle and his wifeSept 24 [1859] an interesting conference after which Brother William Dimock stated to the Church that Mrs. John Doyle had made a request by letter for the Church to grant her a recommendation of her moral character; but as her letter was not present it was decided to defer it till tomorrow after meeting.Sabbath Sept 25 [1859] it was decided that Elder Stephens, brethren William Dimock, William Phalen, Thomas Knowles, and Charles Dimock be a committee to consider said subject and present their decision to the Church.Oct29 [1859] conference meeting after which a letter was brought before the Church received from the Baptist Association in --------- County Wisconsin, United States making inquiry respecting Elder JohnDoyle stating that he had won the affections and been received into one of the churches belonging to that body. He had attended their association, preached once, said he was ordained by our church, had joined the Campbellites, was excluded from them (sic us) for difference of views upon the subject of regeneration, etc. Their object in writing was to ascertain if his statements were true and he if left us with a clean moral character, could we recommend him to the western Baptists. Elder Stephens with a large committee of the church were appointed to make out an answer to said inquiry.Dec 29[1859] conference meting The committee appointed by the Church reported and the following is a copy of the letters sent in accordance with their report to the LaFayette Baptist Association in reference to Elder Doyle:Dear Brethren, Your letter of inquiry in reference to Mr. John Doyle a native of Nova Scotia has come to hand and received our serious consideration. After due investigation of the matter by referring to our church records and other authentic sources, we feel prepared to give what we trust will be satisfactory answers to your inquiry. Mr. Doyle professed religion and became united with this Church Dec 1829. He was ordained an evangelist in Nov 1831. Soon after became pastor of a Baptist Church, residing not far distant, taking his dismission and uniting with that Church. And in the beginning of 1834 became pastor of this church in which office he continued until 1837 when on account of his embracing what is generally termed Campbellite principles and refusing to submit tothe order and discipline of the Church, he was excluded from our communion. We further state that the conduct of Mr. Doyle after his exclusion and previous to his leaving Nova Scotia so affected his moral character that we could not recognize him as a minister of the gospel, consequently we cannot recommend him as such to our western Baptist brethren.Done by order and in behalf of the Church James Stephens, Pastor Charles Dimock, Clerk[Letter] To Mrs. John Doyle:This is to certify that Mrs. Sarah Ann Doyle, a native of Rawdon, Nova Scotia, was formerly a member of the Baptist Church in this place, of the faith and order of the Nova Scotia Baptist Association and that she was excluded from our communion for embracing what is generally called Campbellism and refusing submission to the Church. We further certify that Mrs. Doyle was highly esteemed as a Christian during her connection with the Church and that nothing was ever alleged against her moral character during her communion with this Church and that nothing was ever alleged against her moral or religious character while she was connected with us or subsequently during her residence in this community.By order and in behalf of the Church James Stephens, Pastor Charles Dimock, Clerk Source : Lori Faultless
ID Number: MH:N1029
MH:I794
N143Rawdon Baptist Church TrialNovaScotian, 23 December 1841, p. 4075 November 1841 New AdvertisementsAssembled at Newport, according to previous notice, the several delegates from the different churches, to investigate a charge preferred against the Church at Rawdon, for upholding Elder John Doyle in unrighteous conduct, thereby injuring the cause of Christ.The meeting was called to order by appointing James Seeright of Cornwallis, Moderator; and Gideon Wolaver of Newport and Charles Cameron of Liverpool, Clerks.1st Meeting opened by prayer; 2nd Proceeded to read the charges against Elder John Doyle: first for backbiting and slandering; second for falsehood; 3rd For clandestinely taking a certain sum of money sent to the Missionary Fund, and appropriating it to his own use; and 4th The charge against the church for upholding him in the same and refusing by John Densmore, ex officio, to bring him to trial; 5th The charges being read, the church by her counsel pleaded not guilty; 6th Proceeded to trial, first on the charge against the church, and secondly against Elder Doyle, when after a full and impartial investigation of two days, every charge being fully sustained, Elder Doyle with the church was found guilty and excluded from the connection by unanimous vote; and it is the request of several delegates that this be published to put the public on their guard against Elder J. Doyle, or noticing the slanders vociferated by him or his church, as they are now excluded from us. Gideon Wolaver Charles Cameron - Clerks in behalf of the several churches, by their delegates - JosephJackson, Jacob Porter, Gideon Wolaver, Adolphus West, James Sanford.Source: Lori Faultess
ID Number: MH:N1030
MH:I794
N144"The church in Oshawa flourished remarkably after we had a house of worship, and held a high position for many years. But we were destined to have our troubles, not outwardly, but with false brethrenholding the position of preachers. Our first trouble was with J. Doyle, of whom I shall not speak particularly, suffice it to say he became turbulent without cause and went so far as to declare he would 'break up the church, root and branch and all the Alexander Campbells in the universe could not build it up again.' He crippled the church very much, but did not obliterate it. It still lives, but he has gone to meeting his reward" (Reminiscences, Gospel Herald Foundation, 1998, p. 23. Reprinted from 1883 Christian Worker, Meaford, Ontario.)
ID Number: MH:N1031
MH:I794
N145TIMELINE FOR JOHN DOYLE - 1808 to 1874 The initial timeline that I completed used sources which were from published books and family remembrances, none of which were contemporaneous to the event. This revised timeline is taken from sources which were contemporaneous to the event. LMF - July 17, 2011DATE PLACE SOURCEOctober 1808 Rawdon, Hants Co, NS St. Peter's RC Church, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada - baptism Oct 21, 1808December 1829 Rawdon, Hants Co, NS Rawdon United Baptist Church Book – notes his request for admission to the churchJune 1830 Rawdon, Hants Co, NS Rawdon United Baptist Church BookNovember 1831 Rawdon, Hants Co, NS Rawdon United Baptist Church Book – his ordinationApril 24, 1832 Rawdon, Hants Co, NS Rawdon United Baptist Church Book - marriage record1832 - 1836 Nova Scotia Windsor Road United Baptist Church Book (Sackville, NS) 1837 Rawdon, Hants Co, NS Rawdon United Baptist Church Book – various entries leading to his exclusion1838 Rawdon, Hants Co, NS 1838 NS Census for Rawdon, Hants Co., NSSeptember 1839 Rawdon, Hants Co, NS Correspondence of John Doyle published in The Christian – Nov 1839 – pgs.134 to 137November 1839 Saint John, NB The Christian – January 1840 – page 190August 1840 Rawdon, Hants Co, NS Correspondence of John Doyle published in The Christian – Sep 1840 – pages 102 & 103November 1841 Rawdon, Hants Co, NS Nova Scotian, 23 December 1841, p. 407 – Church trial against John DoyleC 1844 - 1849 Prince Edward Island 1850 Amherst NY census notes births of children there c 1844, 1847 & 1849September 1849 Williamsville, Erie County, NY Millenial Harbinger Vol 7 - No. ! January 1850 Pgs 56 & 57August 1850 Amherst, Erie County, NY 1850 census of that place1852 Whitby, ON He officiated at marriage of Elizabeth Doyle & Robert Milton Goodman & others*1859 Wisconsin Extracts from letters between the Lafayette Baptist Association in Wisconsin and the Rawdon Baptist Church as recorded in the Rawdon Baptist Church book1860 Lima, Grant, Wisconsin 1860 census for that place1862 Smeltzer Grove, Grant Co., WI Obituary of son Frank N. Doyle1868 Sweaburg, Oxford, ON July 3, 1868 letter from John Doyle to US President Andrew Johnson1869 Owen Sound, Grey Co., ON Letter of SarahAnn McCurdy, 10 March 18691871 Oxford Co, ON 1871 Oxford Co., ON census1874 Oxford Co, ON Headstone at Sweaburg Cemetery, Oxford Co., ON* in between 1852 and 1857 there are unsourced references noting that he was in Esquesing (Norval), Erin, King , Pickering, Wawanosh & Everton Ontario, Canada.In addition to these contemporaneous items one finds reference to his migration in his daughter, Elizabeth’s letter to her son, Ed Goodman, in which she notes “ the family moved to PEI when she was 11 (c1844) then to Williamsville, east of Buffalo, NY when she was in her 17th year (c 1850) then to Oshawa (c 1852) He subsequently moved to Owen Sound, where his health was failing, then on to Smeltzer's Grove, Wisconsin where he preached for a time. Then he went to visit his brother in Woodstock, ON where he died.”The sources used initially follow. I caution you that these books were written much later and should not be relied upon as primary sources.* Reuben Butchart's The Disciples of Christ in Canada since 1830 - pages 131, 133, 311, 345, 347, 348, 359, 407, 435, 439, 441, 443* Rawdon & Douglas Two Loyalist Townships in NS written by John Victor Duncanson* West Gore to 1850by Gwen Lefton* A Sweet Family History by Joan Jowsey * Ralph B. Whittier's Notes On The Early History of Central Hants County* Beginning of The Churches of Christ in the Maritimes by W.H. Harding* Letter from Elizabeth Ann Doyle Goodman to her son, Ed Goodman* Eliza of Pleasant Valley by James Doyle Davison - page 37In a 2009 email Pat Patterson noted “ “…we pass the Williamsville NY Meeting House and Museum, which is located in a historic church. I recall driving past it many, many years ago, my mother once said, "I think my great grandfather might have been the Pastor in that church." … she just wasn't turned on by genealogy so I filed away her remark but have to admit I didn't place too much importance to it. The Amherst Census listing the John Doyle family has always frustrated me. I recently decided to do some research. The church was built in 1870 so that was too late for John Doyle's ministry. But a visit to the town historian solved the mystery for me. When you visit the following website, you will see the meeting house and read about it. You will read that the Disciples of Christ Church built it in 1870 when they outgrew their old church. Then you will read thattheir old church was located on the northwest corner of Eagle St and North Ellicott St., which just happens to be on the street directly behind the Meeting House, which is parallel to Main St. where the Williamsville Meeting House and Museum is located. The town historian thought the population of the village was so small then that John Doyle and his family probably lived on Eagle Street. (it is only 1.7 miles from our house…”! Great grandmother Goodman wrote that the family didn't stay there very long. This brings the Nancy Drew out in me. Now I wonder if there are any records of the Disciples of Christ Church in existence. Maybe they "vetted" him and the Rawdon Church records caught up with him! Here is the site where his original church stood. It burned down and was replaced. http://www.stpaulswilliamsville.orgRevised November 18, 2010
ID Number: MH:N1032
MH:I794
N146census: Household Members: Name Age John Doyle 42 (Christian Minister) Sarah A Doyle 40 Elizabeth A Doyle 17 Richard J Doyle 15 John E Doyle 13 Francis W Doyle 11 Sarah E Doyle 8 William A Doyle 6 Harriet R Doyle 3 Charles T Doyle 1. William, Harriet, and Charles were all born in Prince Edward Isle. The rest are listed as Canada.Therefore John and Sarah were living in PEI between 1844 and 1849.
ID Number: MH:N1033
MH:I794
N2162Was Minister of Rawdon Baptist Church in Nova Scotia.[Brøderbund Family Archive #118, Ed. 1, Canadian Genealogy Index, 1600s - 1900s, Date of Import: 7 Aug 1999, Internal Ref. #1.118.1.23539.4]Individual: Doyle, JohnEvent: BornPlace: IrelandProvince of record source: OntarioComments: Laborer.Individual: Doyle, JohnEvent: LivingProvince of record source: Nova ScotiaSource: History of Inverness County, Nova Scotia.Author: J.L. MacDougallPublisher: Mika Publishing CompanyPublication place: Belleville, ONPublication year: 1972Volume/Page(s): 272, 273, 432Sources: Nova Scotia Crown Land Records; Whittier, Ralph B., "Notes on theearly history of central Hants County" serialized in the Hants Journalbeginning 4 Apr. 1979; Records of the Rawdon Baptist Church, AcadiaUniversity Archives, Wolfville,NS; George III to James Dewel and others,R.G. 20, Series "A", Vol. 33 PANS.The 1838 census shows, Rev. John Doyle, Rawdon, Baptist Minister, 2 males under six, 1 female under six, 2 females over fourteen,More About John Doyle, Jr. and Sarah Ann Parker:Marriage: 2 December 1834, Rawdon NS.Notes for REV. JOHN DOYLE, JR.:The records for the Rawdon Baptist Church for Apr. 26, 1832 show John Doyle as an ordained evangelist and Michael Doyle as a licentiate. Note -( Licentiate is the title of a person who holds an academic degree called a licence. The term may derive from the Latin licentia docendi, meaning permission to teach. The term may also derive from the Latin licentia ad practicandum, which signified someone who held a certificate of competence to practise a profession )- On Dec. 2, 1834 brother John Doyle and sister Sarah Ann Parker were married at the Rawdon Baptist Church by the Pastor Richard McLEAN. On Feb. 1838 the records of the church show, "John Doyle and Mr. B. Howard arepropagating erroneous principles. We do therefore protest against such persons occupying this meeting house which was erected solely for the benefit of the particular Calvinistic Baptist Church"On 9 June 1838 Sarah Ann Doyle was excluded from the Rawdon BaptistChurch since she "did not desire to hold church fellowship".Sources: Nova Scotia Crown Land Records; Whittier, Ralph B., "Notes on theearly history of central Hants County" serialized in the Hants Journalbeginning 4 Apr. 1979; Records of the Rawdon Baptist Church, AcadiaUniversity Archives, Wolfville, NS; George III to James Dewel and others,R.G. 20, Series "A", Vol. 33 PANS.The 1838 census shows, Rev. John Doyle, Rawdon, Baptist Minister, 2 males under six, 1 female under six, 2 females over fourteen,"Although he had a farm he keptpreaching. He was a travelling missionary, preaching and organizing churches. travelling on horseback with high boots and spurs, long black coat, black silk hat, white necktie or rather kerchief, a three cornered piece of white muslin put around the neck twice and tied in a bow, I used to think he looked very nice." (From a letter from Elizabeth (Doyle) Goodman to her son Ed).John DOYLE is buriedin Row A, Stone #3, in Sweaburg Union Cemetery in Oxford West County, Ontario, about 7 miles from Woodstock, OntarioWhen his son Frank N. was killed in 1862 the obit says he was living in in SmeltzerGrove, Grant County, Wisconsin. John Doyle - July 16, 2002John Doyle's religious progression and his resulting migration is very well documented. Butchart's book provides the most information and also gives a sense of the type of person that John was. Butchart notes of the Disciples of Christ " All Hants churches stem from the break- away from the Baptist church in Rawdon by elder John McDonald& preacher John Doyle" From Butchart's writings it appears that the start up of the Disciples started while McDonald was still involved with the Baptists & that it was McDonald who convinced Pastor Doyle to break-away. In a later chapter Butchart goes on to say "Doyle was a great fighter in these early days and he left his mark on the times" and later "Some of his letters in 'The Christian' exhibit a gift of rugged language, typical of the man. He was a rare type which may be called the shepherding leader" . Among Butchart's commentary he says that the survival of any pioneer church is mostly due to the talent of its preachers and .... " Doyle especially was an eloquent speaker. ( The Doyles seem to have it in them. River John NS perhaps Canada's first Church of Christ had 'old John Doyle' who preached a stirring note" (one wonders from this comment if John Doyle's father, John, also became a preacher in the Disciples of Christ as John Jr's. elder years were in ON not NS. Whittier seems to suggest this in his writing about the John Doyle/James Doyle land grant c 1810 when he notes "what he did or where he lived before taking up preaching I do not know, however, he seems to have been involved in recruiting John McDonald as an evangelist in the Gores & Rawdons") Lefton comments "Church of Christ worship began in Rawdon when Elder John McDonald and Rev. John Doyle separated, with others, from the Baptist Church there. Worship in West Gore began about 1837 with meetings in the homes" Jowsey says of John "he had a rather stormy career" Duncanson notes ... on Feb1838 the records of the church show "John Doyle and Mr. B. Howard are propagating erroneous principles. We do therefore protest against such persons occupying this meeting house which was erected solely for the benefit of the particular Calvinistic Baptist Church". On June 1838 Sarah Ann Doyle was excluded from the Rawdon Baptist church since she "did not desire to hold church fellowship" Migration: From Butchart we see John In NS through the end of the 1830s and working in the Maritime provinces in 1840. Family sources place him in PEI c 1843. References to him are found in Butchart well into the 1850s. He is found doing church work in 1853 at Esquesing (Norval) & Erin, ON; in 1855 he was appointed to preach a mission in King County , Pickering & Wawanosh ON; and in 1857at Everton ON. Butchart notes that John Doyle referred intimately to Bowmanville where he likely lived and may have served as pastor after William Patterson who served in 1859. John also was in Meaford & Owen Sound where he likely preached. and he also served as an evangelist at Hillier in Prince Edward County. In a letter John's daughter, Elizabeth Doyle Goodman, sent to her son, Ed Goodman, we learn that she was born in Halifax but after she was born the family moved to Rowden (sic) " then we moved to Upper Rowden (sic) where he kept a farm but kept on preaching. He was a traveling missionary, preaching and organizing churches. Traveling on horseback with high boots and spurs, long black coat, black silk hat, white necktie or rather kerchief, a three cornered piece of white muslin put around the neck twice and tied in a bow, I used to think he looked very nice" Elizabeth Doyle Goodman notes the family moved to PEI when she was 11 (c1844) then to Williamsville, east of Buffalo, NY when she wasin her 17th year (c 1850) then to Oshawa (c 1852) He subsequently moved to Owen Sound, where his health was failing, then on to Smeltzers Grove, Wisconsin where he preached for a time. Then he went to visit his brother in Woodstock, ON where he died. The 1862 Iowa obituary for John & Sarah's son, Frank, notes that his parents are living in Smeltzer Grove, Grant County, Wisconsin. Smeltzer's Grove was renamed Georgetown in 1870, it is part of Smelser Township which is located in the lower right hand part of Wisconsin, almost due north of Dubuque, Iowa. Sarah's brother William Parker died atSmeltzer Grove. John moves to West Oxford County at some point between 1862 & 1871. That is where his mother, Elizabeth Smith Doyle, died in 1867. John is found in the 1871 West Oxford census withouthis wife, Sarah, but along with his brothers, Thomas & Michael. John dies & is buried at Sweaburg in 1874. According to some of her descendants Sarah & he had separated sometime before 1874. But shewent to Oxford Co. to take care of her husband before he died. It is not known where she lived after that. They note she died on September 21, 1879. Descendants believe that she is buried in Sweaburg. I have not found any evidence of that to this point. There is a Sarah Doyle buried at Sweaburg, but she is Sarah Ann Tufts, the wife of John's brother, Michael Doyle SOURCE MATERIAL: * Reuben Butchart's The Disciples of Christ in Canada since 1830 - pages 131, 133, 311, 345, 347, 348, 359, 407, 435, 439, 441, 443 * Rawdon & Douglas Two Loyalist Townships in NS written by John Victor Duncanson * West Gore to 1850 by Gwen Lefton * A Sweet Family History by Joan Jowsey * Ralph B. Whittier's Notes On The Early History of Central Hants County * Beginning of The Churches of Christ in the Maritimes by W.H. Harding * Letter from Elizabeth Ann Doyle Goodman to her son, Ed Goodman* Eliza of Pleasant Valley by James Doyle Davison - page 37
ID Number: MH:N65
MH:I794

Find a board about a specific topic

  • Visit our other sites:

© 1997-2014 Ancestry.com | Corporate Information | New Privacy | New Terms and Conditions