Search for content in message boards

Obit of Fannie (nee Ish) Hodge 9 Nov 1906 Woodland, CA

Replies: 4

Obit of Fannie (nee Ish) Hodge 9 Nov 1906 Woodland, CA

Posted: 30 Jan 2010 2:11PM GMT
Classification: Obituary
Surnames: Ish, Hodge, Baldridge, Streeter, Bowen
Woodland Daily Democrat Friday, November 09, 1906

MRS. HODGE DEAD.

A Beloved, Intellectual Member
of Woodland Society.

Had Suffered Two Years With Heart
Trouble-Paralysis Immediately
Preceded Death.

Mrs. George Hodge died Thursday
evening about 6:30 o'clock at the
family residence on North Third
street in this city. For nearly two
years deceased had been ailing with
heart failure and for a long time had
been unable to leave her home. On
Wednesday she suffered a paralytic
stroke, affecting her speech and left
side. She was compelled to take to
her bed from which she was destined
never again to arise.
The funeral will be held on Saturday
at 2 p. m., from the family residence.
Rev. H. Culton of Winters
will officiate.
Deceased was a native of Napa
county, 48 years and 9 months of age.
Her maiden name was Fannie L. Ish.
She spent her girlhood days in Napa,
Solano and Yolo counties and in April,
1884, was married in Winters to Mr.
Hodge.
About thirteen years ago the family
moved to Woodland but still retain
the ranch near Winters, which Mr.
Hodge recently leased to other parties.
Mrs. Hodge was a member of Yolo
Chapter, No. 60, O. E. S., and was
prominently identified with the work
of the order until illness compelled
her to abandon it. She was also a
member of the Presbyterian church in
Winters.
Besides her husband; deceased
leaves four children to mourn her loss,
two sons, Howard and Waverly, and
two daughters, Misses Gladys and
Hazel, all of Woodland. A. B. Ish of
Winters is a brother of deceased.
There are other brothers and sisters
residing in other portions of the state,
but we are unable to ascertain their
names.
Mrs. Hodge was a woman of more
than ordinary literary attainments.
She industriously improved every opportunity,
to study the best authors in
literature and her acquaintance with
them was wide and varied and she was
capable of discussing them and their
works in a singularly entertaining
manner.
She was practical in her Christianity
and her daily walk in life was characterized
by lofty motives and pure Instincts.
In Christian faith she lived
and with a Christian's hope she passed
away to whatever reward awaits her
on the other side.
As a friend she was worthy of affection,
for loyalty to her friends was
one of her most striking characteristics.
Indeed, she never spoke ill of
anyone. She was silent about those
whom she deemed unworthy of praise
and commendation and in her conversation
about others she invariably
used terms of respect.
In all the relations of life she acquitted
herself as a kindly, sympathetic,
womanly woman. As a wife
she was devoted and affectionate
cheerfully and faithfully performing
all the duties and responsibilities imposed
upon her. As a mother she was
loving, patient and careful In her efforts
to give her children examples
worthy of emulation, and to mold
their characters aright. As a woman
her character stands out to be commended
and admired.
She has gone from our midst a true
gentle spirit, loved by all who were
familiar with her virtues and sincerely
mourned by a large circle of
friends and acquaintances.

Woodland Daily Democrat Thursday, February 03, 1910

G. W. HODGE
PASSES AWAY

Was One of Woodland's Most
Estimable Characters

Had Been in Failing Health Since
Last June-Lived in Yolo County
Forty-six Years

The reaper of death has been busy
in the ranks of old residents since the
beginning of the new year. The last
to fall before the remorseless sickle Is
George Hodge, who passed away Wednesday
afternoon.
Mr. Hodge's fatal illness began last
June, with a slight attack of paralysis,
from which he never wholly recovered.
It affected his heart and eventually resulted
fatally. He was confined to
his room practically ever since last
August.
The funeral will take place from the
family residence Friday afternoon at
1:30 o'clock. Interment will be in the
city cemetery.
George W. Hodge was a native of Illinois,
where he was born on the 20th
of December, 1857. He was therefore
52 years, 1 month and 22 days old.
When he was but 6 years of age his
parents crossed the plains to California,
locating near Winters. There Mr.
Hodge was educated and grew to manhood.
He engaged in agriculture and
horticulture, but in 1893 took up his
residence in Woodland and engaged in
the grocery business. In 1905 he retired
from the grocery business, but
retained his interests in agriculture.
In April, 1883, he was married to
Miss Fannie Ish, who died November
6, 1906. To them were born four children,
Miss Gladys Hodge and Mrs. D.
E. Streeter, of Woodland, and Howard
Hodge of San Francisco and Waverly
Hodge of Woodland. Howard did not
arrive until a few hours after his father
passed away.
His mother, Mrs. T. Hodge, also survives
him, also a sister, Mrs. Henry
Robinson and four brothers, Otis, Olin
and Lin, all of Winters, and J. F.
Hodge of Auburn.
The personal traits of Mr. Hodge
were lovable and his habits of life worthy
of emulation. He was quiet and
reserved in manner, but courteous and
considerate in his deportment toward
others. He was a man of fine moral
strength and amiable qualities, and his
unobtrusive life was honorable to himself
and beneficial to the community
and times in which he lived. He found
his greatest contentment and happiness
in the society of his family. It awoke
the gentler sentiments of his heart
and soul to a better, higher and nobler
life. His home life was ideal and his
happiness was only broken by the
touch of death's icy hand when his
wife died over three years ago. During
her illness his devotion to her was
a poem of love. Her death was a severe
blow, a deep sorrow entering where
love had before reigned supreme. But
no murmur escaped when the bitter
cup was pressed to his lips. Christian
fortitude sustained him in his sore
bereavement. His children were the
only rays of sunshine in his stricken
home and to them he was deeply devoted
until the close of his life. We
shall not look upon his kindly face
again, but the example of his life, his
devotion to duty, his rigid adherence
to honorable purpose and his love of
home will make us better for having known him.


Woodland Daily Democrat Thursday, June 05, 1913

DECREES FROM CUPID'S COURT

Miss Hodge the Bride of A. B.
Bowen, Miss McBroom of
Earl Tillotson

Archie Bertine Bowen and Miss
Gladys R. Hodge of this city were married
in Winters Wednesday evening
by Rev. H. C. Culton, pastor of the
Presbyterian church of that town. The
ceremony was witnessed by Mrs. Ned
Streeter and Waverly Hodge, sister
and brother of the bride.
Immediately after the ceremony the
and Mrs. Bowen returned to Woodland
and took up their residence at the
Hodge home on North Third street.
The bride is a native of Yolo county.
She graduated from the Woodland high
school. Since the death of her father
and mother, the late Mr. and Mrs. Goo.
Hodge, several years ago, she has had
charge of the estate. She is a popular
young lady with a very wide acquaintance.
The groom Is a native of Pennsylvania.
He has been, a resident of
Woodland for several years, and is
engaged in the painting and decorating
business. He has acquired a large circle of friends.

Woodland Daily Democrat Saturday, November 13, 1909

MARRIED THURSDAY
Drury Edward Streeter and Miss
Hazel Hodge, of this city, were married
in San Francisco Thursday, as foretold
in the "Democrat," by Rev. Frank
Stuart Ford, pastor of the First Christian
church, San Francisco. They are
at Stanford today, witnessing the university Rugby football game.

Woodland Daily Democrat Wednesday, November 13, 1935


Boy Who Dreamed of Fame, Fortune,
Return a Success

G. Howard Hodge, the name which in New York, means one of the largest
and most outstanding hat manufacturers, is coming back to Woodland
and Winters, where his name recalls a boy, ambitious but mischievous. He is coming
back to visit his sisters, Mrs. Edward Streeter and Mrs. Archie
Bowen, and his brother, Waverly Hodge, all of Winters.
To old-timers, he isn't Mr. Hodge, the tycoon hat manufacturer, he is
George Hodge's son Howard, and successful as he is now, it is his boyhood
career and background that interests them most.
Started Store
They remember him as the son of
George Hodge, who himself came to
Winters in a covered wagon caravan:
from Missouri with his parents and
grew up on a farm. George Hodge
then bought a farm for himself, later
moving to Woodland, where he went
into the grocery business. That was
the firm of Forester and Hodge.
It was here Howard had his boy-
hood of swimmin' in the creeks, dis-.
tributing handbills to buy a bat,
broken windows, marbles, hunting for
mallard ducks—and getting them too,
—mushrooms picked wild in the
fields, some for supper and some to
sell, "pumping" the church organ for
a dollar a month, fighting in the alley
after school, collecting bottles and
sacks to buy a football, delivering
groceries during school vacations and
all the rest of the incidents in the
boyhood career of G. Howard Hodge,
which was equally as successful in its
way as his manhood career has been.
Miss Harriett Lee of Woodland was
one of Howard's teachers and she
recalls him as an "exceptional student."
Fortune Beckons
It was just as his high school days
were. closing that Howard began
planning to run away to New York
to make his fortune. But his father
bought him a new suit case and saw
Howard off for San Francisco to
make his fortune. And Howard's dream
came true.
But first he took a job as stock
boy in Mueller and Rans millinery
factory. Traveling salesman was the next step up,
but the World War came along and took up
considerable time.
Soon after the flurry was over, he
was establishing his own first small
factory at 15 Stockton street in San
Francisco. Then a bigger factory on
Market street with the newly successfully
launched Catallan line of
women's hats to his credit.
New York, however, was his goal,
so he began a business there, first in
a small way and then increasing it to
the present large and beautiful establishments.
So now he is coming home again,
as every youngster dreams, of coming home—successful, admired and
remembered.
SubjectAuthorDate Posted
rldrev 30 Jan 2010 9:11PM GMT 
Revae 10 Feb 2010 5:59PM GMT 
rldrev 10 Feb 2010 8:30PM GMT 
Revae 11 Feb 2010 1:16AM GMT 
rldrev 11 Feb 2010 10:15PM GMT 
per page

Find a board about a specific topic

  • Visit our other sites:

© 1997-2014 Ancestry.com | Corporate Information | New Privacy | Terms and Conditions