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Owen O'Sullivan

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Owen O'Sullivan

Angie Sullivan (View posts)
Posted: 1 Aug 2006 9:51AM GMT
Classification: Query
Some Colonial Dames of Royal Descent, Mrs. Britton Davis, Page 201

Hugh Capet, King of France, 987, had by his wife, Lady Adela (or Alisa), daughter of William, Duke of Aquitane, by his wife, Lady Adelheid, a daugther of Otto I. Emperor of Saxony:

Princess Hedewige (or Havide, sister of Kinger Robert the Pious, who m. Rynerius (or Raginerus) IV., eleventh Count of Hainault, and had:

Lady Beatrix, m. Eblo I., Count de Rouci and de Reimes, and had:

Lady Adela (or Alexandria), Countess de Rouci, who m. Hildwin IV., Count de Montdidier and de Rouci, and had:

Lady Margaret de Rouci, who m. Hugh, first Count of Clermont (see "L'Art de Verifier les Dates," xii, 282), and had:

Lady Adeliza de Clermont, who m. Gilbert de Tonsburg, in Kent, second Earl of Clare, and had:

Gilbert de Clare, created, in 1138, Earl of Pembroke, d. 1149, who m. Lady Elizabeth do Bellomont, daughter of Robert, Earl of Mellent and Leicester, and had:

Richard de Clare, "the Strongbow," second Earl of Pembroke, lord justice of Ireland, d. 1176, who had by his wife, Lady Eva, daughter of Dermot MacMurcha, King of Leinster:

Lady Isabel de Clare, who m., 1189 (hid first wife), William le Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, protector of England during the nonage of Henry III, d. 1219, and had:

Lady Maud Marshall, who m., first, Hugh Bigod, third Earl of Norfolk, one of the sureties for the Magna Charta of King John, d. 1225, and had:

Sir Ralph Bigod, Knt., third son, who m. Lady Berta de Furnival, and had:

Lady Isabel Bigod, who m., first, Gilbert de Lacy, d.v.p., son of Walter, sixth Baron de Lacy, of Trim, d. 1241, and had:

Lady Margaret de Lacy, who m. (his first wife) John, sixth Baron de Verdon, k. 1274, and had:

Some Colonial Dames of Royal Descent, Pedigree XLIX, Page 202

Sir Theobold de Verdon, seventh Baron, lord high constable of Ireland, d. 1309; m. Lady Maud, daughter of Sir Edmund, seventh Baron de Mortimer, of Wigmore, k. 1308, and had:

Lady Elizabeth de Verdon, who m. Bartholomew, second Baron Burghersh, and had:

Sire Bartholomew Burghersh, third Baron, d. 1369, whose daughter:

Lady Elizabeth Burghersh, m. Maurice Fitz-Gerald, fourth Earl of Kildare, d. 1390 and had:

Gerald Fitz-Gerald, fifth Earl of Kildare, lord justice of Ireland in 1405, d. 1410, who m. Lady Margery, daughter of Sir John de Rocheford, Knt., lord of Thistledown, and had:

John-Cam Fitz-Gerald, sixth Earl of Kildare, d. 1427, who had by his wife Margaret de la Herne:

Thomas Fitz-Gerald, seventh Earl of Kildare, lord deputy of Ireland in 1454, and in 1493, lord chancellor, who, dying 25 March, 1478, left issue by his wife, Lady Joan, who d. 1486, daughter of James Fitz-Gerald, seventh Earl of Desmond, also of Royal Descent:

Gerald Fitz-Gerald, eighth Earl of Kildare, lord deputy of Ireland, who m. Lady Allison, daughter of Sir Rowland Eustace, Baron of Portlester, lord chancellor and treasurer of Ireland, and had:

Lady Eleanor Fitz-Gerald, who m., first, Donnel Mac Fineere Mac Carthy-Reagh, prince of Carberry, in Ireland, and had:

Lady Julia Mac Carthy, who m. Dermod O'Sullivan, eleventh Lord Beare and Bantry, who was K., 1549, by an accident, at his castle of Dunboy, and had:

Sir Philip O'Sullivan-Beare, who as tanist to his brother Sire Owen's son, Dermond, held the Castle of Ardea, county Kerry. He m. a daughte of Cormack O'Brien, Earl of Thomond, also of Royal Descent, and had:

Daniel O'Sullivan-Beare, of Ardea Castle, who m. Lady Margaret daughter of the Earl of Clancarthy, by his wife, Lady Margaret, daughter of Donog O'Brien, fourth Earl of Thomond, and had:

Philip O'Sullivan-Beare, of Ardea, who m. Lady Honora, daughter of Donogh, Earl of Clancarthy, d. 1666, and his wife, Lady Ellen daughter of Thomas Butler, Lord Thurles, governor of Kilkenny, d. 1619, also of Royal Descent, and had:

Daniel O'Sullivan-Beare, of Ardea, who m. Lady Ellen, daughter of Daniel O'Sullivan-Mor, tenth lord of Dunkerron, who d. 1699, also of Royals Descent, and had:

Owen O'Sullivan, of Ardea, who m. Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen MacSweeney, of Muskerry, and had:

Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, who m. Joanna, daughter of Dermond McCarthy-Mor, of Killoween, county Kerry, and had:

John Sullivan, b. Ardea, county Kerry, 17 June, 1690, came to America in 1723, and d. at South Berwick, Maine, 20 June, 1795, aged 105 years (see "N.E. Historical and Genealogical Register," October, 1865) and had by his wife, Margaret Browne, a native of County Kerry, who d. in 1801, aged 87 years.

Mary Sullivan, 1752-1827; m. Theophilus Hardy, of Durham, New Hampshire, and had:

Margery Hardy, who m. Edward Wells, of Durham, and had:

Charles Wells, of New York City, who m. Mary Wiggin, and had:

Marie Antoinette Wells, who m. Levi Steele, and had:

Antoinette Wells Steele, a member of the New York and Texas Societies of Colonial Dames of America, who m. Britton Davis, of El Paso, Texas, and had: Newton, b. New York, 22 March, 1890; Antoinette, b. Orange, N.J., 13 November, 1892; and Britton, b. El Paso, 5 October, 1896.
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Taken from genealogy.com on February 17, 2005 -
Early Settlers of Alabama

Page 407

eldest son of the last mentioned Cormac, was created Earl of Clancare, in Kerry, on resigning his estates to Queen Elizabeth, from whom he again received the investiture of them, "to hold of the crown of England, in the English manner." This branch is extinct for more than a century. But the above Cormac Mor had second son, Dermod, first feudal lord of Muskerry, and founder of that potent house, who was killed by the O'Mahonys in 1367. From him sprang in snccession as Lords of Muskerry:

"Teige Cormac, d. 1374, Teige, 1448; Cormac Laidhir (the stout), 1494; Cormac Oge Laidhir, who defeated the Earl of Desmond at the battle of Morne, 1521, d. 1536 Teige d. 1565, Dermod d, 1570. His son, Cormac. Lord of Muskerry, had his residence at Blarney Castle, and died 1616, leaving two sons:

1. Cormac Oge, Lord of Muskerry, the first Viscount (as stated by some writers),
died in London, 1640, leaving a son, Donald, first Earl of Clancarty, whose
male line is extinct.(*)
2. Daniel (or Donald), second son of Cormac, built the Castle of Carrignavar.
County Cork, and married Katherine, dau. of Stephen Meade. His son, Charles,
Esq., of Carrignavar, married Katherine, dau. of David Roche. Seventh Viscount
Fermoy, and was succeeded by his grandson, Charles, son of Daniel and Eliz
(Matthews) McCarty. Charles died s. p. 1761, and was succeeded by his nephew--
Daniel, son of Daniel and Grace (Fitzgerald) McCarty, who died 1763. His
second son, Robert, married (1784) Jane Capel, and died 1823, leaving a son,
Justin, born 1786, father of Justin, now of "Carrignavar" (b. 1816) and who
married (1848) to Louisa, dau. of Major Edward Fitzgerald. A brother,
Joseph, of "Shrub Hill," County Surrey, viear of Wilton, County Cork,
married Mary Frances, dau. of the Ven. William Thompson, Arehdeacon of
Cork, and has several children, among them: Florence MacCartie. He
adopted the old spelling of his name, "MacCarlie," and died 1874.
"Equally important in the Muskerry line are the descendants of Florence McCarthy, of Clodane, and Donough (or Daniel) McCarthy, of Drishane, 1602. (See Burke's Landed Gentry.)

"Florence McCarthy, of Clodane, had a daughter Jane, who married John Marshall, son of Thomas Marshall, who came to County Kerry in the expedition of Sir Charles Wilmot, 1602, and married Mary, daughter of Maurice Fitzgerald, of BallymacAdam Castle, and settled there. John Marshall was driven out by the Irish in the great rebellion of 1641, but returned as captain in Cromwell's army. These were ancestors of the Markham and Pursell families. (Burke's Landed Gentry, p. 1340.) Florence McCarthy was of the family of Donough (or Daniel) McCarthy, of Drishane, descended of the noble family of Muskerry. Members of this line came to Virginia, as did, also, the Marshalls, Markhams, Pursells and Fitzgeralds."

Florence McFinnen-McCarty, of Ardtilly, son of Charles McCarty, of Carrick-nainack, had a daughter. Honora, who married Colonel Owen McSweeny, of Muskerry. Their daughter Mary married Owen O'Sullivan, of Ardia, and had issue; Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardia, who married Joanna, daughter of Dermot McCarty Mor, of Killoween, County Kerry, descended from the Earl of Clancare, and his wife, a daughter of McCarty Reagh, of Carberry, and his wife Eleanor, daughter of Lord Muskerry. A son, John Sullivan, born in Ardia, 1699, came to Maine in 1723, and was father of Major General John Sullivan, of New Haven (b. 1740. d. 1795), of the Revolutionary army; member of Congress, 1774, and President of New Hampshire, 1786 (see New Eng. Hist. and Gen. Register for October, 1865).
___________________________________________________________

Taken from book The Family of John Sullivan - August 18, 2004 -
Materials for a History of the family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England and of the O'Sullivan of Ardea, Ireland chiefly collected by the late Thomas Coffin Amory.
With a pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
BRITISH
929.2415
Su54m
Date of Microfilm 6/2/78
Item of Roll - 5
Camera No. - SL 17
Catalogue No. - XL1B7 - 102#1011
microfilm number 990307 Item 1

Page 104

Table VII

Sir Bernard Burke

13. Tiege O'Sullivan , surnamed the Strong

14. Dermod Balluff O'Sullivan.

15. Donel O'Sullivan the Swarthy.

16. Dermod O'Sullivan the Powdered = Julia or Shela McCarthy (daughter of Donel McCarthy Reagh = Lady Elinor Fitzgerald, daugher of 8th Earl of Kidare)

17. Philip O'Sullivan = Honora McCarthy (daughter of Cormac McCarthy of Duhallow, sister to Donough i.e. the McDonough)

18. Donel O'Sullivan = Ellen O'Sullivan More (duagher of O'Sullivan More)

19. Philip O'Sullivan of Ardea Castle, forfeited, 1641


21. Owen O'Sullivan = Mary, dau of Owen McSweney, Constable of Munster.

22. Philip O'Sullivan = Joan McCarthy (daughter of Dermod McCarthy of Killoween and dau. of McCarthy Reagh)

23. Patrick O'Sullivan Information of Mr. Murtoh O'Sullivan of Kenmare, 1887 = Margaret Fitzgerald
23. Owen b. Limerick 1692, d. 1796 at Berwick, Me. = Margery Browne

24. Daniel O'Sullivan of Ardea = Juliana, dau. and heir of Daniel O'Sullivan of Dromboughilly

25. Philip O'Sullivan who wrote this letter
25 John
25 Margaret
25. Julia
25. Mary
__________________________________

Taken from book The Family of John Sullivan - August 18, 2004 -
Materials for a History of the family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England and of the O'Sullivan of Ardea, Ireland chiefly collected by the late Thomas Coffin Amory.
With a pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
BRITISH
929.2415
Su54m
Date of Microfilm 6/2/78
Item of Roll - 5
Camera No. - SL 17
Catalogue No. - XL1B7 - 102#1011
microfilm number 990307 Item 1

Page 101

Table V

Mr. Daniel O'Sullivan, 1860

16. Daniel O'Sullivan, Lord of Bearehaven.

17. Philip O'Sullivan of Ardea Castle, 2d son of Daniel = Earl of Thomond's daughter.

18. Daniel O'Sullivan = Mary Anne McCarthy (father Earl of Clancarty, grandfather Earl of Cork)

19. Philip O'Sullivan = Honora McCarthy (father Charles McCarthy, mother Catherine Butler, mother's father Duke of Ormond)

20. Daniel O'Sullivan = Ellen O'Sullivan More (father Daniel O'Sullivan More, mother Mary Anne Fitzgerald, mother's father Earl of Kildare, mother's grandfather Earl of Antrim)

21. Owen O'Sullivan = Maryanne McSweney (father Owen McSweeney Lough, mother Honora McCarthy, mother's father Florenc McCarthy McFinen of Ardtilly = McCarthy --- Honora's mother's father Chas, McCarthy of Carrick Namuck.)

Daniel O'Sullivan = Ellen McCarthy, dau to Owen McCarthy Reigh and graddau to McGlonough of Duhala

22. Philip O'Sullivan = Johanna McCarthy (father Darby McCarthy, mother Ellen McCarthy, mother's father Timothy McCarthy of Donoglanavan = daugther of Lord Muskerry)

Patrick O'Sullivan = Margaret Fitzgerald

Daniel O'Sullivan = Ellen McCarthy of the Headford family
Child - Owen O'Sullivan = daughter of McFinen Duff and Margaret Galway

23. Darby O'Sullivan = Mary Anne [dau. of Charles McCarthy of the McFinens of Ardtilly (dotted line to Philip O'Sullivna and Johanna McCarthy #22 -- Straight line to Owen O'Sullivan and daughter of McFinen Duff and Margaret Galway)

23. Brother who went to America

24. Daniel O'Sullivan = Elizabeth O'Sullivan, daughter of Silvester O'Sullivan Macfinen Duff.

25. Philip O'Sullivan = Anne O'Sullivan of Glanonehquin.

26. Daniel O'Sullivan = Mary Dee.
______________________________________

Taken from book The Family of John Sullivan - August 18, 2004 -
Materials for a History of the family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England and of the O'Sullivan of Ardea, Ireland chiefly collected by the late Thomas Coffin Amory.
With a pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
BRITISH
929.2415
Su54m
Date of Microfilm 6/2/78
Item of Roll - 5
Camera No. - SL 17
Catalogue No. - XL1B7 - 102#1011
microfilm number 990307 Item 1

Page 98

The Family of John Sullivan

Eight Tables

To show in brie the Agreement and the Difference between Authorities on this Genealogy

[We number the Generations, in all the tables alike, according to the Pedigree by Sir Bernard Burke, counting Suildhubhain as Generation I.]

Table I.

John of Berwick's Account

16. Daniel O' Sullivan, Lord of Beer Heaven.

17. His second son, from whom was "orginally descendant"

21. Owen O' Sullivan, said to hae had four Countessess to his mothers and grandmothers = Mary Mac Sweeney, dau. of Col. Owen MacSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Capt. Edmond MacSweeney.

22. Major Philip O'Sullivan of Ardea, Co. Kerry, parish of Thououghsisty, by the River of Killmare and Barony of Genarough in said County. = Joane McCarthy, dau. to Dermod McCarthy of Killowen, and the dau. of McCarthy Reak of Carbery. She had three brothers and one sister, viz.: ---
23. John Sullivan, of Berwick, Me.

22. Florence, or mac ffinnin, whose son retained the titl of mac ffinnin.

22. Charles, who left two sons.
23. Derby = Ellina Sullivan of Bunnane.
23. Owen = Honora Mahony, dau. to Dinish Mahony of Droummere in the Barony of Dunderrane or Cappenicussiss

22. Owen, killed at the battle of Airim.

22. The sister = Dermod O'Sullivan, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan, Lord of Dunkerrane.
23. "Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender in Scotland, in 1745."
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Taken from http://mccarthy.montana.com/Articles/KerryHistoryNotes.html on July 29, 2004

ARDEA CASTLE (See p. 273, vol. iv. No. 40.)
The "Paccata Hibernia" gives at p. 660: - "The warders of the castles of Ardea and Carricknesse on the sixth of the same moneth despayring of their master O'Sulevan's returne, rendered both their castles and their lives to the Queen's mercy, so that although he should have animum revertendi (Donal Cam, Lord of Beare), he had neither place of safetie whereunto hee might retyre, nor corn or cattel to feed himself, much less to uphold or renew any warre against the State." These castles were afterwards given to Sir Owen O'Sullivan More, who fought on the side of the English at this time.

In the "Life and Times of James O'Sullivan," by Thomas Amory, we have a very interesting genealogical note from the son of the last owner of Ardea, Philip O'Sullivan, son of Sir Owen O'Sullivan and the daughter of Colonel Owen MacSweeny, attainted with his father, who was obliged to fly to France, where he died from the effects of a wound received in a duel. When this Philip's son dictated the note he was nearly a hundred years old, so that his recollection went back to close on 1688: - "My father was Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea Castle, in the county of Kerry. My mother's name was Joanna MacCarthy, daughter of Dermot MacCarthy, of Killowen. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but she was a daughter of MacCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her eldest brother was Colonel Florence, or MacFineen, and he and his two brothers, Charles and Owen, went out in defence of their nation against Orange (the Prince of Orange). One was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retained the name of MacFineen. Charles I just remember. He left two sons Darby and Owen. Darby married Ellen O'Sullivan, of Bunaune. His brother, Owen, married Honora Mahony, daughter of Denis Mahony, of Dromore, in Dunkerron, county Kerry, and died in the prime of life much lamented. My father died of an ulcer in his breast, caused by a wound he received in France in a duel with a French officer. They were all a short-lived family. I never heard that any of the men arrived at sixty, and I do not remember but one alive when I left home in 1723. They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief, is added to the length of mine. My mother's sister married Dermot, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan, Lord of Dunkerron, and her son, as I understand, was with the Pretender in Scotland in 1745. This is all I can say about my origin, but I shall conclude with a Latin sentence:

Si Adam sit pater conctorum mater et Eva,
Cur non sunt homines nobilitates pares
Non pater aut mater dat nobis nobilitatem
Sed moribus vita nobilitatur homo.
If Adam be father of all, and Eve the mother,
Why, then, are not all men equally noble?
Neither father nor mother give true nobility,
But a man is ennobled by his life and manners.
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Taken from http://mccarthy.montana.com/Articles/KerryHistoryNotes.html on July 29, 2004 -

In 1642, Owen O'Sullivan married Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney, by whom he had a son Philip, attainted like himself by the Cromwellians. He was afterwards a Major in King James' army, and was killed in a duel in France. He had been married to Joanna, daughter of Daniel McCarthy, of Killowen, by a daughter of McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. His wife's sister afterwards married Dermod, eldest son of O'Sullivan More, Lord of Dunkerron. The son of this Dermot O'Sullivan More was in 1745 the companion of Prince Charles Edward, on the occasion of his expedition into Scotland, and the partner of his trials and misfortunes in that country.
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Taken from genelaogy.com on November 25, 2002 -
http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=008422&... -

The Prominent Families of the United States, Prominent Families, Page 265

Sullivan

Daniel O' Sullivan, m. Sarah, dau. of Conor O' Brien, 2nd Viscount Clare, and had issure:

Owen O'Sullivan, m. Mary, dau. of Owen McSweeney, and had issue:

Phillip O'Sullivan (Major), of Ardea, Co. Kerry; m. Joan, dau. of Dermod McCarthy, of Killoween, and had issue:
1. Patrick, whose descendants remained in Ireland.
2. Owen, of whom later.

Owen Sullivan (1690 - 1795), b., in Limerick, 17 June 1690; emigrated to America, 1723; settled at Berwick, Maine; m., 1735, Margery Browne, and, by her (who d. 1801), had issue:
1. Benjamin, b. 1736; d.s.p.
2. Daniel, of Sullivan, Maine, b. 1738; Captain in the Revolutionary War; m. (1) Anne Paul; m. (2) Abigial Bean; d. 1781, leaving issue.
3. John, of Durham, New Hampshire, b. 17 Feb 1740; Major-General in the Revolutionary Army, and first Governor of New Hampshire; m. Lydia Worcester; d. 23 Jan. 1795, leaving issue.
4. James, of whom later.
5. Ebenezer, b. 1753; Captain in the Revolutionary Army; m. Abigial Cotton; c. 3 June, 1799, leaving issue.
6. Mary, b. 1752; m. 1768, Theophilus Hary; d 1827, leaving issue.
He d. 20 June 1795.

James Sullivan (1744-1808), of Boston, Mass., b. 22 April 1744; LL.D. (Harvard), 1780; Member of the Provinical Council, 1775; Judge of the Superior Court, 1776-1782; Attorney General, 1790-1807; Governor of Mass., 1807-1880; m. (1), 22 Feb 1768, Mehetable, dau. of William Odiorne, and, be her (who d. 26 Jan. 1786), had issue:
1. James, b 6 Jan 1769; d.s.p. 29 June 1787.
2. William, b 30 Nov. 1774; Member of the Massachusetts State Legislature and Council for many years; Brigadier-General of Militia; LL.D. (Harvard), 1826; m., 1807, Sarah Webb Swan; d. 3 Sept. 1839, leaving issue.
3. John Langdon, of whom later.
4. Richard, b. 17 June 1779; m., 1804, Sarah Russell; d. 11 Dec. 1861, leaving issue.
5. William Bant, b. 16 March 1781; d. unm. 4 Dec 1806.
6. George, b. 21 Feb. 1783; m., 1809, Sarah Bowdoin Winthrop; d. 14 Dec. 1866, leaving issue.
7. Avis, b. 8 Oct 1771; d. in infancy.
8. Mehetable, b. 29 1772; m. (1), 1793, James Cutler; m. (2), 1801, Jonathon Amory; d. 24 March 1847, leaving issue.
9. Nancy, b. 24 April 1784; d. in infancy.
He d. 10 Dec 1808
_______________________________________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 447

Dunkerron. Their son Dermond, second Count of Bearehaven, was page to the King of Spain, Philip the 4th. In Thurloe’s State Papers, vol. 1st, 479, will be found a letter from the Bishop of Cork, O’Sullivan Beare and O’Sullivan More, dated 1653, at Paris in reference to a landing of troops, estimated from eight to fourteen thousand, in Munster. Smith, 2d vol. Page 236, ed. 1774, says that in his time there was an O’Sullivan Beare in Spain, ennobled as Count of Bearehaven, who was hereditary governor of the Groyne. There is reason to believe that this line is now extinct.

2d. Sir Owen, 14th Lord of Bear and Bantry, married Ellen, daughter of James, Lord Barry, and died 1594. In 1568, he succeeded his brother as chief, and 1570, received a patent from the Crown of the territories of his sept; but his nephew Donnell when he came of age claimed as his rightful inheritance Beare, Bantry, Ardea and all other castles and domains, including the castle and haven of Dunboy. It was finally decreed that the castle of Beare, its haven and demesnes, should be allotted to Donnell; Bantry, about twenty miles to the North-east, to Sir Owen; saving to Sir Philip, younger brother and tanist to Sir Owen, the castle of Ardea and its dependencies on the river Kenmare in Glenarough. Dermod, son of Sir owen, married a daughter of Cormac, Lord Muskerry, and died Lord of Beare and Bantry, in 1617. Their son Dermod, married Joan, daughter of Gerald Fitzgerald, 16th Earl of Desmond, and succeeding his father, died in 1618. From him descends Marshal MacMahon, the present Duke of Magenta.

4th. Dermod, born 1526, married Johanna MacSwiney, grand-daughter of McCarthy More. He was ain all the wars against the English in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, at the head of a large force from Beare, and in the Catholic war was the advisor of his nephew Donald with whom he went into Spain about 1602. He received a pension of six hundred pieces of gold from the Spanish King, and died at Corunna, at the age of one hundred years, about 1626, his wife dying the same year. His son Don Phillip published soon after a history of Ireland in Latin, reprinted in 1850, to which is prefixed a Latin elegy, giving an account of his family. Another son Daniel was slain in fighting against the Turks. His daughter Helena was drowned returning from Spain, and another, Leonora, became a nun.

3d. Sir Phillip, of Ardea, who as tanist to Sir Owen’s son exercised the supreme authority, and held the castle of Ardea appertaining to Tanistry, married a daughter of Cormack, Lord of Duhallow, who built the celebrated castle of Kanturck, still remaining in possession of the Earls of Egmont. His son Donnel is mentioned by Betham as residing at the castle of Ardea in 1613. He was the ancestor of Master Sullivan of Berwick.

For this we depend upon the two following documents, the first drawn up by Master Sullivan, when nearly a hundred years of age at the request of the wife of his son John the revolutionary General; the second a letter from Ardea, dated May 16, 1796, addressed to his son General Sullivan in New Hampshire.

“I am the son of Major Phillip O’Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O’Sullivan, orginal descendent from the second son of Daniel O’Sullivan, called Lord of

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Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 448

Bearehaven. He married Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney, of Musgrey, and sister of Captain Esmond McSweeney, a noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer. They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom, or went out of the country. I never heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remember but one alive when I left home. My mother’s name was Joan McCarthy, daughter of Dermod McCarthy, of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother’s name I forget, but she was a daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Colonel Florence alias McFinnen, and his two brothers Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son who retains the title of McFinnen. Charles I just remember. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of Baunane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Dromore, in the barony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.

“They were short lived on both sides, but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is added to the length of mine. My mother’s sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O’Sullivan, Lord of Dunderron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender in Scotland, in the year 1746. This is all I can say about my origin; but shall conclude with a Latin sentence:

Si Adm sit pater cunctorum, mater et Eva:
Cur nan sunt homines nobilitate pares?
Non pater aut mater dant nobis nobilitatem:
Sed moribus et vita nobilitatur homo. J.S.

The letter referred to is as follows. “A grand uncle of mine having gone to America about sixty years ago, his relations have suffered greatly from being without the means of finding out his fate, till now, by great good fortune, I am informed that you are a son of his. If you find, by the account below, that I have not been misinformed, I shall be glad to hear from you.

“Mr. Owen O’Sullivan, son of Major Phillip O’Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry, Ireland, by Joanna, daughter of Dermod McCarthy, of Killoween, Esq., in said county. They were connected with the most respectable families in the province of Munster, particularly the Count of Bearehaven, McCarthy More, Earl of Clancare, Earl Barrymore, the Earl of Thomond, the Earl of Clancarthy, McFinnen of Glanarough, O’Donoughu of Ross, O’Donough of Glynn, McCarthy of Carberry, Lord Clancarthy and O’Donovan, &c.

I am Sir, your respectfully, “Ardea, May 16th, 1796. Phillip O’Sullivan.”

The connecting links in the pedigree between Owen mentioned in the first of the above documents and Sir Phillip of Ardea, were supplied in 1860, by Mr. Daniel O’Sullivan of Ardea, since deceased at.
_______________________________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 449 -

An adanced age.* He drived his own descent from a brother of Major Phillip. His statement is slightly inaccurate in some of its details, and time would be taken to verify what seems consistent with other genealogical authorities, were not delays proverbially dangerous. Life is precarious, and the materials collected for another purpose with considerable tail may be lost. No apology is needed for endeavoring to preserve, for future generations, information of this nature. It is for this very purpose that this Register was established. We realize the importance of being scrupulously exact in genealogical statements, and were we not impressed with the belief that means exist of rectifying any unintentional error we might be even more on our guard against the possibility of misleading.

The letter states that the parents of Owen, above mentioned, were Daniel O’Sullivan Beare and Ellen, daughter of Daniel O’Sullivan More, 10th Lord of Dunkerron who died in 1699, by Maryanne Fitzgerald, daughter of the Earl of Kildare. Owen, 9th Lord of Dunkerron, married Mary, second daughter of Sir Edmund Fitzgerald, of Cloyne, the “best estated commoner of his time;” Daniel, the 8th, Joan daughter of Patrick Fitzmaurice, 17th Lord Kerry. Through this Joan and Honora Fitzmaurice, 17th Lord Kerry. Through this Joan and Honora Fitzgerald, wife of the Lord Kerry and the daughter of James, 7th Earl of Desmond, who died 1460. Ellen was descended from Elizabeth Plantagenet, daughter of Edward 1st, who married Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Bereford, and through Matilda of Flanders, wife of William the Conquerer, from Charlemagne and King Alfred. Sec 4 Burke’s Commoners, XXX. Prefix to page 569.

In the next preceding generation the same authority informs us that Phillip, the father of Daniel, who married the above Ellen, espoused the daughter of Lord Muskerry, who lived in the castle of Macroom, by Ellena Butler, sister to the Duke of Ormond. This Lord

Note: Phillip O’Sullivan, of Ardea Castle, son of Lord of Bearehaven, married Earl of Thomond’s daughter. His son Daniel married Margaret, daughter of Earl of Clancarthy, and granddaughter of Earl of Cork. His son Phillip married Honora, daughter of Lord Muskerry, who lived at the castle of Macroom, by a sister of the Duke of Ormond. His son Daniel married Ellen, daughter of O’Sullivan More, by Marganne Fitzgerald, daughter of Earl of Kildare, and granddaughter of Earl of Antrim. His son Owen married Marganne, daughter of Owen McSwin__, by Honora McCarthy, duaghter of Florence McFinnen, of Ardtelly, granddaughter of Charles McCarthy of Carricknamarck.” There are some errors in the above, but it is for the most part consistent with the authority. It is not supposed to be precisely accurate, but may aid in ascertaining the truth.

Note: Elizabeth, dau of Ed. I m. Humphrey Bohun, Earl of Hereford. Elena Bohan m. James, Earl of Ormond. Elena Butler m. James, Earl of Desmond. Honora Fitzgerald m. Thomas, 8th Lord Kerry, d. 1469. Joanna Fitzmaurice, dau. of the 17th Lord Kerry, m. Daniel O’Sullivan, More, 8th Lord of Dunderron. Ellen, dau. of Owen, 9th Lord, m. Daniel O’Sullivan Beare, great grandfather of Master Sullivan. Same descent from Edward I can be deduced also by other lines.

Cormic Laldir, Lord of Muskerry, who held the chieftainship of Muskerry from 1448 to 1495, built the famous castle of Blarney about three miles from the city of Cork. It is still standing in ruins, and the Blarney Stone, which endows all who kiss it with the faculty of persuasion and the gift of eloquence, is near the top of the rampart, now only to be approached at considerable peril. The son of Laldir, Cormac Oge, died 1524, having married a daughter of the 9th Lord Kerry. His son and heir Teigue, died 1536, leaving Sir Cormac, friend of Sir Henry Sydney, who died 1588, and who married Ellen roche, daughter of Lord Fermoy, and Dermod who died 1570. Sir Cormac, son of Dermod, died in 1616. Cormac Oge, created Lord Blarney and Viscount Muskerry, married Margaret, daughter of Donogh, 4th Earl of Thomond, and his son Donogh marrying Ellena Butler, sister of James, Duke of Ormond, was created Earl of Clancarthy, and died in 1666. His eldest son Charles, Lord Muskerry, married Margaret Burke, daughter of Clanrickard, and their son dying young, Callaghan, his seond son, who married Elizabeth, daughter of George, 16th Earl of Kildare, by a daughter of Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork, succeeded as second Earl of
__________________________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 449 -

An adanced age.* He drived his own descent from a brother of Major Phillip. His statement is slightly inaccurate in some of its details, and time would be taken to verify what seems consistent with other genealogical authorities, were not delays proverbially dangerous. Life is precarious, and the materials collected for another purpose with considerable tail may be lost. No apology is needed for endeavoring to preserve, for future generations, information of this nature. It is for this very purpose that this Register was established. We realize the importance of being scrupulously exact in genealogical statements, and were we not impressed with the belief that means exist of rectifying any unintentional error we might be even more on our guard against the possibility of misleading.

The letter states that the parents of Owen, above mentioned, were Daniel O’Sullivan Beare and Ellen, daughter of Daniel O’Sullivan More, 10th Lord of Dunkerron who died in 1699, by Maryanne Fitzgerald, daughter of the Earl of Kildare. Owen, 9th Lord of Dunkerron, married Mary, second daughter of Sir Edmund Fitzgerald, of Cloyne, the “best estated commoner of his time;” Daniel, the 8th, Joan daughter of Patrick Fitzmaurice, 17th Lord Kerry. Through this Joan and Honora Fitzmaurice, 17th Lord Kerry. Through this Joan and Honora Fitzgerald, wife of the Lord Kerry and the daughter of James, 7th Earl of Desmond, who died 1460. Ellen was descended from Elizabeth Plantagenet, daughter of Edward 1st, who married Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Bereford, and through Matilda of Flanders, wife of William the Conquerer, from Charlemagne and King Alfred. Sec 4 Burke’s Commoners, XXX. Prefix to page 569.

In the next preceding generation the same authority informs us that Phillip, the father of Daniel, who married the above Ellen, espoused the daughter of Lord Muskerry, who lived in the castle of Macroom, by Ellena Butler, sister to the Duke of Ormond. This Lord

Note: Phillip O’Sullivan, of Ardea Castle, son of Lord of Bearehaven, married Earl of Thomond’s daughter. His son Daniel married Margaret, daughter of Earl of Clancarthy, and granddaughter of Earl of Cork. His son Phillip married Honora, daughter of Lord Muskerry, who lived at the castle of Macroom, by a sister of the Duke of Ormond. His son Daniel married Ellen, daughter of O’Sullivan More, by Marganne Fitzgerald, daughter of Earl of Kildare, and granddaughter of Earl of Antrim. His son Owen married Marganne, daughter of Owen McSwin__, by Honora McCarthy, duaghter of Florence McFinnen, of Ardtelly, granddaughter of Charles McCarthy of Carricknamarck.” There are some errors in the above, but it is for the most part consistent with the authority. It is not supposed to be precisely accurate, but may aid in ascertaining the truth.

Note: Elizabeth, dau of Ed. I m. Humphrey Bohun, Earl of Hereford. Elena Bohan m. James, Earl of Ormond. Elena Butler m. James, Earl of Desmond. Honora Fitzgerald m. Thomas, 8th Lord Kerry, d. 1469. Joanna Fitzmaurice, dau. of the 17th Lord Kerry, m. Daniel O’Sullivan, More, 8th Lord of Dunderron. Ellen, dau. of Owen, 9th Lord, m. Daniel O’Sullivan Beare, great grandfather of Master Sullivan. Same descent from Edward I can be deduced also by other lines.

Cormic Laldir, Lord of Muskerry, who held the chieftainship of Muskerry from 1448 to 1495, built the famous castle of Blarney about three miles from the city of Cork. It is still standing in ruins, and the Blarney Stone, which endows all who kiss it with the faculty of persuasion and the gift of eloquence, is near the top of the rampart, now only to be approached at considerable peril. The son of Laldir, Cormac Oge, died 1524, having married a daughter of the 9th Lord Kerry. His son and heir Teigue, died 1536, leaving Sir Cormac, friend of Sir Henry Sydney, who died 1588, and who married Ellen roche, daughter of Lord Fermoy, and Dermod who died 1570. Sir Cormac, son of Dermod, died in 1616. Cormac Oge, created Lord Blarney and Viscount Muskerry, married Margaret, daughter of Donogh, 4th Earl of Thomond, and his son Donogh marrying Ellena Butler, sister of James, Duke of Ormond, was created Earl of Clancarthy, and died in 1666. His eldest son Charles, Lord Muskerry, married Margaret Burke, daughter of Clanrickard, and their son dying young, Callaghan, his seond son, who married Elizabeth, daughter of George, 16th Earl of Kildare, by a daughter of Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork, succeeded as second Earl of
__________________________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 449 -

An adanced age.* He drived his own descent from a brother of Major Phillip. His statement is slightly inaccurate in some of its details, and time would be taken to verify what seems consistent with other genealogical authorities, were not delays proverbially dangerous. Life is precarious, and the materials collected for another purpose with considerable tail may be lost. No apology is needed for endeavoring to preserve, for future generations, information of this nature. It is for this very purpose that this Register was established. We realize the importance of being scrupulously exact in genealogical statements, and were we not impressed with the belief that means exist of rectifying any unintentional error we might be even more on our guard against the possibility of misleading.

The letter states that the parents of Owen, above mentioned, were Daniel O’Sullivan Beare and Ellen, daughter of Daniel O’Sullivan More, 10th Lord of Dunkerron who died in 1699, by Maryanne Fitzgerald, daughter of the Earl of Kildare. Owen, 9th Lord of Dunkerron, married Mary, second daughter of Sir Edmund Fitzgerald, of Cloyne, the “best estated commoner of his time;” Daniel, the 8th, Joan daughter of Patrick Fitzmaurice, 17th Lord Kerry. Through this Joan and Honora Fitzmaurice, 17th Lord Kerry. Through this Joan and Honora Fitzgerald, wife of the Lord Kerry and the daughter of James, 7th Earl of Desmond, who died 1460. Ellen was descended from Elizabeth Plantagenet, daughter of Edward 1st, who married Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Bereford, and through Matilda of Flanders, wife of William the Conquerer, from Charlemagne and King Alfred. Sec 4 Burke’s Commoners, XXX. Prefix to page 569.

In the next preceding generation the same authority informs us that Phillip, the father of Daniel, who married the above Ellen, espoused the daughter of Lord Muskerry, who lived in the castle of Macroom, by Ellena Butler, sister to the Duke of Ormond. This Lord

Note: Phillip O’Sullivan, of Ardea Castle, son of Lord of Bearehaven, married Earl of Thomond’s daughter. His son Daniel married Margaret, daughter of Earl of Clancarthy, and granddaughter of Earl of Cork. His son Phillip married Honora, daughter of Lord Muskerry, who lived at the castle of Macroom, by a sister of the Duke of Ormond. His son Daniel married Ellen, daughter of O’Sullivan More, by Marganne Fitzgerald, daughter of Earl of Kildare, and granddaughter of Earl of Antrim. His son Owen married Marganne, daughter of Owen McSwin__, by Honora McCarthy, duaghter of Florence McFinnen, of Ardtelly, granddaughter of Charles McCarthy of Carricknamarck.” There are some errors in the above, but it is for the most part consistent with the authority. It is not supposed to be precisely accurate, but may aid in ascertaining the truth.

Note: Elizabeth, dau of Ed. I m. Humphrey Bohun, Earl of Hereford. Elena Bohan m. James, Earl of Ormond. Elena Butler m. James, Earl of Desmond. Honora Fitzgerald m. Thomas, 8th Lord Kerry, d. 1469. Joanna Fitzmaurice, dau. of the 17th Lord Kerry, m. Daniel O’Sullivan, More, 8th Lord of Dunderron. Ellen, dau. of Owen, 9th Lord, m. Daniel O’Sullivan Beare, great grandfather of Master Sullivan. Same descent from Edward I can be deduced also by other lines.

Cormic Laldir, Lord of Muskerry, who held the chieftainship of Muskerry from 1448 to 1495, built the famous castle of Blarney about three miles from the city of Cork. It is still standing in ruins, and the Blarney Stone, which endows all who kiss it with the faculty of persuasion and the gift of eloquence, is near the top of the rampart, now only to be approached at considerable peril. The son of Laldir, Cormac Oge, died 1524, having married a daughter of the 9th Lord Kerry. His son and heir Teigue, died 1536, leaving Sir Cormac, friend of Sir Henry Sydney, who died 1588, and who married Ellen roche, daughter of Lord Fermoy, and Dermod who died 1570. Sir Cormac, son of Dermod, died in 1616. Cormac Oge, created Lord Blarney and Viscount Muskerry, married Margaret, daughter of Donogh, 4th Earl of Thomond, and his son Donogh marrying Ellena Butler, sister of James, Duke of Ormond, was created Earl of Clancarthy, and died in 1666. His eldest son Charles, Lord Muskerry, married Margaret Burke, daughter of Clanrickard, and their son dying young, Callaghan, his seond son, who married Elizabeth, daughter of George, 16th Earl of Kildare, by a daughter of Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork, succeeded as second Earl of
__________________________________________________


Taken from gencircles.com on October 6, 2002 -

Owen O'Sullivan
Birth: Est 1650
Death:
Sex: M
Father: Daniel O'Sullivan Beare
Mother: Ellen O'Sullivan Mor

Also Known As: Americans of Royal Descent, Charles H. B
Occupation: of Ardea 1
Spouses & Children
Mary MacSweeney (Wife)
Children:
1. [Descendants] Philip O'Sullivan

1. Author: Charles H. Browning
Title: Americans of Royal Descent
Page: 202
Quality: 2
________________________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=008422&...
on October 2, 2002, The Prominent Families of the United States, Prominent Families, Page 265 -

Daniel O'Sullivan m. Sarah, daughter of Conor O'Brien, 2nd Viscount Clare, and had issue.

Owen O'Sullivan m. Mary, daughter of Owen McSweeney, and his issue

Phillip O'Sullivan (Major), of Ardea Co. Kerry; m Joan, dau of Dermod McCarthy, of Killoween, and had issue -
1. Patrick, whose descendents remain in Ireland
2. Owen, of whom later

Owen Sullivan (1690 - 1795), b., in Limerick, 17 June 1690; emigrated to America, 1723; settled in Berwick, Maine; m 1735, Margery Browne, and, by her (who d. 1801), had issue -
1. Benjamin b 1736; d.s.p.
2. Daniel, of Sullivan, Maine, b 1738; Captain in the Revolutionary War; m 1. Anne Paul; m. 2. Abigail Bean; d. 1781, leaving issue
3. John, of Durham, New Hampshire, b. 17 Feb 1740; Major-General in the Revolutionary Army; and first Governor of New Hampshire; m Lydia Worcester; d. 23 Jan. 1795, leaving issue.
4. James, of whom later.
5. Ebenezer, b 1753; Captain in the Revolutionary Army; m. Abigail Cotton; d 3 June, 1799, leaving issue.
1. Mary, b 1752; m., 1768, Theophilus Hardy; d. 1827, leaving issue.

He d. 20 June 1795

Jame Sullivan (1744 - 1808), of Boston, Mass., b 22 April 1744; LLD Harvard, 1780; member of the Provincial Council, 1775; Judge of the Superior Court 1776-1782; Attorney General, 1790-1807; Governor of Mass, 1807-1880; m 1. 22 Feb 1768 Mehatable, dau. of William Odiorne, and, by her (who d. 26 Jan. 1786), had issue -
1. James, b 6 Jan 1769; d.sp. 29 June 1787.
2. William b. 30 Nov 1774; Member of the Massachusetts State Legislature and Council for many years; Bridadier-General of Militia; LLD (Harvard), 1826; m., 1801 Sarah Webb Swan; d. 3 Sept 1839, leaving issue.
3. John Landon, of whom later.
4. Richard, b. 17 June 1779; m., 1804, Sarah Russell; d. 11 Dec 1861, leaving issue.
5. William Bant, b. 16 March 1781; d unm. 4 Dec 1806
6. George, b 21 Feb. 1783; m., 1809, Sarah Bowdoin Winthrop; d. 14 Dec. 1866, leaving issue.
1. Avis, b 8 Oct 1771; d. in infancy
2. Mehatable, b 29 July 1772; m. 1. 1793, James Cutler; m. 2. 1801, Jonathan Amory; d 24 March 1847, leaving issue.
3. Nancy, b 24 April 1784; d. in infancy.

He d. 10 Dec 1808

John Langdon Sullivan (1777 - 1865), of New York city; b 9 April 1777; M.D. Yale, 1837; m. 1. 10 Oct 1797, Elizabeth Russell, and, by her (who d. 16 April 1854), had issue: -
1. Thomas Russell, of whom later.
1. Elizabeth, b 27 Jan 1800; d num 16 Jan 1871.
2. Emily, b 4 Aug 1801; d unm 8 April 1880

He d. 10 Feb 1865, having m. 2, 1861, Susan Macash, who d.s.p
_____________________________________________________________


Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

James Sullivan
Sprague's Journal of Maine History
Vol. VII FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4
Page 171-187

James Sullivan

(BY JOHN FRANCIS SPRAGUE.)

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim that the Sullivans of Maine descended from the O'Sullivans of ancient Ireland.

They were a powerful septa, who dwelt in the southerly part of Ireland and are now extensively multiplied on both sides of theAtlantic.

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American activities.

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin to a remote period in Irish history.

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their national annals from the beginning of organized government under the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion
resulting from English invasion.

Irish historians assert that it is a well authenticated fact that under Queen Elizabeth, one measure adopted for the more perfect subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national
and private repositories these records, that by gradually weaken- ing, through their destruction, the spirit of clanship, the land might become an easier prey to the spoiler.

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and in many of the ancient chronicles, or psalters which escaped this authorized vandalism frequent mention is made of the O'Sullivans,
and their chieftains.

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first began upon its shores, Ireland had been as highly civilized as any part of western Europe. During those times and to a more recent date the O'Sullivans, who were hereditary princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the Province of Munster, and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarney.

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their domains for a long time remaining unmolested by the invaders they lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans.

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive century until the brave O'Sullivans early in the seventeenth cen- tury were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and
devastation. To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful clan to the time when John Sullivan left Limerick in Ireland and sailed for America would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the history of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his destination was is not now known. The ship in which he sailed was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed in York.

0n this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting romance. On the vessel was a pretty and attractive child named Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it appears that they were lost at sea.

John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left with his family the following statement:

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan, original descendant from the second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Captain Edmond McSweeney, a noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer. They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom or went out of the country I never heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem-
ber but one alive when I left home My mother's name was Toan McCar- thy, daughter of Dermod McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she was daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias
McFinnin, and [its two brothers, Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of McFinnin. Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the
siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of Bannane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the bar- ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.
They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is added to the length of mine. My mother's sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan, lord of Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin.

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea-son of his mother violently opposing his union with a certain young lady that ;he was deeply attached to.

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing in Limerick he was nearly penniless when he left home and entered into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him
after his arrival, to pay his passage to America. Unaccustomed to labor he applied to Parson Moody, of York, whom he had been informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can-celing his obligation to the captain.

John was well educated and tinder the advice of Parson Moody and some of his friends he opened a school at Berwick and became successful school teacher in York County.

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been indentured in accordance with the colonial custom of providing for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he
redeemed her from indenture and adopted her and brought her up and educated her as his own child. When she had reached the period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms and attractions.

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young man, clad in city attire, came by and engaged her in conversation. Fascinated by her charms. he then and there proposed marriage
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. Sullivan. He consulted Margery who frankly admitted that she had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much
to his joy, he assured him that she had no thought of anything serious. But the circumstance revealed to him his own sentiment towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal.
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual and although he was twenty years her senior, so far as any records or evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union.

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted his attention when not engaged in teaching. Much of the time he had two schools under his charge.

He has been described as "a marked man in his personal appear- ance, of great natural abilities and mental cultivation."

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory (1) asserts that he did not attend religious services in the neighbor- hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that reason "it has been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast to the faith of his childhood."

He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great energy and firmness of character.

Amory (supra) says: " Her sons very probably inherited largely from her the ambition and industry that made them useful and dis-tinguished."
________________________________________________

Taken from IGI on February 18, 2005 -

Ordinance Record FamilySearchâ„¢ International Genealogical Index v5.0
British Isles
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Owen O'Sullivan
Male
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Event(s):
Birth: About 1625 Ardea, , , Ireland
Christening:
Death:
Burial:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LDS Ordinances:
Endowment: 09 NOV 1937
Sealing to Spouse: 12 NOV 1937 LOGAN
Mary McSweney
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Marriages:
Spouse: Mary McSweney Family
Sealing to Spouse: 12 NOV 1937 Logan, Cache, Utah
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Messages:
Record of LDS Church ordinance (living or proxy). The record often shows the name of the individual and his or her relationship to a descendant, shown as the heir, family representative, or relative. The original records are arranged by temple, ordinance type, ordinance date, and the relative's name. A family group record for this couple may be in the Family Group Record Collection; Archive Section. (See the Family History Library Catalog for the film number.) These records are alphabetical by name of the father or husband.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Film Number: 178082
Page Number:
Reference number: 7899
_________________________________________________

Ordinance Record FamilySearchâ„¢ International Genealogical Index v5.0
British Isles
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Owen O'Sullivan
Male
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Event(s):
Birth: About 1625 Ardea, , Louth, Ireland
Christening:
Death:
Burial:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LDS Ordinances:
Baptism: 26 JUN 1937
Endowment: 09 NOV 1937 LOGAN
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Marriages:
Spouse: Unavailable Family
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Relative/Proxy:
David D. Sullivan
Lars Sorensen
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Messages:
Record of LDS Church ordinance (living or proxy). The record often shows the name of the individual and his or her relationship to a descendant, shown as the heir, family representative, or relative. The original records are arranged by temple, ordinance type, ordinance date, and the relative's name. A family group record for this couple may be in the Family Group Record Collection; Archive Section. (See the Family History Library Catalog for the film number.) These records are alphabetical by name of the father or husband.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Film Number: 178025
Page Number: 317
Reference number: 9508
____________________________________________

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