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Phillip O'Sullivan

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Phillip O'Sullivan

Angie Sullivan (View posts)
Posted: 1 Aug 2006 9:52AM GMT
Classification: Query
Some Colonial Dames of Royal Descent, Mrs. Britton Davis, Page 201

Hugh Capet, King of France, 987, had by his wife, Lady Adela (or Alisa), daughter of William, Duke of Aquitane, by his wife, Lady Adelheid, a daugther of Otto I. Emperor of Saxony:

Princess Hedewige (or Havide, sister of Kinger Robert the Pious, who m. Rynerius (or Raginerus) IV., eleventh Count of Hainault, and had:

Lady Beatrix, m. Eblo I., Count de Rouci and de Reimes, and had:

Lady Adela (or Alexandria), Countess de Rouci, who m. Hildwin IV., Count de Montdidier and de Rouci, and had:

Lady Margaret de Rouci, who m. Hugh, first Count of Clermont (see "L'Art de Verifier les Dates," xii, 282), and had:

Lady Adeliza de Clermont, who m. Gilbert de Tonsburg, in Kent, second Earl of Clare, and had:

Gilbert de Clare, created, in 1138, Earl of Pembroke, d. 1149, who m. Lady Elizabeth do Bellomont, daughter of Robert, Earl of Mellent and Leicester, and had:

Richard de Clare, "the Strongbow," second Earl of Pembroke, lord justice of Ireland, d. 1176, who had by his wife, Lady Eva, daughter of Dermot MacMurcha, King of Leinster:

Lady Isabel de Clare, who m., 1189 (hid first wife), William le Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, protector of England during the nonage of Henry III, d. 1219, and had:

Lady Maud Marshall, who m., first, Hugh Bigod, third Earl of Norfolk, one of the sureties for the Magna Charta of King John, d. 1225, and had:

Sir Ralph Bigod, Knt., third son, who m. Lady Berta de Furnival, and had:

Lady Isabel Bigod, who m., first, Gilbert de Lacy, d.v.p., son of Walter, sixth Baron de Lacy, of Trim, d. 1241, and had:

Lady Margaret de Lacy, who m. (his first wife) John, sixth Baron de Verdon, k. 1274, and had:

Some Colonial Dames of Royal Descent, Pedigree XLIX, Page 202

Sir Theobold de Verdon, seventh Baron, lord high constable of Ireland, d. 1309; m. Lady Maud, daughter of Sir Edmund, seventh Baron de Mortimer, of Wigmore, k. 1308, and had:

Lady Elizabeth de Verdon, who m. Bartholomew, second Baron Burghersh, and had:

Sire Bartholomew Burghersh, third Baron, d. 1369, whose daughter:

Lady Elizabeth Burghersh, m. Maurice Fitz-Gerald, fourth Earl of Kildare, d. 1390 and had:

Gerald Fitz-Gerald, fifth Earl of Kildare, lord justice of Ireland in 1405, d. 1410, who m. Lady Margery, daughter of Sir John de Rocheford, Knt., lord of Thistledown, and had:

John-Cam Fitz-Gerald, sixth Earl of Kildare, d. 1427, who had by his wife Margaret de la Herne:

Thomas Fitz-Gerald, seventh Earl of Kildare, lord deputy of Ireland in 1454, and in 1493, lord chancellor, who, dying 25 March, 1478, left issue by his wife, Lady Joan, who d. 1486, daughter of James Fitz-Gerald, seventh Earl of Desmond, also of Royal Descent:

Gerald Fitz-Gerald, eighth Earl of Kildare, lord deputy of Ireland, who m. Lady Allison, daughter of Sir Rowland Eustace, Baron of Portlester, lord chancellor and treasurer of Ireland, and had:

Lady Eleanor Fitz-Gerald, who m., first, Donnel Mac Fineere Mac Carthy-Reagh, prince of Carberry, in Ireland, and had:

Lady Julia Mac Carthy, who m. Dermod O'Sullivan, eleventh Lord Beare and Bantry, who was K., 1549, by an accident, at his castle of Dunboy, and had:

Sir Philip O'Sullivan-Beare, who as tanist to his brother Sire Owen's son, Dermond, held the Castle of Ardea, county Kerry. He m. a daughte of Cormack O'Brien, Earl of Thomond, also of Royal Descent, and had:

Daniel O'Sullivan-Beare, of Ardea Castle, who m. Lady Margaret daughter of the Earl of Clancarthy, by his wife, Lady Margaret, daughter of Donog O'Brien, fourth Earl of Thomond, and had:

Philip O'Sullivan-Beare, of Ardea, who m. Lady Honora, daughter of Donogh, Earl of Clancarthy, d. 1666, and his wife, Lady Ellen daughter of Thomas Butler, Lord Thurles, governor of Kilkenny, d. 1619, also of Royal Descent, and had:

Daniel O'Sullivan-Beare, of Ardea, who m. Lady Ellen, daughter of Daniel O'Sullivan-Mor, tenth lord of Dunkerron, who d. 1699, also of Royals Descent, and had:

Owen O'Sullivan, of Ardea, who m. Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen MacSweeney, of Muskerry, and had:

Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, who m. Joanna, daughter of Dermond McCarthy-Mor, of Killoween, county Kerry, and had:

John Sullivan, b. Ardea, county Kerry, 17 June, 1690, came to America in 1723, and d. at South Berwick, Maine, 20 June, 1795, aged 105 years (see "N.E. Historical and Genealogical Register," October, 1865) and had by his wife, Margaret Browne, a native of County Kerry, who d. in 1801, aged 87 years.

Mary Sullivan, 1752-1827; m. Theophilus Hardy, of Durham, New Hampshire, and had:

Margery Hardy, who m. Edward Wells, of Durham, and had:

Charles Wells, of New York City, who m. Mary Wiggin, and had:

Marie Antoinette Wells, who m. Levi Steele, and had:

Antoinette Wells Steele, a member of the New York and Texas Societies of Colonial Dames of America, who m. Britton Davis, of El Paso, Texas, and had: Newton, b. New York, 22 March, 1890; Antoinette, b. Orange, N.J., 13 November, 1892; and Britton, b. El Paso, 5 October, 1896.
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Taken from http://www.public.coe.edu/~theller/soj/ttl/p-p.html on June 22, 2005 -
People and Places in The Tory Lover

Beare (3 and others): The area of southern Ireland over which the O'Sullivan family (Master Sullivan's ancestors) ruled prior to the 17th century.

Abbé de Beaumont (17): Master Sullivan says he knew the Abbé, a nephew of Fénelon, and with him visited Fénelon at Cambrai. In Butler's Life of Fenelon, de Beaumont is mentioned as a friend and subordinate teacher under Fénelon to the royal dukes, and as his nephew (p. 112). In The Age of Louis XIV, Voltaire mentions him as "the king's tutor," who helped to insure that plays were performed at court despite Jansenist objections (Ch. 25).

Duke of Berwick: The Duke of Berwick is not referred to in The Tory Lover, but Jewett meant to include him. See Duke de Sully below.
According to the web site of the Wild Geese Heritage Museum and Library in Galway, Ireland, by Sean Ryan, the Marshal Duke of Berwick (1670-1734) was James FitzJames, Marshal of France. He "was born at Moulins in the Bourbonnais, France, on August 21 1670. He was the son of Arabella Churchill and James II. His mother was a daughter of Sir Winston Churchill, descended from the Councils of Anjou, Poictou and Normandy. His uncle was the famous John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough."
King James II prepared his son for a military career. After the Glorious Revolution of 1688, which deposed James, the King and his son fled to Catholic Ireland to lead the resistance to Protestant English rule. There, the Duke distinguished himself in battle and became acquainted with Patrick Sarsfield and Master John Sullivan's father. He eventually married Sarsfield's widow. After the failure of the Irish resistance, he joined the French army as a volunteer, where he continued to support the Jacobites [supporters of James II], and he again distinguished himself, rising to the position of Marshal of France.

Duke de Boufflers (16): This boy, who was a fellow-student of Voltaire (and according to this novel, of Master Sullivan) in Paris, probably was the grandson of the military hero who gained the title for his success as Marshal of France during the War of the Grand Alliance (1689-1697; see Voltaire, The Age of Louis XIV, Ch. 16). Parton's Life of Voltaire (in Related Materials) tells this story about the boy at the Collége Louis-le-Grand: "It was while Voltaire was a pupil that the Duke de Boufflers and the Marquis d'Argenson conspired with other boys to blow a pop-gun volley of peas at the nose of the unpopular professor, Father Lejay, and were condemned to be flogged for the outrage. The marquis, a boy of seventeen, the son of a king's minister, managed to escape; but the younger duke, though he was named 'Governor of Flanders' and colonel of a regiment, was obliged to submit to the punishment" (v. 1, 31-2).

Cambrai (17): An agricultural and industrial region, specializing in textiles in northern France, southwest of Lille, along the Escaut River. This is the town where Fénelon resided at his death, hence Master Sullivan's travels there with Fénelon's nephew, the Abbé de Beaumont: (Research assistance: Travis Feltman)
Collége Louis-le-Grand (17): A prestigious Jesuit school in Paris, where Voltaire received his formal education during 1704-1711, and where Jewett says Master Sullivan studied in France. No documentary evidence has been found to show that Sullivan actually studied at this school, though it is clear he received a fine education in France. Indeed, Parton's Life of Voltaire suggests it is unlikely Sullivan could have received an education in multiple languages at Louis-le-Grand, which taught mainly Latin and a little Greek.
Smock Alley Theater (30): Margery Sullivan remembers her father telling of the collapse of the gallery in this theater, which took place in 1672.
Falmouth, Maine (29,34): In 1787, the city name was changed to Portland. This was the site in 1775 of a British bombardment that burned the town. According to Amory in The Life of James Sullivan, the attack took place after Captain Mowatt, a commander under Admiral Greaves, was captured by American forces. He was released in response to a threat of bombardment, but "Irritated at the indignities to which he had been subjected during his detention and at the opposition manifested later by the inhabitants to a proposed supply of spars and other materials for the fleet, under the sanction of the admiral ... he bombarded and destroyed Falmouth" (I, 59-60). Amory reports that news of this attack on a civilian population spread panic through sea coast towns and villages from Falmouth to Boston. See also Williamson, History of the State of Maine, v.2, Chapter 16.
Lord Gormanstown (30): The Lords Gormanstown, Howth, and Trimlestown are all remembered by Master Sullivan in Chapter 30 as fancy dressers when attending the theater in Dublin during Sullivan's youth, probably in about 1720. All three families were prominent among the nobility in Dublin in the 18th century. See Extended Notes.
Mary Hamilton (1): Mary Hamilton (1749-1800) in history was Jonathan Hamilton's wife. She was born Mary Manning in the Pine Hill area north of South Berwick, where Master Sullivan was schoolmaster. See Extended Notes.
Colonel John Langdon: (5,22): Langdon (1739-1819), of Portsmouth, N.H., served in the American revolutionary army and in the Continental Congresses. He was navy agent in 1776 and used his own wealth to help outfit the army. After the war, he served in the Constitutional Convention, and then as a United States senator -- administering the oath of office to Presidents George Washington and John Adams --, and as governor of New Hampshire. His cousin, Samuel Langdon, also was an active revolutionary. Sources: Amory, The Life of James Sullivan and New Hampshire: A Guide to the Granite State.
S. E. Morison reports that Jones and Langdon got along badly because of the difficulties in outfitting the Ranger (106-111).
Lebanon (8): A town in Maine on the Salmon Falls River, northwest of Berwick. James Sullivan says this town was originally Tow-woh (264). See also Williamson (v. 2, ch. 6). As Haggens says in Chapter 8, the town's name is in the process of changing from Tow-wow in the 1770s. Now there are several towns in the area, with Lebanon as part of their name. Colonel Hamilton's lumber interests in this area take him about 10 miles north from South Berwick.
Lee (2) An officer Jewett says General John Sullivan replaced on Long Island. The Battle of Long Island took place in 1776. General Charles Lee (1731-1782) was second in command of the Continental Army when he was captured by the British late in 1776. He remained a prisoner until 1778. After his capture, according to Jewett, General John Sullivan replaced him. The Treason of Charles Lee, George H. Moore's revelation that General Lee betrayed the Americans after his capture, appeared in 1858. (Source: Encarta Encyclopedia).
McIntire of York (3): The McIntire family of York (Ch. 3) were Royalist exiles of the old Cromwell times who took in Master Sullivan when he came to Maine. Though it seems clear that Jewett consulted Thomas Amory's biography of John Sullivan for much of her information about Master Sullivan, here she seems to depart from that source, which says that Sullivan went to work for a Mr. Nowell. The McIntire family of York, however, would be a good choice to associate with Master Sullivan. Several McIntires, according to family histories on the Internet, were deported by Oliver Cromwell after the Battle of Dunbar in 1650. These included Micum (Malcolm) McIntire who settled near York, Maine in the 1660s.
Mr. Moody (3): Probably the minister who helped Master Sullivan to his first teaching post after his arrival in America is the Reverend Samuel Moody, who was minister of the first parish at York, from 1700 to 1747, according to James Sullivan, The History of the District of Maine (238-9). See Extended Notes.
Newcastle (7 and other chapters): Now New Castle, a town eastward across the harbor from Portsmouth, N.H., on an island previously known as Great Island. New Hampshire: A Guide to the Granite State says, "... in the years preceding the Revolution it was alive with intrigue and excitement. Here lived the Governor and his officials; here were held the councils and courts of law. The prison for the whole province was at New Castle.... Its taverns were crowded with gay, philandering soldiers of fortune, and its prisons were full of traitors and ministers in danger of the Tower of London, or of the gallows" (266). Fort William and Mary (later Fort Constitution), located here, was the site of an early American success when in 1774, the Sons of Liberty and local patriots under the leadership of the future General, John Sullivan and John Langdon captured the fort and removed a large store of gunpowder that was then used by American forces at Bunker Hill (New Hampshire 266-7).
old Pretender (3): James Francis Edward Stuart (1688-1766) was the son of King James II (Deposed in 1688 in the Glorious Revolution, and replaced by the Protestants William and Mary of Orange). He held court in exile sometimes in Spain, sometimes in France, and was recognized by both as King James III of England. He was called "The Old Pretender" for this and to distinguish him from his son, Charles Edward Stuart, "The Young Pretender" or "Bonnie Prince Charlie."
In the 1745 Jacobite uprising, Charles Edward and his Irish friend, John William O'Sullivan, attempted and failed to restore the Old Pretender to the throne. O'Sullivan is a cousin of Master John Sullivan.
(Research assistance: Gabe Heller).
Passaconaway (10): In "The Old Town of Berwick," Jewett identifies Passaconaway as "the great sachem" of the Berwick region when the first English explorer, Martin Pring, visited the site of the town in 1603. Sullivan in The History of the District of Maine summarizes Dr. Belknap's history of New Hampshire on Chief Passaconaway, the last known general chief in the area of Berwick, "who presided over a number of lesser sachems" (92).
Parson Pike (29): In "The Old Town of Berwick," Jewett identifies Mr. James Pike: "the first grammar school master of Berwick (Harvard, 1725), was called as minister to Somersworth in 1730; and it may possibly have been not until then that [Master] Sullivan took his place." This Parson Pike might seem rather old to take such an active role in rescuing Madam Wallingford; but since James Pike (1702-1792) lived ninety years, he may well have been able to help defend Madam Wallingford at the age of about 75.
In Master Tate's diary, Parson Pike is performing local marriages in 1777. "Tuesday evening, August 1777, Mr. David Hanson of Dover married to Mrs. Mary Roberts of Somersworth by the Reverend James Pike." "Master Tate's Diary" also gives the death of the wife of Nicholas Gilman, Molly, 28 December 1777. Nicholas Gilman was Jewett's great-grandfather on her mother's side. Molly was the daughter of Rev. James Pike; this would suggest that Rev. Pike was Jewett's great-great-grandfather.
Pine Hill (3,9,16): Named as the location of Master Sullivan's school, this Pine Hill is just north of the village of Berwick, about seven miles from Hamilton House. A fort built on this hill was called Hamilton's garrison; Williamson reports it was still standing in 1750 (v. 2, ch. 3). The John Sullivan farm was located here, and this was the original burying place of John and Margery Sullivan. See John Sullivan in "People," and photographs for Chapter 16.
Patrick Sarsfield (3), the great Earl of Lucan, at Limerick: According to The Catholic Encyclopedia the Irishman, Patrick Sarsfield (1650-1693) fought in the cause of King James II of England, a deposed Catholic trying to regain the throne. For his defense of Limerick - where Master John Sullivan's father fought - against King William of England, James II named him Earl of Lucan. He later commanded the Irish Brigades in France under King James II. (Research: Gabe Heller.)
Master Sullivan and his family (2): John Sullivan (1692-1796) and his wife Old Margery (c. 1714 - 1801), settled in the Pine Hill area of Berwick, where Master John taught school for many years while Margery managed the farm. Two of their sons, John (2) and James (2), achieved fame as soldiers and politicians. See Extended Notes.
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Taken from genealogy.com on February 17, 2005 -
Early Settlers of Alabama

Page 407

eldest son of the last mentioned Cormac, was created Earl of Clancare, in Kerry, on resigning his estates to Queen Elizabeth, from whom he again received the investiture of them, "to hold of the crown of England, in the English manner." This branch is extinct for more than a century. But the above Cormac Mor had second son, Dermod, first feudal lord of Muskerry, and founder of that potent house, who was killed by the O'Mahonys in 1367. From him sprang in snccession as Lords of Muskerry:

"Teige Cormac, d. 1374, Teige, 1448; Cormac Laidhir (the stout), 1494; Cormac Oge Laidhir, who defeated the Earl of Desmond at the battle of Morne, 1521, d. 1536 Teige d. 1565, Dermod d, 1570. His son, Cormac. Lord of Muskerry, had his residence at Blarney Castle, and died 1616, leaving two sons:

1. Cormac Oge, Lord of Muskerry, the first Viscount (as stated by some writers),
died in London, 1640, leaving a son, Donald, first Earl of Clancarty, whose
male line is extinct.(*)
2. Daniel (or Donald), second son of Cormac, built the Castle of Carrignavar.
County Cork, and married Katherine, dau. of Stephen Meade. His son, Charles,
Esq., of Carrignavar, married Katherine, dau. of David Roche. Seventh Viscount
Fermoy, and was succeeded by his grandson, Charles, son of Daniel and Eliz
(Matthews) McCarty. Charles died s. p. 1761, and was succeeded by his nephew--
Daniel, son of Daniel and Grace (Fitzgerald) McCarty, who died 1763. His
second son, Robert, married (1784) Jane Capel, and died 1823, leaving a son,
Justin, born 1786, father of Justin, now of "Carrignavar" (b. 1816) and who
married (1848) to Louisa, dau. of Major Edward Fitzgerald. A brother,
Joseph, of "Shrub Hill," County Surrey, viear of Wilton, County Cork,
married Mary Frances, dau. of the Ven. William Thompson, Arehdeacon of
Cork, and has several children, among them: Florence MacCartie. He
adopted the old spelling of his name, "MacCarlie," and died 1874.
"Equally important in the Muskerry line are the descendants of Florence McCarthy, of Clodane, and Donough (or Daniel) McCarthy, of Drishane, 1602. (See Burke's Landed Gentry.)

"Florence McCarthy, of Clodane, had a daughter Jane, who married John Marshall, son of Thomas Marshall, who came to County Kerry in the expedition of Sir Charles Wilmot, 1602, and married Mary, daughter of Maurice Fitzgerald, of BallymacAdam Castle, and settled there. John Marshall was driven out by the Irish in the great rebellion of 1641, but returned as captain in Cromwell's army. These were ancestors of the Markham and Pursell families. (Burke's Landed Gentry, p. 1340.) Florence McCarthy was of the family of Donough (or Daniel) McCarthy, of Drishane, descended of the noble family of Muskerry. Members of this line came to Virginia, as did, also, the Marshalls, Markhams, Pursells and Fitzgeralds."

Florence McFinnen-McCarty, of Ardtilly, son of Charles McCarty, of Carrick-nainack, had a daughter. Honora, who married Colonel Owen McSweeny, of Muskerry. Their daughter Mary married Owen O'Sullivan, of Ardia, and had issue; Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardia, who married Joanna, daughter of Dermot McCarty Mor, of Killoween, County Kerry, descended from the Earl of Clancare, and his wife, a daughter of McCarty Reagh, of Carberry, and his wife Eleanor, daughter of Lord Muskerry. A son, John Sullivan, born in Ardia, 1699, came to Maine in 1723, and was father of Major General John Sullivan, of New Haven (b. 1740. d. 1795), of the Revolutionary army; member of Congress, 1774, and President of New Hampshire, 1786 (see New Eng. Hist. and Gen. Register for October, 1865).
___________________________________________________________

Taken from book The Family of John Sullivan - August 19, 2004 -
Materials for a History of the family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England and of the O'Sullivan of Ardea, Ireland chiefly collected by the late Thomas Coffin Amory.
With a pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
BRITISH
929.2415
Su54m
Date of Microfilm 6/2/78
Item of Roll - 5
Camera No. - SL 17
Catalogue No. - XL1B7 - 102#1011
microfilm number 990307 Item 1

Page 95

We have seven authorities to compare with this official genealogy, or rather parts of it. They are John Sullivan's own Account, written about 1784; Phillip's letter of 1796; a fragment of genealogy furnished by Mr. McCarthy in 1860; another, by Mrs. John Louis O'Sullivan in 1885; the Ardea Parchment, as reported by Mr. Daniel O'Sullivan in 1860, and by his son Mr. Mortimer O'Sullivan in 1876; and a bit of the O'Sullivan Bear Line ina letter rom Mr. O'Herlihy of Cork in 1876. These are not all of equal importance, but each serves, it not otherwise, at least as a test of the general accuracy of the other witnesses on whose word we must depend. We have put into tabular form the statements of each of the eight, so that they may be compared without trouble. Through all the eight tables we carry one system of numbering, 14, for instance, meaning always the fourteeneth generation in the foregoing complete Pedigree by Sir Bernard Burke, where Suildhubhain is the first. It is only Mr. Daniel O'Sullivan who gives more names than will fit this numbering. We are obliged to leave three of his names not numbered, but the position of those which preced and which follow the three is sufficiently determined by his son's version.

It should be noted that Sir Bernard Burke omits Generation 20, and does not say, except as reporting that statement of Owen's descendants, that Owen of the Four Countesses is grandson to Generatin 19 and so to be counted as 21. On the other had he gives a "Sketch of Pedigree" (page 93) to show that there was, about the right time for Owen's father, a

Page 96
Daniel O'Sullivan who married Sarah O'Brien, grand niece of the Earl of Thomond, and granddaughter of the first Viscount Clare. This lady's mother and grandmother were Viscountesses Clare, and two of her great-grandmothers were Countesses, one of Desmond, and the other of Thomond, - a fact quite like enough to the tradition of the Four Countesses to have been its foundation. The Ardea Parchment, it is true, gives Daniel a different wife; but it names only two Countesses, whom she would have made great-grandmother and great-great grandmother to Owen. We expect to find his connection with the Countesses made only through his mother, as otherwise it would not have formed so great a distinction for him in his father's family. We have made a fuller table than Sir Bernard Burke's to illustrate the hypothesis of the O'Brian marriage, collecting for it additional names from the earlier part of his Pedigree, and from the O'Donoghue's "Historical Memoir of the O'Briens." (page 94)

As Mr. Amory no doubt put Sir Bernad Burke in possession of all that he learned from Mr. Mortimer O'Sullivan, we must suppose that Mr. O'Sullivan's statements were as far as possible verified by Sir Bernard Burke before he wrote that Pedigree. Where he differs from them he must have had what seemed to him better authority, and we regret that he does not say what it was. It will be notied that the wives given by the Ardea Parchment to Generations 19 and 20 are each put back two generations by Sir Bernard Burke, who given them to Generations 17 and 18. Or rather, in the case of Generation 17, he gives a wife of the same

Page 97
name with the one whom Ardea gives to Generation 19, though of a different descent, making her Honora McCarty of Duhallow, instand of Honora McCarthy of Muskerry. The two ladies whom he displaces from Generations 17 and 18, namely, the daughter of the Earlsof Thomond and Clancarthy, he entirely ignores. He knows of no wife for Generation 19, and Generation 20, as we have seen, he omits altogether. Mr. Mortimer O'Sullivna in his third letter to Mr. Amory, May 6, 1876 (page 82), admits that he is himself puzzled about these marriages. The repetition of "Philip" and "Donal" makes it easy to confuse the two later generations each with his grandfather. Without seeing the parchment, we can only guess at explanations. This is a most vain amusement, yet one might possibly hit the mark by suggesting that it was the younger Philip, Generation19, who married the Earl of Thomond's daughter. In that case Daniel, Generation 20, in marrying Sarah O'Brien, would have married the daugther ofhis mother's first cousin. Owen to would have had another Countess for a great-granmother, though this is hardly a gain in clearness, for why then did he count only four?

In spite of Sir Bernard Burke's dissent, Mr. Amory was inclined to hold to the Ardea record. His view is presented in the pedigree of Mr. Arthur Amory in Browning's "American of Royal Descent," copyrighted in 1882. There are in this a few mistakes, possibly printer's errors, but as a whole it is drawn, with regard to Generations 17, 18, 19, and 20, from Mr. Mortimer O'Sullivan's letter of March 17, 1876
_________________________________________________________

Taken from book The Family of John Sullivan - August 18, 2004 -
Materials for a History of the family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England and of the O'Sullivan of Ardea, Ireland chiefly collected by the late Thomas Coffin Amory.
With a pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
BRITISH
929.2415
Su54m
Date of Microfilm 6/2/78
Item of Roll - 5
Camera No. - SL 17
Catalogue No. - XL1B7 - 102#1011
microfilm number 990307 Item 1

Page 104

Table VII

Sir Bernard Burke

13. Tiege O'Sullivan , surnamed the Strong

14. Dermod Balluff O'Sullivan.

15. Donel O'Sullivan the Swarthy.

16. Dermod O'Sullivan the Powdered = Julia or Shela McCarthy (daughter of Donel McCarthy Reagh = Lady Elinor Fitzgerald, daugher of 8th Earl of Kidare)

17. Philip O'Sullivan = Honora McCarthy (daughter of Cormac McCarthy of Duhallow, sister to Donough i.e. the McDonough)

18. Donel O'Sullivan = Ellen O'Sullivan More (duagher of O'Sullivan More)

19. Philip O'Sullivan of Ardea Castle, forfeited, 1641


21. Owen O'Sullivan = Mary, dau of Owen McSweney, Constable of Munster.

22. Philip O'Sullivan = Joan McCarthy (daughter of Dermod McCarthy of Killoween and dau. of McCarthy Reagh)

23. Patrick O'Sullivan Information of Mr. Murtoh O'Sullivan of Kenmare, 1887 = Margaret Fitzgerald
23. Owen b. Limerick 1692, d. 1796 at Berwick, Me. = Margery Browne

24. Daniel O'Sullivan of Ardea = Juliana, dau. and heir of Daniel O'Sullivan of Dromboughilly

25. Philip O'Sullivan who wrote this letter
25 John
25 Margaret
25. Julia
25. Mary
__________________________________

Taken from book The Family of John Sullivan - August 18, 2004 -
Materials for a History of the family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England and of the O'Sullivan of Ardea, Ireland chiefly collected by the late Thomas Coffin Amory.
With a pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
BRITISH
929.2415
Su54m
Date of Microfilm 6/2/78
Item of Roll - 5
Camera No. - SL 17
Catalogue No. - XL1B7 - 102#1011
microfilm number 990307 Item 1

Page 102

Table VI

Mr. Mortimer O'Sullivan
("I have always heard that Sir Philip was son of Dermod." See page 105.)

16. Daniel O'Sullivan Bear

17. Sir Philip O'Sullivan of Ardea Castle, 2d son of Daniel = Earl of Thomond's daughter

18. Donal O'Sullivan = Mary Anne McCarthy (father Earl of Clancarthy, grandfather Earl of Cork)

19. Philip O'Sullivan = Honora McCarthy, dau. to Charles McCarthy, Lord of Muskerry, who lived in Castles of Macroom and Blarney.

20. Donnel O'Sullivan = Ellen O'Sullivan, dau to Daniel O'Sullivan More by Mary Anne Fitzgerald, daughter to the Earl of Kildare, and granddaughter to the Earl of Antrim. [Sir Bernard Burke says, "Ellen, dau of O'Sullivan More, " was wife of Donal O'Sullivan (18). He suggests that this Donnel (20) may be the Daniel O'Sullivan who married Sarah O'Brien. See page 96.]

21. Owen O'Sullivan = Mary McSweeney, daughter to Colonel Owen McSweeney of Muskerry.

22. Major Philip O'Sullivan = Johannah McCarthy, daughter to Dermod McCarthy of Killoween by Ellen McCarthy, daughter to Timothy McCarthy of Donglaven, and granddaughter to Lord Muskerry.

23. Dermod O'Sullivan = Aileen McCarthy Macfinnen of Artully
23. Owen O'Sullivan went to America

24. Daniel O'Sullivan = Elizabeth O'Sullivan, daughter to Silvester O'Sullivan MacFinnen Duff of Dereen, tuosist, by Elizabeth O'Donovan, dau. to O'Donovan of Banelahan by Ellen Fitzgerald, daughter to John Fitzgerald, Knight of Kerry.

25. Philip O'Sullivan = Anne O'Sullivan dau. to Daniel O'Sullivan of Glanenchaquin, Tuosist, who was of the Bunane family.
25. John
25. Daniel
25. Kerry

26. (Son of Philip O'Sullivan) Daniel O'Sullivan = Mary Dee, sister to Revds. John and Michael Dee, who were parish priest of Tuosist, and after of Kenmare, about 1826.
26. Philip, 3 daughters, who hold Clouness, where is the house of Philip 25, where Dermod 23 died.
26. Owen
26. Rev. Morty O'Sullivan parish priest of Lisselton.

27. (Son of Daniel O'Sullivan and Mary Dee) Mortimer Dan Philip O'Sullivan corresponded with Mr. T. C. Amory 1876-82 = Elizabeth dau. to Daniel O'Sullivan by Elizabeth McCarthy, dau to Captain Felix McCarthy of Kilgarvan.
27. Dan
27. John
27. Eliza
27 Another Sister
_________________________________________

Taken from book The Family of John Sullivan - August 18, 2004 -
Materials for a History of the family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England and of the O'Sullivan of Ardea, Ireland chiefly collected by the late Thomas Coffin Amory.
With a pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
BRITISH
929.2415
Su54m
Date of Microfilm 6/2/78
Item of Roll - 5
Camera No. - SL 17
Catalogue No. - XL1B7 - 102#1011
microfilm number 990307 Item 1

Page 101

Table V

Mr. Daniel O'Sullivan, 1860

16. Daniel O'Sullivan, Lord of Bearehaven.

17. Philip O'Sullivan of Ardea Castle, 2d son of Daniel = Earl of Thomond's daughter.

18. Daniel O'Sullivan = Mary Anne McCarthy (father Earl of Clancarty, grandfather Earl of Cork)

19. Philip O'Sullivan = Honora McCarthy (father Charles McCarthy, mother Catherine Butler, mother's father Duke of Ormond)

20. Daniel O'Sullivan = Ellen O'Sullivan More (father Daniel O'Sullivan More, mother Mary Anne Fitzgerald, mother's father Earl of Kildare, mother's grandfather Earl of Antrim)

21. Owen O'Sullivan = Maryanne McSweney (father Owen McSweeney Lough, mother Honora McCarthy, mother's father Florenc McCarthy McFinen of Ardtilly = McCarthy --- Honora's mother's father Chas, McCarthy of Carrick Namuck.)

Daniel O'Sullivan = Ellen McCarthy, dau to Owen McCarthy Reigh and graddau to McGlonough of Duhala

22. Philip O'Sullivan = Johanna McCarthy (father Darby McCarthy, mother Ellen McCarthy, mother's father Timothy McCarthy of Donoglanavan = daugther of Lord Muskerry)

Patrick O'Sullivan = Margaret Fitzgerald

Daniel O'Sullivan = Ellen McCarthy of the Headford family
Child - Owen O'Sullivan = daughter of McFinen Duff and Margaret Galway

23. Darby O'Sullivan = Mary Anne [dau. of Charles McCarthy of the McFinens of Ardtilly (dotted line to Philip O'Sullivna and Johanna McCarthy #22 -- Straight line to Owen O'Sullivan and daughter of McFinen Duff and Margaret Galway)

23. Brother who went to America

24. Daniel O'Sullivan = Elizabeth O'Sullivan, daughter of Silvester O'Sullivan Macfinen Duff.

25. Philip O'Sullivan = Anne O'Sullivan of Glanonehquin.

26. Daniel O'Sullivan = Mary Dee.
______________________________________

Taken from book The Family of John Sullivan - August 18, 2004 -
Materials for a History of the family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England and of the O'Sullivan of Ardea, Ireland chiefly collected by the late Thomas Coffin Amory.
With a pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
BRITISH
929.2415
Su54m
Date of Microfilm 6/2/78
Item of Roll - 5
Camera No. - SL 17
Catalogue No. - XL1B7 - 102#1011
microfilm number 990307 Item 1

Page 100

Table IV.

Mrs. John Louis O'Sullivan, 1885

Dermod McCarthy More = Ellen McCarthy Reagh of Carberry

22. Philip O'Sullivan son of Owen O'Sullivan of Bearhaven = Joan McCarthy More

22. . .. . McCarthy More = Dermod O'Sullivan, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan of Dunkerron.

John William O'Sullivan who was with Prince Charles Edward at Culloden; made a Baronet by James III. = Louisa Fitzgerald

Thomas Herbert O'Sullivan = Mary McReady.

John William Thomas Fitzgerald O'Sullivan = Mary Rowley of Bower End and Fenton Vivian, Staffordshire

John Louis O'Sullivan = Susan Kearney Rodgers, sine prole.
____________________________________________

Taken from book The Family of John Sullivan - August 18, 2004 -
Materials for a History of the family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England and of the O'Sullivan of Ardea, Ireland chiefly collected by the late Thomas Coffin Amory.
With a pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
BRITISH
929.2415
Su54m
Date of Microfilm 6/2/78
Item of Roll - 5
Camera No. - SL 17
Catalogue No. - XL1B7 - 102#1011
microfilm number 990307 Item 1

Page 99

Table II

Letter of Philip O'Sullivan, 1796

22. Major Philip O'Sullivan of Ardea, Co. Kerry = Johanna, dau. of Derby McCarthy, of Killoween, Esq. in said County.

23. Owen O'Sullivan, went to America, about 1736, or earlier.

Connected with the most respectable familyes in the province of Munster - particularly: -

The Count of Bearehaven, McCarthy More, Earl of Clincare, Earl Barrymore, The Earl of Thumond, The Earl of Clencarthy, McFinnan of Glanarough, O'Donoughu of Ross, O'Donoughu of Glyn, McCarthy of Carbery, O'Donovan, etc.
____________________________________________

Taken from book The Family of John Sullivan - August 18, 2004 -
Materials for a History of the family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England and of the O'Sullivan of Ardea, Ireland chiefly collected by the late Thomas Coffin Amory.
With a pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
BRITISH
929.2415
Su54m
Date of Microfilm 6/2/78
Item of Roll - 5
Camera No. - SL 17
Catalogue No. - XL1B7 - 102#1011
microfilm number 990307 Item 1

Page 98

The Family of John Sullivan

Eight Tables

To show in brie the Agreement and the Difference between Authorities on this Genealogy

[We number the Generations, in all the tables alike, according to the Pedigree by Sir Bernard Burke, counting Suildhubhain as Generation I.]

Table I.

John of Berwick's Account

16. Daniel O' Sullivan, Lord of Beer Heaven.

17. His second son, from whom was "orginally descendant"

21. Owen O' Sullivan, said to hae had four Countessess to his mothers and grandmothers = Mary Mac Sweeney, dau. of Col. Owen MacSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Capt. Edmond MacSweeney.

22. Major Philip O'Sullivan of Ardea, Co. Kerry, parish of Thououghsisty, by the River of Killmare and Barony of Genarough in said County. = Joane McCarthy, dau. to Dermod McCarthy of Killowen, and the dau. of McCarthy Reak of Carbery. She had three brothers and one sister, viz.: ---
23. John Sullivan, of Berwick, Me.

22. Florence, or mac ffinnin, whose son retained the titl of mac ffinnin.

22. Charles, who left two sons.
23. Derby = Ellina Sullivan of Bunnane.
23. Owen = Honora Mahony, dau. to Dinish Mahony of Droummere in the Barony of Dunderrane or Cappenicussiss

22. Owen, killed at the battle of Airim.

22. The sister = Dermod O'Sullivan, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan, Lord of Dunkerrane.
23. "Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender in Scotland, in 1745."
__________________________________

Taken from http://mccarthy.montana.com/Articles/KerryHistoryNotes.html on July 29, 2004

ARDEA CASTLE (See p. 273, vol. iv. No. 40.)
The "Paccata Hibernia" gives at p. 660: - "The warders of the castles of Ardea and Carricknesse on the sixth of the same moneth despayring of their master O'Sulevan's returne, rendered both their castles and their lives to the Queen's mercy, so that although he should have animum revertendi (Donal Cam, Lord of Beare), he had neither place of safetie whereunto hee might retyre, nor corn or cattel to feed himself, much less to uphold or renew any warre against the State." These castles were afterwards given to Sir Owen O'Sullivan More, who fought on the side of the English at this time.

In the "Life and Times of James O'Sullivan," by Thomas Amory, we have a very interesting genealogical note from the son of the last owner of Ardea, Philip O'Sullivan, son of Sir Owen O'Sullivan and the daughter of Colonel Owen MacSweeny, attainted with his father, who was obliged to fly to France, where he died from the effects of a wound received in a duel. When this Philip's son dictated the note he was nearly a hundred years old, so that his recollection went back to close on 1688: - "My father was Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea Castle, in the county of Kerry. My mother's name was Joanna MacCarthy, daughter of Dermot MacCarthy, of Killowen. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but she was a daughter of MacCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her eldest brother was Colonel Florence, or MacFineen, and he and his two brothers, Charles and Owen, went out in defence of their nation against Orange (the Prince of Orange). One was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retained the name of MacFineen. Charles I just remember. He left two sons Darby and Owen. Darby married Ellen O'Sullivan, of Bunaune. His brother, Owen, married Honora Mahony, daughter of Denis Mahony, of Dromore, in Dunkerron, county Kerry, and died in the prime of life much lamented. My father died of an ulcer in his breast, caused by a wound he received in France in a duel with a French officer. They were all a short-lived family. I never heard that any of the men arrived at sixty, and I do not remember but one alive when I left home in 1723. They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief, is added to the length of mine. My mother's sister married Dermot, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan, Lord of Dunkerron, and her son, as I understand, was with the Pretender in Scotland in 1745. This is all I can say about my origin, but I shall conclude with a Latin sentence:

Si Adam sit pater conctorum mater et Eva,
Cur non sunt homines nobilitates pares
Non pater aut mater dat nobis nobilitatem
Sed moribus vita nobilitatur homo.
If Adam be father of all, and Eve the mother,
Why, then, are not all men equally noble?
Neither father nor mother give true nobility,
But a man is ennobled by his life and manners.
__________________________________

Taken from http://mccarthy.montana.com/Articles/KerryHistoryNotes.html on July 29, 2004 -

In 1642, Owen O'Sullivan married Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney, by whom he had a son Philip, attainted like himself by the Cromwellians. He was afterwards a Major in King James' army, and was killed in a duel in France. He had been married to Joanna, daughter of Daniel McCarthy, of Killowen, by a daughter of McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. His wife's sister afterwards married Dermod, eldest son of O'Sullivan More, Lord of Dunkerron. The son of this Dermot O'Sullivan More was in 1745 the companion of Prince Charles Edward, on the occasion of his expedition into Scotland, and the partner of his trials and misfortunes in that country.
__________________________________________________

Taken from genelaogy.com on November 25, 2002 -
http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=008422&... -

The Prominent Families of the United States, Prominent Families, Page 265

Sullivan

Daniel O' Sullivan, m. Sarah, dau. of Conor O' Brien, 2nd Viscount Clare, and had issure:

Owen O'Sullivan, m. Mary, dau. of Owen McSweeney, and had issue:

Phillip O'Sullivan (Major), of Ardea, Co. Kerry; m. Joan, dau. of Dermod McCarthy, of Killoween, and had issue:
1. Patrick, whose descendants remained in Ireland.
2. Owen, of whom later.

Owen Sullivan (1690 - 1795), b., in Limerick, 17 June 1690; emigrated to America, 1723; settled at Berwick, Maine; m., 1735, Margery Browne, and, by her (who d. 1801), had issue:
1. Benjamin, b. 1736; d.s.p.
2. Daniel, of Sullivan, Maine, b. 1738; Captain in the Revolutionary War; m. (1) Anne Paul; m. (2) Abigial Bean; d. 1781, leaving issue.
3. John, of Durham, New Hampshire, b. 17 Feb 1740; Major-General in the Revolutionary Army, and first Governor of New Hampshire; m. Lydia Worcester; d. 23 Jan. 1795, leaving issue.
4. James, of whom later.
5. Ebenezer, b. 1753; Captain in the Revolutionary Army; m. Abigial Cotton; c. 3 June, 1799, leaving issue.
6. Mary, b. 1752; m. 1768, Theophilus Hary; d 1827, leaving issue.
He d. 20 June 1795.

James Sullivan (1744-1808), of Boston, Mass., b. 22 April 1744; LL.D. (Harvard), 1780; Member of the Provinical Council, 1775; Judge of the Superior Court, 1776-1782; Attorney General, 1790-1807; Governor of Mass., 1807-1880; m. (1), 22 Feb 1768, Mehetable, dau. of William Odiorne, and, be her (who d. 26 Jan. 1786), had issue:
1. James, b 6 Jan 1769; d.s.p. 29 June 1787.
2. William, b 30 Nov. 1774; Member of the Massachusetts State Legislature and Council for many years; Brigadier-General of Militia; LL.D. (Harvard), 1826; m., 1807, Sarah Webb Swan; d. 3 Sept. 1839, leaving issue.
3. John Langdon, of whom later.
4. Richard, b. 17 June 1779; m., 1804, Sarah Russell; d. 11 Dec. 1861, leaving issue.
5. William Bant, b. 16 March 1781; d. unm. 4 Dec 1806.
6. George, b. 21 Feb. 1783; m., 1809, Sarah Bowdoin Winthrop; d. 14 Dec. 1866, leaving issue.
7. Avis, b. 8 Oct 1771; d. in infancy.
8. Mehetable, b. 29 1772; m. (1), 1793, James Cutler; m. (2), 1801, Jonathon Amory; d. 24 March 1847, leaving issue.
9. Nancy, b. 24 April 1784; d. in infancy.
He d. 10 Dec 1808
_______________________________________________________________

From: Todd C. Yetter <mailto:tyetter@cumberlandcollege.edu> To: Angie Sullivan <mailto:tyetter@cumberlandcollege.edu> Sent: 10/7/02 7:47:44 AM Subject: O'Sullivan History
Angie,
[I tried sending this earlier but it was returned to me. I don’t know if it got through to anyone, so am resending it to you.]
Thank you for sending all of this information. Coincidentally, after you sent some things last week, I went on the web to see if I could substantiate any of what John (Owen) Sullivan had stated for his parentage. I found the following sites (which you may already know about) that give a wonderful history, background, and confirmation of John’s line:
<http://www.geocities.com/eomahony/Elizabethan.htm>; : West Cork and the Elizabethan Wars 1565-1603
<http://www.geocities.com/eomahony/OSullivan.htm>; : A Family Divided: The O’Sullivan Beare Case 1587-1601
<http://www.iol.ie/~edmo/mccarthy.html>; : McCarthy Mors
<http://www.celticcrossroads.com/celt1600.htm>; : Ancient Through Modern Times in Celtic History 1,600 AD to 1699
<http://www.montana.com/mccarthy/Articles/TheLastKing2.html&g...; : The Last King, Donal IX MacCarthy Mor,…
<http://www.kenmare.com/history/cappanacuss.html>; : John O’Sullivan of Cappanacuss Castle
<http://www.hils.fsnet.co.uk/family/main.htm>; : Sullivan Family Tree
<http://www.montana.com/mccarthy/Articles/CashelToCarbery.htm...; : From Cashel to Carbery
<http://www.montana.com/mccarthy/Articles/KerryHistory2.html&...; : Ancient History of the Kingdom of Kerry
http://www.montana.com/mccarthy/Articles/KerryHistoryNotes.h... <http://www.montana.com/mccarthy/Articles/KerryHistoryNotes.h...; : Notes for the article: Ancient History…
Again, thanks and hope this helps.
Todd
__________________________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 447

Dunkerron. Their son Dermond, second Count of Bearehaven, was page to the King of Spain, Philip the 4th. In Thurloe’s State Papers, vol. 1st, 479, will be found a letter from the Bishop of Cork, O’Sullivan Beare and O’Sullivan More, dated 1653, at Paris in reference to a landing of troops, estimated from eight to fourteen thousand, in Munster. Smith, 2d vol. Page 236, ed. 1774, says that in his time there was an O’Sullivan Beare in Spain, ennobled as Count of Bearehaven, who was hereditary governor of the Groyne. There is reason to believe that this line is now extinct.

2d. Sir Owen, 14th Lord of Bear and Bantry, married Ellen, daughter of James, Lord Barry, and died 1594. In 1568, he succeeded his brother as chief, and 1570, received a patent from the Crown of the territories of his sept; but his nephew Donnell when he came of age claimed as his rightful inheritance Beare, Bantry, Ardea and all other castles and domains, including the castle and haven of Dunboy. It was finally decreed that the castle of Beare, its haven and demesnes, should be allotted to Donnell; Bantry, about twenty miles to the North-east, to Sir Owen; saving to Sir Philip, younger brother and tanist to Sir Owen, the castle of Ardea and its dependencies on the river Kenmare in Glenarough. Dermod, son of Sir owen, married a daughter of Cormac, Lord Muskerry, and died Lord of Beare and Bantry, in 1617. Their son Dermod, married Joan, daughter of Gerald Fitzgerald, 16th Earl of Desmond, and succeeding his father, died in 1618. From him descends Marshal MacMahon, the present Duke of Magenta.

4th. Dermod, born 1526, married Johanna MacSwiney, grand-daughter of McCarthy More. He was ain all the wars against the English in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, at the head of a large force from Beare, and in the Catholic war was the advisor of his nephew Donald with whom he went into Spain about 1602. He received a pension of six hundred pieces of gold from the Spanish King, and died at Corunna, at the age of one hundred years, about 1626, his wife dying the same year. His son Don Phillip published soon after a history of Ireland in Latin, reprinted in 1850, to which is prefixed a Latin elegy, giving an account of his family. Another son Daniel was slain in fighting against the Turks. His daughter Helena was drowned returning from Spain, and another, Leonora, became a nun.

3d. Sir Phillip, of Ardea, who as tanist to Sir Owen’s son exercised the supreme authority, and held the castle of Ardea appertaining to Tanistry, married a daughter of Cormack, Lord of Duhallow, who built the celebrated castle of Kanturck, still remaining in possession of the Earls of Egmont. His son Donnel is mentioned by Betham as residing at the castle of Ardea in 1613. He was the ancestor of Master Sullivan of Berwick.

For this we depend upon the two following documents, the first drawn up by Master Sullivan, when nearly a hundred years of age at the request of the wife of his son John the revolutionary General; the second a letter from Ardea, dated May 16, 1796, addressed to his son General Sullivan in New Hampshire.

“I am the son of Major Phillip O’Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O’Sullivan, orginal descendent from the second son of Daniel O’Sullivan, called Lord of

__________________________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 448

Bearehaven. He married Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney, of Musgrey, and sister of Captain Esmond McSweeney, a noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer. They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom, or went out of the country. I never heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remember but one alive when I left home. My mother’s name was Joan McCarthy, daughter of Dermod McCarthy, of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother’s name I forget, but she was a daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Colonel Florence alias McFinnen, and his two brothers Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son who retains the title of McFinnen. Charles I just remember. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of Baunane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Dromore, in the barony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.

“They were short lived on both sides, but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is added to the length of mine. My mother’s sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O’Sullivan, Lord of Dunderron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender in Scotland, in the year 1746. This is all I can say about my origin; but shall conclude with a Latin sentence:

Si Adm sit pater cunctorum, mater et Eva:
Cur nan sunt homines nobilitate pares?
Non pater aut mater dant nobis nobilitatem:
Sed moribus et vita nobilitatur homo. J.S.

The letter referred to is as follows. “A grand uncle of mine having gone to America about sixty years ago, his relations have suffered greatly from being without the means of finding out his fate, till now, by great good fortune, I am informed that you are a son of his. If you find, by the account below, that I have not been misinformed, I shall be glad to hear from you.

“Mr. Owen O’Sullivan, son of Major Phillip O’Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry, Ireland, by Joanna, daughter of Dermod McCarthy, of Killoween, Esq., in said county. They were connected with the most respectable families in the province of Munster, particularly the Count of Bearehaven, McCarthy More, Earl of Clancare, Earl Barrymore, the Earl of Thomond, the Earl of Clancarthy, McFinnen of Glanarough, O’Donoughu of Ross, O’Donough of Glynn, McCarthy of Carberry, Lord Clancarthy and O’Donovan, &c.

I am Sir, your respectfully, “Ardea, May 16th, 1796. Phillip O’Sullivan.”

The connecting links in the pedigree between Owen mentioned in the first of the above documents and Sir Phillip of Ardea, were supplied in 1860, by Mr. Daniel O’Sullivan of Ardea, since deceased at.
_______________________________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 450

Muskerry, Donogh, was afterwards Earl of Clancarthy, and died in 1666. The father of Phillip, Daniel, is said to have married Margaret, daughter of the Earl of Clancarthy, who died in 1640, and who married Margaret, daughter of Donogh, 4th Earl of Thomond. The father of this Daniel is described in the letter as of Ardea Castle, and is therein said to have married a daughter of the Earl of Thomond. Two persons named Sarah O’Brien, of that family, according to Lodge, married in the sixteenth century O’Sullivans Beare. One, a granddaughter of the first Earl of Thomond, married as before stated, Donnel, 13th Lord of Bearehaven; the other a daughter of Viscount Clare of the same family, may have married said Donnel’s brother, Sir Phillip, of Ardea, but more likely one of his sons. The above statement stands the test of comparison of dates, and the aged gentleman on whose information we rely was no doubt substantially correct.

What part the family of Ardea took in the Catholic War or subsequent strife under Cromwell in defence of their property and religious rights, does not appear. O’Sullivan More lost a large portion of his territiories in the latter period. In 1653, he was in Paris with O’Sullivan Beare from Spain, making preparation for a descent on Munster, as mentioned above, with money furnished through the French King. From 1660, when Charles II was restored, all branches of the race enjoyed a brief respite of quiet and prosperity, but taking part with James the II against William of Orange, they were proscribed and banished. Major Phillip was with the garrison of Limerick, that, after a stubborn resistance, surrendered in 1691.

By the terms of surrender, such of the Catholics as were unwilling to abandon their religion and take unconditional oaths of allegiance to the English government, were to be furnished with transportation to France; and amongst those who preferred poverty and exile to this humiliation, was Major Phillip. He had married Joanna, daughter of Dermod McCarthy More, descended from the Earl of Clancarre who died in 1596, by Ellen daughter of McCarthy Reagh and Elinor, daughter of Lord Muskerry, who thus untied in her person the three principal branches of McCarthy More, Reagh, and Muskerry. Their property was confiscated, and they were reduced to poverty. The date of his death from the wound received in a duel in France, as mentioned by his son, is not known. He appears to have left two sons besides the subject of this notice, who was born on the seventeenth of June 1690, at Ardea, in the county of Kerry.

Little is known of his education. From its extent and thoroughness it was probably at some one of the seminaries on the continent, where his family in their prosperity had endowed, as was customary in those days, scholarships for the benefit of its members. He returned to Ireland to find even the terms of the surrender disregarded, and entered upon life under many discouragements. His original destination was for the priesthood, but this appears to have been early abandoned. Different traditions have been handed down with regard to his coming to America, but that which connects him with the effort to restore the Stuarts after the death of Queen Ann would seem the

Note: Clancarthy. Donogh, his son, the third Earl, married Elizabeth Spencer, daughter of the Earl of Sunderland, and becoming involved in the ruin of the Stuarts, was forced into exile and lived on the Continent.
_______________________________________

Taken from gencircles.com on October 6, 2002 -

Philip O'Sullivan
Birth: Est 1670
Death:
Sex: M
Father: Owen O'Sullivan
Mother: Mary MacSweeney
Also Known As: Americans of Royal Descent, Charles H. B
Occupation: Major, of Ardea 1
Spouses & Children
Joanna McCarthy Mor (Wife)
Children:
1. [Descendants] John Sullivan

1. Author: Charles H. Browning
Title: Americans of Royal Descent
Page: 202
Quality: 2
_____________________________________________

Taken from gencircles.com on October 2, 2002 -

Phillip O'SULLIVAN
Birth:
Death: 1691 in France
Sex: M
Father: Owen O'SULLIVAN
Mother: Mary MAC SWEENEY
Changed: 8 Sep 2001
Joanne McCARTHY (Wife)
Children:
1. Owen O'SULLIVAN
2. Dermot O'SULLIVAN
_______________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=008422&...
on October 2, 2002, The Prominent Families of the United States, Prominent Families, Page 265 -

Daniel O'Sullivan m. Sarah, daughter of Conor O'Brien, 2nd Viscount Clare, and had issue.

Owen O'Sullivan m. Mary, daughter of Owen McSweeney, and his issue

Phillip O'Sullivan (Major), of Ardea Co. Kerry; m Joan, dau of Dermod McCarthy, of Killoween, and had issue -
1. Patrick, whose descendents remain in Ireland
2. Owen, of whom later

Owen Sullivan (1690 - 1795), b., in Limerick, 17 June 1690; emigrated to America, 1723; settled in Berwick, Maine; m 1735, Margery Browne, and, by her (who d. 1801), had issue -
1. Benjamin b 1736; d.s.p.
2. Daniel, of Sullivan, Maine, b 1738; Captain in the Revolutionary War; m 1. Anne Paul; m. 2. Abigail Bean; d. 1781, leaving issue
3. John, of Durham, New Hampshire, b. 17 Feb 1740; Major-General in the Revolutionary Army; and first Governor of New Hampshire; m Lydia Worcester; d. 23 Jan. 1795, leaving issue.
4. James, of whom later.
5. Ebenezer, b 1753; Captain in the Revolutionary Army; m. Abigail Cotton; d 3 June, 1799, leaving issue.
1. Mary, b 1752; m., 1768, Theophilus Hardy; d. 1827, leaving issue.

He d. 20 June 1795

Jame Sullivan (1744 - 1808), of Boston, Mass., b 22 April 1744; LLD Harvard, 1780; member of the Provincial Council, 1775; Judge of the Superior Court 1776-1782; Attorney General, 1790-1807; Governor of Mass, 1807-1880; m 1. 22 Feb 1768 Mehatable, dau. of William Odiorne, and, by her (who d. 26 Jan. 1786), had issue -
1. James, b 6 Jan 1769; d.sp. 29 June 1787.
2. William b. 30 Nov 1774; Member of the Massachusetts State Legislature and Council for many years; Bridadier-General of Militia; LLD (Harvard), 1826; m., 1801 Sarah Webb Swan; d. 3 Sept 1839, leaving issue.
3. John Landon, of whom later.
4. Richard, b. 17 June 1779; m., 1804, Sarah Russell; d. 11 Dec 1861, leaving issue.
5. William Bant, b. 16 March 1781; d unm. 4 Dec 1806
6. George, b 21 Feb. 1783; m., 1809, Sarah Bowdoin Winthrop; d. 14 Dec. 1866, leaving issue.
1. Avis, b 8 Oct 1771; d. in infancy
2. Mehatable, b 29 July 1772; m. 1. 1793, James Cutler; m. 2. 1801, Jonathan Amory; d 24 March 1847, leaving issue.
3. Nancy, b 24 April 1784; d. in infancy.

He d. 10 Dec 1808

John Langdon Sullivan (1777 - 1865), of New York city; b 9 April 1777; M.D. Yale, 1837; m. 1. 10 Oct 1797, Elizabeth Russell, and, by her (who d. 16 April 1854), had issue: -
1. Thomas Russell, of whom later.
1. Elizabeth, b 27 Jan 1800; d num 16 Jan 1871.
2. Emily, b 4 Aug 1801; d unm 8 April 1880

He d. 10 Feb 1865, having m. 2, 1861, Susan Macash, who d.s.p
_____________________________________________________________


Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 04:03:34 -0600
From: "Larry Nicodemus" <m318619@mail.airmail.net> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book
To: "Angie Sullivan" <sullivanangie_spider@yahoo.com>
Subject: <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mail/clip.gif>; General Sullivan

Here is what I have dug up on General Sullivan and EBENEZER.

Larry

1. Major Philip Owen O'Sullivan b. Arda, m. Joane McCarthy, b. Cork. Major died ABT 1692. became exiled in France under General Patrick Sarsfield in 1691
Children:
2. i Master John Sullivan b. JUN 17 1690.
__________________________________________

From: riobardodwyer <riobardodwyer@eircom.net>
To: <angiesullivan@earthlink.net>
Date: 7/21/02 3:06:00 PM
Subject: O'Sullivan family line.

Dear Angie, That was a fascinating, huge email you sent me. For a few minutes I was on the verge of deleting it before opening it. Because of the appendage/attachment sign on to it and the fact of it taking so long to come in, I was "sure" it was only another one of the many viruses with which we have been plagued for some time back. I had another two emails above it to play around with. So I deleted the one nearest to it, and then your covering letter showed up, which showed that what would be in the attachment was genuine. Had you not put in that first covering letter, I would have deleted the lot and you would have been wondering why I wasn't answering you.

I deal with the Co. Cork section of the Beara Peninsula ----- which takes in the most of it. But what you are looking for is the section of the O'Sullivan Bere sept in the Lauragh/Ardea district of the Tuosist Parish, Co. Kerry, and going right in to the area around Kenmare. The expert on that Co. Kerry section of the O'Sullivan Sept (and also on the McCarthys and the general history of that area) is Mr. Gerard Lyne M.A., c/o National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2, Ireland. He is a native of the Tuosist Parish and has contributed many articles to the Kerry Historical Society's Journals over the years. Very recently he gave an excellent Lecture in Castletownbere entitled "The Kerry Lordship of O'Sullivan Bere", on the occasion of the 400th anniversary of the Siege of Dunboy. His Lecture would have covered alot of what you were looking for. I was hoping that I might be able to get Gerard's email for you from Connie Murphy, Vice-Chairman of the Beara Historical Society. I have been trying for the past two days to get Connie on the phone, but he seems to be away on holidays.

So, under the circumstances, your best bet would be to get in touch by letter with Gerard at the above address. He may still have a copy of that Lecture, and may be able to add alot more. You could send him what you had in the email, and take it from there. A descendant of that Tuosist, Co. Kerry, section of the O'Sullivan Bere's came to Castletownbere, and his descendants were/and are known as the Masters (Schoolmasters). I have the Co. Kerry (and later the Co. Cork section) part of those O'Sullivans covered in my book "Who were my Ancestors ? Castletownbere Parish". The coverage of the Lauragh/Ardea (Tuosist Parish, County Kerry) section of that family goes back to a schoolmaster Patrick O'Sullivan (1720-1800). One of this section, General John O'Sullivan, was on George Washington's Staff during the War of Independence. His brother was later Governor James O'Sullivan of Massachusetts (incl. at the time the State of Maine). Another descendant was later Superior Court Judge for the State of Massachusetts. If you would like to purchase a copy of the book, it costs $50 U.S. overall (cost of book, packing, and postage by surface mail, which usually takes 4/5 weeks to be delivered in the States). A personal check will do provided it is drawn on a Bank (not a Credit Union ---- which will not be cashed by a Bank here; new regulations). My home address is: Riobard O'Dwyer (Genealogist), Eyeries Village, Beara Peninsula, Co. Cork, Ireland.
Very best wishes, Riobard (= the Gaelic for Robert)
____________________________________________

Taken from ancestral file, IGI File, July 18, 2002 -

Philip O'SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: Abt. 1640
Ardee, Louth, Ireland
Parents:
Relatives:
Walter Scott SULLIVAN
_______________________________

Taken from http://james_clan.tripod.com/d0006/g0000002.html#I4072 -

Phillip O'SULLIVAN
____ - 1691
* DEATH: 1691, France
Father: Owen O'SULLIVAN
Family 1 : Joanne MCCARTHY
1. +Owen O'SULLIVAN
2. Dermot O'SULLIVAN
_________________________________

INDEX

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

James Sullivan
Sprague's Journal of Maine History
Vol. VII FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4
Page 171-187

James Sullivan

(BY JOHN FRANCIS SPRAGUE.)

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim that the Sullivans of Maine descended from the O'Sullivans of ancient Ireland.

They were a powerful septa, who dwelt in the southerly part of Ireland and are now extensively multiplied on both sides of theAtlantic.

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American activities.

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin to a remote period in Irish history.

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their national annals from the beginning of organized government under the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion
resulting from English invasion.

Irish historians assert that it is a well authenticated fact that under Queen Elizabeth, one measure adopted for the more perfect subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national
and private repositories these records, that by gradually weaken- ing, through their destruction, the spirit of clanship, the land might become an easier prey to the spoiler.

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and in many of the ancient chronicles, or psalters which escaped this authorized vandalism frequent mention is made of the O'Sullivans,
and their chieftains.

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first began upon its shores, Ireland had been as highly civilized as any part of western Europe. During those times and to a more recent date the O'Sullivans, who were hereditary princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the Province of Munster, and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarney.

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their domains for a long time remaining unmolested by the invaders they lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans.

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive century until the brave O'Sullivans early in the seventeenth cen- tury were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and
devastation. To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful clan to the time when John Sullivan left Limerick in Ireland and sailed for America would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the history of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his destination was is not now known. The ship in which he sailed was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed in York.

0n this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting romance. On the vessel was a pretty and attractive child named Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it appears that they were lost at sea.

John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left with his family the following statement:

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan, original descendant from the second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Captain Edmond McSweeney, a noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer. They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom or went out of the country I never heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem-
ber but one alive when I left home My mother's name was Toan McCar- thy, daughter of Dermod McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she was daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias
McFinnin, and [its two brothers, Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of McFinnin. Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the
siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of Bannane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the bar- ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.
They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is added to the length of mine. My mother's sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan, lord of Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin.

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea-son of his mother violently opposing his union with a certain young lady that ;he was deeply attached to.

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing in Limerick he was nearly penniless when he left home and entered into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him
after his arrival, to pay his passage to America. Unaccustomed to labor he applied to Parson Moody, of York, whom he had been informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can-celing his obligation to the captain.

John was well educated and tinder the advice of Parson Moody and some of his friends he opened a school at Berwick and became successful school teacher in York County.

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been indentured in accordance with the colonial custom of providing for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he
redeemed her from indenture and adopted her and brought her up and educated her as his own child. When she had reached the period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms and attractions.

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young man, clad in city attire, came by and engaged her in conversation. Fascinated by her charms. he then and there proposed marriage
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. Sullivan. He consulted Margery who frankly admitted that she had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much
to his joy, he assured him that she had no thought of anything serious. But the circumstance revealed to him his own sentiment towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal.
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual and although he was twenty years her senior, so far as any records or evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union.

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted his attention when not engaged in teaching. Much of the time he had two schools under his charge.

He has been described as "a marked man in his personal appear- ance, of great natural abilities and mental cultivation."

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory (1) asserts that he did not attend religious services in the neighbor- hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that reason "it has been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast to the faith of his childhood."

He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great energy and firmness of character.

Amory (supra) says: " Her sons very probably inherited largely from her the ambition and industry that made them useful and dis-tinguished."
____________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

1 Phillip O'SULLIVAN b: BET 1633-1666 d: AFT ___ 1691
+ Joane MCCARTHY b: BET 1641-1668 d: BET 1693-1756
2 John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 d: 1790
+ Margery BROWN b: 1714 d: 1801
3 Benjamin SULLIVAN b: BEF ___ 1740 d: BEF ___ 1776
3 Daniel SULLIVAN b: BEF ___ 1740
+ Abigail BEAN
4 Rachel SULLIVAN
4 James SULLIVAN
4 Hannah SULLIVAN
4 Mary SULLIVAN
4 Lydia SULLIVAN
4 John SULLIVAN
3 John SULLIVAN b: 17 FEB 1739 d: 23 JAN 1795
+ Lydia Remick WORSTER
4 Lydia SULLIVAN
4 John SULLIVAN
4 James SULLIVAN
4 George SULLIVAN
3 James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 d: 10 DEC 1808
+ Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748 d: 26 JUN 1786
4 James SULLIVAN b: 1754 d: 27 AUG 1825
+ Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 d: 15 DEC 1847
5 Samuel SULLIVAN
5 John SULLIVAN
5 James SULLIVAN
5 Owen SULLIVAN
5 Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 d: 1 JUL 1872
+ Jane CATHEY d: 1825 BEF
6 George Logan SULLIVAN b: 1820 d: 1877
+ Mary Adeline HAUSS b: 1822 d: 1894
7 John F. SULLIVAN b: OCT 1846
+ Catherine HAYES b: MAY 1846 d: BEF 7 JAN 1920
8 Charles SULLIVAN b: AUG 1871
+ Minnie _____ b: DEC 1871
8 Mary E. SULLIVAN b: JUL 1877
8 Fannie G. SULLIVAN b: NOV 1879
8 Maggie E. SULLIVAN b: JUN 1882
8 _____ SULLIVAN
8 _____ SULLIVAN
8 _____ SULLIVAN d: BEF 1900
8 _____ SULLIVAN d: BEF 1900
7 Frances Jane SULLIVAN b: 1847
+ Monroe LINGLE
7 Allison SULLIVAN b: 1849
7 James A. SULLIVAN b: 1853
+ Alace M. BROWN b: 1856
8 George Logan SULLIVAN b: 1879
8 Mary Irene SULLIVAN b: MAY 1880
7 George Andrew SULLIVAN b: 30 NOV 1857 d: 9 APR 1915
+ Mildred Louisa SHARPE b: AUG 1862
8 Dannie SULLIVAN
8 Effie SULLIVAN
+ Bryan HARTLEY
8 Jess SULLIVAN
8 Robert SULLIVAN
8 Maude SULLIVAN
+ Ira JUSTICE
8 James Monroe SULLIVAN b: 29 JAN 1880 d: 14 JAN 1965
+ Myrtle Caroline RASH b: 13 JUN 1885 d: 17 MAR 1940
7 Charles William (Will) SULLIVAN b: 1861 d: 1932
+ Margaret (Maggie) STEELE
8 George Walter SULLIVAN b: 27 SEP 1894 d: 8 JAN 1965
+ Mary OSBORNE
8 Lucy SULLIVAN
+ Thomas Finley HAWKINS
8 Charlie SULLIVAN d: 1935
7 Susan Victoria SULLIVAN b: 26 OCT 1863 d: 8 MAY 1944
+ William Wesley BUSH b: 5 JUL 1856 d: 10 MAY 1930
8 Andrew Houck BUSH b: 3 DEC 1891 d: 17 NOV 1979
+ Billy MOORE b: 23 OCT 1898 d: 4 SEP 1978
9 Fred BUSH b: 24 OCT 1919 d: 25 JUN 1927
8 E L BUSH b: 11 JAN 1894 d: 26 FEB 1894
8 Logan Gwynn BUSH b: 2 MAY 1895 d: 28 SEP 1966
+ Toy Mae CHILDERS b: 5 MAY 1900 d: 20 JAN 1978
9 William Hearon BUSH b: 11 SEP 1917 d: 7 JUL 1989
9 Luther Hicks BUSH b: 27 APR 1919 d: 4 JAN 1994
8 Bryan Jennings BUSH b: 26 JUL 1896 d: 6 AUG 1988
+ Florence Sue HEFFNER b: 13 FEB 1898 d: 10 JUN 1920
9 Eleanor Sue BUSH b: 4 DEC 1919 d: 7 JAN 1993
+ Ollie Floyd HOWELL b: 27 NOV 1912 d: 16 MAY 1986
10 Eleanor Anne HOWELL b: 4 JUN 1942 d: 4 JUN 1942
+ Americus Myrtle CLEMENTS b: 1897 d: JUL 1968
+ Ruth SELLEY b: 6 FEB 1899 d: 5 JAN 1990
8 Flowers D. BUSH b: 23 SEP 1900 d: 19 NOV 1900
8 Joseph Ivy BUSH b: 17 JAN 1902 d: 6 JAN 1980
9 Joseph Ivy BUSH b: 20 APR 1924 d: 23 AUG 1943
+ Nancy Lee BONNER b: 16 FEB 1909 d: 19 MAY 2001
8 Clinard Steele BUSH b: 16 SEP 1905 d: 17 JUN 1907
8 Virgil Boyd BUSH b: 19 FEB 1909 d: AUG 1981
+ Fern HIXON b: 9 NOV 1911 d: 10 FEB 1961
7 Dock Scroggs SULLIVAN b: MAR 1868
+ Alice M. HARTLEY
8 Lloyd G. SULLIVAN b: MAR 1894
8 Annie SULLIVAN b: APR 1896
8 Fred SULLIVAN b: MAR 1898
+ Gullie _____ b: SEP 1865
+ Catherine SPRATT b: 5 DEC 1798
6 Charles Coatsworth SULLIVAN b: 1836
+ Martha _____ b: 1836
7 Nancy J. SULLIVAN b: 1861
7 Dora SULLIVAN b: 1867
6 Nancy Jane SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1829 d: 1 JAN 1850
+ John E. HOKE b: 1 AUG 1819 d: 10 AUG 1872
7 Franklin Joseph HOKE b: 20 NOV 1849 d: 13 OCT 1897
5 Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 d: 3 AUG 1851
+ Sarah SULLIVAN b: 1807 d: 1880 AFT
6 Martha J. SULLIVAN b: 1832
+ John CORNWELL b: 1833
7 Charles C. CORNWELL b: 1853
+ Bettie _____ b: 1854
8 Mary Jane CORNWELL b: APR 1880
7 Wade H. CORNWELL b: 1858
7 Ellen CORNWELL b: 1863
7 John CORNWELL b: 1866
7 Thomas CORNWELL b: 1869
7 Laura CORNWELL b: 1873
7 Emma CORNWELL b: 1876
6 Morris SULLIVAN b: 1833
6 Sarah A. SULLIVAN b: 1835
6 Matilda SULLIVAN b: 1838
6 James Erwin SULLIVAN b: 1846
6 Frances Adelaide SULLIVAN b: 1848
6 Alice J. SULLIVAN b: 1851
+ Monroe DELLINGER b: 1851
7 Robert DELLINGER b: 1873
7 Charles Lester DELLINGER b: 1876
7 Grier DELLINGER b: 1878
7 Beatrice DELLINGER b: DEC 1879
6 Jasper SULLIVAN b: 1856
6 Pinkey SULLIVAN b: 1858
5 Sarah SULLIVAN
5 Mary SULLIVAN
4 William SULLIVAN
4 John SULLIVAN
4 Richard SULLIVAN
4 Bant SULLIVAN
4 Nancy SULLIVAN
4 Hettie SULLIVAN
+ Johnathan AMORY
4 George SULLIVAN
+ Martha LANGDON
3 Mary SULLIVAN b: 1752
3 Ebenezer SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 d: 3 JUN 1799
+ Abigail COTTON


Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Add Post-em
* ID: I9756
* Name: Phillip O'SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: BET 1633-1666 in Ardea, Ireland 1
* Death: AFT ___ 1691 1
Marriage 1 Joane MCCARTHY b: BET 1641-1668
Children
1. [Has Children] John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland

Sources:

1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
______________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I34117
* Name: Philip O'Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: BET. 1633 - 1666 in Ardea, Ireland
* Death: AFT. 1691
* Note:
[swla2002.FTW]

[NEW.GED]

[SWLA.FTW]

[Genealogy.com, LLC WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585, Date of Import: Oct 30, 2000]

Major Phiulip O'Sullivan of Ardea, who after the loss of Limerick in 1691 to William of Orange, became an exile in France and there he died soon after from a wound inflicted by a French officer. (from A General of the Revolution John Sullivan of New Hampshire by Charles P. Whittemore)

Marriage 1 Joane McCarthy b: BET. 1641 - 1668

* Married: WFT Est. 1658-1689

Children

1. [Has Children] John Sullivan b: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
____________________________________________

Others Searching for Connections:

----- Original Message ----- From: Sue Stuart <mailto:suestu@charter.net> To: angiesullivan@earthlink.net <mailto:suestu@charter.net> Sent: 9/10/02 2:20:41 PM Subject: Cornelius Sullivan 1749-1818 MD
Our family history says we may be related to Philip O"Sullivan from Ardea. I have never found a connection. Do you know? I saw your connection to Philip.
Cornelius Sullivan b. 1749
d. March 1816 in Westminster, Carroll Co, MD
m. ca 1775 Catherine Bohne
issue: John, Jacob, Margaret, Abraham, Mary, Daniel, David, William, and Michael(my line)
Thanks,
Sue
______________________________________

Taken from IGI on February 18, 2005 -

Ordinance Record FamilySearchâ„¢ International Genealogical Index v5.0
British Isles

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Philip O'Sullivan
Male Family
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Event(s):
Birth: About 1650 Ardea, , Louth, Ireland
Christening:
Death:
Burial:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LDS Ordinances:
Baptism: 26 JUN 1937
Endowment: 03 NOV 1937 LOGAN
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Parents:
Father: Owen O'Sullivan Family
Mother: Mary M. Sweeney
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Marriages:
Spouse: Unavailable Family
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Relative/Proxy:
David D. Sullivan
Lars Sorensen
____________________________________________

Ordinance Record FamilySearchâ„¢ International Genealogical Index v5.0
British Isles
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Philip <O'SULLIVAN>
<Male>
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Event(s):
Birth: 1650 Ardea, , , Ireland
Christening:
Death:
Burial:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LDS Ordinances:
Endowment: 03 NOV 1937
Sealing to Parents: 12 NOV 1937 LOGAN
Owen O'Sullivan / Mary McSweney O'Sullivan
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Parents:
Father: Owen O'Sullivan Family
Mother: Mary McSweney O'Sullivan
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Relative/Proxy:
Henry Lucherini
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Messages:
Record of LDS Church ordinance (living or proxy). The record often shows the name of the individual and his or her relationship to a descendant, shown as the heir, family representative, or relative. The original records are arranged by temple, ordinance type, ordinance date, and the relative's name. A family group record for this couple may be in the Family Group Record Collection; Archive Section. (See the Family History Library Catalog for the film number.) These records are alphabetical by name of the father or husband.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Film Number: 178106
Page Number: 1126
Reference number: 39779

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