Search for content in message boards

The Facts; The Late,Great Loius D. and Mary L. Plesha

Replies: 1

The Facts; The Late,Great Loius D. and Mary L. Plesha

John R. Plesha Sr. (View posts)
Posted: 29 Jan 2003 1:58PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hello all, out of respect for my family name I will not lower myself and respond to the low class response (Croatian Dysfunction?) by someone who gets their information from Louis and Mary's firstborn child whose only interaction with them during their final years was to stand at the door greeting mourners at their funerals with tear filled eyes or fighting over their measly estates with his siblings.The truth is that their three children didn't come close to their accomplishments in life or their lack of obsession with material things. They were fiercly proud of their heritage and lifetime members of the CFU and always put family first. Mary's side of the family(Tomich,Klobicar) were the ones originating from the long walk her father (Matt Tomic)took from Louisiana to Summit,IL just before the turn of the century,after working his way across the Atlantic on a Freighter and then spent several years in South America before that long walk to the Chicago area and was proud to have become a U.S. Citizen in 1897.Mary was one of five children,and the only girl.They lived on a small farm on the shore of the DesPlaines River until the 1920's when they were ordered by the State to leave their farm because the highway known as I-55 was being built and set to run right through their land and subsequently the work by the Army Corp of Engineers to reverse the flow of the Desplaines River,presumably part of the project.They moved to Summit and built a large home near the site where the monument used to stand marking the spot where explorers Joliet and Marquette made their famous Portage on the Desplaines River centuries ago. It is said that her mother ran a boarding house for the workers who built the Chicago Sanitary & Ship Canal near the Summit home that they,their children,grandchildren and great-granchildren proudly lived until June,2002-two years after Mary's death on March 31,2000. She was a great woman with a heart of gold and will be greatly missed by most of her family and all who knew and respected her.Louis was a man of many accomplishments and I only have time now to mention a few.He was one of ten brothers and sisters whose family struggled with his fathers death by a hit-and-run driver in McCook,IL,a small town bordering Summit where he resided after meeting and marrying Mary one New Years Eve many years ago.He was an avid athlete and was a player on the McCook Indians Semi-Pro baseball team when he was approached by scouts from the Boston Red Sox and Cleveland Indians to play professional baseball.He turned them down because his father didn't believe that a man should play sports for money and around the same time period became the youngest Village Clerk in IL history,where he was known for his incorruptibility and integrity in serving his community.He also laid the groundwork and worked with others to help bring one of the areas largest employers to McCook which resulted in thousands of Illinoisan's getting good jobs to date-GM's Electro-Motive Division Plant where he also became employed and retired from after many years of loyal service. He still competed on many company teams and events and was well known for his Bowling abilities,playing in tournaments across the country including ABC's first televised Bowling Tournament in Televisions earliest days.He served the Village of Summit well for many years as the Park Dist. President and Commisioner and was a member of many civic groups and contributed greatly to the I&M Canal Corridor becoming a National Park Recreational Area with his groundbreaking work and photgraphs and historic memoribilia he contributed in the early stages prior to his decline in health. He also was a member of the Old Timers Baseball Assn. and attended games with his friend the late Harry Carry until his health precluded him from play and attendance. He was well liked and remembered by all-especially when he got you to shake his hand when he would literally sqeeze the blood from your hand with his vise-like grip. His good natured sense of humor and integrity left those who knew him with a deep sense of loss with his passing.Mary and Louis Plesha were,are,the greatest people to ever live in my book.I hope there are still some Plesha's left that give the family name even half the honor that they brought to the family name,although the likelihood seems minute to me now. And unlike certain others-I'm the first to admit that while I may have the heart,I will never be able to be half the person they were.But I learned enough from them to instill their values on my children to varying degrees and I know Granny and Gramps are smiling down on us now in spite of the ways certain others have chosen to put attention on others so their own shortcomings and failures don't stand out so much. All replies and inquiries will be handled in order and factually. Thanks for your time and I'm functioning just fine!!




SubjectAuthorDate Posted
John R. Plesha Sr. 29 Jan 2003 8:58PM GMT 
DanielPlesha 12 Mar 2003 11:40PM GMT 
per page

Find a board about a specific topic

  • Visit our other sites:

© 1997-2014 Ancestry.com | Corporate Information | New Privacy | Terms and Conditions