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1751 To 1800s

Replies: 2
Posted: 2 Apr 2009 2:14AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Skipper
1751 England -
ABIGAIL SKIPPER Christening: 24 SEP 1751 Shotesham Saint Mary, Norfolk, England
father JOHN SKIPPER
mother ELIZABETH (?)
Source Information Batch Number: 8606433 Sheet 81 Source Call No 1396167 Type Film

Bertie Co., NC 1752 to New York -
About 300 Tuscarora men, women, and children were living on 40,000 acres in Bertie County between 1752 and 1761 Saunders, Colonial Records, V161-2, 320-1
The tribe never gave up its Indian customs.
Their numbers had been reduced to 260 in 1766 when they leased part of their land.
155 members of the tribe moved to the state of New York after the 1766 lease, and the remainder joined them in 1802 Swanton, Indian Tribes of North America, 87

1752 Anson Co., NC -
Thomas Kemp, born before 1731; died after 1761. On 20 Sept. 1752 Thomas2 Kempt, planter, sold to Benjamin Clark for 30 pounds 200 acres on the south side of the Great Pee Dee River, adjoining the widow Kemp's corn field and Benjamin & Christopher Clark's corner, which they had bought from John2 Kemp. Thomas2 Kemp signed his mark. Witnesses were William2 Kemp, Arthor Skipper and Benjamin Menrs. (27) On 2 June 1754 Elizabeth & John2 Kemp granted a power-of-attorney to Thomas2 Kemp regarding 150 acres on the west side of the Great Pee Dee River, on both sides of Mill Creek, adjoining Thomas Tompkins and Thomas Coil.(28) On 5 Jan. 1756 Thomas2 Kemp "now or lately of Anson Co." sold this land to John Persons for 15 pounds, signing the deed with his mark. Witnesses were Hez. Russ and John Acfie.(29) Thomas2 Kemp witnessed a deed from Edmund Cartledge of Anson Co. to Tillotson Keble on 23 Jan. 1758. The other witness was Laurence O'Bryan.(30) On 18 Oct. 1758 Thomas Kemp witnessed a deed from Edmund Cartledge to Tillotson Keble. The other witnesses were Samuel O'Bryan and Sarah Walker.(31) Thomas2 Kemp witnessed a deed from Joseph Nobbs "late of Anson" to William Cox, of Anson Co., on 24 Nov. 1761. The other witness was Isaac Brunson.(32) - Kemp of Williamsburgh, Craven Co., SC, Bladen and Anson Cos., NC and Wayne Co., GA -
Source artemis. crosslink. net

1752 Bertie Co., NC -
Robert West, Sr., advertised in the North Carolina Gazette of New Bern on 13 March 1752 for Thomas Bowman as if he were a runaway slave: ....... Ran away from the subscribers, on Roanoke River, a Negro fellow, named Thomas Boman, a very good blacksmith, near 6 feet high, he can read, write and cyper, Whoever will apprehend him shall be paid 12 Pistoles, besides what the law allows [Fouts, NC Gazette of New Bern, I:3]. ....... Almost twenty years later Thomas Bowman was a taxable "free Molatto" in John Moore's household in the Bertie County tax list of 1771, 1772, and 1774 [CR 10.702.1, Box 13].
Source freeafricanamericans.com

1752 -
Joseph Skipper - Married Gemina (unknown last name)
Children
1. Priscilla Skipper B 1752
2. Milly Skipper B: 1754
3. Nathan Skipper B: 1755 Onslow CO, NC

1754 Bladen County, Nc -
Mixed-race families from Virginia were among the earliest settlers of Bladen County, North Carolina, from which Robeson County was formed in 1787. They were described in a report to the colonial governor of North Carolina in 1754 50 families a mixt Crew, a lawless People, possess the Lands without patent or paying quit rents shot a Surveyor for coming to view vacant lands being inclosed in great swamps. ... No Indians.. in the county Saunders, Colonial Records, V:161.
The colonial tax lists for Bladen County listed the following mixed-race families as "Mulattoes" from 1768 to 1770 Braveboy, Carter, Chavis, Clark, Cox, Cumbo, Dimry, Doyal (Dial), Drake, Evans, Goin, Groom, Hammons, Hayes, Hunt, Ivey, James, Johnston, Jones, Kersey, Lamb, Locklear, Lowery, Overton, Oxendine, Perkins, Phillips, Russell, Skipper, Sweat, Sweeting, Walden, Wharton, Wilkins, and Wilson. One person was called an Indian

1754 Onslow NC -
Joseph Skipper - Married Gemina (unknown last name)
Children
1. Priscilla Skipper B: 1752,
2. Milly Skipper B 1754
3. Nathan Skipper B 1755 Onslow CO, NC
Onslow NC 1755 -
Joseph Skipper - Married Gemina (unknown ?last name)
Children
1. Priscilla Skipper B: 1752,
2. Milly Skipper B 1754
3. Nathan Skipper B 1755 Onslow CO, NC

1755 - August 21, 1755 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
WILLIAMSBURG, August 8. By an Express this Morning from Augusta County, we have the melancholy Account of the Murder of Col. James Patton, who was killed by a Party of Indians, the last Day of July, on the Head Branches of Roanoke, and eight more Men, Women, and Children. Col. Patton was going out with Ammunition, &c. for the Use of the Frontier Inhabitants, and stopping at a Plantation on the Road to refresh himself, the Convoy being about five Miles before, he was beset by 16 Indians, who killed, and stripped him, and then made off with his Horse, &c. We are likewise well assured, that the Indians have killed 7 or 8 People in the County of Halifax, near Smith Mountains, and that at least 70 or 80 Families have left their Habitations in that County, and fled for it, some to North Carolina, and some further down into the County, and the County of Lunenburg.

October 9, 1755 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
BOSTON, Sept. 29. By a Vessel from North-Carolina, we have Advice from good Hands, that the Cherokee Tribe of Indians, encouraged by a Bounty of Three Pounds Sterling, and Seven Pounds for every Scalp of the Enemy, granted by the Province of South-Carolina, had, to the Number of 1600, engaged to march against the French, and the Indians in their Interest, on the Ohio; and that as a further Encouragement towards the Expedition, the Government of North-Carolina, had made a present to them of 300 Steers. (A late Writer says, “The Cherokees are computed to be three Times the Number of the Six Nations put together. They are a free and independent People, were never conquered, never relinquished their Possessions, never sold them, never surrendered or ceded them.”)

1755 Onslow NC and England -
Nathan Skipper Birth Date 1755 City: Onslow State: NC Country USA died 1840 Maury Tenn married Nancy (?) children are
Children
1. Moses Skipper Spouse Mary (Potter) married Grace (?) born abt 1720
Source www. familysearch.org
Abraham Skipper Birth: 1755 - North Carolina, USA Death1819 - Brunswick, North Carolina, USA Parents: Barnabus Skipper Spouse Mary (Potter) children
Children
1. Nathaniel A Skipper M 7 Aug 1792 in [city], [county], North Carolina, USA
2. Rebecca Skipper F abt 1794
3. Silas Skipper M abt 1796
4. Sophia Skipper F abt 1798
5. David Alfred Skipper M abt 1802 in Brunswick, [county], North Carolina, USA
6. Jacob L Skipper M abt 1804
7. Drucilla E Skipper F abt 1806
8. John Wiley Skipper M 26 Jan 1810 in [city], Brunswick, North Carolina, USA
Source Ancestry.com
1755 Brunswick Co., NC -
MARY3 POTTER (MILES2, ROBERT1) was born Abt. 1763 in Brunswick Co., NC. She married ABRAHAM SKIPPER, son of BARNABUS SKIPPER. He was born Abt. 1755, and died Abt. 1820.
Children of MARY (POTTER) and ABRAHAM SKIPPER are: 16.
i. NATHANIEL4 SKIPPER, b. August 07, 1792; d. April 16, 1878.
ii. REBECCA SKIPPER, b. Abt. 1794. 17.
iii. SILAS SKIPPER, b. Abt. 1796, NC; d. September 1849, Dale Co., AL.
iv. SOPHIA SKIPPER, b. Abt. 1798. 18.
v. DAVID ALFRED SKIPPER, b. Abt. 1802, Brunswick Co., NC.
vi. JACOB L. SKIPPER, b. Abt. 1804.
vii. DRUCILLA E. SKIPPER, b. Abt. 1806.
viii. JOHN WILEY SKIPPER, b. January 26, 1810.
source www.rootsweb.com
her father was 2. MILES2 POTTER (ROBERT1) was born 1740 in Town Creek, Brunswick Co., NC,
and died Abt. 1798 in Will was written October 10, 1798. He married ELIZABETH. Children of MILES POTTER and ELIZABETH are: 3. i. JAMES POTTER3 SR., b. 1756, Town Creek, Brunswick Co., NC; d. 1830, Town Creek, Brunswick Co., NC. ii. LETICIA POTTER. 4. iii. JOHN G. POTTER, b. 1752, Brunswick Co., NC; d. September 20, 1826, Brunswick Co., NC. 5. iv. MILES POTTER JR., b. December 04, 1754, Brunswick Co., NC; d. August 17, 1827, Town Creek, Brunswick Co., NC. v. ROBERT POTTER, b. 1758, Brunswick Co., NC; d. April 1850, New Hanover Co., NC of fever. 6. vi. MARY POTTER, b. Abt. 1763, Brunswick Co., NC.
his father was 1. ROBERT1 POTTER was born 1708 in New Hanover Co., NC per Jim Ruark, and died 1757 in New Hanover Co., NC. He married MARY W.. She was born Abt. 1700 in New Hanover Co., NC. Children of ROBERT POTTER and MARY W. are: i. JOHN2 POTTER, b. 1730, Town Creek, Brunswick Co., NC; d. Bef. 1771, New Hanover Co., NC. ii. ROBERT POTTER, b. 1735, Town Creek, Brunswick Co., NC; d. 1783,
Smithville, Brunswick Co., NC; m. ANN WILLETTS. iii. MARY POTTER, b. 1740, Town Creek, Brunswick Co., NC. 2. iv. MILES POTTER, b. 1740, Town Creek, Brunswick Co., NC; d. Abt. 1798, Will was written October 10, 1798. v. MARGARET POTTER, b. 1742, Town Creek, Brunswick Co., NC; m. ARTHUR MCKAY. vi. ELIZABETH POTTER, b. 1744, Town Creek, Brunswick Co., NC.
source www.rootsweb.com

1755 Cool Springs Horry Co., SC -
Hugh O Skipper Born: abt 1874
his father was Matthew McKinley Skipper Born: 29 Oct 1844 Cool Springs, Horry, South Carolina, USA Died: 4 Mar 1924
his father was Arthur Crawford Skipper Born: 7 Feb 1823 [city], Horry, South Carolina, USA Died: 17 Jun 1906 S, [country]
his father was Peter Skipper Born: [city], [county], South Carolina, USA Died: 60
his father was Peter Skipper Born: 1755 [city], [county], South Carolina, USA Died:

1756
John Peter Sheifer State: SC County: Granville County Township: Muster Roll Year: 1756 Page: 234 Database: SC Early Census Index

Samuel Spry State: SC County: Granville County Township: Muster Roll Year: 1756 Page: 237 Database: SC Early Census Index

1750s and 1757 SC and NC Border - Rotten Grain and Strong Sprits -
Native leaders were not blind to such problems, and by the 1750s many were speaking out against the alcohol trade. One of the most eloquent was a Catawba chief known as King Haglar, who lived near the border of North Carolina and South Carolina. In 1757 he chastised traders who would " rot your grain in tubs, out of which you take and make strong spirits", and vainly urged colonial officials to stem the flow of Caribbean rum and English whiskey into people's villages. more You sell it to our young men, and give it to them, many times... it rots their guts and causes our men to get very sick, and many of our people have lately died by the effects, and I heartily wish you would do something to prevent your people from daring to sell or give them any of that strong drink. - King Haglar, Catawba -
Source BOOK, Through Indian Eyes , Reader's Digest Association, Inc Page 61 -
NOTE: - This book is filled with facts about Indian History.

1757 - April 7, 1757 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
March 10. A Gentleman, who lives at the Yadkin, writes to a Friend of his here, of the 19th ult. “That 13 Catawba Indians, had just passed by there, from Fort Cumberland, with 4 French Scalps, which they got (with some others they had delivered to the Governor of Virginia) in several Skirmishes near Fort du Quesne, and lost only two of their Men: That 17 compleat Catawba Warriors passed by his House the Day before, going to War against the French: And that they inform’d him, King Hagler was to follow them in a few Days with 100 more.”

June 16, 1757 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
WILLIAMSBURG, May 27. The Persons who afterwards conducted them thro’ the settlements to the Boundary Line of North-Carolina, report, That no Men could behave better than they did in all their March; that they were continually talking of the Agent and his Speech with the greatest Satisfaction, and often repeated, that they would send fresh Parties to our Frontiers. ‘Tis to be hoped that those who were present, and know what passed, while those Indians were here in Williamsburg, and in what a Temper they left it, will, when they read the above, be convinced what an Injury Gentlemen do to their Country and themselves, who not having had sufficient Opportunities of knowing Indians and their Affairs or Manners, yet, with an ill-timed, tho’ well meant Intention, concern themselves too much with them, and interfere in the Management committed by his Majesty to the said Agent, for the general Good of his Subjects

1759 Cheraw Indians -
In 1759 a party of 45 "Charraws," some of whom were under their chief, "King Johnny," joined the English in the expedition against Ft Du Quesne -
NOTE: - I would like to know more about this chief. -
What was his last name? -
Was he married? -
Did he have children? -
What was his wife's name?

1759 - July 19, 1759 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
Charles-Town, in South-Carolina, June 16. July 4. Letters from North-Carolina inform us, that the Back Inhabitants of that Province being kept in continual Alarms by the Cherokees, a strong Detachment of their Provincial Forces, under the Command of Major Waddell, was marched towards the Western Frontiers, for the Protection of the Inhabitants. At the same time no Mention is made of any Outrages committed by those Indians since their Murdering some of the Settlers in Rowan County.

July 26, 1759 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
Charles-Town, in South-Carolina, July 14. Monday arrived an Express from the Settlements in the Forks of Broad-River, with an Account, that on the 22d ult. the Bodies of two Hunters, named Beeks and Trammel, were found cruelly murdered, about a Mile distant from each other: They appeared to have been killed some Days; the People there were much terrified, and persuaded themselves that the Cherokees were the Authors of this Mischief; but the Persons murdered were not scalped, nor were any Indian Tokens found near the Bodies. - Our last Letters from Cape-Fear, dated the 6th Instant, say, “That on the 1st Col. Harris arrived there Express from the back Settlements, to acquaint Governor Dobbs, that 2 or 3 Days before he left them, a Man belonging to a scouting Party that had been sent out upon the first Mischief done by the Indians in those Parts, as he was looking for his Horse, was surrounded, killed and scalped by 3 Indians; and that 2 Lads had been missing 3 Days, supposed to have been taken and carried off by the same Indians: That the back Settlers had therefore mostly quitted their Habitations, and taken Shelter in Fort Dobbs; while others were endeavouring to discover the Enemy. And that the Catawbas insinuated these Outrages were committed by Shawanese; but it was the Opinion of Col. Harris, and the rest of the white People, the Murderers were some of the Middle-Towns Cherokees. That Governor Dobbs had thereupon ordered two Detachments up for the Protection of the Western Frontiers, one of 30 Men from Capt. Bailey’s Company from Ocacock, and one of the same Number of Men from Fort Johnston, all to be under the Command of Major Waddel, who had sent 6 Swivel Guns and Ammunition before him as far as there was Water-Carriage, and marched himself the 3d Instant; and on his Arrival with this Force on the Western-Frontiers, it was hoped the Inhabitants would return to their Settlements. - Besides the Troops already in the Pay of this Province, the General Assembly have this Week resolved, that two Companies of Rangers be forthwith raised, for the Protection of the Inhabitants in our back Settlements, against the Insults and Outrages of Indians.

August 7, 1759 Edinburgh Evening Courant -
Charles -Town, June 1. Advices from fort Laudoun, by an express who arrived in town on Friday, mention, that 15 of the Cherokee Indians were returned to Settico, in the Upper Cherokees, with 22 scalps of those poor people murthered in Rowan country [sic]. We hear proper measures have been taken by the administration here, for obtaining effectual satisfaction for the outrageous breach of treaty, and impudent and barbarous insult committed by those Cherokees, in murdering and scalping the Rowan settlers.

November 22, 1759 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
Charles -Town (in South Carolina) October 13. Mr. Richard Smith, the Virginia Trader, who was going to the Cherokees with 80 Horse Load of Goods, arrived here last Sunday Afternoon, with a Cherokee Indian, under an Escort of Militia: There was another Indian with him, who made his Escape, on seeing the Province in Arms. Mr. Smith fortunately had Directions to proceed no farther than to Salisbury, in North-Carolina, till he should receive further Instructions from Governor Lyttleton, and accordingly left his Goods there; but finding all Parts alarmed, instead of waiting for the Instructions he expected, proceeded hither immediately. - October 20. By an Express which arrived here Yesterday Morning from North - Carolina, we have Advice, that Governor Dobbs has sent Orders for making Draughts from all the Northern Regiments of Militia in his Province, to act against the Cherokees, if necessary; and that he was sending Ammunition to those Regiments, and taking every other Measure proper in the present Juncture.

December 13, 1759 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
Charles-Town (in South Carolina) Nov. 10. November 24. Wednesday Evening, an Express which had been sent by this Government to Virginia, returned from thence in ten Days. Private Advices by him, do not so much as hint that any Thing is likely to be done by that Government towards our Expedition to the Cherokees: But our Letters from Cape-Fear confidently say that North-Carolina Banishes an Aid in Men, and that they are actually on their March to join our Forces at, or near, Keowee

1749 / 1759 Raleigh NC - Anson County: -
Record of Deeds 1749-1759, Vols. A,B,C-1: roll # C.005.40001 North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, NC - 62 Skipper George indenture

1759 Craven Co., Sc Archives -
Series Number S213184 Volume:0007 Page 00047 Item 03 Date: 1759/02/21 Description: SKIPPER, THOMAS, PLAT FOR 250 ACRES IN CRAVEN COUNTY. Names Indexed: SKIPPER, THOMAS / LEIGH, EGERTON / THOMSON, HUGH / Locations: CRAVEN COUNTY / LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER Type: PLAT/ Topics: / Thomas Skipper PLAT FOR 250 ACRES IN CRAVEN COUNTY - NOTE Was he married and did he have children? SC 1759 ????? Series Number: S213019 Volume: 0009 Page: 00211 Item: 00 Date: 1759/10/13 Description: SKEPPER, THOMAS, LAND GRANT FOR 250 ACRES IN CRAVEN COUNTY. Names Indexed: SKEPPER, THOMAS // Locations: CRAVEN COUNTY / Type: LAND GRANT

1759 Catawba Indians -
In 1759 it appeared again, and this time destroyed nearly half the tribe. At a conference at Albany, attended by delegates from the Six Nations and the Catawba, under the auspices of the colonial governments, a treaty of peace was made between these two tribes. This peace was probably final as regards the Iroquois, but the western tribes continued their warfare against the Catawba, who were now so reduced that they could make little effectual resistance.
1759 they again suffered from smallpox

1760 Catawba Indians -
1760 is chiefly a record of petty warfare between themselves and the Iroquois and other northern tribes, throughout which the colonial government tried to induce the Indians to stop killing one another and go to killing the French. With the single exception of their alliance with the hostile Yamasi

1760 - January 24, 1760 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
Charles-Town (in South Carolina,) Nov. 24. OUR last Account from the Army was brought down to November 13th. They marched that Day to Twelve-Mile Creek in the following Order, viz. 1. The Advance-Guard with a Subaltern from the Regulars; 2. the Troop; 3. the Volunteers; 4. the Artillery Company, guarding the Field-Pieces and Powder-Waggons; 5. the Governor, with his Staff-Officers and Houshold; 6. the Regulars; 7. Col. Richardson’s Battalion (40 of which, and of Powell’s and Richardson’s also, were picked out to act as Light Horse;) 8. Col. Powell’s Battalion; 9. the Indians under a Captain’s Guard; 10. the Rear-Guard; 11. the Waggons and Carts, about 100 or more, a Number of Horses packed with Flour, Servants, &c. under a strong Guard of Militia; the Line of March was two Miles long. — Nov. 14th. Marched in the same Order as before to Mile Creek, and encamped near Dennis Hayes’s: Several Waggons broke down, and Horses tired, could not reach the Encampment that Evening: The broken Waggons were ordered to be lighted and repaired. Nov. 15th. Marched to Hallow Creek, and encamped at 1 P.M. to give Time for the Waggons that had been disabled to come up, who all (but 4) got up that Evening: Capt. Dugeon, the Engineer, went forward with the Pioneers, to repair the Road. Nov. 16th. Decamped very early, and marched to Little Saludee. Here an Express met the Governor, with Accounts, that the four Cherokees, who deserted the Army at the Congarees, had got into the Nation the Day before Mr. Elliot and the Raven (Otacitte’s Runner;) that upon their Arrival, a general Alarm had run through all their Towns; and Runners were dispatched over the Hills; and also to the Creeks, with a painted Tomahawk, to desire their immediate Assistance; that the young Men were determined to die rather than deliver up a Murderer; and that the prevailing Sentiment of their Councils seemed to be, to meet our Army, with their collected Force, at Twelve-Mile River, which is exactly 12 Miles on this Side Keowee. Some of our Accounts say, that there were 5 Creek Indians in the Nation when Elliot and the Raven arrived, who immediatly pushed off as Runners; and seem to suspect, that the Raven, instead of delivering the good Talk sent by Otacitte, had given a very bad one of his own. This Day it was reported, that two Catawba’s, who had been sent by Col. Richardson in Quest of the Cherokee that got off coming with the Goods from Virginia, had killed him, and carried his Scalp into the Catawba Nation. This Night they were more strictly watchful over the Cherokees than ever, to prevent any more of the treacherous Villains escaping. Nov. 17th. The Army marched to Saludee old Town, where it was joined by Col. Chevellette’s Battalion, and about 40 Chickesaws, 27 of which were good Gun-men, and likely young Fellows: The Chickesaws were drawn up in a Line opposite to Chevellette’s Encampment, and received the Governor with rested Arms; His Excellency then advanced, shook Hands with and spoke to them; he told them, “That he was going to the Cherokee Nation; that he had sent for them to go with him; that he was going to get Satisfaction for Insults and Murders committed by them on his People; and desired they would keep a good Look-out, and let him know immediately if they should discover any Cherokees about but withal charged them not to kill or hurt any, till he knew whether they would give the Satisfaction he should require, or not.” His Excellency also acquainted them, “That he had some Cherokees with him, under a Guard, which they should not molest or hurt; but desired, that if any of them should offer to run away, they should endeavour to take them, and bring them back to him.” They promised to observe all the Governor said, and that they would scout and keep a good Look-out; after which, as his Excellency went forward, they saluted him with a Volley: They were all painted and dressed in their War Attire. This Morning the Governor sent off an Express to Major Waddel, to hasten his Junction with our Army: We have no Account that can be depended on, of the Number of Forces he will bring; some of our Letters say, 1000 Provincials only, others add to them 4 or 500 Militia; one Letter tells us, the Major was actually on the March, and as near to Keowee as our Army. At Night the Cherokees made an Attempt to send a String of white Wampum to the Chickesaws, but were prevented. - November 18th. The Army halted, for some of the Waggons to get up; to give Presents to the Chickesaws, and to deliver out Arms, &c. to such of the Militia as had none, who were many. That Evening one of the Artillery-men detected one of the Interpreters carrying two Strings of Wampum from the Great-Warrior of the Cherokees to the Chickesaws; the Fellow upon being detected pretended he was sent to but a Horse with it; but that Excuse appearing very lame, Captain Gadsden sent the Wampum to the Governor, that this Affair might be further inquired into. The whole Army, on the 18th did not consist of more than 1687 Men, including Waggoners, Negroes, &c. and not 1300 of these could be called fighting Men; of them, 10 or 12 (of the Back Inhabitants) had deserted every Night since the 15th. November 19th. Arms were to continue distributing to such as wanted, and on the 20th, the whole Body was to move for Ninety six. The Chickesaws had an old Cherokee Woman Prisoner; there was an young Creek Fellow among the Cherokees, and another among the Chickesaws; the latter was married among the Chickesaws, and looked upon himself as one of that Nation, however was related to the former; the Chickesaws therefore begged the Governor would release that Prisoner to them, offering the Cherokee Woman in his Room; his Excellency accordingly released the Creek Indian, upon their promising that he should not run away, and that they would be answerable for his good Behaviour. - The Accounts received in the Camp the 16th Instant from the Cherokees, puts us in Mind of a Letter we received about 18 Days ago, from one of the Middle-towns, dated the 27th of October; wherein we were told, “That the Headman of that Town had on the 25th, early in the Morning, come to the Writer, an after first insisting that he would solemnly promise not to reveal one Thing he should tell him, to any in the Nation, acquainted him: That all the Satisfaction the Indians, who were then going to Town, intended to offer, was, that every Murderer should be sent out in Quest of a French Scalp, or Prisoner, for every white Man he had killed; that they looked upon this running the Risque of their Lives as a sufficient Retaliation; and that if this Offer did not prove satisfactory, they were bent upon Mischief, and Mr. Gouedy’s Store was the first Place they had pitched upon to plunder: That there had been a general Conspiracy among the Indians, viz, the Upper and Lower Cherokees, Creeks, and Catawbas (the Chickesaws only were ignorant of it) and that the said Cherokees then in Town had carried several Wenches with them who could speak English well, in particular one Seers’s Wench, that had lived in Town a long Time, to give us a shocking Specimen of Indian Policy, to be put in Practice, in case the Governor should not then give them a Talk to their Mind. - December 1. There being some Chasm in our Intelligence from the Army, from the 18th to the 24th Instant, by some of our Letters not having yet come to Hand, we shall defer publishing our Advices from thence till our next. The Army was healthy and in high Spirits, but the Rifle-barrel Men continued to desert 10 and 12 at a Time. They arrived at Ninety-six the 21st ult. where they were building a Fort, and were to move forwards for Keowee as Yesterday. - December 8. Our Advices from the Army on March to the Cherokee Nation, from the 19th to the 28th ult. inclusive are as follows: November 19th. Upwards of 400 Provincial Arms were delivered out to the Militia and Regulars. Presents were also distributed amongst the Chickesaws, and more promised them when the Expedition should be over. All the Waggons got up. Orders issued to march forward the next Day, many of the People fell sick. November 20th. Decamped from Saludee old Town, and at Noon marched, the Morning being taken up in distributing Ammunition. At 3 P.M. halted at Half-Way Swamp. The Army then consisted of about 1400 Gunmen, above 100 Waggons, besides Carts and Pack-horses. The Chickesaws staid behind to send off their Women and Children. Sickness and Desertion encrease. November 21st. At 9 AM. marched for Ninety-Six: Arrived and encamped there at 2 P.M. after crossing 2 Creeks. All the Baggage and Provisions got up. The Chickesaws also joined the Camp. Here they found Chenallotohee, Brother to Tiftoe (one of Occunastota’s Party, under Guard:) He pretended to be hunting in these Parts, and that hearing of the Governor’s Approach, he came to see his Excellency; being told that the Governor would see and talk with him at another Time, he went out to fetch in his Party, and promised to return the next Day. November 22d. The Ground was reconnoitred for a proper Place to build a Magazine and Stockade Fort, to secure Ammunition and Provision, and a Retreat, if necessary: To save Time, Expence and Trouble, Mr. Gouedy’s Barn was fixed on for a Store house, and it was resolved to stockade it in. Chenallotohee returned to the Camp, with his Party (which some of our Letters say consisted of 17, altho’ he brought in but 41) The Governor admitted him into his Presence; asked what he came about, and what he had to say? He answered, that he was hunting, and desired to see his Brother; whereupon, after being told all that his Excellency had said to the rest of the Indians in his former Talks, and that he might either continue to hunt with his Party where he was, or go home to his Nation, and tell what he saw and heard, he was soon dismissed, with leave to see his Brother Tiftoe and the rest of Occunnastota’s Party, that they were well: When he saw them, he seemed pleased that nothing more had befallen them than their Confinement; and told Tiftoe, “That the 4 Indians who deserted from the Congarees, had carried bad Talks into the Nation, and reported that they were all made Slaves; that the Indian who went from Town with Lucas, had given a good Talk; but he had heard that the Raven had also given a bad one, which had put the whole nation in a Ferment.” Tiftoe told him, “that they had all been well and kindly used since they had been with the army; and blamed the Run-aways for being abridged of Liberty:” He told him farther, “that those of his Countrymen who were concerned in killing the English, must be delivered up to the Governor. Chenallotohee then said, “he was willing to accompany his Excellency, and act with him in getting Satisfaction; and desired to be permitted to stay in the Camp all Night,” this the Governor did not think proper (for notwithstanding his fair Speeches, it was suspected he came only to see the Strength of the Army, and to converse with his Countrymen, to discover whether it would be prudent or adviseable to oppose the Army’s Passage over 12 Mile River, as had been designed) and he was ordered to depart immediately; which he did at 4 P.M. When the Order came, Tiftoe was talking to him about delivering up the Murderers, telling who they were, and who were proper Persons to seize them. Major Boud arrived this Day, with his Voluntiers. Great Plenty in the Camp, and Blankets were sold at the Charles -Town Price; yet Desertions continued. Sickness continued, but not Mortality. November 23d. Mr. Elliot returned form the Nation; left Keowee the Day before, and Fort-Loudoun the 15th; all well in both those Garrisons: He saw the Little Carpenter, who appeared a good deal concerned at the vigourous Measures this Government was pursuing, professed much Friendship for the English, and said, if the Governor would permit him, he would meet his Excellency at Keowee: Elliot represented the Middle Towns as peaceable and well disposed, many of the Upper and some of the Lower the same, and a good deal terrified; but said, that the Towns who had been concerned in Murders, who might make up about 500 Men, remained refractory, and made Preparations for War. This Day some of Colonel Richardson’s Men joined him from the Borders of North-Carolina, and reported, that Major Waddel was to have set from Fort-Dobbs, with 200 Men, on the 20th; for which Report there does not however seem to be any Foundation. The Army now between 13 and 1400 strong. An Account was received that Chenallatohee was gone for Keowee, and said he would give a good Talk. - November 24. Captain Dugeon, the Engineer, laid out the Ground for the Stockade; the Pioneers, Volunteers, Servants, &c. opened the Ditch for planting the Puncheons. Elliot was sent off an Express, it was thought, to give Permission to the Little-Carpenter to meet the Governor at Keowee; whither the Middle-town’s People had already agreed to come, though they expressed an Aversion to be joined with those of the Upper and Lower Towns (who they say are bad) lest they should not be distinguished, but treated as one People. November 25th. Nothing remarkable happened. Continued to work on the Stockade. November 26th. Two Runners arrived in the Camp from the Nation, with an English Flag, and brought a Talk, and a large Quantity of Wampum: An Express arrived at the same Time from Keowee, intimating, that these Runners were only Spies, and came to converse with their Countrymen, under Pretense of seeing the Governor; his Excellency would not see them, but ordered that they should immediately depart, and go Home. Letters from Keowee said, that the Army having so many Headmen of the Nation in Custody, had puzzled the Indians very much, and that it was the only Thing that had prevented their doing more Mischief, and committing further Acts of open Hostility. From certain Orders issued on this Day, it was thought the Governor had received Intelligence of scouting Parties being about, to observe the Motions of the Army. November 27th. The Banquet to the Stockade was finished, and the Gate put up. Some Volunteers from Port Royal joined the Army. An Express arrived from Virginia. Meazles, Purgings, and pleuretic Complaints, rather increased than abated. November 28th. The whole Army was reviewed, except the Indian Guard and Rangers, and found considerably short of the Returns; there were 1299 effective Men. Orders were given to march early on the 29th for Keowee; during the whole march to which, every Man is to be under Arms an Hour before Day, and so continue till Sun-rise, to prevent a Surprize, that being always the Time when Indians make their Attacks. A Garrison was to be left at Fort Ninety-six, which is 90 Feet square, has Sheds on one Side of the Store-house for the Men, and will be of great Service to the Inhabitants of those Parts in all Times of Alarm. And Major Singleton was ordered to join the Army by long Marches, with 200 Men of the new Draughts. - In a Letter from Augusta, dated 24th ult. (which we were favoured with a Sight of last Saturday) it is said, “That the whole Chactaw Nation of Indians are now in the British Interest, except about 100, whom the French employed and paid as Rangers. That the Superintendent still remains at the Oakfuskees; and that the Mortar of the Oakchoys, with eighteen Warriors, is gone to join the Cherokees.”

March 20, 1760 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLESTOWN (in South-Carolina) Feb. 23. The Virginia Goods designed for the Cherokees, brought by Richard Smith as far as Salisbury, in North-Carolina and there stopped, are still at that Place, and properly secured.

March 27, 1760 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
Extract of a Letter from Whitemarsh, in North-Carolina, dated February 21, 1760. “I came from Kingston, in South Carolina, late last Night.—An Express arrived at George-Town, giving an Account of a large Body of Indians on Horseback, who were killing and destroying the Inhabitants, both white and black, and laying waste the whole Country before them.—They were got down to a Place called Four Holes, within thirty Miles of Charles-Town. — The Alarm is general throughout the Province, and they are all now under Arms.— There is another large Body of Indians on the Back of Anson and Rowan Counties, and if they push on with the same Precipitation, we have the greatest Reason to expect that they will soon be here.”

April 10, 1760 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLESTOWN, (in South-Carolina) March 15. It is reported that the Cherokees, who went out from the upper Towns, some Time since, against Virginia, &c., have made an Attempt upon Fort Dobbs, in North-Carolina; and been repulsed with some Loss. And also, That a Party of Militia on Broad River, had, on the 8th Instant, engaged a superior Number of Indians, and come off victorious, with 15 Scalps, &c But both these Reports want Confirmation.

April 24, 1760 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLESTOWN, (in South-Carolina) April 2. We hear the 700 Rangers are now compleated, and continue to scout for the Protection of the back Settlements. The Forts at Ninety-six, Saluda, &c. &c. are all safe. Several of the scouting Parties have come up with divers Parties of Indians, some of whom they have killed and scalped. The Levies for the new Regiment go on. There are Reports of a second Attack on Fort Dobbs in North-Carolina. There have been no Accounts either from Fort Prince George, Keowee, or Fort Loudoun, since those published in this Paper of 5th and 12th ult, nor have we been able to learn what, or if any Assistance, the Provinces of Virginia and North Carolina will afford in reducing the Cherokees.

May 22, 1760 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLES-TOWN (in South Carolina) April 23. An Account is just now received, that a Catawba Woman and Child have been lately killed and scalped in their own Country and that two very large Gangs of Cherokees are set out for the Frontiers of North-Carolina and Virginia, while they pretend to treat of Peace with us. […] At the same time that this Peace-talk is come, we hear of the scalping Gangs of Cherokees being more numerous than ever, and extending in the Settlements from Little-Saludy quite to Salisbury in North-Carolina; but the Day before the Express left Ninety-Six, three Men who went to a Plantation at Long Canes to hunt Cattle, were beset by one of those Gangs, of whom only one got back to the Fort; and they aimed particularly at one Archy, a Half breed.

June 19, 1760 The Pennsylvania Gazette
Yesterday also arrived an Express from Virginia, with Dispatches from Governor Fauquier, Private Letters of the 8th Instant, do not give us any Hopes that Fort Loudoun will be relieved from thence; and say, that Colonel Byrd’s Regiment is thus stationed, viz. 400 Men at Alexandria, and the remaining 300 to guard the Frontiers. - Letters of the 24th Instant, from North-Carolina, afford us no Prospect of Assistance from thence, to reduce the Cherokees.

August 28, 1760 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLES -TOWN (South Carolina) August 9. The same Day [Tuesday last] the Hon. Edmond Atkin, Esq; His Majesty’s Agent for, and Superintendant, of Indian Affairs, &c. arrived in town from the Cherokee Country (whither he went with the Army) but last from Pine-tree Creek, on Wateree, where, we are told, he has happily settled the Affair of their Lands, so many Years depending between the Catawba Nation, and this Province and North Carolina: Almost the whole Nation was present, and unanimously approved of what was done; whereby both Provinces may reap great Benefit, as well as Individuals, and the Public in general, especially at this Juncture, because the Dissatisfaction of the Catawbas, on Account of the Lands they claimed, might have been the Means of our losing that brave and faithful Nation, who, tho’ now reduced to about 100 fighting Men, are still important to the Welfare and Security of our Back Settlements. King Hagler, two Catawba Captains, and a young Warrior, accompanied Mr. Atkin down, in order to apply for the Reward granted for Cherokee Scalps, and a Prisoner

November 13, 1760 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
Charles -Town (in South Carolina) October 15. The Province of North Carolina has raised four Companies, One Hundred Men each, under the Command of Col. Hugh Waddel, who are employed for the Protection of their Frontier against the Cherokees. The Head Quarters are at Fort Dobbs. Twenty of our Rangers came upon an Indian Camp, killed one Indian, and wounded another, and retook a large Quantity of Beef which the Indians had just killed.

1760s Anson Co., NC -
Barnabus Skipper, believed to be the son of George Skipper , lived in Anson County, NC, along with his family in the 1760's. Unfortunately, Barnabus and his family was apparently involved in livestock rustling with his sons John and Silas. Solomon Quick, who had intermarried with the Skippers, was also indicted with Barnabus and his sons.
NOTE: Barnabus Skipper, lived in Anson County, NC along with his family in the 1760's Barnabus and his family was apparently involved in livestock rustling with his sons John and Silas Solomon Quick, who had intermarried with the Skippers, was also indicted believed to be the son of George Skipper

abt 1760
Elizabeth (Skipper) Quick b abt 1760 died 1832 married Solomon Quick b 1757
children
1. Needham Quick b 1798 d 1860
her father was Barnabus Skipper b 1744
SOURCE trees. ancestry. com
MORE: Elizabeth (Skipper) Quick Birth: 1760 - Bennettsville, Marlboro, South Carolina, USA Death: 1832 - Marlboro, South Carolina, USA
Parents: Barnabus Skipper, Rachel (Smith)
Spouse: Solomon Quick

1760 Northampton County, NC and 14 June 1819 Cumberland County NC -
Byrd Cornet, born say 1760, enlisted in the North Carolina Continental Line on 20 July 1778 [N.C. Historical & Genealogical Register II:581]. He was living in Northampton County, North Carolina, between 24 June 1783 and September 1790 when he was paid money by the estate of Thomas Deloatch [Gammon, Records of Estates, Northampton County, I:72], and he paid one pound to the St. George Parish, Northampton County wardens on 4 June 1798 [CR 71.927.1, fol. 34]. Byrd was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1790 [NC:75] and was counted as "other free" in the Chatham County census in 1800, called "Hew Bird Cornet" [NC:196]. On 14 June 1819 he married Betsy Skippey (Skipper?) , Cumberland County, North Carolina bond, Daniel Munroe bondsman. He may have been the father of i. Ned, head of a Pasquotank County household of 2 "other free" and one slave in 1810 [NC:892].

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1760 Marion SC -
The use of the term "Portuguese" for a mixed-race person accepted as white was used as early as October 1812 when the Marion District, South Carolina Court of Common Pleas ruled that Thomas Hagans did not have to pay the levy on "Free Negros" because he was Portuguese [NCGSJ IX:259]. Thomas was the son of Zachariah Hagins, a "Mulatto" bound out in Johnston County, North Carolina Court in October 1760 -
Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, I: 46 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1760 SC -
Abraham Skipper Birth Date: 1760 Birthplace: South Carolina Volume: 160 Page Number: 202 Reference: Heads of Fams. at the first U.S. census. SC. By U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington, 1908 - 150p - 56
Source: American Genealogical - Biographical Index (AGBI) at Ancestry.com

Slave Registers of former British Colonial Dependencies, 1812-1834 -
Sciper Estimated Birth Year abt 1760 Age: 61 Nationality: African (Black) Gender Male PARISH St George (Parish) List of Slaves Colonial Dependency Grenada Owner Name James Laing Record Date 1821

1760 Cheraw Indians -
There seem to have been 2 villages, as on a map of 1760 we find this place designated as "Lower Saura Town," while about 30 miles above, on the south side of the Dan and between it and Town fork, is another place marked "Upper Saura Town." They are also alluded to by F. D. Smyth (Tour in LT. S., 1784), who says the upper town was insignificant.

abt 1760s Cheraw District SC
I find it strange that I can not locate anything else on my ancestor Hugh Skipper and he was in the same area as George Skipper ???? About the same time frame. 175?/1760? Hugh Skipper b abt. 175?/1760 in ? m. Sarah had ? I figured Hughs age by the 1790 Cheraw District SC Census and the 1776 military record. Any and all help highly appreciated. Thanks, Ann ....... As of Dec 2007 nothing else located on my ancestor Hugh and his family. Now I need to locate Hugh Skipper1 his parents. All help highly appreciated. Generation 1 Hugh ? Skipper1 b about 175?/1760 m. Sarah (?) had the following children. Generation 2 Gilbert Skipper2 born 1797 married to Vicey/Dicey (?maybe NELSON) and ?Isaac Skipper born 1802. Your line continues through Gilbert as you know. 1. Jesse J. Skipper b. 1825 2. Martha A. Skipper b. 1832 3. Sarah Lucretia Skipper b. 1834 4. Hagan M. Skipper b. 1836 5. Jane T. Skipper b. 1840 6. Margaret Skipper b. 1840 7. Thomas James Skipper b. June 6,1842 - My Line ******* 8. Stephen H. Skipper b. 1844 9. Samuel C. Skipper b. 1846 10. James Skipper b. 1858 1860 census of Darlington County, South Carolina shows this NOTE: - I have all the family history for the family down too todays date. I located this record * 175? SC - My line - American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) www. ancestry.com Gilbert Skipper 175? South Carolina - Gilbert Skipper Birth Date: 175? Birthplace South Carolina Volume: 160 Page Number: 203 Reference: Heads of Fams. at the first U.S. census. SC. By U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington, 1908. (150p.):46 - Source Information: Godfrey Memorial Library, comp. American Genealogical Biographical Index database on-line. Provo, UT, USA The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Godfrey Memorial Library. American Genealogical-Biographical Index. Middletown, CT, USA Godfrey Memorial Library - Gilbert Skipper NOTE I think and believe that my Hugh and or Gilbert Skipper had a first name or a middle name Unknown??? NOTE My Ancestor levitaann@yahoo.com NOTE The next record I find for Gilbert is in 1776 SC Cheraw SC census. NOTE Between 175? and 1776 SC Census what was Gilbert doing? NOTE Who were Gilbert's parents? Note Did Gilbert have brothers and sisters? NOTE Nothing else located on my Gilbert Skipper before 175?. NOTE There is a Hugh Skeepper / ?SKIPPER in 1632 England thats to early to be my Gilberts father. Note I'm still looking.......levitaann@yahoo.com - Thomas James Skipper son of Gilbert was born in 1842. Jesse was born in 1825. On the 1850 census it looks like Tepee, but it is Jessee. Double s's were often written this way on old documents - it just looks like a "p". The "T" is definitely a "J", as the enumerators other J's are formed the same way just as the child Jane's middle initial is a "T", but Jane has the same "J" that appears to be a "T" as Jessee. Jessee's middle initial is a "G". Its not formed like the writer's J's at all. Jesse's name has the same "ss" that looks like a "p" in 1860 as it has in 1850, but the "J" is plainly a "J". The "V" on Vicey's name curves back over the top and so looks like a "D". Ancestry's index has Diony, but it is Vicey on the actual census. She's also listed as Vicey in 1860. You have Saml for one of the children's names and in the census, its Samuel, abbreviated "Saml." There are 3 upstrokes on the written "m". In 1860 the abbreviation is more obvious. Also Hagan is Hagar. I hope this helps

SC Canuga -
The name of two former Cherokee towns, one, a Lower Cherokee settlement, apparently on the waters of Keowee r., S. C., destroyed in 1761; the other a traditional settlement on Pigeon r., probably near the present Waynesville, Hay wood co., N. C. Mooney in 19th Rep. B. A. E., 479, 524, 1900

1761 Catawba Indians -
1761 had some 300 warriors, or about 1,000 people.

1761 - September 17, 1761 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLES-TOWN (South-Carolina) August 19. By letters from North-Carolina, of the 10th instant, we learn, that Colonel Waddle was marched for fort Dobbs, with such part of his regiment as was provided with arms, in order to join the Virginia forces, as soon, and at such place, as should be ordered by Col. Byrd.

1762 Catawba Indians -
1762 a small party of Shawnee killed the noted chief of the tribe, King Haiglar near his own village. From this time the Catawba ceased to be of importance except in conjunction with the whites

1762
Samuel Spry State: SC County: Colleton County Township: Will Year:1762 Record Type: Probate Records Page:00201 Database: SC Colonial Probate Index

Anson County, North Carolina -
Vol. 3: 1762-1766: Roll # C.005.40003 ANSON County Record of Deeds 1761 -1769, Vols. 5,3,H -1 North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, N.C. - 268 George and Barnaba bill of sale - 273 George and Barnaba indenture - Surname for both Skipper

1763
George Skipper Senr. Anson CO 1763,
Benjamin Skipper Anson CO 1763,
Barnaba Skipper Anson CO 1763,
note: I would like to know as much as possible abou these three skipper men living in Anson County NC in the year 1763 where did george skipper jr live and where was he born? who did he marry? who did benjamin marry?

9 November 1762 -
many of the leading residents of Halifax County petitioned the Assembly to repeal the discriminatory tax against free African Americans, and in May 1763 fifty-four of the leading citizens of Granville, Northampton, and Edgecombe Counties made a similar petition. They described their "Free Negro & Mulatto" neighbors as persons of Probity & good Demeanor (who) chearfully contribute towards the Discharge of every public Duty injoined them by Law.
Source freeafricanamericans.com

1763 Camden SC
About King Haigler, Catawba Indian Nation - King Hagler, Chief of the Catawba Nation (1750 -1763). A noble Catawba Indian who befriended early Camden settlers, King Haiglar is often called "The Patron Saint of Camden." Today, he reigns over Camden in the form of a life-sized weather vane which graces the tower of what once was the circa -1886 Opera House, now a local department store. 950 Broad Street, Camden.

SC 1763 Catawba Indians -
1760 is chiefly a record of petty warfare between themselves and the Iroquois and other northern tribes, throughout which the colonial government tried to induce the Indians to stop killing one another and go to killing the French. With the single exception of their alliance with the hostile Yamasi, in 1715, they were uniformly friendly toward the English, and afterward kept peace with the United States, but were constantly at war with the Iroquois, Shawnee, Delawares, and other tribes of the Ohio valley, as well as with the Cherokee. The Iroquois and the Lake tribes made long journeys into South Carolina, and the Catawba retaliated by sending small scalping parties into Ohio and Pennsylvania. Their losses from ceaseless attacks of their enemies reduced their numbers steadily, while disease and debauchery introduced by the whites, especially several epidemics of smallpox, accelerated their destruction, so that before the close of the 18th century the great nation was reduced to a pitiful remnant. They sent a large force to help the colonists in the Tuscarora war of 1711-13, and also aided in expeditions against the French and their Indian allies at Ft Du Quesne and elsewhere during the French and Indian war. Later it was proposed to use them and the Cherokee against the Lake tribes under Pontiac in 1763
1761 had some 300 warriors, or about 1,000 people.
1763 they had confirmed to them a reservation, assigned a few years before, of 15 miles square, on both sides of Catawba river, within the present York and Lancaster Counties., S. C. On the approach of the British troops

1763 Anson County NC -
Skipper Surnames that were Taxpayers -
George Skipper Chow CO 1721,
George Skipper Senr. Anson CO 1763,
Benjamin Skipper Anson CO 1763,
Clemonds Skipper BRUN CO 1772 ,
Barnaba Skipper Anson CO 1763,
Thomas Skipper ROAN CO 1720,
Fred Skipper Blad CO 1763,
Hardy Skipper Blad CO 1763,
Jacob Skipper Dobb CO 1769,
James Skipper Roan Co 1720,
Joseph Skipper Blad Co 1763,
Joseph Skipper Onslow Co 1769,
Moses Skipper Brun Co 1772,
Robert Skipper Chow Co 1721
Source: Title: North Carolina Taxpayers, 1679-1790. Volume 2 Chapter: S Page: 185
George Skipper Senr. Anson CO 1763,
Benjamin Skipper Anson CO 1763
Barnaba Skipper Anson CO 1763,

1757 / 1763 Anson County NC -
Vol 3 page 68 , 69 - 20 obt 1763 adj. Thomas Skipper and Knowland Source Title: Anson County, North Carolina Deed Abstracts, 1749 -1766, Abstracts of Wills & Estates, 1749 -1795 Chapter: Volume 3 Page: 102

1759 England -
Hampshire: - Register of Marriages, 1580 -1812 Marriages at St. Mary Bourne, 1663 to 1812. Volume 2. County: Hampshire Country: England Richard Soper, b., & Anne (Hayes), s., of Hurstbourne Priors, lic. 29 Jul 1759
Source Ancestry.com

1763 NC -
Hardy Skipper State: NC County: Bladen County Township: No Township Listed Year: 1763 Database: NC Early Census Index - Hardy Skipper State: NC County: Bladen County Township: Tax List Year: 1763 Database: NC Early Census Index

1749/1795 Anson Co., NC -
Geroge Skipper SR., Barnaba Skipper, and Benjamin Skipper Source Title Anson County, North Carolina Deed Abstracts, 1749 -1766, Abstracts of Wills & Estates, 1749 -1795 Chapter Anson County List of Taxables for the Year 1763 Page 122

?1761 Va and SC -
Thomas Norwood of "Saluda River" whose military service is shown in "Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution" (Moss) is probably the son of Samuel Norwood m. Elizabeth (Brush) (Augusta, VA and Abbeville, SC) and grandson of Theophilus Norwood I m. Elizabeth (Johnson). This would make him a nephew of Theophilus II and a brother of my ggggrandfather, Theophilus (sometimes referred to as "IV"). Most, if not all, male members of this branch of the family all seem to have served in the war. The entry for Thomas (p. 734) reads: "Norwood, Thomas S21400 b. 17 June 1761, Augusta County, Va. While residing on the Sauda River, he entered service during 1781 under Capt. Samuel Rosamond. He marched to Cuffeytown and was enrolled by Maj. Field Pardue to serve in Capt. Richard Johnson's company of horse [sic.] He was in the siege of Grayson's Fort and the siege of Ninety Six as a baggage wagon guard. He served under Capt. Rosamond after the siege was lifted. Thereafter, he joined Capt. Robert Maxwell, with whom he served until the end of the war. A.A.5581;Q324." This Thomas was still living and is listed in Samuel's will of 16 Nov 1789 and Elizabeth's will of 29 Dec 1806 of which he was an executor.
I don't know if this helps, but ... Earl Norwood
MISC NOTE - Darlington, Cheraws Black Creek -
In the book of research on THE SOUTH CAROLINA NORWOOD TRADITION by Mr. Bauer this information is given on Thomas: "Thomas Norwood: During the 50 year period ending with the 1810 Census of Darlington County, there were two Thomas Norwoods of record in Darlington; One of these was a son of Theophilus 2. ( or Jr. I believe there are 13 on record) This is proved by good circumstantial evidence in the form of the 1790 and 1800 census and land records in SC State Plat Book 8:109 #2 for 200 acres in Cheraws District on the south west side of Black Creek near Swift Creek; surveyed 22 Sept 1784 by William Powe, D. S. Census records show that Thomas Norwood was born before 1755. He may have been the oldest son of Theophilus 2 Norwood, since (in 1784) Thomas was first son to buy land in the Swift Creek area near the land which Theophilus 2 Norwood purchased in 1760. I will not burden this thesis with a detailed rationale of the census records. That is covered in another document. Suffice it to say that a rigorous examination of the census records showed that (1) the Thomas Norwood, with a wife and 9 children in the 1800 census was one generation later than Theophilus 2 Norwood and could only have been a son of Theophilus 2 Norwood; (2) records rule out that he could have been a son of Theophilus's brother, Samuel; (3) records rule out that he could have been any other nephew of Theophilus 2; (3) records rule out that he could have been a cousin or grandson of Theophilus 2; and (4) it would be incredible to believe that he could be unrelated in any way to Theophilus 2 Norwood since he was in the Norwood nest on Swift Creek. (Mr. B. had 2 #3's in that paragraph) This was the Thomas who went to Georgia between 1801 and 1809; and whose son, Britton Norwood, acted as his agent in a land transaction in Darlington in 1815. It is significant that Thomas Norwood did not join the "heirs" of Theophilus 2 Norwood when they were selling this land on Swift Creek in 1792. Thomas appears to have been living in Darlington at that time, and no record explains why he didn't participate in that transaction. However, that fact, alone doesn't preclude Thomas being a son of Theophilus 2 Norwood. There may have been records which would explain it and they were burned in the Darlington Court House fire. Remember, the 1792 Indenture was in private possession and didn't burn." That is the end of his information on Thomas. Do you know the history before Theophilus I, the Tory who was murdered. He was born around 1700 and Theophilus 2 was born around 1725 if my memory is correct. According to this work Thomas would have been the son of Theophilus 2 and Margaret (Dawson). My Zachariah was the son of Theophilus 2 and Eliza (St. George) . Also this Theophilus was in the Revolution on the colony side! ...... Hope this will help. Lucy

1763 NC -
Who were the parents of Hardin S. Skipper, a taxpayer in 1763 Bladen Co., NC? By 21 May 1782 he and his wife Elizabeth (?) were in Washintgon Co., VA where they and Jesse Humphrey administered the estate of Tom Skipper.
In 1783 Hardy Skipper is on a NC tax list in an area that later became Green Co., TN. At that time VA and NC were in ownership dispute over the land called Washington Co. so the Skipper family probably found themselves back in NC without having actually moved.
On 6 Dec 1813, Hardy Skipper was on jury duty in Campbell Co., TN along with his son-in-law John Craig. Hardy Skipper died 1822 in Campbell Co. and his estate was administered by John Craig.
His widow Elizabeth Skipper's will was probated in 1830 in Campbell Co.
The Will named her daughter Mary Ann (Skipper) Craig and
Mary's children
John,
Reuben,
Elizabeth,
Sally
Polly.
Mary Ann (Skipper) Craig was born 1787 in VA and she d. 30 Apr 1868 in Campbell Co.
A Benjamin Skipper married Charity Davis) 21 Mar 1815 in Knox co., TN
Jacob Skipper married Nancy (Magee) 22 Aug 1812 in Washington Co., TN.
Are these two men sons of Hardy Skipper?
How was Tom Skipper related to Hardy?
Who were the parents of Hardin S. Skipper, a taxpayer in 1763 Bladen Co., NC? By 21 May 1782 he and his wife Elizabeth (?) were in Washintgon Co., VA where they and Jesse Humphrey administered the estate of Tom Skipper.
In 1783 Hardy Skipper is on a NC tax list in an area that later became Green Co., TN. At that time VA and NC were in ownership dispute over the land called Washington Co. so the Skipper family probably found themselves back in NC without having actually moved. On 6 Dec 1813, Hardy Skipper was on jury duty in Campbell Co., TN along with his son-in-law John Craig. Hardy Skipper died 1822 in Campbell Co. and his estate was administered by John Craig. His widow Elizabeth (?) Skipper's will was probated in 1830 in Campbell Co. The Will named her daughter Mary Ann (Skipper) Craig and Mary's
children
1. John,
2. Reuben,
3. Elizabeth,
4. Sally
5. Polly.
Mary Ann (Skipper) Craig was born 1787 in VA and she d. 30 Apr 1868 in Campbell Co.
NOTE
A Benjamin Skipper married Charity Davis 21 Mar 1815 in Knox co., TN
Jacob Skipper married Nancy Magee 22 Aug 1812 in Washington Co., TN.
Are these two men sons of Hardy Skipper?
How was Tom Skipper related to Hardy?

1763 Brunswick Co., NC -
Based upon an email I received from Slade Skipper, 4/25/2003, who comes through the George Washington Skipper Line, I am confident to call the following: 1) Moses Skipper and Grace (????) Skipper, of Brunswick County, NC are the Parents of Abraham Skipper, John Skipper, and James Skipper, (who were born around 1750). 2) Moses and Clemmond Skipper were brothers 3) Clemmond Skipper is the father of Isaac & Jesse Skipper.
The source of my founding comes from references made to the 1772, 1785, 1790 Brunswick County Census and Tax Record Reports.
My research indicates that Abraham, John W. and Isaac of Brunswick County were the sons of Barnabas Skipper of Anson Co.
The three brothers moved to Brunswick County before 1790 when they appeared in the Census.
Donna, Barnabus Skipper b. ca 1740 went to Marlboro Co., SC before 1800 and is listed in the census there, as is his son John, so the John Skipper in 1800 Brunswick Co., NC is not his.
Abraham Skipper has absolutely no descendants , among the many hundreds that I have seen, named Barnabus, so I doubt his father's name was Barnabus.
There were Skippers in Brunswick Co. in 1772 (Moses and Clemonds Skipper ) and in Bladen Co. in 1763 (Jos., Fred, and Hardy) from which Brunswick was formed.
I strongly suspect that the Brunswick Co. Skippers descended from some of these. I think in this instance, location takes precedence when considering circumstantial evidence.
Bladen Co. in 1763 ( Jos. Skipper, Fred Skipper , and Hardy Skipper ) from which Brunswick was formed. I strongly suspect that the Brunswick Co. Skippers descended from some of these.
I think in this instance, location takes precedence when considering circumstantial evidence

Bladen Co., NC and Washintgon Co Va. and Tenn -
Hardin S. Skipper, a taxpayer in 1763 Bladen Co., NC? By 21 May 1782 he and his wife Elizabeth (?) were in Washintgon Co., VA where they and Jesse Humphrey administered the estate of Tom Skipper. In 1783 Hardy Skipper is on a NC tax list in an area that later became Green Co., TN. At that time VA and NC were in ownership dispute over the land called Washington Co. so the Skipper family probably found themselves back in NC without having actually moved. On 6 Dec 1813, Hardy Skipper was on jury duty in Campbell Co., TN along with his son-in-law John Craig. Hardy Skipper died 1822 in Campbell Co. Tn and his estate was administered by John Craig. His widow Elizabeth (?) Skipper's will was probated in 1830 in Campbell Co. The Will named her daughter Mary Ann (Skipper) Craig and Mary's children 1. John, 2. Reuben, 3. Elizabeth, Sally 4. Polly. Mary Ann (Skipper) Craig was born 1787 in VA and she d. 30 Apr 1868 in Campbell Co., TENN.
A Benjamin Skipper married Charity (Davis) 21 Mar 1815 in Knox co., TN and a Jacob Skipper married Nancy (Magee) 22 Aug 1812 in Washington Co., TN.
Are these two men sons of Hardy Skipper?
How was Tom Skipper related to Hardy?

MISC NOTE - Bertie Co., NC -
Discriminatory Taxation and Indentured Apprenticeship - In mid-eighteenth century North Carolina we find wealthy mixed race families counted in some years by North Carolina tax assessors as "mulatto" and in other years as white. Jeremiah and Henry Bunch, Bertie County slave owners, were taxed in Jonathan Standley's 1764 Bertie County list as "free male Molattors" in 1764, but as whites in Standley's 1765 Bertie list, and again as "free Molatoes" in 1766 [CR 10.702.1]. Michael Going / Gowen was taxed in Granville County as white in 1754 and was called "Michael Goin, Mulattoe" in 1759 [CR 44.701.19]. - John Gibson, Gideon Gibson and Gibeon Chavis, all married the daughters of prosperous white farmers. Some members of the Gibson, Chavis, Bunch and Gowen families became resolutely white after several generations.

1763 -
Benjamin Skipper SOURCE Ancestry. com - Benjamin Skipper State: NC County: Anson County Township: No Township Listed Year: 1763 Database: NC Early Census Index

1764 - January 11, 1764 Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh) -
Charlestown, South Carolina, Nov. 9. Their Excellencies the Governors of North Carolina and of this province, his Honour the Lieutenant-governor of Virginia, and the gentlemen who set out with them from thence on Tuesday the 25th ult. for the congress at Augusta, arrived at Fort Moore on Wednesday last: they were very genteelly entertained at Sheldon, by Stephen Bull, Esq; at Mr. Galphin’s, where they lay the 1st instant: they were met by John Stuart, Esq; Superintendant of the southern district, attended by Attakullakulla, Ottassite, Salloue, and the other Cherokee headmen. The Governor of Georgia arrived at Augusta the 25th past. The presents were all got up safe.

1765 - March 28, 1765 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLES-TOWN (South-Carolina) Feb. 9. Several white men from the western parts of this province and North-Carolina, have lately gone into the Cherokee settlement, and killed beaver, which occasions some uneasiness, as it is expressly contrary to treaty; and we hear the Cherokees have complained of it; but in the same modest terms they have adopted for two or three years past.

August 12, 1765 Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh) -
Charlestown, (South-Carolina) June 19: By letters from North-Carolina, we learn, that Col. Lewis, immedately on receiving information of the barbarous murder of the Cherokee Indians, (as lately mentioned) dispatched expresses to his Honour Francis Fauquier, Esq; Lieutenant-Governor of Virginia, who laid the advices before the Assembly of that colony, then sitting at Williamsburg, and the House of Burgesses came to the following resolutions, viz. - “Resolved, That the killing the Cherokee Indians, as mentioned in a letter of Colonel Andrew Lewis to his Honour the Governor, which he has been pleased to lay before this House, is a flagrant violation of the treaties of peace established and subsisting between his Majesty and the said Indians, and that the offenders ought to be prosecuted with the utmost severity. - “Resolved, That an address be presented to his Honour the Governor, to desire that he will be pleased to offer a considerable reward for apprending the said assassins; that he will cause the resolutions of this House to be transmitted to the Cherokees, and to assure them, that every proper step will be taken to bring the offenders to justice. - Lieutenant-Governor Fauquier accordingly issued a proclamation, offering a reward of £100 for apprehending each of the two principal ringleaders, and £50 for each of the others concerned in the said murders, besides a pardon to any one of them, not an actual perpetrator of the murder, who will make such discovery, that the rest may be brought to justice. Colonel Lewis had apprehended two of the murderers, and had sent two messengers to the Cherokees, to inform them of the whole affair; and we hear from Fort Prince George, that an express was arrived there from Governor Fauquier, which Mr. Price, the Commandant, had sent by an Indian by the Superintendant’s Deputy, then in the Upper Towns, where the relations of the murdered Indians live, and are said to be of great interest.

1765 Anson Co. NC -
14 feb 1765 page 188 George Skipper to Barnaba Skipper Source Title Anson County, North Carolina Deed Abstracts, 1749-1766, Abstracts of Wills & Estates, 1749-1795 Chapter Volume 3 Page 110

Anson NC 1765 -
Pp. 192-193 13 Feb. 1765 GEORGE SKIPPER of Anson, planter, to BARNBA SKIPPER, forL20 proc. money...50 A adj. MR. GRIFFUTHS, granted to JOHN CLARK, 200 A on N side PD, near mouth of Little Creek, conveyed from CLARK to SKIPPER 1 Feb 1749...GEO. SKIPPER (SEAL), Wit SAML SNEAD, JOHN CRAWFORD, THOS. MOORMAN Recd. L20 of BARNABA SKIPPER 14 Feb 1765. GEO. SKIPPER (SEAL).
NOTE GEORGE SKIPPER of Anson, planter to BARNABA SKIPPER 200 A on N side PD, near mouth of Little Creek conveyed from CLARK to SKIPPER 1 Feb 1749

1765 SC -
John Skepper Gender Male Marital Status Married Place of Birth South Carolina Estimated Birth Year: abt 1765 Age: 85 Month of Death Apr Cause of Death C Place of Death (City, County, State) Horry, Horry, South Carolina Census Year 1850 Source Citation Census Place (City, County, State): Horry, Horry, South Carolina Roll MORT_17 Page Enumeration District Line Numbe 34 - John Skipper Year: 1850 County: Horry Dist. State: SC Age: 85 Gender: M (Male) Month of Death: Apr State of Birth: SC ID#: MRT50_2298 Occupation: FARMER Cause of Death: CONSUMPTION - SC born abt 1765 - John Skipper Year: 1850 County Horry Dist. State SC Age 85 Gender M (Male) Month of Death Apr State of Birth SC ID#: MRT50_2298 Occupation FARMER Cause of Death CONSUMPTION Source U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules Index - 1765 born abt - John Skipper Year 1850 County Horry Dist. State SC Age 85 Gender M (Male) Month of Death Apr State of Birth SC ID#: MRT50_2298 Occupation FARMER Cause of Death CONSUMPTION
Source U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules Index

1765 England -
Moses Skepper married ELISABETH (SPICE) Marriage: 02 JUN 1765 Saint Dunstan, Stepney, London, England

1766 Bertie County between the Roanoke River and Roquist Pocosin -
Since they left the Southeast, it is difficult to determine the extent to which they mixed with the free African American population of Bertie County. Many of their names were recorded in the deeds of 1766 and 1777 by which they leased over 8,000 acres of the land in the southwest corner of Bertie County between the Roanoke River and Roquist Pocosin to the Attorney General: James Allen, Sarah Basket, Thomas Basket, William Basket, Betty Blount, Billy Blount, Sr., Billy Blount, Jr., Edward Blount, George Blount, Sarah Blount, Thomas Blount, Bille Blunt, Jr, Samuel Bridgers, William Cain, John Cain, Molly Cain, Wineoak Charles, Jr., Wineoak Charles, Sr., Bille Cornelius, Charles Cornelius, Isaac Cornelius, Billy Denis, Sarah Dennis, Billy George, Snipnose George, Watt Gibson, James Hicks, John Hicks, Sarah Hicks, Senicar Thomas Howell, Tom Jack, Capt. Joe, John Litewood, Isaac Miller, James Mitchell, Bille Mitchell, Bille Netof, Bille Owens, John Owens, Nane Owens, William Pugh, John Randel, Billy Roberts, Tom Roberts, Jr., John Rogers, Harry Samuel, John Senicar, Thomas Senicar, Ben Smith, John Smith, Molly Smith, Thomas Smith, Bille Sockey, William Taylor, Bridgers Thomas, Tom Thomas, Lewis Tuffdick, West Whitmel Tufdick, Whitmel Tuffdick, Isaac Whealer, James Wiggians, John Wiggins, Molly Wineoak and Bette Yollone DB L - 2:56 M:314-9
Source freeafricanamericans.com

1766 - July 17, 1766 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLESTOWN, in South-Carolina, June 20. The Cherokee Indians, who expressed great Satisfaction on having the Boundary fixed between them and this Province, and being very impatient to have the Limits between them and the Provinces of North-Carolina and Virginia likewise ascertained, applied, on that Head, to the Honourable John Stuart, Esq; Superintendant of the Southern District of North-America, on whose Representations, we are informed, the Government of North-Carolina appears very willing and desirous to have a Line run, to divide the Settlements of that Province from the Country reserved by his Majesty for the Hunting Ground of those Indians.

July 17, 1766 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLESTOWN, In South Carolina, June 20. A Sachem of the Tuskaroras is arrived at Brunswick, in North Carolina, with Credentials from the Honourable Sir William Johnson, Bart. Superintendant of the Northern District of America. His Errand is to sollicit his Countrymen, settled in North Carolina, to go and join the Rest of their Tribe incorporated with the Six Nations.

July 21, 1766 Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh) -
Charlestoun, May 30. The boundary line between this province and the Cherokee Indians has been lately run, according to the proposal made by his Honour the Lieutenant-Governor. Mr. Cameron, the Superintendant’s Deputy appointed by him for the Cherokee nation, with a number of headmen and warriors, met Mr. Wilkinson, appointed by his Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, and happily accomplished the affair. These Indians express great uneasiness at the limits between their lands and those of North-Carolina and Virginia remaining unsettled; and if measures are not speedily taken to give them the reasonable satisfaction they request, it is apprehended bad consequences may ensue.

October 9, 1766 The Pennsylvania Gazette - CHARLES-TOWN, South-Carolina. -
They write from North-Carolina, that one Willam Linvill, his son, and another young man, who had gone over the mountains at the head of the Yadkin river to hunt, were there surprized by some Indians. The father and son were both killed on the spot; the other young man got off, though much wounded, and arrived at his settlement, where he is since dead. No accounts had been received of what tribe or nation the Indians were: But it is thought, the relations of those Cherokees who were killed last year in Virginia, will, according to their inhuman custom, take every opportunity of revenge, at least till they have killed as many as they lost. - The same letters add, that the government of North-Carolina hath agreed, that the line dividing that province from the hunting-grounds claimed by, and reserved to, the Cherokees, shall be immediately run out, as proposed by the said Indians in their talk to the honourable John Stuart, Esq; superintendant of the southern district of America, viz. From the place where the line behind this province terminates on Reedy-River, a north course to the mountains, and thence a direct course to colonel Chiswell’s lead mine, on the Great Kannawah, behind Virginia. In consequence of which, orders have been dispatched to Mr. Cameron, the superintendant’s deputy in the Cherokee nation, to proceed with such headmen as the said nation shall depute, to meet the persons appointed by his excellency governor Tryon, in order to finish this very important business. - September 16. By letters from the Cherokee country we are informed, that the white people mentioned in our last, were killed by a party of northward Indians, who still continue their incursions against the Cherokees, notwithstanding the steps taken by Sir William Johnson, and Mr. Stuart, to effect a peace between them. The son of Attakullakulla, and seven others, his relations, were lately killed by a party who fell upon them as they were picking berries at a small distance from their habitations. Ouconnostota, or the great-warrior, and several other headmen, were lately at fort Prince-George, on a visit to Mr. Price, the commandant, who delivered and explained to them, a talk from the superintendant, relating, among other things, to the war between the Creeks and Chocktaws: Ouconnostota said they were both rogues, and might fight it out between themselves. It appeared the Creeks had been tampering with the Cherokees, in order to induce them to take part with them against the Choctaws.

1767 - May 14, 1767 Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLESTOWN (SOUTH CAROLINA) April 13. - April 14. Our late Intelligences from the Cherokee Country are, that the Northern Tribes had formed a large Encampment on the Back of North Carolina, from whence they frequently dispatched scalping Parties against the Cherokees; but that Salloue, or the young Warrior of Estatoe, had collected a numerous Body of the best Marksmen from all the Towns, to go against them, in order to destroy their Encampment, and prevent any further Incursions from that Quarter.—It is further said, that, after strict Enquiry, the Cherokees had no hand in killing Mr. Boyd; nor were there any of the Virginia Traders murdered, as was reported.

1767
Joseph Spry State: SC County: Colleton County Township: Will Year: 1767 Record Type: Probate Records Page: 00022 Database: SC Colonial Probate Index

June 8, 1767 Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh) -
Letters from Charlestown, South Carolina, of April 17th, say, “According to accounts from the Cherokee country, the northern tribes who continue the war against those Indians, having formed a large encampment on the back of North Carolina, from which they continually detached scalping parties against the Cherokees: Salloue, or the young warior of Estatoe, has collected a numerous party of chosen men from all the towns, and is gone out to destroy the said encampment. It appears, upon the strictest enquiry, that the Cherokees were not at all concerned in the murder of Mr. Boyd and that the various acounts of the murder of the seven Virginia traders were entirely groundless, no such murder having been committed.

July 30, 1767 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
CHARLESTOWN SOUTH CAROLINA June 30 July 14 From North Carolina we are informed, that Governor Tyron with the commissioners appointed for that purpose, joined by the chiefs of the Cherokee nation, on the 4th of June, began to run out the boundary line between North Carolina and the Cherokee Hunting - Grounds, at the Corner Tree on Reedy River, where the line behind the province terminates. The surveyors went a north course 53 miles, marking as they went into the mountains; and on the 13th of June, they marked several trees on the top of Mount Tryon, on the head waters of White Oak and Pacolet Creeks, running into Green and Broad Rivers; but several obstacles having impeded a further survey, it was agreed by the whole, that the boundary should be a direct line from the said marked trees to Chiswell’s mines in Virginia which being settled and agreed upon, proper instruments were drawn up, and signed by the parties present, to he transmitted to his Majesty. The Indians were so highly pleased with his Honour’s condescension to their several Requisitions, that they complimented him with the war name of the Great Wolf of North Carolina

abt 1767 NC and Tenn
John Skipper 1767 – 1838 mother was ? Spouse Nancy (?) 1760 – ? father was Nathan Skipper b 1755 1755 Onslow, North Carolina d 1840 Maury, Tennessee source trees.ancestry.com - John Skipper Birth 1767 - Onslow, North Carolina Death 1838 - Maury, Tennessee Parents Nathan Skipper, Nancy (?) Spouse Lucretia (Hawkins) - abt 1767 NC and Tenn John Skipper 1767 – 1838 mother was Spouse Nancy (?) 1760 – ? father was Nathan Skipper b 1755 1755 Onslow, North Carolina d 1840 Maury, Tennessee source trees.ancestry.com - John Skipper Birth: 1767 - Onslow, North Carolina Death: 1838 - Maury, Tennessee Parents Nathan Skipper, Nancy (?) Spouse: Lucretia (Hawkins)

Onslow NC 1767 -
SKIPWORTH / SKIPPER: Jonathan (non-Quaker, only on the Draper list) Jonathan Skipworth or Skipper is not mentioned in Worldconnect. This might mean he was killed during the Revolution. A Nathan Skipper or Skipworth b. Onslow Co., NC received a pension in Maury Co., TN 1827 for service in the North Caroline Line (Col. Armstrong's Regt) seeing battle at Germantown and Brandywine. The other choice for Skipworth is an old Henrico Co., VA family that intermarried with the Randolphs. I believe the Onslow Co., NC family to be more likely. The Skippers, Hammons, Simmons and Spencers of Surry Co., NC may all be interrelated somehow, and I have not figured it out yet, but I think there is a Croatan / Lumbee Indian connection in here somewhere. This connection could explain some of the lack of information on these lines. 1767-1771 Regulator petitions: Barnaby and George Skipper sign. Members of the Skipper family of Onslow Co., NC changed their name to Skipworth when they moved west. Barnabus Skipper is known to be partially Native American and some of his descendants are listed as free persons of color in the 1790 NC census. Free persons of color (native Americans) had full citizenship rights in North Carolina until 1835. Not on the 1782 Montgomery Co., VA personal tax list, nor is he on the 1793 Wythe tax list, nor are there any on the 1790 Surry Co., NC census.
Source www.newrivernotes.com

Norfolk Co., Va -
Francis Skiper was married to Ann (?) Skipper , an African American woman, before February 1667/8 when they sold land in Norfolk County - W&D E:1666 -75; Orders 1666 -75, 73
Source freeafricanamericans.com

1768
Robert Spear SC Craven District No Township Listed 1768 / Robert Spear State: SC County: Craven District Township: No Township Listed Year: 1768 Database: SC Early Census Index

SC 1768 Cheraw Indians -
The last notice of them is in 1768, when their remnant, reduced by war and disease to 50 or 60, were still living with the Catawba. - www.accessgenealogy.com
Cheraw. Significance unknown. Also called:
Ani'-Suwa'II, Cherokee name.
Saraw, Suali, synonyms even more common than Cheraw.
Xuala, Xualla, Spanish and Portuguese forms of the word, the x being intended for sh.
Connections. The Cheraw are classed on circumstantial grounds in the Siouan linguistic family though no words of their tongue have been preserved.
Location.-The earliest known location of the Cheraw appears to have been near the head of Saluda River in Pickens and Oconee Counties, S. C., whence they removed at an early date to the present Henderson, Polk, and Rutherford Counties.
In 1768 the survivors numbered 50 to 60.
NOTE: If they were so few I now see why there are very few family histories on the Skipper surname.

1768 Bladen Co., NC - Colonial Tax Lists -
Byrd, William L., III, Bladen County Tax Lists, 1768-1774, Volume I . (Robeson was formed from Bladen in 1797). pp.4-9 Mulatoes: Isom Skipper, Arthur Lamb, Simon Cox & Adam Ivey, William Wilkins, Rasses Goen, Thomas Cairsey, Junr., Aaron Drake, Ishamel Chevers & wife, Cannon Cumbo & wife, James Carter & son Isaac, James Lowery & wife: Jas Hunt & William Jones, Cudworth Oxendine, James Clarke & wife, Cooper Clarke & wife, Jas. Doyal & wife & Arthur Evans, John Wilson, Solomon James, Moses Walker & wife, Thomas Russel, Isaac Lamb & son Needham, Daniel Wharton & wife & Son Richard Wharton, Isaac Johnston, Jacob Lockliar & wife, Joshua Perkins & two sons & wife, William Sweat & son Benj., Joseph Ivey, Major Lockliar, Joshua Braveboy & son Lewis, Solomon Johnston Junr. & wife, Thomas Sweat, Gilbert Cox, Peter Cairsey & son David, Richd. Jones & wife, Thomas Cairsey Senr., Moses Skipper.
Source: freeafricanamericans.com

MISC
Other Free" Heads of Household in the 1800 North Carolina Census by family name
Scipper, Isaac 8 Bruns 14 - Scipper, Jesse 3 Bruns 14 - Scipper, Moses 5 Bruns 14 - Scipper, Urias 8 Bruns 14

Other Free" Heads of Household in the 1810 North Carolina Census, by Family Name
(Microfilm M252, reels 38-43)
Ship, Peter 3 Halifax Co. page 46 and Skipper, John jr. 3 Brunswick Co. page 228

MISC - The Swamp Outlaws -
LOWERY'S CABIN Just such a place as the above is the house of Henry Berry Lowery, the outlaw chief, except that, being a carpenter he has nailed weather strips over the interstices, between the logs and made himself a sort of bedstead and some chairs. Source freeafricanamericans. com - THE SWAMP OUTLAWS or, THE NORTH CARLINA BANDITS Being a Complete History of THE MODERN ROB ROYS AND ROBIN HOODS by George Alfred Townsend - New York: Robert M. De Witt , Publisher 1872 letters sent to the New York Herald in February and March 1872 - [p.9, first page of book] Among the Lowerys, the Outlaw Terrors of North Carolina -- Tuscarora, Senegal, and Caucasian Blood Mingling in Their Veins--History of their Campaign--A Bloody Nine Years' Record --Sixteen Murders, --Three Hundred Robberies, and Not a Man Lost to the Band--Hopeless Condition of Affairs--The Old North State Dismayed and Baffled--Graphic Pen Picture of Henry Berry Lowery, the Outlaw Chief--Portraits of "Boss" Strong, Steve Lowery, Andrew Strong and Tom Lowery.
Source freeafricanamericans.com

1768/1770 - Va and 1768/1770 Bladen Co., NC -
Mixed- race families from Virginia were among the earliest settlers of Bladen County, North Carolina, from which Robeson County was formed in 1787. They were described in a report to the colonial governor of North Carolina in 1754: 50 families a mixt Crew, a lawless People, possess the Lands without patent or paying quit rents; shot a Surveyor for coming to view vacant lands being inclosed in great swamps. ... No Indians...in the county [Saunders, Colonial Records, V:161].
The colonial tax lists for Bladen County listed the following mixed-race families as "Mulattoes" from 1768 to 1770: Braveboy, Carter, Chavis, Clark, Cox, Cumbo, Dimry, Doyal (Dial), Drake, Evans, Goin, Groom, Hammons, Hayes, Hunt, Ivey, James, Johnston, Jones, Kersey, Lamb, Locklear, Lowery, Overton, Oxendine, Perkins, Phillips, Russell, Skipper, Sweat, Sweeting, Walden, Wharton, Wilkins, and Wilson. One person was called an Indian: Thomas Britt [Byrd, William L., III, Bladen County Tax Lists, 1768-1774, I: 4-9, 14-17, 24-46, 50]..... A complaint of 13 October 1773 listed "free Negors and Mullatus living upon the Kings land...Raitously Assembled together" in Bladen County Captain James Ivey, Joseph Ivey, Ephraim Sweat, William Chavours Clark, Bengman Dees, William Sweat, George Sweat, William Groom, Senr, William Groom, Junr, Gidion Grant, Thomas Groom, James Frace, Isaac Vaun, Sol. Stableton, Edward Locklear, Tiely Locklear, Major Locklear, Recher Groom, and Ester Carsey [G.A. 73, Box 7].
And a representation from Bladen County to the House of Assembly on 18 December 1773 complained of the number of free negroes and mulattoes who infest that county and annoy its Inhabitants [Saunders, Colonial Records, IX:768].......
Source freeafricanamericans.com

MISC -
Cooper River District is in Berkeley County, SC

1769 SC NOTE -
(Old) DISTRICT 96, SC Formed 1769 from Old Berkeley and Craven Divided 1798 See Abbeville, Edgefield, Greenville, Laurens, Newberry, Pendleton and Union

1769 SOUTHAMPTON CO., VIRGINIA -
SOUTHAMPTON CO., VIRGINIA PP. 57-60 ....... AS A COURT FOR THE COUNTYOF SOUTHAMPTON THE TH DAY OF MARCH 1769........ THIS INDENTURE OF MEMORENDUM .... PROVED BY THE ..... OF BENJAMIN CLEMENTS, BENJAMIN RUFFIN AND CHARLES SIMMONS WHEREFORE HERETO AND ORDERED BY THE RECORDED....... TASS R/ KELL..., CCB...... THIS INDENDURE IMPARTITE MADE THE FIRS DAY OF JANUARY, IN THE OF OUR LORD, .... ..... ... .. . . . . BETWEEN SAM, FRANK, DOCTOR TIM, JOHN ...., GEO. SCIPER, (SIC) JACK .... AND WATT BAILEY, CHIEFTEN OF THE NOTTOWAY INDIANS OF THE FIRST PART JOHN SIMMONS OF SOUTHAMPTON COUNTY, THOMAS, ... AND BENJAMIN EDWARDS OF THE COUNTY, .... .. .. . . . ... . . . .. SECOND PART AND BENJAMIN ....., OF THE COUNTY OF SOUTHAMPTON OF THE THIRD PART. WHEREAS BY ONE ACT OF THE GENREAL ASSEMBLY ORDER AT A ...... ....... HELD AT WILLIAMSBURG IN THE EIGHTH YEAR OF THE REIGN OF OUR LORD GEORGE THE SECOND KING OF GREAT BRITIAN INTITLED AN ACT TO ENABLE THE NOTTOWAY INDIANS TO SELL CERTAIN LAND THERERIN MENTIONED FOR DISCHARGING (?) THE INDIAN INTREPRETER IT IS AMONG OTHER THINGS ..... THAT THE CHIEFMEN OF THE NOTTOWAY NATIONS ARE IMPOWERED TO MAKE SALE OF ALL OR ANY PART OF A CERTAIN .......... OF LAND TO SIX MILES DIAMETER LYING AND BEING ON THE NORTH SIDE OF NOTTOWAY RIVER IN THE COUNTY OF ...... BY AND WITH THE CONSENT OF SAID JOHN SIMMONS THAT ........ BENJAMAIN EDWARDS WHO ARE BY THE SAID ACT APPOINTED ..... ERS TO SEE THE SAID ACT DULY EXCUTED AND AFTER.... AGREEMENT MADE FOR THE .... OF ANY PART OF THE SAID LAND ... ... .... DO NOT EXCEED FOUR HUNDRED (?) ACRES TO ANY ONE PERSON ... .. . .. . MAY BE LAWFULL FOR THE SAID CHIEF MEN TOGETHER WITH THE ..... TRUSTEES AFORESAID OR THE SUVIVOR OR SUVIVORS OF THEM TO ..... AND DELIVER A ....MENT TO THE PURCHASOR WHO IMMEDIATELY AFTER TEH EXECUTION WEHERE OF SHALL PAY UPON TO THE CHIEF MEN .... ..... .... ...... TO THE ... .. . . .......... ..., ....... ..... ....... THOMAS ......, LS FRANK ........., LS BENJ. EDWARDS, LS SAM'L ........., LS HIS X MARK WILLIAM ANDREWS JOHN .........., LS B... RUFFIN HIS X MARK . . .... GEORGE SKIPPER, LS HIS X MARK JACK ........., LS HIS X MARK ........ ....., LS HIS X MARK AS A COURT HELD FOR THE COUNTY OF SOUTHAMPTON THE .... OF THE DAY OF MARCH 1749. THIS INDENTURE IS MEMORANDUM ... PROVED BY THE OATHS OF BENJ. RUFFIN, WILLIAM ANDREWS, ...... ..... ........, THERETO AND ORDERED TO BE RECORDED. FAST(SIC) R. KELLS, CLK
TYPED BY JOY SKIPPER CORNWELL APRIL 7, 2001 SOURCE: THE COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT WAS OBTAINED FROM THE SC HISTORICAL SOCIETY CHALMERS STREET, CHARLESTON, SC 29401 - As noted above George bought land in Chowan Co. (now Bertie Co., NC) from James Skipper. Was James his brother? If so, who was their father? There had to be another Skipper prior to them. Who could he be?

1769 Anson County, NC - Bladen Co. -
History of Anson County, NC - Anson County was named in honor of British Admiral Lord George Anson, a First Lord of the Admiralty. He commanded the vessel which brought Princess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Germany, to her future husband King George III. Germans emigrated to the area around Anson County, as did many settlers from the British Isles, Africa, and Moravia. In 1748 or 1749 Anson County was formed from Bladen County and, at the time, it reached all the way to the Mississippi River. Petition dated October 9, 1769. "Mr. Speaker and Gen't of the Assembly. Humbly Showeth: That the Province in General labour under general grievances, and the western part thereof under particular ones; which we not only see, but very sensibly feel, being crouch'd beneath our sufferings and not withstanding our sacred privileges, have too long yielded ourselves slaves to remorseless oppression. - Permit us to conceive it to be our inviolable right to make known our grievances, and to petition for redress as appears in the Bill of Rights pass'd in the reign of King Charles the first, as well as the Act of Settlement of the Crown of the Revolution. We therefore beg leave at the Act of the Settlement of the Crown of the Revolution. We therefore beg leave to lay before you a specimen there of that your compassionate endeavors may tend to the relief of your injured Constituents, whose 13 distressed condition call aloud for aid. The alarming cries of the oppressed possibly may reach your ears; but without your zeal how they shall ascend the throne - how relentless is the breast without sympathy, the heart that cannot bleed on a view of our calamity; to see tenderness removed, cruelty stepping in; and all our liberties and privileges invaded and abridg'd (by as it were) domestickes who are conscious of their guilt and void of remorse. - O how darling! how relentless whilst impending Judgements loudly threaten and gaze upon them, with every emblem of merited destruction. A few of
the many grievances are as follows, (viz't) 1. That the poor inhabitants in general are much oppress'd by reason of the disproportionate Taxes, and those of the western Counties in particular; as they are generally in mean circumstances. 2. That no method is prescribed by law for the payment of the taxes of the Western Counties in produce (in lieu of a currency) as in other Counties within this Province to the Peoples great oppression. 3. That Lawyers, Clerks, and other petitioners; in place of being obsequious Servants for the Country's use, are become a nuisance, as the business of the people is often transacted without the least degree of fairness, the intention of the law evaded, exorbitant fees extorted, and the sufferers left to mourn under their oppressions. 4. That an Attorney should have it in his power, either for the sake of ease or interest, or to gratify their malevolence and spite, or commence suits to what courts he pleases, however inconvenient it may be to the Defendants; is a very great oppression. 5. That all unlawful fees taken in Indictment, where the Defendant is acquitted by his Country (however customary it may be) is an oppression. 6. That Lawyers, Clerks, and others, extorting more fees than is intended by law; is also an oppression. 7. That the violation of the King's Instructions to his Delegates, their artfulness in concealing the same from him; and the great injury the People thereby sustains: is a manifest oppression. And for remedy whereof, we take the freedom to recommend the following mode of redress, not doubting audience and acceptance which will not only tend to our relief, but command prayers at a duty from your humble Petitioners. 1. That at all elections each suffrage be given by Ticket & Ballot. 2. That the mode of Taxation be altered, and each person pay in proportion to the proffits arising from his Estate. 3. That no future tax be laid in Money, until a currency is made. 4. That there may be established a Western as well as a Northern and Southern District, and a Treasurer for the same. 5. That when a currency is made it may be let out by a loan office (on land security) and a Treasurer for the same 6. That all debts above 60s (shillings) and under 10 pounds be tried and determined without lawyers, by a jury of six freeholders, impaneled by a Justice, and that their verdict be enter'd by the said Justice, and be a final judgement. 7. That the Chief Justice have no perquisites, but a Salary only. 8. That Clerks be restricted in respect to fees, costs, and other things within the course of their office. 9. That Lawyers be effectively Barr'd from exacting and extorting fees. 10. That all doubts may be removed in respect to the payment of fees and costs on Indictments whereas the Defendant is not found guilty by the jury, and therefore acquited. 11. That the Assembly make known the Remonstrance to the King, the conduct of the cruel and 14 oppressive Receiver of the Quit Rents, for omitting the customary easie and effectual method of collecting by distress, and pursuing the expensive mode of commencing suits in the most distant Courts. 12. That the Assembly in like manner make known that the Governor and Council fo frequently grant lands to as many as they think proper without regard to Head Rights, notwithstanding the contrariety of his Majesties instructions, by which means immence sums has been collected, and numerous Patents granted, for much of the most fertile lands in this Province, that is yet uninhabited and cultivated, environed by great numbers of poor people who are necessitated to toil in the cultivation of bad Lands whereon they hardly can subsist, who are thereby deprived of His Majesties liberality and Bounty nor is there the least regard paid to the cultivation clause in said Patent mentioned, as many of the said Council as well as their friends and favorites enjoy large quantities of Lands under the abovementioned circumstances. 13. That the Assembly communicates in like manner the Violation of His Majesties Instructions respecting the Land Office by the Governor and Council, and of their own rules, customs and orders. If it be sufficiently proved, that after they had granted Warrants for some Tracts of Land, and that the same was in due time suvey'd and returned and the Patent fees timely paid into the said office; and that if a private Council was called to avoid spectators, and peremptory orders made that Patents should not be granted; and Warrants by their orders arbitrarily to have been issued in the names of other Persons for the same Lands, and if when intreated by a solicitor they refus'd to render so much as a reason for their so doing, or to refund any part of the money paid by them extorted. 14. That some method may be pointed out that every Improvement on Lands in any of the Proprietors part be proved when begun, by whom, and every sale made, that the eldest may have the preference of at least 300 acres. 15. That all taxes in the following Counties be paid as in other Counties in the Province (i.e.) in the produce of the County and that warehouses be erected as follows (viz), In Anson County at Isom Haleys Ferry Landing on PeeDee River, Rowan and Orange at Cambleton in Cumberland County, Mecklenburg at __?___ on the Catawba River, and in Tryon County at __?__ on __?__ River.
16. That every denomination of People may marry according to their respective mode Ceremony and customs after due publication or License. 17. That Doc't Benjamin Franklin or some other known patriot be appointed agent, to represent the unhappy state of this Province to his Majesty, and to solicit the several Boards in England.
John Sno r ----- Jonathan Gowers ----- Jason Meadow ­­----- Isaac Armstrong ---- Stokey Yeamons ----- Robert Broadaway ---- William Thomson ----- Thomas Harper ---- Samuel Tonehberg ---- Auth'd Hutchins ---- John Johnson ----- Samuel Flake ----- Seamor Almond ----- James Upton ----- Thomas Balice ----- Isaac Falconberg ----- Jacob Watson ----- John Preslie ----- Francis Smith ------ Isham Belvin ----- John Cartright -----John Jeffrey ------ Owen Slaughter ----- Thomas Lacy ----- Neal French ----- Thomas Wright ----- John Jackson ----- Jero Miller ----- Patrick Sanders ----- Joseph French -----Tiery Robinson ----- John Ryle ----- William Newberry ----- Gabrill Davis ------- John Culpepper ----- Leonard Webb ----- Aquila Jones ------ John Jones, Sr. ------ Julius Holley -----Thomas Tallant ----- Wm. Grifen Hogon ----- John James Junr. ----- James Denson ------ Robert Maner ---- John James Senr ----- William Raiford ----- John Watts ----- Jimmey James ----- John I. Merree ---- John Davis ----- Jonathan Helms ----- George Wilson ----- Richard Leak ----- Tilmon Helms ----- Robert Webb ----- Charles Hines ----- James Sanders ----- Thomas Taylor ----- James McIlvanilly ----- John Bailey ------ David Smith ----- Van Swearingen ----- Samuel Gaylord ----- 15 ----- James Barker ----- William Hore ----- Richard Sands ----- John Mims ----- Joseph Martin ----- Jason Irol Hinsinbru ----- John Brooks Junr ----- Thomas Nelson ----- Thomas Preslar ----- William C.B.Bond ----- William Burns ---- Thomas Culpepper ---- John Bond ----- John Leveritt ---- Daniel Culpepper ----- Moses M. Tallant ------- Theofilis Williams ----- John Snider ----- Benjamin Dumas ------ William Leveritt ----- William Mims ---- Joseph White ------ James Williams ----- Robert Smith ----- William Sidden ----- John Coleman ------ Zachariah Smith --- Silvannus Waker ----- Meeagar Edwards - John Smith ----- John Smith (Sandhill) ------ Anthony Mathis ----- John Thomas ---- David Dumas ------ Fagan Gring ------- William Burt ----- Benjamin Smith ------ Samuel Ratcliff ------ Edward Smith ----- William Benton ----- John Long ----- Elijah Clark ----- William Coleman ---- Charles Smith ----- John Clark ----- Alexander McPherson ------ James Bound (Bond?) ---- James Adams ----- E. Pickett ----- Abraham Pelyou ----- Thomas Mason Junr ----- Thomas Gowers ----- Jason Meadow Junr ----- John Bennet ----- Jonathan Turner ----- Daniel Laws ----- Thadwick Hogins ----- Barnabee Skipper ----- Abraham Bellow ----- Thomas Barrotz ----- George Skipper ----- Thomas Donnor ----- James E. Arnet ---- John Jenkins ----- Joseph Hindes ----- Thomas Trull ---- David Phelps ----- William Haley ----- William Cukpepper ----- John McNish ---- Francis Clark ------- John Thomas Suggs ------ Jonathan Lewellyn ----- Jeremiah Terrell ----- John Hornbeck ----- Leonard Franklyn ----- Darass Burns ------ William Dinkins ----- Edward Almond ------ Thomas Baley ----- Thomas Dinkins ------ Thomas Mims ----- Stephen Bush ------ Marverick Layn ---- John Stinkberry ------ Jacob Cockerham ------ Waterman Boatman ---- William Leaton ----- John Flowel ------ John Simmons ---- Luke Robinson ----- Stephen Jackson ----- Augustine Prestwood ---- John Webb ------ John Jones ----- Richard Downs ---- Andrew Griffin ---- Archelam Moorman ---- Samuel Ratcliff Junr ---- George Estress ----- William Digge ----- Elisha Ratcliff ----- James Griffin ----- Bennakia Moorman ----- John Poston ---- William Estress ---- William Haley Junr ----- John Poston, Sr. ------
Stephen Bush ----- John Mathews ----- Ned Mathes ---- Joseph Burcham ----- James Mathews ---- Benjamin Bunt ---- Stephen Piecock ----- Joseph Webb ----- Jowl Jormal ---- Robert Jarman ----- Andrew Falconbery ----- Yomond Lloyd ---- William Thredgill ----- Isaac Falconbert Junr ----- Thomas Lucas ---- Robert Lowery ----- Henry Falconbery ------ Wlliam Lucas ---- Denes Norlen ----- David Cox ----- Christopher Butler ---- Lewis Lowery ----- John Horback ----- John Sowel ---- Edward Chambers ------ Beaty Web ----- Edward Morris ---- Thomas Pickett ----- Isaac Inceste ----- William Treneen ---- William Ussery ------- William Web ------ John Williams ---- William Jowers ----- Walter Gibson ------- John Burcham ---- Shadrach Denson ----- Silvester Gibson ----- William Sowel ---- Joseph Harrison ----- Burlingham Rudd ----- John Carpenter ---- Joseph Howelt ------ John Murphy ----- Francis Jourden ---- Thomas Ussery ---- John Liles ----- Henry Burcham ---- John Thomas ------ James Liles ----- William Morris ---- 16 ---- Benjamin Covington ----- Thomas Arrington ------ John Morgan ---- Isam Haley ----- Thomas Mackneih ----- James Burcham ---- Silas Haley ----- Thomas Fox ------ James Sanders ---- George Belvin ------ Henry Stokes ----- Joseph Morris ---- William Blewet ----- John Brooks Junr ------ Samuel Sowel ---- Charles Sowell ------ William Lucas Junr ------ Welcome Ussery ---- James Gibson ------ Joseph Allen ------- Matthew Raiford junr ---- William Gibson ------ William Morris Junr ---- Elisha Thomson ---- John Hunt ------ Lewis Sowell ----- John Thompson ---- Richard Braswell -------- John Skinner ----- Goin C. Morgan ----- George Braswell ------ Jesse Wallas ----- Ref. Source: "Colonial Records", Vol. VIII, 1769-1771, pp. 81-82 and pp. 241-244, by Saunders; also: North Carolina History Told By Contemporaries," pp.87-93, by Lefler; also: "The War of The Regulators and The Battle of Alamance, May 16, 1771, by William S. Powell.

1770 Craven County Black River SC -
??????? Series Number: S213184 Volume: 0019 Page: 00501 Item: 01 Date: 1770/10/15 Description: SKIPPER, GEORGE, PLAT FOR 100 ACRES IN CRAVEN COUNTY. Names Indexed: SKIPPER, GEORGE / DOZER, JOHN / BREMAR, JOHN / Locations: CRAVEN COUNTY / BLACK RIVER Type: PLAT/
NOTE: I would like to know who was living around George and John? -
NOTE: My grandmother Skipper married a Dozier.

1770
Royal Spry SC Craven District Will 1770 Record Type: Probate Records Page: 00556
Database:SC Colonial Probate Index

1771
Henry Spry SC Craven District Will 1771 Record Type: Probate Records
Page: 00581 Database: SC Colonial Probate Index

Born abt 1773 Sc to Alabama -
John J Scipper [John J Skipper] Age: 80 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1770 Birth Place: South Carolina Gender: Male Home in 1850(City,County,State): District 2, Montgomery, Alabama
hh
Ann Scipper 77
John J Scipper 80
Year: 1850; Census Place: District 2, Montgomery, Alabama; Roll: M432_12; Page: 160; Image: 182

abt 5 June 1770
John Skipper father was William Skipper mother was Eleanor (?)

1770 Scotland to SC -
In the year 1770, John Skipper and Mary (Shepherd) Skipper (his wife) came from Scotland and settled near Charleston, SC. Being unable to speak English well enough to be understood, their name was misinterpreted and they were known as Skipper; this being a very well-known name in that section at that time. To them were born
two children,
John
Betsey.
When quite a young man, son John Skipper went to Alabama and was never heard of again.
It was supposed that the Indians had killed him.
Betsey Skipper married Ira Skipper and had a daughter, Maria (or Marier).
Ira died and Betsey married Peter Skipper and went with him to live in Bladen County, NC.
To them were born 7 children -
Ira,
Peter,
Daniel,
Charlotte,
Ellen,
Havallah, and
Patrick....Peter, Sr. was a captain in the War of 1812 and taught school. At the time of his death, he was mail agent between Wilmington NC and Fayetteville NC . On one of his trips he was drowned." .......
Ira and Betsey's daughter, Maria (Skipper), married Goodwin Ellison Bowen in Bladen County in 1830. This marriage is the first record I have been able to find about the Shepherds and Skippers. I can trace Maria Skipper and Goodwin after their marriage but haven't been able to find a thing before that time.
Anybody have any information or ideas on where to look? ......
NOTE: Cannot be my line, as my Gilbert Skipper was already in earlier records in the United States ........ levitaann@yahoo.com - my line - American Genealogical-Biographical Index www. ancestry.com - my Gilbert Skipper 175? South Carolina - Gilbert Skipper Birth Date: 175? Birthplace: South Carolina Volume: 160 Page Number: 203 Reference: Heads of Fams. at the first U.S. census. SC. By U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington, 1908. (150p.):46 -
Source Information: Godfrey Memorial Library, comp.. American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999.
Original data: Godfrey Memorial Library. American Genealogical-Biographical Index. Middletown, CT, USA: Godfrey Memorial Library.

1771
Henry Spry State: SC County: Craven District Township: Will Year: 1771 Record Type: Probate Records Page: 00581 Database: SC Colonial Probate Index

1771 -
Mary Skipper Birth: 1771 Death: 1822 - all saints church Lawshall, Suffolk Spouse: James Mortlock
Source: Ancestry.com

1771 Craven County, Black River Sc Archives -
Series S111001 Vol 0010 Page 00450 Item 04 Date: 1771/05/27 Description: SKIPPER, GEORGE, MEMORIAL FOR 100 ACRES ON BLACK RIVER, CRAVEN COUNTY. Names Indexed: SKIPPER, GEORGE // Locations: CRAVEN COUNTY / BLACK RIVER Type: MEMORIAL/ Georger Skipper MEMORIAL FOR 100 ACRES ON BLACK RIVER, CRAVEN COUNTY
NOTE Was he married and did he have children?

Craven County, SC Archives 1771 -
???????? Series Number: S213019 Volume: 0023 Page: 00319 Item: 00 Date: 1771/04/10 Description: SKIPPER, GEORGE, LAND GRANT FOR 100 ACRES IN CRAVEN COUNTY. Names Indexed: SKIPPER, GEORGE // Locations: CRAVEN COUNTY / Type: LAND GRANT
NOTE: Was he married and did he have children?

1771 Craven County Sc Archives -
Series S213184 Vol 0017 Page 00245 Item 02 Date: 1771/05/21 Description: JENKINS, THOMAS, PLAT FOR 350 ACRES IN CRAVEN COUNTY. Names Indexed: BREMAR, JOHN / JENKINS, THOMAS / HART, WILLIAM / SKIPPER, THOMAS / DOZER, JOHN / Locations: CRAVEN COUNTY / LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER / BIG SWAMP Type: PLAT - NOTE Thomas Skipper , John Dozier
NOTE: Were they married and did they have children?
What were their names?
I would like to know who was living around George and John?
MY Grandmother (Skipper) married a Dozier.........
What is this close to? Town??????

1771 Craven County SC Archives -
Series S111001 Vol 0011 Page 00002 Item 01 Date 1771/07/21 Description JENKINS, THOMAS, MEMORIAL FOR 2 TRACTS ONE FOR 350 ACRES THE OTHER FOR 500 ACRES, BOTH ON LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER, CRAVEN COUNTY Names Indexed JENKINS, THOMAS / WATIES, WILLIAM / SKIPPER, THOMAS / COACHMAN, BENJAMIN / Locations LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER / CRAVEN COUNTY Type MEMORIAL Thomas Skipper NOTE Was he married and did they have children?

1771 NC to Marlboro Co., SC -
JOHN1 WALLACE He married RACHEL (SKIPPER) She was born 1771, and died February 11, 1827 in Marlboro Co., SC.
Children of JOHN WALLACE and RACHEL SKIPPER are
i. STEPHEN2 WALLACE, b. January 03, 17851 d. October 07, 1811, Marlboro Co., SC1.
2. ii. WILLIAM J. WALLACE, b. November 24, 1787, North Carolina; d. March 03, 1852, Marks Creek, Hamlet, Richmond County, NC.
3. iii. BARNABUS WALLACE, b. January 13, 1792, North Carolina; d. August 22, 1871,
John Skipper Year: 1850 County: Horry Dist. State: SC Age: 85 Gender: M (Male) Month of Death: Apr State of Birth: SC ID#: MRT50_2298 Occupation: FARMER Cause of Death: CONSUMPTION
Source: U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules Index

1771 Marlboro Co., SC -
Name: Josiah Skipper Age: 79 Estimated birth year: abt 1771 Birth Place: South Carolina Gender: Male Home in 1850 (City,County,State): Marlboro, South Carolina - 1850 Census
Josiah Skipper
NOTE: Was he married and did he have children?

1772 - Brun County NC - Skipper Surnames that were Taxpayers -
George Skipper Chow CO 1721,
George Skipper Senr. Anson CO 1763,
Benjamin Skipper Anson CO 1763,
Clemonds Skipper BRUN CO 1772 ,
Barnaba Skipper Anson CO 1763,
Thomas Skipper ROAN CO 1720,
Fred Skipper Blad CO 1763,
Hardy Skipper Blad CO 1763,
Jacob Skipper Dobb CO 1769,
James Skipper Roan Co 1720,
Joseph Skipper Blad Co 1763,
Joseph Skipper Onslow Co 1769,
Moses Skipper Brun Co 1772,
Robert Skipper Chow Co 1721
Source: Title: North Carolina Taxpayers, 1679-1790. Volume 2 Chapter: S Page: 185

1772 England -
Hampshire: - Marriage License allegations, Bishop of Winchester, 1689-1837 Allegations for Marriage Licences in Dampshire, in the Registry of the Bishop of Winchester. Volume 3. County: Hampshire Country: England Sparrow, Benjamin, of Gosport, mariner, b., & Elizabeth Turner, of the s., a minor, with c. of her m., Sarah Turner, 17 Feb 1772.

1772 Brunswick Co. -
Skippers in Brunswick Co. in 1772 Moses and Clemonds Skipper

1772 Anson Co., NC -
Some of the first references of William Speed living in Anson County, North Carolina occur in 1772. On October 14, 1772, Barnaby Skipper deeded 150 acres to William Speed. In October 1779, William Speed and John Speed were also one of several hundred signers of a petition in Anson County, North Carolina to have the county divided into two counties with the Pee Dee River the dividing line.[1] On October 23, 1779, a law was passed dividing the county thus creating Richmond County

MISC NOTE -
Anson County, North Carolina to have the county divided into two counties dividing the county thus creating Richmond County

1772 Brunswick Co., NC -
Based upon an email I received from Slade Skipper, 4/25/2003, who comes through the George Washington Skipper Line, I am confident to call the following: 1) Moses Skipper and Grace (????) Skipper, of Brunswick County, NC are the Parents of Abraham Skipper, John Skipper, and James Skipper, (who were born around 1750). 2) Moses and Clemmond Skipper were brothers 3) Clemmond Skipper is the father of Isaac & Jesse Skipper. The source of my founding comes from references made to the 1772, 1785, 1790 Brunswick County Census and Tax Record Reports. My research indicates that Abraham, John W. and Isaac of Brunswick County were the sons of Barnabas Skipper of Anson Co.
The three brothers moved to Brunswick county before 1790 when they appeared in the Census.
Barnabus Skipper b. ca 1740 went to Marlboro Co., SC before 1800 and is listed in the census there, as is his son John, so the John Skipper in 1800 Brunswick Co., NC is not his.
Abraham Skipper has absolutely no descendants , among the many hundreds that I have seen, named Barnabus, so I doubt his father's name was Barnabus.
There were Skippers in Brunswick Co. in 1772 (Moses and Clemonds Skipper) and in Bladen Co. in
1763 (Jos., Fred, and Hardy) from which Brunswick was formed.
I strongly suspect that the Brunswick Co. Skippers descended from some of these.
I think in this instance, location takes precedence when considering circumstantial evidence.

1773 Dobbs Co. NC -
In a most extraordinary move, on 13 February 1773 the Dobbs County court recommended to the General Assembly that Edward Carter's daughters be exempted from the discriminatory tax against female children of African Americans Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, IX 495.
Source freeafricanamericans.com

born abt 1774 -
Ebenezer Skipper Estimated Birth Year: abt 1774 Age in 1870: 96 Birthplace: South Carolina Home in 1870: Galivants Ferry, Horry, South Carolina Race: White Gender: Male Value of real estate: Post Office: Conway
hh
Joel B Skipper 62
Nancy Skipper 53
Ebenezer Skipper 96
Manasba Cannon 21
Florentine Cannon 21
Year: 1870; Census Place: Galivants Ferry, Horry, South Carolina; Roll: M593_1499; Page: 89; Image: 180 -
1774 - Galivants Ferry, Horry, Sc - Ebenezer Skipper Galivants Ferry, Horry, SC abt 1774 South Carolina
White Male - 1870 Census - Ebenezer Skipper -
NOTE Was he married and did he have children? -
Ebenezer Skipper b 1774 d 1860 married South Carolina, USA
Spouse Ann (?) Skipper 1772 – 1860
Children
William Cooper 1814 –1848
Children
LUCRETIA HAWKINS b abt 1778
his father NATHAN SKIPPER his Mother (?)
her father is Allen Hawkins her Mother Esther (?)

1775 Catawba Indians
in 1775 to 400 souls

1775 - September 2, 1775 Edinburgh Evening Courant -
EDINBURGH. There are letters from Carolina, brought by the Shew, Capt Bowman, who is arrived at Whitehaven, which bring an account, that the Indians on the back settlements have taken advantage of the troubles that now subsist there, and have drove the back-settlers from their habitations, and carried off their valuable effects. - Great numbers in the back settlements on North Carolina are well affected to government, peace, and free commerce with Britain and the West Indians.

born abt 1775 SC -
Tamperaner Sipper Gender: Female Marital Status: Widowed Place of Birth: Richland Estimated Birth Year: abt 1775 Age: 75 Month of Death: May Cause of Death: Coug Fever Place of Death: (City, County, State) Fairfield, South Carolina Census Year: 1850 Source Citation: Census Place (City, County, State): , Fairfield, South Carolina; Roll: MORT_17; Page: ; Enumeration District: ; Line Number: 21.
NOTE: COULD Sipper be SKIPPER?

1775 SC ? -
Benjamin Skipper Born: 1775-1794 in Not Stated, xx County, South Carolina, USA - Ancestry.com Benjamin Skipper -
NOTE: - Was he married and did he have children? -
Legions In Time, Legends From The Past - Personal Member Tree

1775 Brunswick, NC -
Isaac W. SKIPPER birth abt Brunswick, North Carolina died abt About 1832 wife ? and parents ? children 1. Isaac W. Jr. SKIPPER b abt About 1799 , Brunswick, North Carolina 2. Needham Benton SKIPPER b About 01 AUG 1804 , Brunswick, North Carolina died abt 15 JUL 1866 3. Riviera Quincy SKIPPER b abt 1817 , Brunswick, North Carolina Christening: Death: 22 MAR 1864 Burial: ?

1776 - September 4, 1776 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
WILLIAMSBURG, August 24. A letter from Hillsborough, North-Carolina, dated August 1, informs us, that the Indians have committed some outrages on the frontiers of that province, have put to death many individuals, and murdered several families; but we hope their career is before this time stopped by some thousands of the militia that were marching against them.

September 4, 1776 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 4. Augusta, July 3, 1776. “Sir, “I take the liberty of inclosing your Excellency the copies of two depositions which came by express from Major Williamson yesterday, likewise a copy of an intercepted letter from Henry Stuart, to the frontier inhabitants of North-Carolina and Virginia. - “I am afraid the emissaries of government have at last accomplished their hellish designs with the Cherokees, yet I believe they may have mis-timed matters, as I hope we shall be able to give them a good drubbing before they can get assistance from the King’s troops or any other nation. - “Last night Major Williamson had upwards of a thousand men embodied, and in a few days expect to have five, when they intend marching immediately into their nation. Should this happen, your Excellency will doubtless see the necessity of having some force on the frontiers of this province. I shall order the draught that has been made of this regiment to Broad River and Ogechee as soon as possible, but not to go over the line till I receive your Excellency’s orders, which I shall wait for with impatience. I shall likewise be glad to know how far we are to act in concert with the Carolinians, or if we are only to guard our own frontiers. I have not heard from the Creeks for some time past. The last accounts were favourable. I mentioned to your Excellency some time ago our intention of carrying two Indians to Ninety-Six, which I did; they saw a poor fellow suffer death, and we have since sent them off to their nation, perfectly satisfied. I am, with due respect, your Excellency’s very humble servant, - R. RAE.” - To his Excellency A. Bullock, Esq; - “South-Carolina, Ninety-six district. - “Personally appeared Aaron Smith, son of Captain Aaron Smith, of Little River, in the said district, planter, who being duly sworn maketh oath, that, this morning about daybreak, a number of Indians, about eight or ten in number, came to this father’s house, and killed him and Lorick Smith his son, and fired upon him and his brother who made their escape, and that he believes all the rest of the family are killed. - (Signed.) AARON SMITH.” Sworn before me this first day of July, 1776, 8 o’clock in the morning. - (Copy.) JOHN PURVES, J.P. - N.B. This Little River is in South-Carolina, six miles from the Indian land. - South-Carolina, Ninety-six district. “Before me, John Purves, one of the Justices of the Peace for said district, personally appeared David Shettroe, of Keowee, who being duly sworn, maketh oath that yesterday morning, about a quarter of an hour before the first cock crew, two Indians came to his house on the river bank, near fort Prince George, and called to him to get up, which he did and opened the door, when they came in and asked for water, which he gave them. The youngest of the two, named the Glass, desired him to make some fire that they might see; the other named the Tarapin; as he went up to the chimney to blow up the fire, the Glass laid hold of him, and told him he was his slave, it was very bad times, the white people were going to break out, and he should not run away from him; then the Tarapin stepped up to an old man named William McTeer, who was lying on the floor, and told him he was his slave, and must go along with him. They drove this deponent and McTeer before them until they came to the house of Mr. James Holmes in Keowee, where he saw a great number of the Lower Towns Cherokee Indians, where they had taken Mr. Holmes and his wife and a white child prisoners; also Thomas Holmes, John Lammas and his wife, and two or their children (boys) and a man that had gone from Enoree on business. That while he staid there they also brought one John Garrick, and a man that came from Rocky run, prisoners. That the Indians took all Mr. Holmes’s effects, drank as much rum as they chose, and then stove a hogshead, and let the rum that was in it run out; that about dawn of day the Indians drove all the white people out of the house, and sent a party up the river with them to guard them, except this deponent, who staid and saw them plunder Mr. Holmes’s house. The fellow who took this deponent prisoner gave him two deerskins, told him to make shoes for himself, to walk over the hills to Mr. Cameron, for he must go with him there; that during his confinement one Ratcliffe, a white man, kept riding about among the Indians, laughing and scoffing at the prisoners; that an Indian fellow told him, when in confinement, that George Parris, a half breed, was gone down to acquaint the King’s people over Saluda to come to join the Indians, to help and to fight for the King; that the Indian, who pretended to be this deponent’s master, sending him to hunt a horse for him to ride, about two hours before sunset yesterday, he made his escape from them; farther that he saw them bring several guns, pipe hatchets, and sundry other effects, the property of Edward Wilkinson, Esq; to the house where he was taken, and that he was in the employ of Edward Wilkinson, Esq; and that he cannot write. - Signed his DAVID + SHETTROE. Sworn before me this 30th mark. day of June, 1776. - JOHN PURVES, J.P. - “Gentlemen, “Some time ago Mr. Cameron and myself wrote you a letter by Mr. Thomas, and enclosed you a talk we had with the Indians respecting the purchase which is reported you lately made of them on the river Wattaga, Noluchuckey, &c. We are since informed that you are under great apprehensions of the Indians doing mischief immediately; but it is not the desire of his Majesty to set his friends and allies the Indians on his liege subjects, therefore, whoever you are, that are willing to join his Majesty’s forces, as soon as they arrive at the Cherokee nation, by repairing to the King’s standard, shall find protection, and their families, and be free from all danger whatever; yet, that his Majesty’s officers may be certain which of you are willing to take up arms in his Majesty’s just right, I have thought fit to recommend it to you, and every one that is desirous of preventing inevitable ruin to themselves and families, immediately to subscribe a written paper, acknowledging their allegiance to his Majesty King George, and that they are ready and willing, whenever called on, to appear in arms in defence of the British rights in America, which paper, as soon as it is signed, send to me by some safe hand. Should any of the inhabitants be desirous of knowing how they are to be kept free from every kind of insult or danger, inform them that his Majesty will immediately land an army in West Florida, march them through the Creek to the Chickasaw nation, where five hundred warriors from each nation are to join them, and then come by Chote, who have promised their assistance, and then to take possession of the frontiers of North-Carolina and Virginia; at the same time that his Majesty’s forces make a diversion on the sea coast of those provinces. If any of the inhabitants have any beef, cattle, flour, port or horses to spare, they shall have a good price for them, by applying to us as soon as his Majesty’s troops are embodied. I am, yours, &c. HENRY STUART.” - Wattaga. This day Nathan Read came before me one of the Justices of Wattaga, and made oath on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God, that a stranger came up to Charles Roberson’s gate yesterday evening, who he was he did not know, and delivered a letter, a true copy of which is above. - JOHN CARTER. Sworn before me the 19th May, 1776. Attest. JAMES SMITH. Extract of a letter from Charlestown (South-Carolina) July 21, 1776. “You are undoubtedly informed before this that that detestable villain Stewart has prevailed upon the Cherokees to take up the hatchet against our countrymen, this however does not in the least intimidate us. Our people march forth against the savages with all the alacrity and chearfulness you can conceive, and with a lull determined resolution to extirpate the whole tribe. The damage done to us by them is yet trifling. A number of the heads of the Tories in this province, when they heard of the breaking out of the Indians, wrote to our Governor, and told him that they never dreamt the Kind would descend to such low and diabolical designs, that they were now willing to do every thing in their power to assist their brethren in America.—These are men of influence on the frontiers, and will be very useful against the Indians. - ”July 27. “In a little brush with the Indians the other day, our people were successful, killed, wounded and took prisoners a considerable number. Colonel McIntosh, of Georgia, with a party of his regiment, went out a few days ago to reconnoitre the situation of the two young Wrights, who are posted on St. Mary’s river, which separates Florida from Georgia. When he came within two miles of their fort, he was fired on from an out post of theirs, our Colonel returned the fire, killed one and took nine prisoners, upon which the fort fired an alarm gun; the man of war below hearing this, immediately detached a barge with a Lieutenant and 9 men, all these the Colonel thought proper to seize upon. In the brig lately taken here with Highlanders on board was found about £ 600 sterling worth of goods. July 31.” There is now an expedition determined on to Florida, where the enemy have about 1000 men posted at St. Augustine.

October 26, 1776 Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh) -
It is reported that the Cherokee Indians have fallen upon the inhabitants of Carolina, and slaughtered many of them and that on the said inhabitants applying for protection to the King’s Governor, they were told that they must take the oath of allegiance, and acknowledge the sovereignty of Great Britain, or otherwise they would not be entitled to such protection.

October 30, 1776 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
WILLIAMSBURG, October 18. Advice had been received, that General Rutherford, with the North Carolina troops, had penetrated as far as the Cherokee middle settlements, and that the savages were flying precipitately before him.

abt 1776 Norfolk
john skipper born 1776 in ashill norfolk died 1837 in ashill norfolk Spouse keziah (ward) 1776 – 1816 married 10 Oct 1799
Children
1.
2.
3.
4.

Slave Registers of former British Colonial Dependencies, 1812-1834 -
? Sciper Estimated Birth Year abt 1778 Age 41 Gender Male Colonial Dependency Berbice Owner Name J Schumacher Record Date: 1819


? SC abt 1778 Misc Note -
All I know of the name of Peter Skipper Jr. , bc 1778, wife is Mary (?).
Peter Skipper Jr. -
NOTE: What were their children's names?
Who were Peter Skipper JRS. parents?
What is Mary's maiden name?

1779
Geroge Suber State:SC County:Ninety-Sixth District Township:To Township Listed Year:1779 Database:SC Early Census Index

1779 Jones Co., NC -
25 Feb 1779 Joseph Skipper and Nathan Skipper Source: Title: Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779-1868 Vol I Chapter: Abstracts of the Deeds of Jones County, North Carolina: Deed Book B (1779-1780) Page: 89 - Joseph Skipper Source: Title: Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779-1868 Vol I Chapter: Abstracts of the Deeds of Jones County, North Carolina: Deed Book B (1779-1780) Page: 91 - Joseph Skipper Source: Title: Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779-1868 Vol I Chapter: Abstracts of the Deeds of Jones County, North Carolina: Deed Book C (1779-1784) Page: 99
Joseph Skipper Source: Title: Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779-1868 Vol I Chapter: Abstract of the Deeds- Book 14 (1813-1819) Page: 542 - Jones CO, NC - Nathan Skipper
Source: Title: Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779-1868 Vol I Chapter: S Page: 1056

1779 - Va and Anson Co. NC 1779 -
George Skipper, son of George Skipper, Chiefman of the Nottoway from south eastern VA/north easter NC. He lived in Anson Co. during this time frame. He had a son named Samuel also. " SAMUEL SKIPPER 100 ACRES NO. 126 (from Book A page 26) STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA RECORDED IN THE SECRETARY'S OFFICE JNO. BRANCH P. SEC. TO ALL TO WHOM THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME GREETING: KNOW ye that we for and in consideration of the sum of fifty shillings for every hundred acres hereby granted paid into our treasury by Samuel Skipper have given and granted and by these presents do give and grant unto the said Samuel Skipper a tract of land containing one hundred acres lying and being in our County of Anson of the East side of Pee Dee on a branch of Solomon's Creek: Beginning at a pine amongst three pines pointers and runs thence S. 40 W. 20 chains to a stake among three pines then N. 50 W. 31 chains and 63 links to a stake and three pines then No. 40 Et 31 chains and 63 links to a corner then S. 50 Et 31 chains and 63 lengths to a corner then South forty West eleven chains 63 chains to the beginning as by the plat hereunto annexed doth appear together with all woods, waters, mines, minerals, hereditaments, and appurtenances to the said land belonging or appertaining. To hold to the said Samuel Skipper his heirs and assigns forever yielding and paying to us such sums of money yearly otherwise as our General Assemblyfrom time to time may direct provided always that the said Samuel Skipper shall cause this grant to be registered in the Register's office within twelve months from the date hereof. Otherwise the same shall be void and of no effect. In testimony, whereof, we have caused our Great Seal to be hereunto affixed. Witness Richard Caswell, Esq, our Governor, Captain, General, and Commander in Chief at Kingston the third day of September in the fourth year of our Independence and in the year of our Lord, One thousand seven hundred and seventy nine.
By His Excelly's. Comd. Rd. Caswell. Wm. "
Note: Samuel Skipper was supposedly hung with his brother George Skipper.
NOTE: Bishop Gregg's HISTORY OF THE OLD CHERAWS reveals an unexpected fact concerning the Skippers. Describing the Revolutionary conflict between Tories and Patriots--the desperate and bloody partisan warfare which gripped the Carolina backcountry-- he says: "On the eastern side of the river (the Pee Dee,) near the dividing line between Richmond County, and what is now Marlborough District, lived two young men, named Skipper, of mixed blood, but peaceable and inoffensive. They had taken parole, however, and for no other offence, were seized by the Whigs on both sides of the line and hung. Such a course was well calculated to excite a feeling of bloody retaliation and thus the murderous conflict continued."
NOTE: About what year was this???? What was the names of these 2 Skipper men? Were these Skipper men married? Did they have children? Who were their neighbors? - Ann, Saw your post on genealogy.com about the Skipper brothers who were hung. Larry Cates wrote about that somewhere on the web. This was just after the Revolutionary War. It said they had just taken "parole" In other words they had been tories, or had sided with the British, and had taken parole saying they would support the newly formed U.S. nation. Apparently that was not good enough for some folks. Larry seems to indicate that they were killed partly because they were indians. Andrew

1779 - Va and Anson NC 1779 and Marlborough District SC, -
SAMUEL SKIPPER 100 ACRES NO. 126 (from Book A page 26) STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA RECORDED IN THE SECRETARY OFFICE JNO. BRANCH P. SEC. TO ALL TO WHOM THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME GREETING: KNOW ye that we for and in consideration of the sum of fifty shillings for every hundred acres hereby granted paid into our treasury by Samuel Skipper have given and granted and by these presents do give and grant unto the said Samuel Skipper a tract of land containing one hundred acres lying and being in our County of Anson of the East side of Pee Dee on a branch of Solomon's Creek: Beginning at a pine amongst three pines pointers and runs thence S. 40 W. 20 chains to a stake among three pines then N. 50 W. 31 chains and 63 links to a stake and three pines then No. 40 Et 31 chains and 63 links to a corner then S. 50 Et 31 chains and 63 lengths to a corner then South forty West eleven chains 63 chains to the beginning as by the plat hereunto annexed doth appear together with all woods, waters, mines, minerals, hereditaments, and appurtenances to the said land belonging or appertaining. To hold to the said Samuel Skipper his heirs and assigns forever yielding and paying to us such sums of money yearly otherwise as our General Assembly from time to time may direct provided always that the said Samuel Skipper shall cause this grant to be registered in the Register's office within twelve months from the date hereof. Otherwise the same shall be void and of no effect. In testimony, whereof, we have caused our Great Seal to be here unto affixed. Witness Richard Caswell, Esq, our Governor, Captain, General, and Commander in Chief at Kingston the third day of September in the fourth year of our Independence and in the year of our Lord, One thousand seven hundred and seventy nine. By His Excelly's. Comd. - Rd. Caswell. Wm. " Nottoway Indians of South hampton Co., Va in 1600's.
NOTE: Bishop Gregg's HISTORY OF THE OLD CHERAWS reveals an unexpected fact concerning the Skippers. Describing the Revolutionary conflict between Tories and Patriots--the desperate and bloody partisan warfare which gripped the Carolina backcountry-- he says: "On the eastern side of the river (the Pee Dee,) near the dividing line between Richmond County NC , and what is now Marlborough District SC , lived two young men (BROTHERS) , named Skipper, of mixed blood, but peaceable and inoffensive. They had taken parole, however, and for no other offence, were seized by the Whigs on both sides of the line and hung. Such a course was well calculated to excite a feeling of bloody retaliation and thus the murderous conflict continued."
NOTE: About what year was this????
What was the names of these 2 Skipper men?
Were these Skipper men married?
what were the wives names?
Did they have children?
Who were their neighbors?

1779 - Anson Co., NC 3 Aug 1779 -
Deed: Anthony Ivey to John Powers, both of Anson County, £150, 150 acres on the north side of the Little Pee Dee River adjoining the river, Skipper, and Thomas… being part of a 300-acre grant to Hopkin Howell of 25 July 1774. Signed: Anthony Ivey. Witness: Thomas Curtis, Israel Medlock. Anson County Deed Book 7, p155 Could this be the same Anthony Ivey in Bladen 23 years earlier? The land is in what would become Richmond County a few months later, very close to later Robeson County. Skipper is apparently George Skipper, who had land on the north bank of the river. - NOTE: I could not find any record of the sale of this grant by Hopkin Howell
3 Aug 1779 Deed: Anthony Ivey to John Powers, both of Anson County, £150, 150 acres on the north side of the Little Pee Dee River adjoining the river, Skipper, and Thomas… being part of a 300-acre grant to Hopkin Howell of 25 July 1774. Signed: Anthony Ivey. Witness: Thomas Curtis, Israel Medlock. [Anson County Deed Book 7, p155] Could this be the same Anthony Ivey in Bladen 23 years earlier? The land is in what would become Richmond County a few months later, very close to later Robeson County. Skipper is apparently George Skipper, who had land on the north bank of the river. I could not find any record of the sale of this grant by Hopkin Howell. [See next entry]............ 29 Aug 1779 Mary Ivy baptized at the Welsh Neck Baptist Church. On 5 September 1779 she would sign the charter and join the church. [from minutes online at www.rootsweb.com Since she is later the widow of Anthony Ivey, it appears that he moved from Anson County to the vicinity of what was later Marlboro County, South Carolina. The Welsh Neck Church was located in Marlboro County until 1798 when it moved across the river to Darlington County. [See entry for June 1790.] Source genfiles.com

1779 - RICHMOND COUNTY NC 1779 -
RICHMOND COUNTY, NC - CENSUS - Tax Lists 1779-1838 - John Snead 486 Thomas Skipper

1780 Catawba Indians -
1780 the Catawba withdrew temporarily into Virginia, but returned after the battle of Guilford Court House, and established themselves in 2 villages on the reservation, known respectively as Newton, the principal village, and Turkey Head, on opposite sides of Catawba River. 1780 it was 490 reported

abt 1780 SC to Alabama and Tenn
Temperance (?) Skipper Age: 70 Estimated birth year: abt 1780 Birth Place: South Carolina Gender: Female Home in 1850 (City,County,State): Township 11, Butler, Alabama - Ancestry.com MORE:
Husband: Barnabus SKIPPER Birthdate: abt. 1780 Birthplace: SC Death date: 1842 Place of death: Butler County, AL
Father: Barnabus Skipper
Mother: Unknown Marriage date: Unknown Marriage place: SC
Wife: Temperance, (unknown),
SKIPPER - JORDAN Birthdate: abt. 1787 Birthplace: SC Death date: Unknown after 1860 Place of death: Unknown Father: Unknown Mother: Unknown
CHILDREN
Child No. 1: Wesley SKIPPER Sex: M Birthdate: Unknown Birthplace: SC Death date: Unknown Place of death: Unknown Marriage date: Unknown Marriage place: Unknown Spouse's name: Unknown
Child No. 2: Thomas P. SKIPPER Sex: M Birthdate: Unk. Birthplace: SC Death date: Unk. Place of death: Unk. Marriage date: Unk. Marriage place: Unk. Spouse's name: Unk.
Child No. 3: Temperance Sex: F Birthdate: Unk. Birthplace: SC Death date: Unk. Place of death: Unk. Marriage date: Unk. Marriage place: Unk. Spouse's name: Unk.
Child No. 4: Sion SKIPPER Sex: M Birthdate: 1810 Birthplace: SC Death date: 1857 Place of death: AL Marriage date: 1830 Marriage place: Butler County, AL Spouse's name: Mary GOINS
Child No. 5: John SKIPPER Sex: Birthdate: Unk. Birthplace: SC Death date: Unk. Place of death: Unk. Marriage date: Unk. Marriage place: UNK. Spouse's name: Unk.
Child No. 6: Rebecca SKIPPER Sex: F Birthdate: UNK. Birthplace: SC Death date: UNK. Place of death: UNK Marriage date: UNK. Marriage place: UNKS Spouse's name: UNK.
Child No. 7: Silas SKIPPER Sex: M Birthdate: ABT. 1823 Birthplace: SC Death date: 1862-Civil War Veteran Place of death: Buried Baton Rouge, LA, VA Cemetery Marriage date: Abt. 1845 Marriage place: TN Spouse's name: Harriet -unknown
Child No. 8: Barney B. SKIPPER Sex: M Birthdate: Abt. 1824 Birthplace: SC Death date: 1857 Place of death: BUTLER COUNTY, AL Marriage date: UNK. Marriage place: UNK. Spouse's name: UNK.
Child No. 9: Nancy SKIPPER Sex: F Birthdate: Unk. Birthplace: TN Death date: UNK. Place of death: UNK. Marriage date: UNK. Marriage place: UNK. Spouse's name: UNK.
Child No. 10: Martha SKIPPER - RABUN Sex: F Birthdate: 1820? Birthplace: TN Death date: UNK-after 1870 Place of death: Crenshaw County, AL Marriage date: About 1834 Marriage place: Unknown Spouse's name: Richard Rabun Child No.
11: Elizabeth SKIPPER Sex: F Birthdate: Unk. Birthplace: TN Death date: Unk. Place of death: Unk. Marriage date: Unk. Marriage place: Unk. Spouse's name: Unk.

abt 1780 - SC and Alabama
Barnabas B Skipper Birth: 1780 - South Carolina, USA Death: 6 Aug 1842 - Butler, Alabama, USA Marriage: South Carolina, USA
Parents: Barnabas B Skipper, Elizabeth (?)
Spouse: Temperance (?) [Temperance Skipper]

Calendar of the Tennessee and King's Mountain papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts
Vol III page 16 26 July 1781 1XX47 - The Tassell Chief speaks for the Chickamonga.
Calendar of the Tennessee and King's Mountain papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts
Vol III page 19 Oct 15, 1782 1XX51 - Col Joseph Martin , Indian Agent at Long Island.
Vol III page 20 Dec 10, 1782 !XX52 - Cherokee Chiefs Oconastota, the Tassell
Calendar of the Tennessee and King's Mountain papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts
Vol III page 25 Nov 5-6 1XX65 -
Mingoamah the Red King
Tushatoka the Mountain Leader
Betrico
Fontonta
Toboholoby
Toashoway
Chickasaw Chiefs
John Depford a half breed at French Lick (Nashville), Cumberland River

1783 -
John Skipper father of Ezekiel May 12 1783 - August 25 1863 aged 80 years

MISC NOTE:
I think in order to work any futher back say to Barnabus. We have to figure out who and what relation were all these Town Creek Skippers to one another. If we can I believe it will lead us back to where we need to go. See I have also been to the Town Creek area. Someone online spoke of a graveyard being on Bear Trap Drive in the Town Creek area. This is where I found a graveyard up in the woods with John Skipper buried there B-1783 was married to a (Potter). Potter's land also border Skippers land here's what I think I believe, That John Skipper and Abram Skipper and Silas Skipper are brothers. Silas got custody of David, Alfred, & Jacob after Abram Skipper their fathers death. I know that David Skipper was born in 1800 -1802. I would put Abram Skipper being born between 1770 -1780 which would fall in line with John Skipper possibly being a brother. Not sure when Silas Skipper was born though. Anyway I haven't quit searching I hope something I have found may be of some help.
I will continue searching
Barnabus Skipper
John Skipper buried there B -1783 was married to a (Potter) - Bear Trap Drive in the Town Creek area
Abram Skipper born between 1770 -1780
Silas Skipper
David Alfred Skipper was born in 1800 -1802
Jacob Skipper
NOTE: Where is Bear Trap Drive in the Town Creek Reply from Andrew Skipper - Phillip, This is fascinating. I am supposed to be descended from Silas Skipper, brother of John Skipper , that is if this is the John Skipper maybe son of Barnabus Skipper who was involved in livestock theft in Anson County in the 1780's - 1790's. I would love to know where this graveyard is and any other information you have about these Skippers. I have never been able to connect this Silas (born c 1770) with Arthur Skipper (1800-1855) who I know for sure is my ancestor. Any help you give would be tremendous! NC. MISC. NOTE - Also another book that was in the library. A book named court minutes of Brunswick Co. Here is the first record - Ordered that the following hands vizt.; John Skipper,Jr, John Skippers negro, William Greer. John Greer, Joshua Skipper, Nathaniel Skipper,Ser. & Moses Skipper, do work on the road called the old North West Road from Hoods Creek to Town Creek, under the direction of Benj. Lies Jr, overseer of the s'd road-order iss'd. Second record - Ordered that Silas Skipper be and he is hereby appointed guardian to David Alfred & Jacob Skipper and that he enter into bond in the sum of Three Hundred dollars with J W Leonard & Jno t Sullivan Securities-bonds filed Third record-Ordered that J W Leonard be and he is hereby apointed guardian to Drusiclla Skipper & John Wiley Skipper and that he enter into bond in the sum of five hundred dollars with Joseph Russ & Pitt W Robeson Securities-Bond filed Very interesting facts I have been working on David Skippers father for awhile I'm sure glad you found facts stateing that David is the son of Abraham. Also find it very interesting about him having maybe two wives. In the 1850 census of Horry County it speaks of him being born in North Carolina. Were was Abraham from wasn't it also North Carolina at first. See I have been told that we came from either Brunswick County or Columbus County then to Horry County. Also are you from down Edith Martins line. I recently went to Leland North Carolina and found the family Cementery on Bear Trap Drive. I'm also trying to get the records of Skippers buried on Townscreek rd in Zion Baptist Church Cemetery. Whats ironic about this is bear trap drive is off of Townscreek rd. I talked to a man that had a webb page on the church. He told me there were two branches of Skippers buried there but no online records. He said that I could come down and check it out . Or he would get the names for me if he got the time. I haven't received a E=mail yet. If I don't get one soon I'm going back down to Leland and check it out. Do you know were any of Abraham Skippers kids are buried or David or other Skipper family or church Cemteries that airn't online are in the Horry County, Brunswick County area.
Sincerely Phillip Skipper
On a recent trip to Bear Trap Drive here are my findings. (Cemetery)
James Madison Skipper son of George Skipper and De-lila (?) Skipper Sept 17 1905 - April 18 1908
John W Skipper Sept 1898 - May 18 1902
Ezekiel Skipper October 12 1821 - March 8 1886
Judy (?) Skipper wife of Ezekeil Skipper April 20 1820 - August 17 1905
Virginia E. Skipper daughter of Daniel Skipper and Louisa (?) Skipper Died Sept. 6 1832 Aged 9 years, 7 months
John Skipper father of Ezekiel Skipper May 12 1783 - August 25 1863 aged 80 years
Elisabeth (?) Skipper mother of Ezekiel Skipper , wife of John Skipper Dec 7 1791 - Feb 17 1863
This cementery was on someone's land possibly owned by Skippers at one time in was up in the woods, you wouldn't have known it was there cause you can't see it from the road. Phillip Skipper
John R. S. Stanlaw Born Dec 1 1817 died May 18 1895
Cenening Ottangy (?) March 25 1862 died July 23 1862
POTTER
William H. Wesott husband of Millie Potter (?) May 22 1841 died March 1 1863
Lilly Caroline Potter Daughter of Millie Potter Born Sept 24 1870 died October 19 1876

SC, TENN, and Alabama -
Barnabas Skipper born about 1780 in SC, married to Temperance(unknown)born abt. 1787 in SC. They were in TN in or about 1825 and in AL by 1834 when land was patented. Barnabas and Temperance were the parents of 9 children, some born in SC, and others in TN. They were
Wesley,
Sion,
Silas,
Barney B.,
Martha,
Temperance,
Rebecca,
Nancy,
Elizabeth.
Sion is our direct descendent through his oldest son, Barney, born 1831, Butler County, AL
Barney married Abigail Amanda(unknown)born in SC abt.1827 and they had the
following children:
Joseph,
Silas,
Mary J.
Sara J.,
Barney,
John W.(my g-grandfather).
Barnabas born in 1780, died in Butler County in 1842.
His wife, Temperance, born 1787, after his death, in 1855 married Charles B. Jordan.
They are listed on the 1860 census, but no where after this.
My brick walls are these is the father of Barnabas Skipper born in 1780,
Barnabas born abt. 1744?
What are the maiden names of Temperance born about 1787 in SC and Abigail Amanda Skipper born in SC about 1827?
When did Temperance Skipper Jordan die and where is she buried?
I know that Amanda Skipper, John W. and Barney,her children,were in MS on the 1880 census and in Ouachita Parish LA in 1888.
Did they go to Texas before LA?
When did Amanda die and where is she buried? I hope this helps.

SC and Tenn. 1780 -
This information has been passed to me: - Barnabus Skipper (born in SC in 1780) married Temperance (born in SC in 1780). Had 11 children: ( Wesley, Thomas P. Skipper, Temperance, Sion, John, Rebecca, Silas, Barney B. all of these were born in SC), (Nancy, Martha and Elizabeth (these 3 born in TN). I will write as I get information. Shannon

SC and Butler Co., Alabama -
Barnabus "Barney" B. SKIPPER son of George SKIPPER and Unknown , was born in 1780-1790 in South Carolina, died in 1842 in Butler County, Alabama, at age 62, and was buried in Routon Cemetery, Honoraville, Crenshaw County, Alabama. Barnabus married ²Temperance in South Carolina.
Children from this marriage were:
i. Sion Wesley SKIPPER (born in 1810 South Carolina)
ii. Temperance SKIPPER (born on 18 Nov 1820 South Carolina - died on 13 Jan 1886 in Walton County, Florida)
iii. Ebenezer D. SKIPPER (born in 1808-1809)
iv. Barnabus "Barney" B. SKIPPER, Jr (born in 1827 South Carolina)
v. Thomas P. SKIPPER (born in South Carolina)
vi. John SKIPPER (born in South Carolina) vii. Rebecca SKIPPER (born in South Carolina)
viii. Silas SKIPPER (born about 1825 South Carolina)
ix. Nancy SKIPPER (born in Tennessee)
x. Martha SKIPPER (born in Tennessee)
xi. Elizabeth SKIPPER (born in Tennessee)
More: Temperance was born about 1780 in South Carolina and died about 1860, about age 80. Temperance married ²Barnabus "Barney" B. SKIPPER in South Carolina.
Temperance next married ²Charles Benjamin JORDAN on 11 Jan 1855 in Butler County, Alabama.
source hometown. aol. com - on line

SC to Butler CO., Alabama -
George SKIPPER was born about 1750. George married (name unknown). Children from this marriage were:
i. Barnabus "Barney" B. SKIPPER ( born in 1780 -1790 South Carolina - died in 1842 in Butler County, Alabama
source hometown. aol. com

England -
Gloucestershire: - Register of Marriages,1557-1812 GR: H3"550 Edwin Maddy, D.C.L., mayor 1837- 8 Marriages at Tetbury, 1631 to 1812. GR: H3 Volume 1. County: Gloucestershire Country: England Mr. William Shippery & Mrs. Sarah (Morwent) 10 Aug 1676
Source Ancestry.com

England -
Gloucestershire: Glouchester - Freemen of the City of Gloucester, 1641 -1838 GR: H3 John King, esq., mayor 1720-1 GR:"H3" John King, esq., mayor 1720-1 GR: H3 John King, esq., mayor 1720 -1 County: Gloucestershire Country: England 1720 Sam. Haynes, app. of Rob. Savory, farrier

1777 England -
Gloucestershire: - Register of Marriages,1557-1812 Edwin Maddy, D.C.L., mayor 1837-8 Marriages at Tetbury, 1631 to 1812. GR:"H3" Volume 3. County: Gloucestershire Country: England John Shipton, resident, & Mary Sparrow, s. 19 Jan 1777
Source: Ancestry.com

1790
George Sheapherd State: SC County: Charleston District Township: No Township Listed Year: 1778Database: SC Early Census Index

1780 / 1781 Va and ILL -
Reel 18732 -11 - 1221 - 1222 - 1780 / Pay of William Skipper for service in [Capt. Richard] Brashear company from May 30, 1780 to January 12, 1781. Source: Based on the Microfilmed George Rogers Clark Papers At the Virginia State Library and Archives - The Illinois Regiment
Note: There is a William Skipper in SC also 1733 ??? are the two William Skipper's related?????

1781 Pa -
Joseph Kiper who married Elizabeth (Quick) Jan. 25, 1804. He was born 10-17-1778 in Virginia; she was born Jan. 17. 1781 in Pennsylvania.They both died in Greyson, KY, Breckinridge Co. Their son John Kiper was born May,18, 1821.
Source genforum.genealogy.com / kipper / messages

Brunswick County, NC
Based upon an email I received from Slade Skipper, 4/25/2003, who comes through the George Washington Skipper Line, I am confident to call the following: 1) Moses Skipper and Grace (????) Skipper, of Brunswick County, NC are the Parents of Abraham Skipper, John Skipper, and James Skipper, (who were born around 1750). 2) Moses and Clemmond Skipper were brothers 3) Clemmond Skipper is the father of Isaac & Jesse Skipper. The source of my founding comes from references made to the 1772, 1785, 1790 Brunswick County Census and Tax Record Reports. My research indicates that Abraham, John W. and Isaac of Brunswick County were the sons of Barnabas Skipper of Anson Co. The three brothers moved to Brunswick county before 1790 when they appeared in the Census.

Barnabus Skipper b. ca 1740 went to Marlboro Co., SC before 1800
and is listed in the census there, as is his son John, so the John Skipper in 1800 Brunswick Co., NC is not his. Abraham Skipper has absolutely no descendants, among the many hundreds that I have seen, named Barnabus, so I doubt his father's name was Barnabus. There were Skippers in Brunswick Co. in 1772 (Moses and Clemonds Skipper ) and in Bladen Co. in 1763 (Jos., Fred, and Hardy) from which Brunswick was formed. I strongly suspect that the Brunswick Co. Skippers descended from some of these.
I think in this instance, location takes precedence when considering circumstantial evidence.

Calendar of the Tennessee and King's Mountain papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts

1780 Aug 18 - 14 DD24 Page 173 - Cornwallis , Lord. Camden S.C. Letter to Col John D. Cruger, Col George Turnbull and Col (Banatre) Tarleton ordered to pursue Sumter, who has only force in the section, inhabitants who had submitted to British and then revolted to be imprisoned, militia men to be hanged. copy 2pp

1780 Nov 10 - 16DD17 page 178 - Hanging of Col Ambrose Mills, and other men under Ferguson. Capt Edward Oates nesr PeDee British hanged after Camden. page 178

MISC - 1781 - The Battle of Guilford Court House
was a battle fought on March 15, 1781 inside the present-day city of Greensboro, North Carolina, during the American Revolutionary War. 1,900 British troops, under General Lord Cornwallis, fought an American force, under Rhode Island native General Nathanael Greene, numbering 4,400. Despite the relatively small numbers of troops involved, the battle is considered one of the most decisive of the Revolutionary War. Prior to the battle, the British appeared to have successfully reconquered Georgia and South Carolina with the aid of strong Loyalist factions, and thought that North Carolina might be within their grasp. In the wake of the battle, Greene moved into South Carolina, while Cornwallis chose to invade Virginia. These decisions allowed Greene to unravel British control of the South, while leading Cornwallis to Yorktown and surrender. The battle is commemorated at Guilford Courthouse National Military Park. Following the Battle of Cowpens, Cornwallis was determined to destroy Greene's army. However, the loss of his light infantry at Cowpens led him to burn his supplies so that his army would be nimble enough for pursuit. He chased Greene in the Race to the Dan, but Greene escaped across the flooded Dan River to safety in Virginia. Cornwallis established camp at Hillsborough and attempted to forage supplies and recruit North Carolina's Tories. However, the bedraggled state of his army and Pyle's massacre deterred Loyalists. On March 14, 1781, while encamped in the forks of the Deep River, Cornwallis was informed that General Richard Butler was marching to attack his army. With Butler was a body of North Carolina militia, plus reinforcements from Virginia, consisting of 3,000 Virginia militia, a Virginia State regiment, a Corps of Virginian eighteen-month men and recruits for the Maryland Line. They had joined the command of Greene, creating a force of some nine to ten thousand men in total. During the night of the March 15, further reports confirmed the American force was at Guilford Court House, some 12 miles (20 km) away. Cornwallis decided to give battle, though he had only 1,900 men at his disposal. He detached his baggage train, 100 infantry and 20 Cavalry under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Hamilton to Bell's Mills further down the Deep River, then set off with his main force, before breakfast was able to be eaten, arriving at Guilford at midday. Meanwhile, Greene, having received the reinforcements, decided to recross the Dan and challenge Cornwallis. On March 15, the two armies met at Guilford Court House, North Carolina (within the present Greensboro, North Carolina). The advance guards met near the Quaker New Garden Meeting House. Banastre Tarleton's Light Dragoons were briefly engaged by Light Horse Harry Lee's Dragoons about 4 miles (6 km) from the Guilford Court House. The British 23rd Regiment of Foot sent reinforcements forward and Lee withdrew, ordering a retreat to Greene's main body. Cornwallis found the Americans in position on rising ground about one and a half miles (2.5 km) from the court house. He was unable to gain much information from his prisoners or the local residents as to the American disposition. To his front he saw a plantation with a large field straddling both sides of the road, with two more further over on the left separated by 200 yards or so of woodland. To his right beyond the fields the woodland extended for several miles. On the far side of the first field was a fenced wood, 1 mile (1.6 km) in depth, through which the road passed into an extensive cleared area around the court house. Along the edge of this woodland was a fence forming the American first line of defense and a 6-pound cannon on each side of the road. Greene had prepared his defense in three lines. North Carolina militia formed the first line, with backwoods riflemen on the left and right flanks to snipe advancing British. In the second line, he placed the Virginia militia. His regulars comprised the last line. Two more 6-pound cannon were sited in the center of the line. His third and strongest line consisting of his Virginian Regiment, Delaware infantry, and the 1st and 5th Maryland regiments was a further 400 yards further on, though placed at an angle to the west of the road. While superficially resembling the deployment successfully used by Daniel Morgan at Cowpens, the lines were hundreds of yards apart and could not support one another. Since the east side of the road was mostly open, Cornwallis opted to attack up the west side and, following a short barrage of cannon shot on the cannon positions of the first line, at 1:30 p.m., Cornwallis moved his men forward. When they were about 150 yards short of the fence, a volley was fired from the Americans, whose long guns had a greater range than British muskets, but the British continued until they were within musket shot then fired their own volley in return. On a command from Webster, they then charged forward, coming to a halt 50 paces from the American lines because the North Carolina Militia, as noted by Sergeant Lamb of the 23rd Regiment "had their arms presented and resting on the picket fence...they were taking aim with nice precision". Urged onwards by Lieutenant Colonel James Webster of the 33rd Regiment of Foot, the British continued to advance. The North Carolina Militia, to the west of the road, fired their muskets then turned and fled back through the woods, discarding their personal equipment as they ran. The British advanced on the second line. Heavy resistance was shown, but Webster pushed around the flank and on to the American 3rd line. The woodland was too dense to allow practical use of the bayonets. The British army forced its way through the first two lines with significant losses. The 71st Regiment, Grenadiers and 2nd Guards moved up the center, following the musket shots from the 33rd and 23rd Regiments to their left. To the right, the 1st Guards and Hessians were being harried by Lee's Legion. The British guns and Tarleton’s Light Dragoons moved forward along the road keeping pace. The 2nd Guards in the centre found themselves coming out into open ground around the court house to the left of the Salisbury road. They spotted a large force of Continental Infantry and immediately attacked them and captured two 6-pounders. They then pursued the Continentals into the wood and were repulsed by Colonel Washington’s Dragoons, and the 1st Maryland Regiment, abandoning the two guns they had just captured. Lieutenant Macleod, in command of two British 3-pounders, had just arrived and was directed to fire on the Dragoons. While many British soldiers were killed from friendly fire, the Americans broke off and retreated from the field. Cornwallis ordered the 23rd and 71st Regiments with part of the Cavalry to pursue the Americans, though not for any great distance. Tarleton and the remainder of the Dragoons were sent off to the right flank to join Bose and put an end to the action from Washington. During the battle, Cornwallis had a horse shot from under him. American Colonel Benjamin Williams was later decorated for his personal bravery at Guilford Courthouse ... The battle had lasted only ninety minutes, and although the British technically defeated the American force, they lost over a quarter of their own men. The British casualties consisted of 5 officers and 88 other ranks killed and 24 officers and 389 other ranks wounded, with a further 26 men missing in action. Webster was wounded during the battle, and he died a fortnight later. The British, by taking ground with their accustomed tenacity when engaged with superior numbers, were tactically victors. Seeing this as a classic Pyrrhic victory, British Whig Party leader and war critic Charles James Fox echoed Plutarch's famous words by saying, Another such victory would ruin the British Army! .... In a letter to Lord George Germain, delivered by his aide-de-camp, Captain Broderick, Cornwallis commented:" From our observation, and the best accounts we could procure, we did not doubt but the strength of the enemy exceeded 7,000 men [Greene's accounts put this closer to 4,400].... I cannot ascertain the loss of the enemy, but it must have been considerable; between 200 and 300 dead were left on the field of battle.... many of their wounded escaped .... Our forage parties have reported to me that houses in a circle six to eight miles around us are full of others .... We took few prisoners". He further went on to comment on the British force " The conduct and actions of the officers and soldiers that composed this little army will do more justice to their merit than I can by words. Their persevering intrepidity in action, their invincible patience in the hardships and fatigues of a march of above 600 miles, in which they have forded several large rivers and numberless creeks, many of which would be reckoned large rivers in any other country in the world, without tents or covering against the climate, and often without provisions, will sufficiently manifest their ardent zeal for the honour and interests of their Sovereign and their country. " After the battle, the British were spread across a large expanse of woodland without food and shelter, and during the night torrential rains started. 50 of the wounded died before sunrise. Had the British followed the retreating Americans they may have come across their baggage and supply wagons, which had been camped up to the west of the Salisbury road in some old fields prior to the battle. Greene, cautiously avoiding another Camden, retreated with his forces intact. With his small army, less than 2000 strong, Cornwallis declined to follow Greene into the back country, and retiring to Hillsborough, he raised the royal standard, offered protection to the inhabitants, and for the moment appeared to be master of Georgia and the two Carolinas. In a few weeks, however, he abandoned the heart of the state and marched to the coast at Wilmington, North Carolina, to recruit and refit his command. At Wilmington, the British general faced a serious problem, the solution of which, upon his own responsibility, unexpectedly led to the close of the war within seven months. Instead of remaining in Carolina, he determined to march into Virginia, justifying the move on the ground that until Virginia was reduced he could not firmly hold the more southern states he had just overrun. This decision was subsequently sharply criticized by General Clinton as unmilitary, and as having been made contrary to his instructions. To Cornwallis, he wrote in May: " Had you intimated the probability of your intention, I should certainly have endeavoured to stop you, as I did then as well as now consider such a move likely to be dangerous to our interests in the Southern Colonies." For three months he raided every farm or plantation he came across, from whom he took hundreds of horses for his Dragoons. He also converted another 700 infantry to mounted duties. During these raids he freed thousands of slaves, of which 12,000 joined his own force. The danger lay in the suddenly changed situation in that direction; as General Greene, instead of following Cornwallis to the coast, boldly pushed down towards Camden and Charleston, South Carolina, with a view to drawing his antagonist after him to the points where he was the year before, as well as to driving back Lord Rawdon, whom Cornwallis had left in that field. In his main object — the recovery of the southern states — Greene succeeded by the close of the year, but not without hard fighting and repeated reverses. "We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again," were his words.
MISC NOTE -
African American soldiers served in both American and British armies in the Battle of Guilford Court House?

about 1781
The lifting of the spirits of the patriots in the Carolinas and the renewal of their will to resist the British invader were important and immediate effects of Ferguson's defeat at Kings Mountain. News of this decisive victory spread rapidly through the region, bringing out stronger patriot militia forces in North Carolina and from nearby Virginia. It also revived patriot guerrilla warfare in South Carolina. Tories in the Carolinas became greatly discouraged and disorganized. The British did not immediately sense the importance of this sharp improvement in patriot morale and were inclined to discount the loss of the relatively small Tory force under Ferguson. At the headquarters of the British forces in New York it was even denied that the battle had taken place.
The unexpected success of the patriots at Kings Mountain caused a delay of almost 3 months in Cornwallis' northward advance. This was a serious loss of time which had a far-reaching effect upon his campaign in 1781. The immediate turn of events in the war in the South that came with the victory at Kings Mountain forced Cornwallis to abandon his foothold at Charlotte, in the unfriendly territory of North Carolina. Fearful that the patriots would try to regain control of key posts in South Carolina, he retreated to Winnsboro, in the upper part of that State. Here he took up a defensive position during the first part of the winter of 1780—81 to await reinforcements sent south by General Clinton. Although ill during most of this period, Cornwallis attempted to regain the support of his former Tory allies in the region and to plan a second invasion of North Carolina.
Source - The Book - History Of Kings Mountain


1780/1781 -
ZACHARIA2 SKIPPER (BARNABUS/BENJAMIN/PETER1)1 was born Abt. 17801. Children of ZACHARIA SKIPPER are: i. JAMES3 SKIPPER, b. Abt. 1796, NORTH CAROLINA. ii. DRURY SKIPPER, b. 1805, NC; d. Bet. 1850 - 1860, RICHMOND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA.

1781 -
Catawba Indian Villages. In early days this tribe had many villages but few names have come down to us. In 1728 there were six villages, all on Catawba River, the most northerly of which was known as Nauvasa. In 1781 they had two called in English Newton and Turkey Head, on opposite sides of Catawba River.

1781 -
Reel 18732 -11 - 1221 - 1222 - 1781 - Pay of William Skipper for service in [Capt. Richard] Brashear company from May 30, 1780 to January 12, 1781. Source: Based on the Microfilmed George Rogers Clark Papers At the Virginia State Library and Archives - The Illinois Regiment -
Note: There is a William Skipper in SC also 1733 ??? are the two William Skipper's related????


Va. 1782 -
SKIPWORTH / SKIPPER: Jonathan (non-Quaker, only on the Draper list) Jonathan Skipworth or Skipper is not mentioned in Worldconnect. This might mean he was killed during the Revolution. A Nathan Skipper or Skipworth b. Onslow Co., NC received a pension in Maury Co., TN 1827 for service in the North Caroline Line (Col. Armstrong's Regt) seeing battle at Germantown and Brandywine. The other choice for Skipworth is an old Henrico Co., VA family that intermarried with the Randolphs. I believe the Onslow Co., NC family to be more likely. The Skippers, Hammons, Simmons and Spencers of Surry Co., NC may all be interrelated somehow, and I have not figured it out yet, but I think there is a Croatan / Lumbee Indian connection in here somewhere. This connection could explain some of the lack of information on these lines. 1767-1771 Regulator petitions: Barnaby and George Skipper sign. Members of the Skipper family of Onslow Co., NC changed their name to Skipworth when they moved west. Barnabus Skipper is known to be partially Native American and some of his descendants are listed as free persons of color in the 1790 NC census. Free persons of color (native Americans) had full citizenship rights in North Carolina until 1835. Not on the 1782 Montgomery Co., VA personal tax list, nor is he on the 1793 Wythe tax list, nor are there any on the 1790 Surry Co., NC census.

Source: www.newrivernotes.com


1782 -

Who were the parents of Hardin S. Skipper, a taxpayer in 1763 Bladen Co., NC? By 21 May 1782 he and his wife Elizabeth (?) were in Washintgon Co., VA where they and Jesse Humphrey administered the estate of Tom Skipper. In 1783 Hardy Skipper is on a NC tax list in an area that later became Green Co., TN. At that time VA and NC were in ownership dispute over the land called Washington Co. so the Skipper family probably found themselves back in NC without having actually moved. On 6 Dec 1813, Hardy Skipper was on jury duty in Campbell Co., TN along with his son-in-law John Craig. Hardy Skipper died 1822 in Campbell Co. and his estate was administered by John Craig. His widow Elizabeth Skipper's will was probated in 1830 in Campbell Co. The Will named her daughter Mary Ann (Skipper) Craig and Mary's children John, Reuben, Elizabeth, Sally and Polly. Mary Ann (Skipper) Craig was born 1787 in VA and she d. 30 Apr 1868 in Campbell Co. A Benjamin Skipper married Charity Davis) 21 Mar 1815 in Knox co., TN and a Jacob Skipper married Nancy (Magee) 22 Aug 1812 in Washington Co., TN.

Are these two men sons of Hardy Skipper?

How was Tom Skipper related to Hardy?


21 May 1782 - Washington Co, Va -
names mentioned Elli Skipper, Hardy Skipper, and estate of (Thomas Skipper -
Source: Title: Annals of Southwest Virginia 1769 -1800 Part 2 Chapter 1782 Page 1100 -
NOTE I would like to know any and all information on the above family. -
NOTE: Did Hardy ever use he name HUGH ???

born abt 1782 - Slave Registers of former British Colonial Dependencies, 1812-1834 -
Sciper Estimated Birth Year abt 1782 Age 35 Nationality African (Black) Gender: Male PARISH Elizabeth (3) Colonial Dependency Jamaica Owner Name Robert Watt Record Date 1817

1782 Va. -
names mentioned Elizabeth Skipper and Isom Skipper
Source: Title: Annals of Southwest Virginia 1769-1800 Part 2 Chapter: 1782 Page: 1104

Calendar of the Tennessee and King's Mountain papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts
23 Aug 1783 2DD145/146 page 197-198 - Casey Col Levi order to Capt James Dillard. Directs him to raise a scouting party and apprehand Toties. request him to give copy of order to to Capt. George Martin.

1783 Nc and Ga. -
Daniel Skipper born about 1783 to 1792 died on Nov. 5, 1865 in Bibb County, Georgia. Daniel's wife was Sophia (?) on the 1850 & 1860 census. In 1870 there was an Elizabeth Skipper whos age was about that of Sophia. Their state of birth was N. C. - Daniel Skipper born aabout 1783 to 1792. Had children Lydia, Elizabeth and John. John had children George, Charles B., Sarah, maybe Mary Jane, James T., William P., Ben Franklin, John West and Martha. - I have Daniel SKIPPER was born 1792 Brunswick Co., NC. He married Sophia UNKNOWN born 1799 North Carolina. The children I have are Mary J. SKIPPER born 1824 Brunswick Co., North Carolina; Elizabeth F. SKIPPER born 1832 Brunswick Co., North Carolina; John W. SKIPPER born 20 July 1835 Brunswick Co., North Carolina and Lydia SKIPPER born 1839 Bibb Co.,

1783 -
Who were the parents of Hardin S. Skipper, a taxpayer in 1763 Bladen Co., NC? By 21 May 1782 he and his wife Elizabeth (?) were in Washintgon Co., VA where they and Jesse Humphrey administered the estate of Tom Skipper. In 1783 Hardy Skipper is on a NC tax list in an area that later became Green Co., TN. At that time VA and NC were in ownership dispute over the land called Washington Co. so the Skipper family probably found themselves back in NC without having actually moved. On 6 Dec 1813, Hardy Skipper was on jury duty in Campbell Co., TN along with his son-in-law John Craig. Hardy Skipper died 1822 in Campbell Co. and his estate was administered by John Craig. His widow Elizabeth Skipper's will was probated in 1830 in Campbell Co. The Will named her daughter Mary Ann (Skipper) Craig and Mary's children John, Reuben, Elizabeth, Sally and Polly. Mary Ann (Skipper) Craig was born 1787 in VA and she d. 30 Apr 1868 in Campbell Co. A Benjamin Skipper married Charity Davis) 21 Mar 1815 in Knox co., TN and a Jacob Skipper married Nancy (Magee) 22 Aug 1812 in Washington Co., TN. -
Are these two men sons of Hardy Skipper? -
How was Tom Skipper related to Hardy?

Calendar of the Tennessee and King's Mountain papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts
page 29 Aug 18, 1784 - Chickamaga Chief is Raven
Page 29 22 Oct 1784 - Sachens and Warriors - Six Nation - Fort Stanwix

1784 SC Ashipoo. -
An unidentified village on a stream between Edisto and Combahee r., S. C., about 12 m. from the coast. Brion de la Tour, map U. S., 1784.

Onslow Co. State census of North Carolina, 1784-1787
page 120
Jos Skipper
Nath Skipper
Richmond Co. State census of North Carolina, 1784-1787
page 138
Benj. Skipper
Barnaby Skipper

1784 Cheraw Indians
1760 we find this place designated as "Lower Saura Town," while about 30 miles above, on the south side of the Dan and between it and Town fork, is another place marked "Upper Saura Town." They are also alluded to by F. D. Smyth (Tour in LT. S., 1784), who says the upper town was insignificant

1784 Catawba Indians -
1784 only 250 were reported

1784 Bear Dam Creek, Town Creek District, Brunswick Co., NC -
According to another Skipper "Cousin", Joy - John Skipper, b. 1784 in Bear Dam Creek, Town Creek District, Brunswick Co., NC is father of John Boswell Skipper. She says that his mother is Elizabeth Skipper. She has John's father as M. R. Skipper.


1784 Cheraw DISTRICT / INDIAN CREEK / THOMPSON CREEK / PEE DEE RIVER SC Archives - Series Number S213190 Volume 0007 Page 00239 Item 02 Date 1784 /08/12 Description SKIPPER, SAMUEL, PLAT FOR 200 ACRES ON INDIAN CREEK, CHERAWS DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY ALEXANDER CRAIG Names Indexed SKIPPER, SAMUEL / CRAIG, ALEXANDER / LOCKWOOD / Locations CHERAWS DISTRICT / INDIAN CREEK / THOMPSON CREEK / PEE DEE RIVER Type PLAT
NOTE:
Bishop Gregg's HISTORY OF THE OLD CHERAWS reveals an unexpected fact concerning the Skippers. Describing the Revolutionary conflict between Tories and Patriots--the desperate and bloody partisan warfare which gripped the Carolina backcountry-- he says: "On the eastern side of the river (the Pee Dee,) near the dividing line between Richmond County, and what is now Marlborough District, lived two young men (BROTHERS), named Skipper, of mixed blood, but peaceable and inoffensive. They had taken parole, however, and for no other offence, were seized by the Whigs on both sides of the line and hung. Such a course was well calculated to excite a feeling of bloody retaliation and thus the murderous conflict continued." NOTE: About what year was this???? What was the names of these 2 Skipper men? Were these Skipper men married? what were the wives names? Did they have children? Who were their neighbors? - Ann, Saw your post on genealogy.com about the Skipper brothers who were hung. Larry Cates wrote about that somewhere on the web. This was just after the Revolutionary War. It said they had just taken "parole". In other words they had been tories, or had sided with the British, and had taken parole saying they would support the newly formed U.S. nation. Apparently that was not good enough for some folks. Larry seems to indicate that they were killed partly because they were indians. Andrew

1784 - November 24, 1784 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
RICHMOND, November 13. By late accounts from the western country, we learn that the Indians are so exasperated at the proceedings of some of the settlers from North-Carolina, who had encroached upon their territory, that they were making every preparation to go to war; several parties are already out, and have done considerable mischief. The western Indians had been informed by some ill-disposed persons, that their whole country was to be taken from them, but on being assured to the contrary, they were somewhat pacified; and, it is said, had determined to address Congress on the subject. That the Indians about the Falls of Niagara had declared war, and were expected to break out every day. That the Spaniards had made offers to several of the nations, and were endeavouring to incite them against the Americans. That a large army of northern Indians were on their way against the inhabitants of the Ohio; and that dreadful consequences were apprehended, if some mode was not speedily adopted for their defence.

born abt 1784 - Slave Registers of former British Colonial Dependencies, 1812-1834 -
? Sciper Estimated Birth Year abt 1784 Age 36 Nationality: African (Black) Gender Male PARISH St Mary Colonial Dependency Jamaica Owner Name James Cruikshank Record Date 1820

1784 NC -
20 Sept 1784 Joseph Skipper NC Private 640 Arces to heir Chapter: S Page: 483 Source: Title: Revolutionary War Bounty Land Grants Chapter: S Page: 483 and 29 Sept 1784 Nathan Skipper NC Private 640 Arces to heir

1784 - Reel 18732 -11 - 1221 - 1222 - August 30, 1784: -
Pay of William Skipper for service in [Capt. Richard] Brashear company from May 30, 1780 to January 12, 1781. Source: Based on the Microfilmed George Rogers Clark Papers At the Virginia State Library and Archives - The Illinois Regiment
Note: There is a William Skipper in SC also 1733 ??? are the two William Skipper's related?????

1785 - Cheraw County SC. -
Was formed in 1785. It was soon changed to Chesterfield County. The first county seat was at Cheraw and later moved to the village of Chesterfield. The records were all burned by Sherman in 1865.

born abt 1785 - Slave Registers of former British Colonial Dependencies, 1812-1834 -
? Sciper Estimated Birth Year abt 1785 Age 38 Nationality Barbadian Gender Male PARISH: St Michael Colonial Dependency Barbados Owner Name Abrm R Brandon Record Date 1823

MISC -
Bear Dam Creek, Town Creek Dist., Brunswick NC to Mcclellanville, Charleston, SC - John SKIPPER b 1785 Place: Bear Dam Creek, Town Creek Dist., Brunswick, Nc Father: Mother: Wife's Name Elizabeth b 1792 Place: Bear Dam Creek, Town Creek Dist., Brunswick, Nc Father: Mother: children 1. F Margaret SKIPPER b about 1815 Place: North Carolina 2. M Arthur SKIPPER b about 1817 Place: North Carolina 3. F Winney SKIPPER b about 1817 Place: North Carolina 4. M Ezekial SKIPPER b about 12 Oct 1821 Place: North Carolina Died: 8 Mar 1886 Place: Brunswick Co., North Carolina 5. M John Boswell SKIPPER b 1815 Place: Wilmington, Nc Died: 12 Oct 1886 Place: Wappetaw Presby., Mcclellanville, Charleston, Sc 6. M Daniel SKIPPER b about 1813 Place: North Carolina

1785 NC - Revolutionary War Bounty Land Grants
1. 30 Sept 1785 Eziekel Skipper NC Private 640 Acres to heirs -
2. 30 Sept 1785 Hardy Skipper NC Private 640 Arces to heirs -
Source: Title: Revolutionary War Bounty Land Grants Chapter: S Page: 482

NC 1785 -
? Andrew Skipton Nc Private 30 Sept 1785 640 Arces to heir
Source Title: Revolutionary War Bounty Land Grants Chapter: S Page: 483

1785 - Cheraw DISTRICT / PEE DEE RIVER / INDIAN CREEK SC Archives -
Series Number: S213190 Volume: 0001 Page: 00219 Item: 00 Date: 1785 /02/02 Description: DISMUKES, GEORGE, PLAT FOR 250 ACRES ON INDIAN CREEK, CHERAWS DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY ALEXANDER CRAIG. Names Indexed: DISMUKES, GEORGE / CRAIG, ALEXANDER / SKIPPER, SAMUEL / Locations: CHERAWS DISTRICT / PEE DEE RIVER / INDIAN CREEK Type: PLAT/
NOTE:
Bishop Gregg's HISTORY OF THE OLD CHERAWS reveals an unexpected fact concerning the Skippers. Describing the Revolutionary conflict between Tories and Patriots--the desperate and bloody partisan warfare which gripped the Carolina backcountry-- he says: "On the eastern side of the river (the Pee Dee,) near the dividing line between Richmond County, and what is now Marlborough District, lived two young men (BROTHERS), named Skipper, of mixed blood, but peaceable and inoffensive. They had taken parole however, and for no other offence, were seized by the Whigs on both sides of the line and hung. Such a course was well calculated to excite a feeling of bloody retaliation and thus the murderous conflict continued."
NOTE: About what year was this????
What was the names of these 2 Skipper men?
Were these Skipper men married?
what were the wives names?
Did they have children?
Who were their neighbors?
1785 -
THOMPSONS CREEK, Cheraw SC Archives - Series Number: S213190 Volume: 0002 Page: 00173 Item: 02 Date: 1785/03/01 Description: BELL, WILLIAM, PLAT FOR 100 ACRES ON THOMPSONS CREEK, CHERAWS DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY WILLIAM POWE. Names Indexed: BELL, WILLIAM/POWE, WILLIAM / SKIPPER, SAMUEL / Locations: CHERAWS DISTRICT / THOMPSON CREEK Type: PLAT/

MISC NOTE - SC
Chunacansti - Mentioned by Alcedo (Die. Geog., i, 565, 1786) as a pueblo of the province of South Carolina, on a swift river of the same name which flows s. E. to the sea. Unidentified

Franklin County, Virginia Marriage Bonds, 1786 - 1858
Payne, Thos. and Fanny Powell, dau. Robt., Jan. 14, 1799. Sur. Robt. Powell, Jr.
Payne, John and Lucy Clarkson, dau. David, Oct. 7, 1806. Surs. Henry Debo and Wm. J. Edmunds.
Payne, Moses and Judith Beard, Jan. 27, 1808. Sur. Samuel Beard.
Payne, Jubal and Rhoda Basham, Aug. 20, 1808. Sur. Wm. Basham and Robt. Harrison.
Payne, Robt. and Elizabeth Wright, Oct. 4, 1813. 98.
Payne, John and Juliana Speer, Mar. 6, 1819. Sur. Isaac Speer.
Payne, Thos. and Mary A. Spencer, dau. Polly N. Newbill, Dec. 20, 1819. Sur. Jas. S. Newbill.
Payne, Robt. and Sarah B. Helm, Dec. 19, 1826. Sur. Jubal Early. 119.
Payne, William and Sarah Payne, dau. Floyd, Dec. 3, 1828. Sur. Chas. B. Powell.
Payne, Robt. P. and Elizabeth Payne, dau. Floyd, Mar 30, 1829. Sur. Calvin Bartholomew.
Payne, Joseph M. and Elizabeth Webb, dau. Reuben, Apr. 4, 1836. Sur. Reed Payne. 140.
Payne, Jubal and Polly Harris, dau. Jubal, Dec. 17, 1839. Sur. Silas Payne. 86.
Payne, Silas and Mary Saunders, Jan. 5, 1847. 3.
Source Ancestry.com

1786
Mary Spry State: SC County: Charleston County Township: Will Year: 1786 Record Type: Probate Records Page: 00048 Database: SC Colonial Probate Index

1786 - SC TO GEORGIA -
I have an Elizabeth (Skinner) b 5 Apr 1789 in Cheraw District SC, who married Samuel Register b 01 Dec 1786. Their family moved to south GA and had numerous descendants.

Calendar of the Tennessee and King's Mountain papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts
Page 32/33 Jan 3-10, 1786 2XXII - Piomingo, Mingatushka, Latopoia for the Chickasaw Nation; Yockanahoma, Yockahoopoie, and 13 small medal chiefs of the 1st class, and 12 medal and gorget captains for the Choctaw Nation.

1786 -
THOMPSONS AND INDIAN CREEKS, CHESTERFIELD COUNTY, CHERAW DISTRICT, SC archives - Series Number: S213190 Volume: 0012 Page: 00243 Item: 00 Date: 1786/12/12 Description: CRAIG, ALEXANDER, PLAT FOR 950 ACRES ON THOMPSONS AND INDIAN CREEKS, CHESTERFIELD COUNTY, CHERAW DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY ALEXANDER CRAIG. Names Indexed: CRAIG, ALEXANDER / PURVES, GILBERT / PASLAY, ROBERT / PRESTWOOD, WILLIAM / SKIPPER, SAMUEL / DISMUK, GEORGE / YARBOROUGH, JOEL / CARTER, WILLIAM / CLARY, JOHN / DAVIS, THOMAS / LOCKWOOD, JOSHUA Locations: CHERAWS DISTRICT / CHESTERFIELD COUNTY / PEE DEE RIVER / THOMPSON CREEK / INDIAN CREEK / MILL BRANCH Type PLAT
NOTE: Bishop Gregg's HISTORY OF THE OLD CHERAWS reveals an unexpected fact concerning the Skippers. Describing the Revolutionary conflict between Tories and Patriots--the desperate and bloody partisan warfare which gripped the Carolina backcountry-- he says: "On the eastern side of the river (the Pee Dee,) near the dividing line between Richmond County, and what is now Marlborough District, lived two young men (BROTHERS), named Skipper, of mixed blood, but peaceable and inoffensive. They had taken parole however, and for no other offence, were seized by the Whigs on both sides of the line and hung. Such a course was well calculated to excite a feeling of bloody retaliation and thus the murderous conflict continued." NOTE: About what year was this???? What was the names of these 2 Skipper men? Were these Skipper men married? what were the wives names? Did they have children? Who were their neighbors? - Ann, Saw your post on genealogy.com about the Skipper brothers who were hung. Larry Cates wrote about that somewhere on the web. This was just after the Revolutionary War. It said they had just taken "parole". In other words they had been tories, or had sided with the British, and had taken parole saying they would support the newly formed U.S. nation. Apparently that was not good enough for some folks. Larry seems to indicate that they were killed partly because they were indians. Andrew

born abt 1787 in SC to Ga
Benjamin Skipper [Parents] was born about 1787 in South Carolina. He died after 1850 in Laurens Co, Georgia. Benjamin married Lucy (Skipper) about 1828 in South Carolina.
Lucy (Skipper) was born about 1790 in South Carolina. She died after 1850 in Laurens Co, Georgia. Lucy married Benjamin Skipper about 1828 in South Carolina.
They had the following children:
F i Crecy Skipper was born about 1829 in Laurens Co, Georgia.
F ii Rachael M Skipper was born about 1832 and died after 1870.
F iii Sally Skipper was born about 1835 in Laurens Co, Georgia.
F iv Jane Skipper was born about 1837 in Laurens Co, Georgia.
M v Allen Skipper was born about 1840 in Laurens Co, Georgia.
M vi Daniel W Skipper was born 2 Nov 1849 and died before 1907.

NC -
I'm trying to find info. on LUCRETIA HAWKINS. Her father was ALLEN HAWKINS and mother was ESTER (?) HAWKINS. She was born about 1787 in Onslow Co., NC. She was married to JOHN SKIPPER. She was my 4th great grandmother.
1787 -
John Skipper - Married Lucretia (Hawkins) B: 1787.
Children are
1. Kiziah (?) Skipper B: 1799?,
2. Celia Skipper B:1802,
3. Sally Skipper B: 1803?,
4. John Skipper B:1805?,
5. Thursa Ann Skipper B: 1810.
6. Thomas Brantley Skipper B:1812,
7. James Skipper B: 1814,
8. Willis Goodman Skipper B: 1821,
9. Ira Calloway Skipper B: 1823,
10. Darius Hill Skipper B:1825,
11. Eli Lors Skipworth B: 1828, Eli Lors Skipworth - Married Martha Ann (Staples) in 1848 and their first child was born 1 year later. Mary Amanda (her sister) came to live them and her first child was born in 1856. Eli had children by both women but did not marry Mary Amanda. There is a 1860 census in Muhlenberg Ky showing Eli L 32 and Martha A 32 and their children, and Mary Staples 26 and two of her children are with them. The next census in 1870 in Muhlenberg Ky showing Eli L 41 and Martha A 42 are still together with their children but Mary is no longer with them. All 8 of Mary's children are born by 1868, so she must have left and gone somewhere else before 1870. This means that Mary lived with them for 12 years, maybe a little longer, 1856 to 1868. Then the next census in 1880 in New Madrid MO shows Eli at 52 and Martha A at 54 and William K at 24 is still with them and girls, Samuel moved to New Madrid MO too but lived with his wife Margaret and his children. Eli died December 3, 1880 in Point Pleasant, New Madrid CO, MO. I believe that Martha went with William K and the younger daughters to California after Eli's death. I then found where Martha A. Skipworth drew a pension (civil war) from Eli L Skipworth Co B 11th Ky Inf Corporal Union (enlisted 10/16/1861, wounded and discharged 6/7/1862) I found where the widow's pension was applied for in Chico, Butte County California December 27, 1890. Census information regarding children is a little confusing but I think I narrowed it down to who all of the
children are:
Martha Ann: Samuel Winfield - 1849 (my gggrandfather),
John Thomas - 1852,
Mary Sue - 1854,
William K - 1857,
Josphine 1858 (died before 1860 census)
Eliza - 1861,
Willis E - 1861,
Lou - 1866,
Cobu - 1870,
Rosetta - 1870
Seala - 1873
Mary Amanda: America E - 1856,
Burris M (?),
Samuel Henry - 1858,
Isabel - 1860,
Matilda - 1862,
Judge M - 1866,
John BJ - 1868,
Mason (?).
12. Miles Pinckney B: 1830,
NOTE: These children are all Skipworths, but they show up with both last names.
John Skipper changed the family name (maybe) after going to Maury CO TN and marrying Lucretia.
Then John Skipper/Skipworth died 1840 in Maury CO TN and Lucretia (Hawkins) went to Muhlenberg KY with her remaining children .....
Posted by: Karen Skipworth (ID1875) Date: January 23, 2008

1786 -
Cheraw SC TO GEORGIA -
I have an Elizabeth (Skinner) b 5 Apr 1789 in Cheraw District SC, who married Samuel Register b 01 Dec 1786.
Their family moved to south GA and had numerous descendants.

1787 -
Dock, does your records go back beyond these three? I have a Lydia Skipper, she married Hardy Jesse Carter, he was b. 1736 - 46 and d. after 1786. Among their
children
Matthew, b. 21 May 1787, Darlington Co., SC
Sorry I don't have dates on Lydia. Thanks for any help you might give us.

1787 Laurens Co SC to Laurens Co Ga. -
Benjamin Skipper b about 1787 SC d after 1850 in Laurens Co SC married Lucy (Skipper) in or about 1828 in SC she was b about 1790 in SC she died after 1850 in Ga.
children
Crecy Skipper was born about 1829 in Laurens Co, Georgia ,
Rachael M Skipper was born about 1832 and died after 1870,
Sally Skipper was born about 1835 in Laurens Co, Georgia,
Jane Skipper was born about 1837 in Laurens Co, Georgia,
Allen Skipper was born about 1840 in Laurens Co, Georgia,
Daniel W Skipper was born 2 Nov 1849 and died before 1907

1788 - November 26, 1788 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
RICHMOND, (Virginia) Nov. 12. Extract of a letter dated Green-County (North-Carolina) October 25, 1788. “On the 17th instant, Gallespy’s Fort, (below the mouth of Little river) on Holstein, a little after sunrise was furiously attacked by about 300 Indians under the command of John Watts. The few men in the Fort made a gallant resistance; but being overpowered by numbers, and their ammunition being expended, the Indians rushed over the walls, or rather the roofs of the cabins, which made part of the Fort; great was the horror of the scene that then ensued. The best accounts say our loss is 28 persons, mostly women and children, as several of the men belonging to the Fort were abroad at the time. This body, we are told, is part of a much larger one now encamped at Chota, composed of both Creeks and Cherokees, said to be under the direction of Alexander McGillvray. And I am just now informed, that one thousand Indians have crossed the Tenasee, in two divisions, and that one of them had attacked Major Houston’s fort, and the other was near Captain White’s, on the north side of Holstein. The whole of our militia are under marching orders, and Col. Kenedy has already set out with those that were first ready; resolving to defend the country to the last extremity. So you may shortly expect to hear of a bloody scene indeed. - Major King is returned from the Middle Settlements, and gives but little encouragement of a prospect of peace; he went by the way of Swannanno, and proceeded through several towns, and returned down the Tennasee, until he met with a party of Indians returning from Gallespy’s fort. They dissuaded him from proceeding to Chota, saying the Indians in the main camp were angry and might kill him. The party of Indians gave the Major a relation of what passed at the attack on our fort, and said the Indians have several prisoners. Colonel Martin since his unsuccessful expedition is become unpopular Sevier is yet in confinement North Carolina, notwithstanding the encouragement given by her Executive in July last, supports us but feebly; and it will be our hard lot singly and alone to contend with the combined forces of two numerous tribes, well supplied by a neighbouring State, and it is said countenanced by Congress. It is a hard case to condemn an individual unheard; but far worse a whole people, and the more so, when barbarians are to be the executioners, and the innocent to suffer with the guilty. The humanity and justice of the rulers of the nation will surely revolt at such consequences, when they are fully and rightly informed.

SC to Ga. -
have an unknown Skipper, believe may be Barnabus, lived in SC who had following
children:
Benjamin, b. 1787, SC, d. aft 1850 Laurens?) GA;
Daniel, b. 1788, SC, d. 18547, GA;
Barney B., b. bet 1776-1794;
Elizabeth;
John;
Joseph.
Have a bit more; spouses, etc.
My great grandmother was Rachael dau. of Benjamin. She was b. abt 1832, Laurens Co., GA, d. aft 1870 Laurens?, GA. Married Mark Bellflower, Apr 20, 1856.
Children
John W.
Wright Allen (grandfather).


1788 - BLACK CREEK, CHERAW DISTRICT, SC. 1788 SC Archives -
???????????? Series Number: S213190 Volume: 0022 Page: 00367 Item: 02 Date: 1788/05/22 Description: SKIPPER, SAMUEL, PLAT FOR 300 ACRES ON BRANCH OF BLACK CREEK, CHERAW DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY ALEXANDER CRAIG. Names Indexed: SKIPPER, SAMUEL / CRAIG, ALEXANDER / Locations: CHERAWS DISTRICT / BLACK CREEK / PEE DEE RIVER Type: PLAT

SC born abt 1788 -
Geol b Skipper [Joel B. Skipper] Estimated Birth Year: abt 1788 Age in 1870: 82 Birthplace: South Carolina Home in 1870: Galivants Ferry, Horry, South Carolina Race: White Gender: Male Value of real estate: Post Office: Conway
hh members
Geol b Skipper 82 b abt 1788
Louisa Martin 30
Catherine Martin 11
Yancy M Martin 8
Lauretta Martin 3 Year: 1870;
Census Place: Galivants Ferry, Horry, South Carolina; Roll: M593_1499; Page: 86; Image: 174.

Cheraw SC NOTE -
Samuel Skipper lived in the same Cheraw area as my ancestors, not known if related..........??????? ? Who was Samuel's father and mother? Could his father maybe be George2 Skipper? - If Samuel was hung with his brother George2 Skipper JR., Did Samuel have a family that he left behind?
NOTE:
Bishop Gregg's HISTORY OF THE OLD CHERAWS reveals an unexpected fact concerning the Skippers. Describing the Revolutionary conflict between Tories and Patriots--the desperate and bloody partisan warfare which gripped the Carolina backcountry-- he says: "On the eastern side of the river (the Pee Dee,) near the dividing line between Richmond County, and what is now Marlborough District, lived two young men (BROTHERS), named Skipper, of mixed blood, but peaceable and inoffensive. They had taken parole however, and for no other offence, were seized by the Whigs on both sides of the line and hung. Such a course was well calculated to excite a feeling of bloody retaliation and thus the murderous conflict continued."
SC. 1788 - BLACK CREEK, Cheraw SC Archives -
???????????? Series Number: S213190 Volume: 0022 Page: 00367 Item: 02 Date: 1788/05/22 Description: SKIPPER, SAMUEL, PLAT FOR 300 ACRES ON BRANCH OF BLACK CREEK, CHERAW DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY ALEXANDER CRAIG. Names Indexed: SKIPPER, SAMUEL / CRAIG, ALEXANDE / Locations: CHERAWS DISTRICT / BLACK CREEK / PEE DEE RIVER Type: PLAT / - Note: Samuel Skipper was supposedly hung with his brother George Skipper.

MISC NOTE -
Cheraw Indians Connection in which they have become noted. The Cheraw are famous as one of the few tribes in the Carolinas mentioned by De Soto's chroniclers which can be identified and located with fair precision. They were noted later for their persistent hostility to the English and have left their name in Suwali Gap in the Blue Ridge Mountains, N. C.; in Saura Town Mountains, Stokes County, N. C.; in the town of Cheraw, Chesterfield County, S. C.; and possibly in the Uwaharrie River and Uwabarrie Mountains of North Carolina. There is a locality named Cheraw in Otero County, Colo.
NOTE:
Bishop Gregg's HISTORY OF THE OLD CHERAWS reveals an unexpected fact concerning the Skippers. Describing the Revolutionary conflict between Tories and Patriots--the desperate and bloody partisan warfare which gripped the Carolina backcountry-- he says: "On the eastern side of the river (the Pee Dee,) near the dividing line between Richmond County, and what is now Marlborough District, lived two young men, named Skipper, of mixed blood, but peaceable and inoffensive. They had taken parole however, and for no other offence, were seized by the Whigs on both sides of the line and hung. Such a course was well calculated to excite a feeling of bloody retaliation and thus the murderous conflict continued." - NOTE: About what year was this???? What was the names of these 2 Skipper men? Were these Skipper men married? Did they have children? Who were their neighbors? - MORE Ann, Saw your post on genealogy.com about the Skipper brothers who were hung. Larry Cates wrote about that somewhere on the web. This was just after the Revolutionary War. It said they had just taken "parole". In other words they had been tories, or had sided with the British, and had taken parole saying they would support the newly formed U.S. nation. Apparently that was not good enough for some folks.
Larry seems to indicate that they were killed partly because they were indians. Andrew

1788 - SC, and Ga., and NC -
Daniel Skipper, b. 1788, SC; d. 1857, GA. I show his wife as Mary "Polly" unknown, b. 1799.
Daniel's parents were: Nathan Skipper, b. Onslow Co., NC; d. bef 1840 and, Jemima (mother).
Grandparent Joseph Skipper.
Daniel's siblings were:
Benjamin,
Barney,
Elizabeth,
John,
Joseph.
I am descended from Benjamin's daughter Rachael, b. abt 1832, Laurens Co., GA (my ggrandmother).
Daniel SKIPPER's father was Abraham SKIPPER of Brunswick Co., NC.
His mother was likely the daughter of Miles POTTER.
Some have said her name is Mary, but we have no proof of that yet.
Daniel Skipper born in North Carolina, died in Bibb County, Georgia, married to Sophie (?).
I think they had three children,
Elizabeth,
John
Lydia.
Let me know if this is the same Daniel. -
Daniel Skipper - b. 1788 S. Carolina; d. 1857 Ga.; enlisted in Ga. Militia 9 Dec 1812; shown on Wilkinson Co., Ga. census in 1840; mar. Mary "Polly" _____; b. 1799.
Children:
1) Mary Ann Skipper - b. 1817; mar. Bentley Outlaw. Mary Ann Skipper who m. Bentley Outlaw in Wilkinson Co., GA 10-03-1835.
2) Rachel Skipper - b. 6 Feb 1825; d. c1860/70; mar. James Hartley.
3) Amie Ann Skipper - b. 1831; mar. Garrett NeSmith.
4) Martha E. Skipper - b. 1833; mar. Riley Hartley.
5) Daniel Webster Skipper - b. 5 Mar 1834; d. 20 Jul 1888; mar. Georgia Ann Hall.
6) Lawson Skipper - b. 1837.
7) Mark Anthony Skipper - b. 2 Mar 1839; d. 30 Nov 1901; mar. Rosetta Sutton & Bea Ward.
8) Nancy Skipper - b. 1839.
9) Sarah Skipper - mar. Daniel Kingery.
10) Winnifred Skipper - mar. James Hartley.
11) Simeon Gabriel Skipper -

1788
Skipper Estimated Birth Year: abt 1788 in Africa, Age: 30 Gender: Male Colonial Dependency: Berbice Owner Name: Robert Grant Record Date: 1818 Source Citation: Class: T71; Piece: 437; Page: 88
Skipper Estimated Birth Year: abt 1788 in Africa, Age: 31 Gender: Male Colonial Dependency: Berbice Owner Name: Robert Grant Record Date: 1819

1789 - August 12, 1789 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
NEW-YORK, August 7. Articles of a truce agreed upon at War Ford, on French Broad river, June 16, 1789, between the Hon. John Steele, Esq; on behalf of the state of North-Carolina, and the Head Men and Warriors of the Cherokee nation. Art. I. THAT each party, meaning North-Carolina and the Cherokee Nation, shall without delay surrender all the prisoners now in captivity, at a place, and to persons hereafter to be appointed. Art. II. That all papers, horses, negroes, and other property now in being, which were taken from the citizens of North-Carolina, shall be restored at the treaty. Art. III. That the white people as they are now settled on the frontiers of North Carolina shall remain in perfect security, until the time of holding the treaty, which will be as soon as possible. Art. IV. That in the mean time there shall be an entire cessation of hostilities on the part of the citizens of North Carolina, as well as the Indians; and should the lawless of either nation commit any kind of violence, complaint shall be made, and not retaliation on the innocent. Art. V. Should the Creek Indians make an attempt to pass through the Cherokee country, with design to attack or molest our frontier, the head men and warriors of the Cherokee nation shall use their influence to prevent or turn them back; but on this proving ineffectual, information shall immediately be given to all the frontier settlements of such design. Art. VI. The citizens of North-Carolina shall have liberty to travel the new road to and from Cumberland settlements, without interruption, until the treaty may be held. - The business being thus finished, Mr. Steele addressed the people at the frontier, a number of whom were present, and urged the necessity of their strict observance of the articles of a truce, being as essential to their interest individually, as to the public at large. - The Indians, about 500 in number, with most of the head men of the nation, were plentifully supplied with provisions, and left French Broad river on the 19th day of June in fine spirits, to return to their respective towns.

1789 SC -
I have an Elizabeth (Skinner) b 5 Apr 1789 in Cheraw District SC, who married Samuel Register b 01 Dec 1786. Their family moved to south GA and had numerous descendants. Not sure of the number now

Calendar of the Tennessee and King's Mountain papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts
page 48 - 11 May 1790 2XX35 - Captain Shipley should have some reimbursement of some sort.

abt 1790 -
Barnabas Skipper who died about 1790 who could be related to the John C. Skipper that you are referring to. As I do more reseach and if I come across a connection, I'll let you know. My relatives are from Brunswick County, NC. MORE - I failed to mention in the original posting that John C. Skipper was born in 1799. I have no idea what the "C" stands for. Possibily just an initial. Thomas' civil war records use the C but never a name. The gravestone has the name Thomas C. Skipper. John was born in NC according to census records.

1790 - Census NC -
Benjamin Skipper County Richmond State North Carolina Year 1790 Census Place Richmond, North Carolina Roll M637_7 Image 0437

1790 - 1860 -
Enumerators listed Native Americans who did not live on reservations and were taxed, but seldom identified them as Native Americans. They were usually identified as white if they were living with white people, or black if they were living with black people. Native Americans living on reservations or as nomads were not counted.

1790 - Anson Co., NC and Kershaw Co., SC -
Bill Woodard Sep 11, 1996 - Seeking information on WOODARD, Charles/Henry or William. Listed in records of the Minute Court of Anson County,N.C. in July 1774,as orphan children of William WOODARD. Ordered to be brought to court by Samuel SKIPPER. Records of court destroyed by fire and no other records have been found. Henry WOODARD listed as serving in Rev. War, and receiving payment for services. Samuel SKIPPER awarded land grant on the PeeDee river ( possibly in N. Carolina) for service in Rev. War. Skipper may have been guardian of the three sons of WILLIAM WOODARD,or even a relative. Charles WOODARD appears on 1790 Census as having been a resident of Kershaw district, S.C. would like any information on any of the four listed. Charles married Rebecca ? prior to 1790, place of marriage unknown.
Any help appreciated. thanks Bill - billwood@tab.com


1790 - Cheraw SC -
1790 Federal Census Cheraw District - 360 5 Skipper Gilbert 1 0 1 0 0 *******MY Ancestor****** 360 7 Shipper* Eliza 1 0 1 0 0 *Skipper p. 373 1 Skipper Sarah 1 2 3 0 0 - 1790 Cheraws Dist SC – pg 373 – Sarah – 1 male over 15, 2 males under 16, 3 females Gilbert Skipper - St Thomas, Cheraws District, SC 1790 Sarah Skipper - St Thomas, Cheraws District, SC 1790 - NOTE: This is my Family line levitaann@yahoo.com - Sarah/Sallie (?) Skipper, Dixon married John Dixon 2nd, and they had a son James W. Dixon

MISC NOTE -
Cheraw Indians Connection in which they have become noted. The Cheraw are famous as one of the few tribes in the Carolinas mentioned by De Soto's chroniclers which can be identified and located with fair precision. They were noted later for their persistent hostility to the English and have left their name in Suwali Gap in the Blue Ridge Mountains, N. C.; in Saura Town Mountains, Stokes County, N. C.; in the town of Cheraw, Chesterfield County, S. C.; and possibly in the Uwaharrie River and Uwabarrie Mountains of North Carolina. There is a locality named Cheraw in Otero County, Colo.

1790 NC Census -
James Skipper County: Brunswick State: North Carolina Source Citation: Year: 1790 Census Place Brunswick, North Carolina Roll M637_7 mage 0359

1790 Census Cheraws SC
Thomas Norwood
Male 16 and up
male under 16
male under 16
female
female
female
female

In the 1790 census the only Norwoods are
Samuel, Thomas, Zachariah. - They could all be children of Theophilus in fact, since they are on the same plat, that is my assumption I assume Theophilus is living with one of them..

1790 census SC
Jno Kirk Camden District, SC Roll: M637_11; Image: 0145.
Math Kirk Camden District, SC Roll: M637_11; Image: 0145.
Robt Kirk Camden District, SC Roll: M637_11; Image: 0145.
Giddeon Kirk St Johns, Charleston, SC
Petter Kirk St Johns, Charleston, SC
John Kirk St Phillips and St Michaels, Charleston, SC
John Kirk St Phillips and St Michaels, Charleston, SC
Sarah Kirk York, SC
Stephen Kirk York, SC

1789/1802 -
Charles City County Deed Book 4 1789-1802 LVA Reel #2 has index
p. 56 – Thomas Lee Shippen sets free Negro slave named John Green aged 44 yrs–17 Nov 91–rec 17 Nov 1791
p. 57 – articles of agreement between Thomas Lee Shippen of Philadelphia and his slave John Green whereby Green agrees to serve for 7 years from date of articles as a hostler and Shippen agrees to find him in his dwelling house, sufficient meat, drink, washing and lodging and if Green is not willing to serve beyond the seven years to give 6 months notice –17 Nov 91 – rec same – Green signs with mark


1790/1793 -
Chesterfield County Deed Book 12 1790-1793 LVA Reel # 4 / p. 228 – 27 June 1792 – Nancy Gibbons of Chesterfield County and Dale Parish believing that God created all mankind equally free emancipates: Mingo, 45 yrs old to be free Jan 1, 1793; Mary, 13 yrs old to be free Jan 1, 1800; Billy, 4 yrs old to be free Jan 1, 809 – rec July court 1792

NC U. S. Census of 1790
lists eight Skipper heads-of-homes in North Carolina Barnabas, Abraham, Benjamin, James, John, Joseph, Moses and Nathan. While connections have not been made yet, it is likely that our subject, Joseph Skipper is linked to one or more of these North Carolina Skippers. Known records show that Joseph came from, and was probably born in, New Hanover, North Carolina in 1814. During the early 1850’s, he took his family and headed west, stopping for a while in Tennessee, and then arriving in the Lanty area of Conway County in 1856. Indications are that they came in wagons pulled by oxen. The 1850 Census of New Hanover County, N.C., lists the family as Joseph, 36, farmer: Louisa (?) , wife, 19: James, 2: and David, 1. Listed below these is a Charles, age 8, and Rebecca Garnto, mother of Louisa. (Charles’ position in the family is not clear; speculation is that he was Joseph’s son by a previous marriage; note the difference in Joseph Skipper and Louisa’s ages, and that she would have been only 13 years old when Charles was born.) All in this family are said to have been born in North Carolina.

Slave Registers of former British Colonial Dependencies, 1812-1834 -
Sciper Estimated Birth Year abt 1791 Age 27 Gender Male Colonial Dependency Berbice Owner Name R C Downer Record Date 1818

1792 - Chesterfileld SC 1792 Railey Deed Record - Located in Kershaw County, SC, -
Lynches Creek - Source of submission: Register of Deeds, Kershaw Co., S.C. Apt. F, drawer 59 - 72, Roll 64 - COURT RECORDS - Chesterfield Co.,S.C.-17 Dec. 1792 To all to whom these presents shall come or may or any misconcerns to Allen Chapman, Esq. Coroner of chesterfield Co. in the state of S.C. aforesaid and greeting Whereas by virtue of a certain Writ of --- Facias issue? from and out of the county court of chesterfield to me directed I have in pursuance thereof lately siezed and taken in executed a certain Plantation or Tract of land situated in Chesterfield Co. aforesaid on Lynches Creek containing 300 acres more or less whereon Charles Railey now lives bounding by land in all sides at the time of the original survey -- and for the property of James Homes deceased to satisfy and answer the cost and damage in a certain suit which George Skipper had then lately recovered before the Justices of the said Co. Court against the adm. of said estate as by the said Writ of Fiose? Facias was directed and commanded and Whereas also I have this day pursuant to the descretion of the law in such case made and provided set up and --- to public sale or out cry the said Tract of land with the appertenances to the highest and best bidder and at or upon such sale or out cry Lovick Rochell was the highest and best bid for the said tract of land at and for the price and sum of 56 pounds sterling. Now therfore know all that I the said allen Chapman by virtue of the said Writ of Fine Facias in pursuance of the directions of the law in such cases made and provided and the power by law in me vested in consideration of the sum of 56 pounds sterling to me in hand paid the said Lovick Rochell at and before the sealing and delivery of the receipt whereof I do hereby ack. have granted sold ---- transferred and set over and by these presents do grant and alien transfer and set over unto him the said Lovick Rochell his heirs and asigns all and singular the said plantation or tract of land above mentioned situate lying and being on Lynches Creek in --- set my hand and seal of Office at Chesterfield Court House this first day of Dec. in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety two and in the seventeenth year of the American Independance. Sealed and Delivered in the presence of Joseph Booth, Joel Bullard Allen Chapman, Coroner (Drawing of land plat) State of S.C.,Chesterfield Co.- Personally appeared before me Alexander Craig, clerk of the County Court of Chesterfield Joseph Booth who being duly sworn saith that he was present and did see Allen Chapman Coroner of the said Co. sign seal and as his act and deed deliver the ---- instrument of writing for the uses and purposes there in contained and that he saw Joel Ballard subscribed his name to the same as a witness together with himself. Sworn to before me this 17th Dec. 1792 Alex. Craig Clk.CC. Joseph Booth Chesterfield Co. Clerks Office recorded in Bk. no.2 pages 627 this 19th day of Dec. 1792 and examined by Alex. Craig, Clk. CC -
NOTE: This George Skipper and Deed are in the same area as my ancestors in Chesterfiled County SC., not known if related???????? -
NOTE: MY ancestor in area.


1792 - BLACK CREEK Cheraw SC -

?????????? Series Number: S213190 Volume: 0031 Page: 00532 Item: 02 Date: 1792/11/28 Description: SKIPPER, JOHN, PLAT FOR 150 ACRES ON SOUTH WEST SIDE OF BLACK CREEK, CHERAW DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOSIAH CANTEY. Names Indexed: SKIPPER, JOHN / CANTEY, JOSIAH /SKIPPER, GEORGE / Locations: CHERAWS DISTRICT/BLACK CREEK Type: PLAT/


1792 - Darlington SC -

NORWOOD, JOHN, PLAT Names Indexed: NORWOOD, JOHN, others including NORWOOD, THOMAS / NORWOOD, SAMUEL / SWIFT CREEK / NORWOOD BRANCH / BELLYACHE CREEK 1799 WADDLE, DANIEL, Mentioned include: /NORWOOD, SAMUEL, NORWOOD, THOMAS / NORWOOD, JOHN / SWIFT CREEK / CUFFYTOWN CREEK /
1799 WADDILL, ABEL, PLAT Names Indexed include: NORWOOD, THOMAS / NORWOOD, JOHN / BLACK CREEK / SWIFT CREEK / BELLYACHE CREEK /

1793 sc to alabama -
Barnabas B Skipper Age: 57 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1793 Birth Place: South Carolina Gender: Male Home in 1850(City,County,State): Southern Division, Dale, Alabama hh Barnabas B Skipper 57 Martha A Skipper 28 Rebecca Skipper 60 Rutilla Skipper 18
Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: Southern Division, Dale, Alabama; Roll: M432_4; Page: 200; Image: 408. -

born 1792 sc - Barnabas B. Skipper Gender: male Birth Place: SC Birth Year: 1793 Spouse Name: Rebecca ??? Spouse Birth Place: SC Spouse Birth Year: 1790 Marriage Year: 1811 Marriage State: SC Number Pages: 1
source: ancestry.com

MISC -
The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research SCMAR, Volume VII Number 3, Summer, 1979 Darlington County Memorialized Records (Continued from Vol. 7, p.80) Parties Conveyance Date Consideration Lands and Money. Situation Christopher Teele (?) to Deed of Janry 30th Fifty pounds stg. 200 acres in County Chamblis Hill Conveyce 1792 of Darlington Christopher Teele to Deed of Janry 30th Fifty pounds stg. 199 acres Darlington Hannah Teele Conveyce 1792 County Christopher Teele Deed of Sale Janry 30th Ten pounds Stg. 100 acres So side


abt 1794 - NC to Marlboro County SC Around 1794, - after repeated court cases brought against them, the Skippers moved across the border to Marlboro County, South Carolina. Marlboro County has been described by some as a "county of color" and no doubt refers to the many mixed blood families that lived there. These mixed blood families congregated in communities and attended mixed blood churches.

abt 1794 SC -
Benjamin Skipper Born: 1794 in Not Stated, xx County, South Carolina, USA - Legions In Time: Legends From The Past Personal Member Tree Name: ? Benjamin Skipper Birth 1775 South Carolina

1794 -
Abraham King, Snr. of Georgetown District to James Prince. ____ Pounds Sterling. 100 acres on Pleasant Meadows Sw. (granted to John Edwards 24 Jun 1793) S/ Abraham King, Esther King. W/ Isaac Skipper, Abraham King. Aff. Abraham King, Jr. 7 May 1794. Recd 13 Oct 1817.

1794 England -
Harriet Sciper Age: 57 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1794 Relation: Head Gender: Female Where born: Commercial Road, Essex, England Civil Parish: Tottenham Ecclesiastical parish: Trinity County / Island: Middlesex Country: England Registration district: Edmonton Sub-registration district: Hornsey ED, institution, or vessel: 3c Household schedule number: 189
Source Citation: Class: HO107; Piece: 1702; Folio: 428; Page: 45; GSU roll: 193610

1794 England -
Ann Skiffer Age: 67 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1794 Relation: Wife Spouse's Name: John Gender: Female Where born: St John Westminster, Middlesex, England Civil Parish: Westminster St John The Evangelist Ecclesiastical parish: St Mary County / Island: Middlesex Country: England Westminster Sub-registration district: St John ED, institution, or vessel: 19 Household schedule number: 240 Ann Skiffer 67 John Skiffer 67
Source Citation: Class: RG9; Piece: 50; Folio: 18; Page: 37; GSU roll: 542563

1794 - North Carolina Wills S.
page 236 1794 SKIPPER, JOSEPH, Jemima (wife); Priscilla, Nathan and Milly.

1795 - Southampton Co., VA Indians -
Listed as Nottoway and Nansemond Indians on land deeds in Southampton, Virginia:
1735……………….King Edmunds, James Harrison, Ned, Peter, Robert Scoller Sam, Wanoke Robin, William Hines, Frank, Wanoke Robin Jr. Cockarons Tom, Cockarons Will.
1750……………….Sam, Frank, Jack Will, John Turner, Wat Bailey, George Skipper
1795……………….John Turner, Celia Rogers (a Nansemond), Suky Turner
1808 Special Census on Nottoway in Southampton:
adults: Litteton Scholar, Tom Turner, Jemmy Wineoak, Edy Turner, Nancy Turner, Betsy Step
Children: Tom Step, Henry Turner, Alexander Rogers, John Woodson, Winny Woodson, Anny Woodson, Polly Woodson, Fanny Bartlett, Solomon Bartlett, Billy Woodson, Jenny Woodson

Marriage 1795 NC -
James Skipper - International Genealogical Index / NA Gender: Male Marriage: 1795, North Carolina 01 FEB 1837, North Carolina to Frances (?) He died 01 FEB 1837, North Carolina
Source On Line Salt Lake

1795 NC to SC -
Betsey Scipper Gender: Female Race: White Marital Status: Widowed Place of Birth: North Carolina Estimated Birth Year: abt 1795 Age: 85 Month of Death: Jan Cause of Death: Beetride?? Place of Death: (City, County, State) Smithville, Marlboro, South Carolina Census Year: 1880 Census Place (City, County, State): Smithville, Marlboro, South Carolina; Roll: MORT_15; Page: 1; Enumeration District: 111; Line Number: 25 -
Who was she married to?????

?1795 Columbia SC -
Eliza Kirk Estimated Birth Year: abt 1795 Age in 1870: 75 Birthplace: South Carolina Home in 1870: Columbia, Richland, South Carolina Race: White Gender: Female Value of real estate: Post Office: Columbia
Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Columbia, Richland, South Carolina; Roll: M593_1507; Page: 166; Image: 335.

1795 NC to SC -
Betsey Scipper Gender: Female Race: White Marital Status: Widowed Place of Birth: North Carolina Estimated Birth Year: abt 1795 Age: 85 Month of Death: Jan Cause of Death: Beetride?? Place of Death: (City, County, State) Smithville, Marlboro, South Carolina Census Year: 1880
Source Citation: Census Place (City, County, State): Smithville, Marlboro, South Carolina; Roll: MORT_15; Page: 1; Enumeration District: 111; Line Number: 25

1796 England -
Hampshire - Marriage License allegations, Bishop of Winchester, 1689 -1837 Allegations for Marriage Licences in Dampshire, in the Registry of the Bishop of Winchester. Volume 3. County: Hampshire Country: England Spier, Thomas, of Weston Patrick, 21, b., & Mary Compton, of the s., 21, sp., at W. P., 15 Oct 1796. William Spier, bondsman.

1796 - September 21, 1796 The Pennsylvania Gazette -
HALIFAX, (N. C.) September 5. On the 18th ultimo, arrived at Raleigh, from the state of Tennessee, Surry county, Col. Hubbard, distinguished by the Indians for his undaunted bravery, who brings accounts that the Creek Indians have lately broke out unprovoked, stole about 20 horses, and marched out of the settlement very deliberately; having made but a short day’s march; they were followed by a part of active white men and overtaken, but their number was too formidable for an attack; they were all mounted and well armed, in number (as well as the white men could guess at the distance of 200 yards) about three hundred. The white men left letters on the trees where they made a stand, informing the Indians of the great evil which such lawless conduct might bring upon their nation, and requesting them to call to mind the troubles their brethren the Shawanese brought upon themselves, in consequence of such conduct, and their blind attachment to their beloved man over the water. - This gentleman further informs, that about ten thousand of the citizens of that country are prepared to settle the lands in the Big Bent of the Tennessee, as low down as the Muscle Shoals, claiming under a purchase made of the Indians, and by a grant obtained from the state of Georgia. Quere, whether the New-York treaty made with McGillivray and the United States, and sanctioned by the delegation of Georgia, will not draw forth against those men the strong arm of the Union?

1796 - BLACK CREEK Cheraw SC -
???????????????? Series Number: S213190 Volume: 0032 Page: 00547 Item: 02 Date: 1796/01/23 Description: SKIPPER, JOHN, PLAT FOR 500 ACRES ON BLACK CREEK, CHERAW DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOSIAH CANTEY. Names Indexed: SKIPPER, JOHN / CANTEY, JOSIAH / SKIPPER, GEORGE / Locations: BLACK CREEK / CHERAWS DISTRICT Type: PLAT/

1796 CUMBERLAND COUNTY NC -
JAMES3 SKIPPER (ZACHARIA2, BARNABUS / BENJAMIN / PETER1) was born Abt. 1796 in NORTH CAROLINA. He married FRANCES (LEWELLEN) February 01, 1837 in CUMBERLAND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA, daughter of MR. LEWELLEN and MRS. LEWELLEN.
Notes for JAMES SKIPPER: Subj: Re: NC HALIFAX Skipper Date: 6/5/00 2:48:33 PM Eastern Daylight Time From: JKHowell@digitalexp.com (Jeanette Howell)
James Skipper b. 1796 in NC d. 1 Feb 1837: widow, Frances and 7 heirs.
Children:
William Hays, in rt. of his wife, Comfort; 1815 NC - William Hayes / Comfort Skipper Cumberland Vincent West Robinson Mumfor Bond Date 07 Nov 1815 Bond 000032742 ImageNum 007303 Record 01 122
Simon Skipper;
Gatesy Hudson ?Skipper = Gilbert Hugh Skipper
Celia Skipper;
Mary Skipper;
James Skipper;
Right Hudson ?Skipper.
James Skipper b. 1796, NC; died after 1850. Martha, wife, b. 1808 NC.
Comfort b. 1829 NC,
Mary b. 1837 AL,
Celia b. 1840 AL,
Marion b. 1843.
Do these children belong to either James above?
1. Benjamin Jackson Skipper
2. Daniel Skipper
3. Martha Skipper
4. James C. Skipper 1823 m. Eliza (?) and had at least 8 children.
5. Allen Skipper
6. John Skipper
7. Rutilla Skipper
Children of JAMES SKIPPER and FRANCES (LEWELLEN) are:
i. MARY4 SKIPPER2, b. 1837, NC2.
ii. JAMES SKIPPER2, b. 18382,2,2.
iii. THOMAS SKIPPER, b. 1839, NC3.
iv. CURTIS SKIPPER, b. 1843, NC3.
v. ELIZABETH SKIPPER4, b. 1844, NC4.
vi. MARTHA SKIPPER5, b. 1845, NC5.
vii. CHARLES SKIPPER6, b. 1847, NC6.
viii. LOLLIE SKIPPER, b. 1849, NC7.
ix. NOAH P. SKIPPER, b. 1850, NORTH CAROLINA; m. MRS. SKIPPER, Abt. 1869, ? CUMBERLAND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA. More About NOAH P. SKIPPER: Census: 1870, P. 537 RICHMOND COUNTY, NC. ENUMERATED IN THE HOUSEHOLD OF HIS GRANDFATHER ZACHARIA SKIPPER.7
3. DRURY3 SKIPPER (ZACHARIA2, BARNABUS / BENJAMIN / PETER1)8,9 was born 1805 in NC9, and died Bet. 1850 - 1860 in RICHMOND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA9. He married MARY MARGARET (NEE?) SKIPPER9 Abt. 1828. Notes for DRURY SKIPPER: 1870 Richmond Co., NC census lists Zacharia in h/h with Drury and listed as father. More About DRURY SKIPPER: Census: 1860, RICHMOND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA, P. 754, FN 607. EFFIE JOHNSON AGE 62, B. 1808, LISTED IN HOUSEHOLD.9
Children of DRURY SKIPPER and MARY SKIPPER are:
i. ALMA4 SKIPPER9, b. 1832, RICHMOND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA9.
ii. ANN SKIPPER9, b. 1834, RICHMOND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA9.
iii. MURDOCK SKIPPER9, b. 1835, RICHMOND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA9.
iv. DANIEL SKIPPER, b. 1836.
v. WILLIAM B. SKIPPER9, b. 1836, NC9. More About WILLIAM B. SKIPPER: Census: 1850, UNION COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA, ENUMERATED WITH THE FAMILY OF HUGH HOUSTON, FN 19.9
vi. ALEXANDER (SANDY) SKIPPER9, b. 1840, RICHMOND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA9.
vii. SARAH SKIPPER9, b. 1842, RICHMOND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA9.
viii. JAMES SKIPPER9, b. 1850, RICHMOND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA9.
ix. MAGGIE SKIPPER9, b. 1852, RICHMOND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA9.
x. JAMES SKIPPER9, b. 1860
xi. EFFIE JOHNSON, b. 1808, ? SISTER TO MARY (MARGARET).
HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY ALABAMA, P.437. WRITTEN BY MRS. MARVIN SCOTT.
MISC NOTES
Martha,Jane,Skipper. Bn in Henry Co,Alab.
James,Skipper,SR married to Francis Was a soldier in the REV, NC.
Children;
Simon,Skipper bn NC.
James,Skipper married to Martha,Jane.
Comfort,Skipper married William,B,Hayes
Gatsy Hudson Skipper = ?Gilbert Hugh Skipper
Celia,Skipper
Mary,Skipper
?Right Hudson Skipper
Civil,C,Skipper was bn bt 1838 in think NC, and believe place of death unknown,
Francis,M,Skipper was bn bt 1843 think NC.
Ellsa,P,Skipper age 22, in Missippi She married Abraham,Gordon. who was son of Arthur,Gordon. He was age 25 in Missippi and deceased.
Some Skippers were bn in Henry Co,Alab.
And some in NC.
James,Skipper bn aft 1790's married Martha,Jane,SR
children;
Martha,
Jane,Skipper bn 1833 Henry Co,AL,
Hugh,
Thomas,
Murphy
Arthur,M,Skipper Married Elisabeth,Ann,Gamble
Elisabeth,Ann,Skipper Married James,J,Murphy
James,J,Skipper 3rd.
Mary,Skipper
1, William,Skipper
2, William,Clark,Skipper,Sr
3,William,Clark,Skipper,Jr
4,James,Skipper married Frances,Skipper
# 2 and 3 may be same person.
James,Skipper birth unknown fought in revolutionary war. trained in Skippervill.NC. was bn in North Carolina. Age was between 1760 to 1850. He died in Abbeville,Henry Co,Alab. Abner,Chester was last will in testament Will Adminstrator. James was believe burried in Abbeville area. I am looking for more research on this particular James,Skipper. James,Skipper married Wife Francis I think in North Carolina thire kids are
Comfort,Skipper bn NC
Simon,Skipper BN NC
Gatsy Hudson Skipper = Hugh Gilbert Skipper
Celia,Skipper
Mary,Skipper
James,A,Skipper BN After 1793 NC Died 1860 Monticelo,Drew County Arkansas.
Married his wife Martha,Jane.
James,Skipper,JR had a daughter Martha,Jane,Skipper bn bt 1833. Who married Hugh,Thomas,Murphy Henry County,bt 1853.
James,A,Skipper,Jr died in 1860 Monticelo,Drew County Ark 1860.
James,A,Skipper and wife Martha,Jane. in Drew County Ark
Children.
Most of them were bn Henry County Alabama.
1,Martha,Jane,Skipper Murphy bn 1833
2,Arthur,M,Skipper
3, Elizabeth,Ann,Skipper married James,J,Murphy Barbour Countynty,Alab
4,Mary,Farmer,Skipper bn 5,24,1836 Henry Co,Alab
5,Civil,C,Skipper
6,Francis,M,Skipper possibly a son
7, Elisa,P,Skipper age 22 marrid Abraham Gordon

born abt 1797
This is what I have on the Nirams. Apparently his name was actually Adoniram. I'd shorten it too.
Descendants of Niram Skipper
1 Niram Skipper 1797 + Creasy 1800 -
.... 2 ? Skipper 1810 -
.... 2 ? Skipper 1810 -
.... 2 ? Skipper 1810 -
.... 2 ? Skipper 1810 -
.... 2 ? Skipper 1825 -
.... 2 ? Skipper 1826 -
.... 2 John Skipper 1827 -
.... 2 Niram Skipper 1828 + Mary A. 1834
.......... 3 Charlotte A. Skipper 1851 -
.......... 3 John B. Skipper 1854 -
.... 2 Daniel Skipper 1829 -
.... 2 ? Skipper 1831 -
.... 2 Ceily Skipper 1838 -
.... 2 ? Skipper 1832 -
.... 2 Charlotte Skipper 1842 -

Calendar of the Tennessee and King's Mountain papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts
1797 April 2 11DD124 Page 218 - Chief of the Cherokee is Bloody Fellow

1797 - Darlington Sc -
Name Gilbert Skipper Age 53 Estimated birth year abt 1797 Birth Place South Carolina Gender Male Home in 1850(City,County,State): Division 4, Darlington, South Carolina Source Citation Year 1850 Census Place Division 4, Darlington, South Carolina Roll M432_851 Page 335 Image 667. MY ancestor levitaann@yahoo.com - Gilbert Skipper Age 53 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1797 Birth Place South Carolina Gender Male Home in 1850 (City,County,State) Division 4, Darlington, South Carolina hh Diony (?) Skipper 43 b abt 1807 Gilbert Skipper 53 Hogan M Skipper 14 Jane T Skipper 10 Jessee J Skipper 25 Martha A Skipper 18 Saml C Skipper 4 Sarah L Skipper 16 Stephen H Skipper 12 Source Citation: Year 1850 Census Place Division 4, Darlington, South Carolina; Roll M432_851 Page 335 Image 667
I was told by my grandmother that her nickname Diony was Dicey or Vicey -
This is my ancestor with his family. levitaann@yahoo.com

1797 - SC, and Alabama -
Jacob Ott b. 1797 in Orangeburg Co., SC., who served in the War of 1812. He was awarded two bounty land grants - one was sold to a Skipper and one to a Brinks. My Otts appeared in Dale Co., AL in 1830 and later moved to Clarke Co., AL.

1797 - NC to Ga. -
Elizabeth Skipper, b. 1797; mar. Willie Rawls 1818; b. N. Carolina; settled in Wilkinson Co., Ga. then later to Laurens Co., Ga. Children: I) Oliver Hazard Perry Rawls - b. 1820; d. 1873; mar. Martha Fordham 1845; b. 1827; d. 1910. Children: 1 James Roy Rawls, 2 Benjamin Haywood Rawls, 3 Olive Jane Rawls, 4 Oliver Marshall Rawls, 5 Letha Sara Rawls, 6 Napoleon Bonaparte Rawls, 7 Martha Etta Rawls, 8 Joel Ira Rawls, 9 Robert L. C. Rawls, 10 Mary Civilia Rawls, 11 Otis Hazard Perry Rawls. II) Alec Rawls - b. 1828; settled in Ga. then in Miss; mar. Mary _____; b. 1828. III) Margaret Rawls - b. 1830; mar. John Dominy; b. 1827; Children: 1 Alexander W. Dominy, 2 Mary A. E. Dominy, 3 Daniel Dominy, 4 Joseph E. Dominy, 5 Benjamin Dominy, 6 Mary Ann Dominy, 7 Emma Dominy, 8 Alice Dominy.

born 1798 Ga -
John Wallace Age in 1860: 62 Birth Year: abt 1798 Birthplace: Georgia (Country) Home in 1860: Precinct 12, Butler, Alabama Gender: Male Post Office: Greenville hh members John Wallace 62 Levicy Wallace 55 Martha A Wallace 37 B C Wallace 20 E M Wallace 14 Jane Wallace 8 A F Wallace 19 S G Wallace 16 John Riley Jay 8 James Jay 5 Elias E Jay 6 Vicy E Scipper 17 Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Precinct 12, Butler, Alabama; Roll: M653_3; Page: 277; Image: 280. -
Need more info Vicey Married? a Scipper could she be my Vicey in SC? she is born about 1843

1798 -
BOGGY SWAMP Cheraw Sc*************My Ancestor ********* Series Number: S213192 Volume: 0037 Page: 00119 Item: 03 Date: 1798/09/21 Description: SKIPPER, GILBERT, PLAT FOR 150 ACRES ON BOGGY SWAMP, CHERAW DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY WILLIAM LIDE FOR PHILIP DOSSET ON NOVEMBER 26, 1789. Names Indexed: SKIPPER, GILBERT / DOSSET, PHILIP/LIDE, WILLIAM / Locations: BOGGY SWAMP / PEE DEE RIVER / CHERAWS DISTRICT Type: PLAT/
levitaann@yahoo.com - He was married to Diony or Dicey, or Vicey told to me by my grandmother - Her last name is unknown - levitaann@yahoo.com - Dicey or Vicey could be a nickname for Diony. Her maiden name might be Diony ? (Nelson)

MISC NOTE -
Cheraw Indians Connection in which they have become noted. The Cheraw are famous as one of the few tribes in the Carolinas mentioned by De Soto's chroniclers which can be identified and located with fair precision. They were noted later for their persistent hostility to the English and have left their name in Suwali Gap in the Blue Ridge Mountains, N. C.; in Saura Town Mountains, Stokes County, N. C.; in the town of Cheraw, Chesterfield County, S. C.; and possibly in the Uwaharrie River and Uwabarrie Mountains of North Carolina. There is a locality named Cheraw in Otero County, Colo.

1798 -
Abbeville, and Darlington SC and Edgefield co., SC - "General" John Norwood (wife Jane Pickens) died in Abbeville, SC in 1798. Captain John Norwood (wife Mary Warren) died in 1825 in Darlington, SC. The third man named John Norwood in SC during the American Revolution lived in Edgefield Co, and his wife was Mourning Harris. Does this help? Helen...... Captain John Norwood (wife Mary Warren) died in 1825 in Darlington, SC....... Was Mary Warren the sister of Joseph Warren who married Penelope Ratcliff. Joseph & Penelope Ratcliff Warren administered the estate of her father James Ratcliff in S.C

1798 -
North Carolina Wills P. page 41 1798 POTTER, MILES, SR., Robert, Miles, John and Joseph; Abraham Skipper; Margaret McMurray.

1798 -

Chesterfield County Deed Book 14 1795-1800 LVA Reel # 5 p. 197–29 Jan 1798–John Bolling of Chesterfield emancipates mulatto woman Jane aged about 26 yrs at present employed in the family of Samuel Myers in the city of Richmond – rec February court 1798


1799 -
John C. Skipper was born in 1799. I have no idea what the "C" stands for. Possibily just an initial. Thomas' civil war records use the C but never a name. The gravestone has the name Thomas C. Skipper. John was born in NC according to census records


Late 1700s Anson CO., NC? / SC? -
Benjamin Skipper is a name among the Skippers that lived on the NC/SC border in the late 1700's - I am assuming Benjamin was a Revolutionary War soldier. He might be the brother or son of Barnabus Skipper who lived in Anson County, NC, in the late 1700's. Perhaps he moved to Tennessee after that time. That is what my Skipper line did also. More Hi Andrew, I assume Benjamin was in the Rev. War also. However, the only Skipper Rev. War records I found on Heritage Quest were James and Nathan's. If I'm not mistaken, sometimes Rev. War veterans sold their land sight unseen to others. Hope this helps someone: Deed Book "C" 1813-1815 Page 11 - Tennessee Grant to Nathaniel Taylor for 640 acres. No. 1639, for Military Service by Benjamin Skipper to State of North Carolina, Warrent No. 4778, Sealed 22 Aug. 1807 by No. 61. Being in Williamson Co., TN, 2nd District, 3rd Range, 7th Section. Surveyed 18 Apr. 1808 Reg: 27 June 1810. Source Taken from a book I own "Land Deed Genealogy of Bedford County Tennessee 1807-1852

1799 -
Chesterfield County Deed Book 14 1795-1800 LVA Reel # 5 p. 402 –11 Feb 1799 – John Friend of Chesterfield for divers causes emancipates one Negro man named Daniel Lewis – rec April court 1799

1799 SC -
WADDLE, DANIEL, Mentioned include: / NORWOOD, SAMUEL, NORWOOD, THOMAS / NORWOOD, JOHN / SWIFT CREEK/CUFFYTOWN CREEK/
1799 WADDILL, ABEL, PLAT Names Indexed include: NORWOOD, THOMAS / NORWOOD, JOHN / BLACK CREEK/SWIFT CREEK/BELLYACHE CREEK

Calendar of the Tennessee and King's Mountain papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts
page 67 - 26 Sept 1799 - 5XX7 John Tully killed Stoctons Valley near Thomas Stoctons Valley, the Harpes last seen going toward place of their father in law, Roberts. William Wood and Nathaniel Stockton finding Tully's Corspe.

1800 - SC -
Arthur SKIPPER b 1800 Marlboro SC d abt 1855 Yorkville, Gibson, Tn married abt 1820 Nancy Odom SC children 1. Silas SKIPPER 2. Alexander SKIPPER 3. Thomas SKIPPER 4. Scion SKIPPER 5. ? 6. ? 7. Nancy SKIPPER 8 Harris SKIPPER 9. Noah SKIPPER 10 ? 11. William SKIPPER 12. Samuel SKIPPER 13. Nancy SKIPPER 14 Sarah Francis SKIPPER 15 Julia Ann SKIPPER - ? Fifteen Children
NOTE
Harris Skipper b abt 1833

1800 Marlboro SC Census -
Barnabas Skipper Marlboro District, SC 1800 / John Skipper Marlboro District, SC 1800 / John Skipper Marlboro District, SC 1800 / Silas Skipper Marlboro District, SC 1800 /
Note: Who did all these Skipper men marry and what were the names of all their children?

1800 SC - The following transcript was taken from a microfilm copy of the United States Federal Census of South Carolina for 1800. The pages transcribed record the households in the area of South Carolina that today includes modern Horry County. There is also part of modern day Georgetown County included in the census record but the division is not certain enough to leave out the Georgetown County residents. A map is included to suggest where the census was taken.
Page Sixteen 1800 Kingston County. SC (see above description) MALES=0-10.10-16.16-26.26-45.45 FEMALES=..0-10.10-16.16-26.26-45.45- ..Free.Slaves
Aba Skipper Jun 52010-11010-0-0
Isaac Skipper 10010-11100-0-0
Peter Skipper Senr 21001-11010-0-0
Arther Skipper 11010-21010-0-4
Charles Skipper 01101-32001-0-0

NC - Misc Note about the Cherokee Indians - One Group escaped and took refuge in the North Carolina mountains.

1800 - Darlington SC census:
Thomas Norwood
Male over 45
Female over 45
female 10 thru 15
Mary Cain
female 26 thru 44
female 26 thru 44
female under 10
female under 10

1800 - Cheraws and Darlington, SC -
There is enough circumstantial detail there that I thought I should at least look for Mary (Cain) and Thomas Norwood. The Thomas Norwood who served in the Revolution from the Abbeville branch of the Norwoods is too young to be Marys husband she was b. abt 1770, according to the censuses. The Thomas in Cheraws / Darlington is just right, and is with a Mary (Cain) in the censuses in Darlington in 1800, 1810. I'm wondering if anyone out there has any evidence to support or refute this. Heres everything I've figured out so far. I have not been able to go to Georgia, so this came from the web.

Other Free" Heads of Household in the 1800 South Carolina Census, by Family Name
Quick, Annice 11 "other free" Marlboro p.57a

Other Free" Heads of Household in the 1800 North Carolina Census by family name
Scipper, Isaac 8 Bruns 14
Scipper, Jesse 3 Bruns 14
Scipper, Moses 5 Bruns 14
Scipper, Urias 8 Bruns 14
SubjectAuthorDate Posted
elizabethlevi... 2 Apr 2009 8:14AM GMT 
sammie82 4 Mar 2010 7:28PM GMT 
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