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General John Sullivan - Revolutionary War

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Re: General John Sullivan - Revolutionary War

Posted: 29 Jan 2004 9:40PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 30 Mar 2004 9:33PM GMT
Surnames: Sullivan
General John Sullivan Timeline -

7 Feb 1740 - General John Sullivan born to Margery Browne and John Owen Sullivan

29 Aug 1771 - Son George Sullivan born to John Sullivan (age 31) and Lydia Worshester. Sullivan, George (1771-1838) of Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H. Son of John Sullivan; nephew of James Sullivan. Born in Durham, Strafford County, N.H., August 29, 1771. Member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1805, 1813; New Hampshire state attorney general, 1805-06, 1815-35; U.S. Representative from New Hampshire at-large, 1811-13; member of New Hampshire state senate 2nd District, 1814-16; Presidential Elector for New Hampshire, 1828. Died in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., April 14, 1838. Interment at Winter Street Cemetery, Exeter, N.H. See also: congressional biography.

1774 - John Sullivan - Delegate to Continental Congress from New Hampshire, 1774, 1780-81

1775 - Daughter Mary Sullivan born to John Sullivan (age 35) and Lydia Worshester.

22 June 1775 - John Sullivan (age 35) becomes Brigadier-General Continental Army

21 December 1775 General John Sullivan, having encamped in Cambridge at Winter Hill, waits his fate in the planned attack agianst the British batteries occupying Bunker Hill

1775 - Brigadier General Sullivan (age 35) commanded left wing of army

9th August, 1776 - John Sullivan (age 36) becomes Major-General

1776 - Peter Bryant Bruin Major and Aide-de-Camp, John Skey Eustace (Ga) Aide-de-Camp, to General Sullivan (age 36)

On June 1 [1776] - Washington's six additional regiments arrived under the command of Major General John Sullivan (age 36) of New Hampshire. The next day Thomas died, and Sullivan took command.

4 June 1776 - Colonel Thompson was promoted a brigadier general March 1, 1776, and on the 19th of March he relieved General Charles Lee of the command of the forces at New [p.191] York. In April following he was ordered to Canada, to reenforce General John Thomas. He met the remnant of the Northern army on its retreat from Quebec, and assumed the chief command, yielding the same on the 4th of June to General John Sullivan (age 36) , by whose orders he made a disastrous attack on the enemy at Three Rivers, and was there made a prisoner.

June 13 [1776] - General Sullivan (age 36) retreated to Ile-aux-Nois

14 August 1776 - Alexandria Scammell (NH.) Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan (age 36)

14 August 1776, to 12th June, 1779 - Lewis Morris Jr. (N. Y.) Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan (age 36)

15 August 1776 - William Stephens Smith (N. Y.) Major and Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan (age 36)

9th October, 1776 - Edward Sherburne (N. H.) Major and Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan (age 36)

August 29 (Quaker Hill) - General Sullivan (age 36) and troops repulsed the Bristish forces

August 1776 - In the center of the American line, about the same number of German troops skirmished with the Massachusetts and Connecticutt soldiers under Major General John Sullivan (age 36) of New Hampshire, who had managed to avoid censure for his awful performance in Canada.

August 1776 - General Sullivan (age 36) taken prisoner at Long Island

[August 30, 1776] But Admiral Howe was not interested in preventing an American retreat. On the contrary, he was once more pursing a negotiated peace. Aboard his flagship, HMS Eagle, he had spent much of the previous day in conversation with the two captured American generals, William Alexander and John Sullivan. He got nowhere with Alexander, whose family had seen savage British repression of Scottish revolts. But John Sullivan was more naive and emotional. He eagerly agreed to become his Lordship's emissary to the Continental Congress.

December 1776 - General Sullivan (age 36) exchanged

7 August 1777 - In early August, Sullivan is overcome with bleeding ulcers and writes to Washington: Hanover

27 September 1777 - John White (Pa) volunteer Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan (age 37)

9 November 1777 - Nicholas Van Cortlandt (N. Y.) Major and Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan (age 37)

1777 - Patrick Cogan, an officer of the First New Hampshire Regiment in the Revolution, who served under General John Sullivan (age 37) at Ticonderoga

1778 - General Titcomb's brigade in the unsuccessful campaign of General Sullivan (age 38) against the British at Newport, Rhode Island

1778 ? - Rufus King served in the Revolutionary War; became aide to General Sullivan (age 38) in his expedition to Rhode Island

9 August 1778 Rhode Island Adventure - the day after Sullivan (age 38) had ferried his army from the mainland to the north end of Newport's Aquidneck Island, the French discovered that Admiral Howe's fleet was approaching from New York.

9 September 1778 - Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General Sullivan (age 38), and to the officers and troops of his command, for their fortitude and bravery displayed in the action of August 29th (Quaker Hill), in which they repulsed the British forces and maintained the field."

1779 - Jonathon Dayton accompanied General Sullivan (age 39) on his western expedition

1779 - Joseph Brant, (Thayendanega) accompanied the expedition from Fort Niagara against General Sullivan (age 39)

In 1779 the Americans retaliated with overwhelming force, sending Major General John Sullivan (age 39) at the head of the 4,000 - man army into the heart of Iroquis country.

14 October 1779 - "Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General Sullivan (age 39) and the brave officers and soldiers under his command, for effectually executing an important expedition against such of the Indian nations as, encouraged by the councils of his Britannic majesty, had perfidiously waged an unprovoked and cruel war against these United States, laid waste many of their defenseless towns, and with savage barbarity slaughtered the inhabitants thereof."

30 November 1779 - General John Sullivan (age 39) resigned

1780 - 1781 - John Sullivan - Delegate to Continental Congress from New Hampshire, 1774, 1780-81

1782 -1786 - John Sullivan New Hampshire state attorney general

1785 - 1786 - John Sullivan member of New Hampshire Governor's Council

1786 - 1788 - John Sullivan President of New Hampshire

June 1788 became the month of decision. Virginia's convention met on the second, New York's on the seventeenth and New Hampshire's on the eighteeneth. Although they started latest, the Granite Staters surged to the head of the pack because they had thrashed out a lot of disagreements in their earlier convention - and because Governor John Sullivan (age 48) had gone from mediocre general to first-class politician. During the months of adjournment, he and his right-hand man, John Langdon, had worked tirelessly to change minds and hearts. One June 21, only three days after the delegates reconvened, the Constitution prevailed 57 to 46.

1789 - 1790 - John Sullivan federal judge

23 January 1795 - General John Sullivan (age 54) died

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Materials for a History of the Family of John Sullivan of Berwick, New England
and of the O'Sullivans of Ardea, Ireland
Chiefly Collected by the Late Thomas Coffin Amory
with a Pedigree of O'Sullivan Beare by Sir J Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster
Printed for Private Distribution
3/906
Cambridge:
John Wilson and Son
University Press
1893

The Family of John Sullivan Page 149
John Sullivan of Berwick, New England, and his Children, Grandchildren, and Great-Grandchildren

John Sullivan
b. Limerick, Ireland, June 17, 1690.
d. Berwick, Me., Saturday, June 20, 1795.
Was probably christened Owen, and so called until he came to America. Emigrated about 1723. Landed at York, Maine. Settled at Berwick, where he farmed, drew deeds, and was the schoolmaster until he was ninety years of age.
m. about 1735
Margery Browne,
b. Cork, Ireland, 1714
d. Berwick, Me., 1801.

First Generation.

Benjamin
b. about 1736
Served in the Royal Navy, and was lost at sea before the American Revolution. No marriage mentioned.

Daniel
b. Berwick, Me., about 1738
d. 1781
Settled at New Bristol, now Sullivan, Me. Served as Captain in the Revolutionary Army in the War of Independence. His house at Sullivan was burned by the British, and he taken from it to spend six months int eh Jersey prison-ship. He died on his way home after his release.
m. 1st York, Me., Mar 24, 1758, Anne Paul of York. She and her child died early
m. 2nd Fort Pownall, Waldo Co., Me., June 17, 1765, Abigail Bean (dau of John Bean of York, who, with others, obtained the grant of land where Sullivan now is.)

John
b. Berwick, Me., Feb 17, 1740
d. Durham, N.H., Jan 23, 1795
Major General in the Revolutionary Army during the War of Independence. First President (Governor) of New Hampshire. Practised law at Durham.
m. Lydia Worchester
b. Oct 14, 1738
d. Mar 22, 1820

James
b. Berwick, Me., 1744
d. Boston, Mass, Dec 10, 1808
Judge of the Superior Court, Attorney General, and in 1808 Governor of Massachusetts. Lived at Saco, Me., Groton, Mass., and Boston.
m. 1st, Mehetable Odiorne of Durham
b. Durham, N. H., June 26, 1748
d. Boston, Mass., Jan. 26, 1786
m. 2d, Martha Langdon
b. 17
d. Boston, Aug. 26, 1812
No children. She had before married, 1st Barrell; 2d, Simpson.

Mary
b. Berwick, Me., 1752
d. Strafford, N.H., autumn 1827
m. May 4, 1768
Theophilus Hardy of Durham
Lived at Durham, near her brother General Sullivan.

Ebenezer
b. Berwick, Me, 1753
d. Charleston, S.C., 1799.
Served as Captain in the Revolutionary Army in the War of Independence. Practised law at South Berwick
m. Abigail Cotton of Portsmouth, N.H.
________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.dnai.com/~meehan/sullivan/to1800.html#490 -

1777: Reprimand from G. Washington

After some hard times Washington had met his first military successes at Trenton and Princeton, the previous winter of 1776. General John Sullivan from New Hampshire had been with Washington and had fought well and hard at these triumphant moments.

True, Sullivan's military career had not gone uncriticized. Retreats rarely draw glory, and Sullivan's leadership of the agonizing American retreat from Canada in the summer of 1776, if conducted with bravery and toughness, was a retreat nonetheless. More seriously, Sullivan's forces had been soundly defeated at Long Island in August of 1776, and Sullivan had been captured.

Prior to his exchange and resumption of command under Washington, he had conveyed peace offers from Lord Howe to Congress, which had led to suspicions about his loyalties among some radicals and among others who didn't like him.

Like many men George Washington wisely sought association with others who balanced his own qualities. At his worst Washington could be dour and overcautious and perhaps on that basis found the presence of the vain, mercurial, and sometimes reckless General John Sullivan of New Hampshire a contrast. But there were limits, and when in early March 1777 after passing on various promotions of his senior commanders Washington received a testy letter from Sullivan saying that "thought I never wish to complain I can't help the Disagreeable feeling So common to mankind when they find themselves slighted and Neglected" and begging Washington to tell him his faults so that he might quit the army and "Rid the Continent of an officer who is unworthy to Trust with command." Washington was annoyed. Sullivan's letter was whining in tone. It amounted to blackmail. Washington's reply is perhaps one of history's most memorable, stern and paternal reprimands:

Morristown 15, March, 1777.

"Do not, my dear General Sullivan, torment yourself any longer with imaginary slights, and involve others in the perplexities you feel on that score. No other officer of rank in the whole army has so often conceived himself neglected, slighted, and ill treated as you have done, and none I am sure has had less cause than yourself to entertain such ideas. Mere accidents, things which have occurred in the common course of service, have been considered by you as designed affronts. But pray, Sir, in what respect did General Greene's late command at Fort Lee differ from his present command at Baskenridge, or from yours at Chatham? And what kind of separate command had General Putnam at New York? I never heard of any except his commanding there ten days before my arrival from Boston, and one day after I had left it for Haerlem Heights, as senior officer. In like manner at Philadelphia, how did his command there differ from the one he has at Princeton, and wherein does either vary from yours at Chatham? Are thee any peculiar emoluments or honors to be reaped in the one case and not in the other? No. Why, then, these unreasonable, these unjustifiable suspicions? Suspicions which can answer no other end than to poison your own happiness and add vexation to that of others. General Health, it is true, was ordered to Peekskill, so was General Spencer, by the mere chapter of accidents (being almost in the country), to Providence, to watch the motions of the fleet then hovering in the Sound. What followed after to either or both was more the effect of chance than design.

Your ideas and mine respecting separate commands have but little analogy. I know of but one separate command, properly so called, and that is in the Northern Department, and General Sullivan, General St. Clair, or any other general officer at Ticonderoga will be considered in no other light, whilst there is a superior officer in the department, than if they were placed at Chatham, Baskenridge, or Princeton. But I have not time to dwell upon subjects of this kind. In quitting it I shall do it with an earnest exhortation that you will not suffer yourself to be teased with evils that only exist in the imagination, and with slights that have no existence at all, keeping in mind, at the same time, that if distant armies are to be formed there are several gentlemen before you in point of rank who have a right to claim a preference."

Could Washington continue to depend on Sullivan as one of his highest commanders? True, Sullivan had shown initiative; the first battle of the war had been Sullivan's raid on Fort William and Mary near Portsmouth. In Boston in 1776 Sullivan had served well during the siege. Sullivan's dislike of the English was perhaps typical of the Irish and Washington might capitalize on that and did by appointing Sullivan to lead a celebration of Saint Patrick's Day. But then there had been the debacle at Trenton. Congress had been angrily seeking someone to blame for that. Sullivan had been captured and had returned with messages from the British commander Harve. Susceptible to flattery, mercurial in temper, Sullivan's persistence and loyalty could be questioned. So Washington was in a quandary. He might cut Sullivan off, throw him to the dogs. Sullivan was not a brilliant commander; most of his military learning came from reading books. In that sense he was probably replaceable. But on the other hand Sullivan, better at beginnings than endings, overly sensitive, quick to pout and quit and feel sorry for himself when other men might continue with the task. But the man was spirited, and spirit was in short supply with winter. And if Sullivan himself was short in combat experience, he certainly came from a fighting tradition. Washington knew he needed Sullivan.

At the same time it must be said that 1777 had not been an easy year for John Sullivan.. He had been captured at Long Island, seduced by Howe to carrying peace overtures to Congress. Released, he resumed command. The victories at Trenton and Princeton should have gone a long way toward cleaning up any suspicions of his loyalty, competence, and bravery. But in matters of revolutionary war it was not that easy.

Then there had been matters of health. Days in winter camp made Sullivan restless; he thought too much. Sullivan's stomach had been bothering him. There were opportunities to brood. On February 22 John Adams wrote to him complaining that though his constituents were paying for a great army, they were not receiving their money's worth in good news. They didn't even know where the army was. Adams addressed Sullivan: "In truth, my old friend, I wish to hear, more than I do, of the vigilance, activity, enterprise and valor of some of our New England generals." The eighteenth century was well tuned to the subtle insult. Sullivan, a sensitive man, could sense Adams' true attitude toward him. To Benjamin Rush, who hated Washington and his generals, whom he considered a band of drunkards, Adams had the previous fall been more blunt on the subject of Sullivan -- he wished that Sullivan had taken the first bullet at Long Island. Meanwhile there were complaints from various southern gentlemen about the performance of the northern armies. To these, Sullivan responded:

I have always had an aversion to fighting on paper for I have never yet found a man well versed in that kind of fighting that would practice any other. To Sullivan, Southern valor appears to be a composition of boasting and conceit. As for the fighting spirit of Yankees, No men fight better or write worse than the Yankees of which this letter will be good evidence.

Arriving back in New Hampshire on a short leave (3/20) to take care of pressing business at home Sullivan found soldiers, ordered to Ticonderoga by Washington, unequipped with either clothing or arms. His complaints about the condition of arms supplied were answered by accusations that the soldiers and officers were failing to care for what was supplied to them. Meanwhile news from Connecticut that Howe's army, aided by the "neutral gentry" was achieving early successes against the American militia, caused Sullivan to fume against the tory traitors, "ungenerous animals" now "rearing their heads in every part of the continent." Sullivan angrily urged the NH Committee of Safety to rid the country of them..

In early June, (6/2) the British made another attempt to win Sullivan over to the king's cause: "You will be one of the first sacrifices to the resentment and justice of government, your family will be ruined, and you must die with ignominy; or if you should be so happy as to escape, you will drag along a tedious life of poverty, misery, and continual apprehensions in a foreign land," an old Tory friend wrote to him, suggesting that it was not too late for Sullivan to tread back the steps he had already taken and bring New Hampshire back to king and country.

In early June Sullivan received a letter from the gadfly Benjamin Rush complaining that a Major Sullivan under General Sullivan's command had beaten one of Rush's servants, and that Sullivan was clearly delinquent in not effecting proper punishment. The same day he received a letter from his brother Ebenezer, a British prisoner of war, begging that the use his influence to arrange for his redemption.

On the military front it was a harrowing time for Washington's generals. Howe's forces outnumbered their own, and they continually expected an attack. Many days passed when Sullivan expected that the next day would be the one when he would fall in battle -- gloriously he hoped. But Howe's movements were oddly desultory and apparently indecisive. It was an atmosphere of continuing tension, in which slight disputes were liable to be magnified.

Some time in June, Sullivan, Nathaniel Greene, and Henry Knox discovered that a Frenchman, Philippe du Coudray, had been appointed major general by Congress -- a foreigner given a superior position to them, who had been carrying the burnt of the resistance. The three generals wrote an angry and to some, disrespectful, letter to Congress complaining of the appointment. On July 1, Sullivan wrote to Hancock about the rumor of du Coudray's appointment: "If this report be true I shall be under the disagreeable necessity of quitting the service." The next day found him begging Washington's influence to relieve his brother Ebenezer of the "amazing difficulties" attendant on his role as a paroled prisoner of the British.

On July 5 he again threatens to resign in a letter to Washington, explaining that he had been challenged to a duel by a medical officer of lower rank as a result of some argument over medical services. The officer had backed down but Sullivan then came under criticism of his fellow generals for accepting a challenge from an inferior. Sullivan is in a frenzy -- should he accept invitations to duel from everyone? ("I am by no means an enemy to duels; I most sincerely wish that Congress had encouraged instead of prohibiting them.") How should he handle such insults from majors? From sergeants?

On July 7 Congress resolves that the complaint of Sullivan, Greene, and Knox regarding the Frenchman's appointment constitutes "an invasion of the liberties of the people, and indicating a want of confidence in the justice of Congress" -- the generals were invited to either apologize for "so dangerous a tendency" or retire. Meanwhile he had the day-to-day problems of a restless and half-clothed, barefoot, and inadequately armed body of troops to deal with -- regular desertions, demands for leave, incidents of misbehavior or theft of civilian goods by the soldiers, quarrels and discipline problems among the men, and the constant half-seen shifting of Howe's forces. Two of his men, Brown and Murphy, having been convicted by court martial for stealing civilian goods while drunk and ordered by Washington to be executed, Sullivan received a single pardon to be issued to a man of his choosing at the moment of execution. Sullivan, having at the urging of one of his officers, chose Murphy as the one to be saved, his pardon to be announced after Brown had been executed before the assembled troops; only, at the moment the nose was being placed around Brown's neck, another officer rode up to say that Brown had been an innocent, albeit

drunken bystander to the whole incident... In early August, Sullivan is overcome with bleeding ulcers and writes to Washington: Hanover August 7th, 1777 Dear General I Joined my Division Three Days Since but am Exceeding weak & what is Still more afflicting I am Extremely apprehensive that I shall never perfectly Recover Doctr Jones says that my Excessive Fatigue has So much Injured The whole nervous System that nothing but a Long Continuation of the Cold Bath accompanied with a Strict Regimen can Restore me to a perfect State of Health -- all Solid Food & all Drink Except water must be abstained from. Spirits I must never again use but with the greatest Caution (if at all) as he Conceives that the free use of them has in great measure assisted in bringing on my Complaint & if continued will always have the Same Effect. This being the fourth time I have Bled he apprehends That the Bleeding has almost become habitual & will (if not prevented in the above mentioned manner) prove Fatal. I will however do all in my power to perform my Duty in the Division So Long as my new mode of Living will afford me strength sufficient for the purpose -- hand, Sullivan's rebuke to the officer was so severe that the officer deserted to the British and complaints from Washington's staff that he wasn't filing proper reports of his troop strength. Meanwhile Sullivan's published remarks vaguely impugned the loyalty of General St. Claire, who had withdrawn his troops from Ticonderoga in July, resulted in a demand from St. Claire for a "clarification" of the strong suggestion that satisfaction would be demanded in the absence of such an explanation -- "it is therefore left to yourself to explain, and that Explanation, whatever it is, I expect you will be good enough to send me by the Bearer. The Gentlemen is one of my Aids de Camp and will wait for it." The August 22 raid was very much in the Sullivan style -- daring, but energetic, but not successful, with 25 American casualties and over a hundred of the raiders captured. Though Sullivan's troops killed or wounded many of the British troops and Tory sympathizers, troop discipline was poor and many were trapped on the island as a result of confusion over the timing and location of boats meant to carry them back to New Jersey. Though Washington generally approved of the raid, he consented to Congressional demands that an inquiry into Sullivan's conduct be made, though Washington, needing Sullivan's services in the upcoming confrontation with Howe's army, which was moving toward Philadelphia.

Thursday, September 11, found Sullivan commanding the right wing of Washington's forces. Confused or faulty intelligence resulted in Howe's troops outflanking the Americans, and the collapse of Sullivan's part of the line. Sullivan, unable to rally his men, joined the adjacent division where his horse was shot out from under him and, according to one officer "his uniform bravery, coolness, and intrepidity, both in the heat of battle, rallying and forming the troops when broke from their ranks, appeared to me to be truly consistent with, or rather exceeded, any idea I had ever of the greatest soldier." Others, especially North Carolina's Thomas Burke, accused Sullivan's blundering as being the cause of the loss of the battle. The defeat occurred at a time when Congress was growing impatient with the performance of Washington's army, and sullivan was suspended from the army. For many months afterwards, he found him dealing with depositions and criticism and hearings. From all of these he would be ultimately acquitted.

70
1778: Ailments of General John Sullivan

In early August, Sullivan is overcome with bleeding ulcers and writes to Washington: Hanover August 7th, 1777

Dear General

I Joined my Division Three Days Since but am Exceeding weak & what is Still more afflicting I am Extremely apprehensive that I shall never perfectly Recover Doctr Jones says that my Excessive Fatigue has So much Injured The whole nervous System that nothing but a Long Continuation of the Cold Bath accompanied with a Strict Regimen can Restore me to a perfect State of Health -- all Solid Food & all Drink Except water must be abstained from. Spirits I must never again use but with the greatest Caution (if at all) as he Conceives that the free use of them has in great measure assisted in bringing on my Complaint & if continued will always have the Same Effect. This being the fourth time I have Bled he apprehends That the Bleeding has almost become habitual & will (if not prevented in the above mentioned manner) prove Fatal. I will however do all in my power to perform my Duty in the Division So Long as my new mode of Living will afford me strength sufficient for the purpose -- In August, Sullivan was troubled with insubordination from one of his officers on the one hand, Sullivan's rebuke to the officer was so severe that the officer deserted to the British and complaints from Washington's staff that he wasn't filing proper reports of his troop strength. Meanwhile Sullivan's published remarks vaguely impugned the loyalty of General St. Claire, who had withdrawn his troops from Ticonderoga in July, resulted in a demand from St. Claire for a "clarification" of the strong suggestion that satisfaction would be demanded in the absence of such an explanation -- "it is therefore left to yourself to explain, and that Explanation, whatever it is, I expect you will be good enough to send me by the Bearer. The Gentlemen is one of my Aids de Camp and will wait for it."

The August 22 raid was very much in the Sullivan style -- daring, but energetic, but not successful, with 25 American casualties and over a hundred of the raiders captured. Though Sullivan's troops killed or wounded many of the British troops and Tory sympathizers, troop discipline was poor and many were trapped on the island as a result of confusion over the timing and location of boats meant to carry them back to New Jersey.

Though Washington generally approved of the raid, he consented to Congressional demands that an inquiry into Sullivan's conduct be made, though Washington, needing Sullivan's services in the upcoming confrontation with Howe's army, which was moving toward Philadelphia.

Thursday, September 11, found Sullivan commanding the right wing of Washington's forces. Confused or faulty intelligence resulted in Howe's troops outflanking the Americans, and the collapse of Sullivan's part of the line. Sullivan, unable to rally his men, joined the adjacent division where his horse was shot out from under him and, according to one officer "his uniform bravery, coolness, and intrepidity, both in the heat of battle, rallying and forming the troops when broke from their ranks, appeared to me to be truly consistent with, or rather exceeded, any idea I had ever of the greatest soldier." Others, especially North Carolina's Thomas Burke, accused Sullivan's blundering as being the cause of the loss of the battle. The defeat occurred at a time when Congress was growing impatient with the performance of Washington's army, and sullivan was suspended from the army. For many months afterwards, he found him dealing with depositions and criticism and hearings. From all of these he would be ultimately acquitted.
_____________________________________

Taken from http://www.dnai.com/~meehan/sullivan/to1800.html#490 -

1776: Charms Abigail Adams, But Not Her Husband

On December 21, 1775 General John Sullivan, having encamped in Cambridge at Winter Hill, waits his fate in the planned attack agianst the British batteries occupying Bunker Hill. Old Borwas and Jack Frost are now at work building a bridge over the Charles River, which when complete will be the access to Charlestown which Sullivan is determined to retake, or perish in the attempt; Sullivan would have learned this river crossing trick from his father, Master John Sullivan of Berwick, a scholarly Irishman who would have been familiar with Anteneas' history, in which the Romans were much impressed with the Gaulish military strategy of crossing frozen river, a matter about which they natually knew little. Sullivan writes to John Adams, urging him to exhort the those timid slaves in Washington to abandon their moderation. He adds that when an opportunity to fight presented itself if I should not have courage myself, I should do all in my power to encourage others to join the fight. These kind of comments did not win Sullivan friends in Congress.

Benjamin Rush, who hated Sullivan, claimed that John Adams hoped that Sullivan would be among the first to get a ball through his head. But Abigail Adams,visiting Sullivan at his post in Cambridge that December, reported to her husband that Sullivan had a "warm constitution", that he was "when once roused not very easily lulled," but otherwise easy, social, and popular with the men.

Meanwhile Sullivan was growing impatient with the pace of the war and the slow freezing of the Charles. On December 29 he tried to mount a suprise attack by walking across the frozen river at night but the ice began to crack, or, some say, a musket discharged accidentally, and his 300 man force had to retreat.

Sullivan raged and fumed, quarrelled about provisions and money, gave urgent orders and advice; writing to one officer in New York he noted Your men are frequently to be cautioned against offering any insult or abuse to the Indians, as one act of rudeness in a soldier might involve America in a dangerous war with a savage enemy. But Sullivan never got another chance to retake Bunker Hill. When he stormed the hill in March he found, fortress defended by lifeless straw sentries. General Howe had slipped out of Sullivan's grasp, retreated from Boston. According to his biographer Charles Whittemore Sullivan was brave to the extent of folly, ambitious,desirous of popularity, but inclined to be arrogant and unduly sensitive.

In fact the details of the battle of Bunker Hill have been controversial. In 1825 William Sullivan took the deposition of some forty Americans who claimed to have been survivors of that famous event. Critics disdained the attempt to revive the reputation of the Irish-American general, who was widely disdained among American historians. The effort to document Sullivans role at Bunker Hill was described as a tale that "drew more on the imagination than was fit for historical evidence."
_______________________________________________________

1895: Satin, Lace, and Diamonds

April 25 1895:

The architects, Mckim, Mead, and White, gave a reception this evening in their beautiful Public Library to Abbot and Sargent, the painters, whose decorative work was unveiled for the first time. There were two hundred guests, men and women, forty of whom came over from New York for the night. It was a splendid affair of brilliant jewels and costumes which can never be repeated, for the building now becomes the People's Palace, making further fashinable exclusion there impossible. An orchestra played on the landing of the marble staircase, up and down which the pretty women strolled in all their glory of satin, lace, and diamonds. It happened to be a very worm night, and through the open windows of the court the fountain flashed and sparkled, throwing its tallest jet almost to the roof....

Sullivan, grandson of General John Sullivan, was a gentlman, playwright, former tutor to Henry Cabot Lodge, something of a dandy and social hanger-on.
_______________________________________________

SULLIVAN-L Archives

From: "Laurie Sullivan" <laura95242@hotmail.com>
Subject: John Sullivan" Revolutionary War Warrants issued to Virginia veterans (Kentucky)
Date: Sat, 01 Dec 2001 03:33:26 -0800

Here's some info before I lose it;)

Sullivan researchers for NC Sullivan/Sullivent etc., is this OUR John
Sullivan? This links him to VA...before NC...any ideas?

** I tried running searches for different versions of 'Sullivan' and all
were rejected. If you try, read the instructions that state 'a minimum of
four characters must be used, i.e. sull or suli or sili...).

Laurie

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All 'Sullivans' that were listed:
REVOLUTIONARY WAR WARRANTS QUERY RESULTS BY VETERAN

Printable Results
Page 1

Warrant Veteran Assignee

3259.0 Sullivan, Craven
3355.0 Sullivan, Frederick Clay, Thomas
1364.0 Sullivan, John

http://www.sos.state.ky.us/intranet/REvlist.asp
------------------------------------------------------------
Detailed Information About
Sullivan, John

Warrant ID 1364.0 Veteran Name Sullivan, John
Assignee Acres 200 Years 3
Rank Corporal Unit Virginia State Line
Branch Unknown Date 07/12/1783

Authorized WTRM 71*
Note

Revolutionary War Warrants
Did your ancestor receive a bounty land warrant for service in the Revolutionary War? Our database can help answer that question.The database -- which allows you to search by warrant number, veteran name, and immediate assignee -- will point you to the list of Virginia veterans who received
military warrants for use in the Kentucky Military District, located south of Green River….Our database is limited to Revolutionary War Warrants issued to Virginia veterans. The database does not include other types of warrants, such as French & Indian War, Treasury, Preemption or Commissioner's Certificates.

http://www.sos.state.ky.us/intranet/revwarwar.asp

--------------------------------------------------

There are links on the main page that have interesting information, such as
'REVOLUTIONARY WAR MILITARY DISTRICT' history (map included):

http://www.sos.state.ky.us/ADMIN/LANDOFFI/militarydist.asp

Main page for the above info, State of Kentucky:
http://www.sos.state.ky.us/ADMIN/LANDOFFI/landoffice.asp
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Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 452

Made his transit appear more to be wished than dreaded. He continued to converse sensibly till seven days before his death, when his speech failed him. After this, he seemed to take but little notice of anything that passed; in an apparent state of devotion, buoyed up above every fear, and apparently insensible to pain, he met the king of terrors with a fortitude that must have appeared surprising to a person who had not experienced the happiness of a well-grounded hope. Apparently sensible to the last moment, he closed his eyes without a sigh or groan.

“His integrity, uprightness in his dealings, his benevolence and hospitality, together with his instructive conversation and desire to be useful to mankind, insured him the veneration and esteem of all that knew him.”

Mrs Sullivan had come with him to this country as a child, and when she grew up to womanhood became his wife. If the tradition be true that her name was Margaret Browne, she may possibly have been of a family with which his own had been repeatedly connected in marriage - that of Kenmare. The representative of that family, compromised by adherence to the Stuarts, was a the time in exile and poverty. She possessed great personal beauty and force of character, and to her influence as well as to that of their father may be ascribed the energy and vigor which made their children distinguished. She survived him several years, dying in 1801, at the age of eighty-severn.

The children of Master Sullivan were -

Benjamin, an officer in the British Navy. He was lost at sea, some years before the separation of the colonies from the mother country.
Daniel, born about 1738, married Miss Bean, and established himself, in 1765, at the head of Frenchman’s Bay, in Maine, at what is now a flourishing seaport deriving from him the name of Sullivan. He erected several mills, built vessels, and was prosperous. In the Revolutionary war he was energetic and devoted, raising and commanding a force of minute men, and by his activity and fearlessness did good service to the cause. In 1779, he was with his company at the siege of Castine, and after returning home he kept them in readiness for action, inflicting many heavy blows upon the enemy. The English and tories made several attempts to capture him, which were ineffectual, from the constant vigilance of the patriots. But one stormy night in February, 1781, a British war vessel anchored below the town, and landed a large force of sailors and marines. The house was silently invested, and Captain Sullivan, aroused from his slumbers, found his bed surrounded by armed men. He was hurried to the boat, and his dwelling fired so suddenly that the children were with difficulty saved by their mother and the hired man who lived in the family. Take to Castine, his liberty and further protection from harm were tendered him, on condition he took the oath of allegiance to the king. Rejecting these proposals, he was carried prisoner to New York, and confined in that dreadful hulk, the Jersey prison ship, which has been paralleled in our day by Belle Isle and Andersonville. Here the pestilence, engendered by confinement and the tender mercies of Provost Cunningham, did its work, and he died in April, 1782.. His only son James married Miss Preble, but left no
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Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 453

children. From his daughters have sprung many descendants residing in Sullivan or its neighborhood.

John, born at Berwick, Februdary 18, 1740. This is no place for any detailed account of a career which demands a separate volume, a tribute to his memory which we trust some competent pen of New Hampshire will yet pay. The friend of Washington, and, after Washington, Greene and perhaps Putnam, the most able and active military commander of the revolution, his service as a statesman in Congress in 1774-5, 1780-1781, as chief magistrate of New Hampshire in 1786, 1787, and 1789, as President of the Convention to ratify the Federal Constitution in 1788, his professional life as Attorney General of his State and one of the most eloquent and successful members of its bar, would render his biography a suitable medium of communicating much historical lore connected with his State and the country.

In May, 1775, when many members of the Congress, who realized that independence was intended, hesitated, Mr. Dickinson moved a second petition to the King. This Mr. John Adams opposed; and when he sat down, Mr. Sullivan he says followed on the same side, in a strain of wit, reasoning and fluency even unusual for him, which inspired with terror those who favored conciliation. A few months before he had taken part in the capture of the fort at Portsmouth, carrying off some hundred of kegs of powder to Durham, a portion of which was concealed under the pulpit of the meeting-house near his own dwelling. On the green in front of the church, with other officers, he burnt his commission as Major from the British Crown, and, appointed Brigadier by the Congress when Washington was elected commander in chief, went with him to Cambridge, where his brigade and that of General Greene formed Lee’s Division - the left wing of the army investing Boston. After the evacuation of that place in March, 1776, he was sent to take command of the army in Canada, discharging a difficult duty to the satisfaction of his chief, and receiving from the officers under him, many of whom were among the most distinguished in the subsequent campaigns, expressions of the most gratifying esteem and affection. By his vigorous resistance for three hours on the left wing at Long Island, with the gallantry of Lord Sterling on the right, the enemy were kept bay and our army saved from destruction. Both generals were captured, but soon afterwards exchanged. Sullivan, who had been created Major General, was active during the autumn in Chester, and after Gen. Charles Lee was taken prisoner, led the army to join Washington, and Christmas evening, in command of the right wing, crossed the Delaware, contributing largely to our success at Trenton and Princeton. During the winter with inferior forces he kept the enemy in their lines, protecting our own at Morristown. In July, he made a descent on Staten Island, commanded the right wing, Sept. 11 at Brandywine, and Oct 4 at Germantown. He passed the winter at Valley Forge, commanded the ensuing summer in Rhode Island and at the siege of Newport, and in 1779 the expedition against the Six Nations. Had his request for adequate supplies been granted, the ulterior object of the campaign, penetration into Canada by Niagara, might have been accomplished. When the Federal government was organized, his health had become much shattered, and though able to perform his duties as one
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Taken from genealogy.com on October 9, 2002 - Series 2, Volume 3, Master Sullivan of Berwick - His Ancestors and Descendants, Page 454

Of the Federal Judges, to which office he was appointed by Washington, he did not long survive, dying 28 January, 1795, in the fifty-fourth year of his age.

“If not tall, General S. was a person of commanding prescence, with dark eyes of remarkable brilliancy, and a fine voice. His manners were dignified, but easy and graceful, having a faculty of making each one in a company of many persons think he was a object of his particular attention. He was hospitable, fond of display, and prodigal of money. In his dealing he was honest, generous, and honorable. In his temper he was ordinarily mild and tranquil, and as far removed from petulance as a man could be; but when irritated he was stormy and violent.” Several historical notices of him have appeared from time to time, that of greatest length being by Peabody, in Spark’s American Biography.

General Sullivan married about 1760, Miss Lydia Worcester, who was born Oct. 14, 1737, and surviving her husband, died March 21, 1820, in the eighty-third year of her age, in the house in Durham which he had purchased in 1765, and always occupied, and which still remains in a good state of preservation. Behind the house, in a family cemetary on the farm which was of considerable extent, they were buried. He left a daughter Lydia, born 17 March, 1763, who married Judge Steele, Sup. Jud. Ct., N.H. He had also three sons: John, b 29 Oct, 1767; died s.p. at Georgetown, S.C., July, 1796. George, born 29 Aug., 1771, died 14 June 1838, H.C. 1790, same class as his brothers. In 1805 he was a member of the State Legislature; in 1811, in U. S. Congress; and for 21 years was Attorney General. As an eloquent advocate he is said to have been unsurpassed in New England, and took high rank in his profession as a sound lawyer. He m. Clarissa Lamson. John, his eldest son, born 8 May, 1800, d. 17 Nov., 1862. From 1848 till his death, he held the office of Attorney General, N.H., which had been long filled by his father and grandfather. He married Olivia Rowe, and left children.

4. James, b 22 April, 1744, d. 8 Dec 1808; m 1, Hetty Odiorne, b 26 June 1748, d. 26 Jan. 1786, dau of William Odiorne (son of Jotham, S.J.O., N.H.) by Avis, dau. of Dr. Hugh Adams, by Susan Winburne; 2, Martha, sister of Gov. John Landon, d Aug 26, 1812. In 1770 he was King’s Attorney for York; 1774, in Provincial Congress; 1776, Judge Supreme Court; 1784 and 1785, Delegate to Continental Congress, member Mass. Leg.; 1787 in Governor’s Concil; 1788, Judge of Probate; 1790-1807, Attorney General; 1796, on commission for determining Eastern Boundary; 1804, Elector of President; 1807 and 1808, Governor of Massachusetts. For other particulars see Amory’s Life of James Sullivan, 1858. He left six sons, of whom the eldest, James, b. June 6, 1760, d. June 29, 1787, from exposure in long continued cavalry service in the suppression of Shay’s rebellion. 2d, William, b 30 Nov., 1774, d. 3 Sept., 1889; m. 19 may, 1802, Sarah Webb, dau of Col. James Swan, b. May 19, 1782, d. 9 June, 1851. 8d, John, b Ap[ril 9, 1777, d. Feb. 10, 1865; m. Oct. 10, 1797, Elizabeth, dau of Hon. Thomas Russell, b. Aug. 17, 1779, d. April 16, 1854. 4th, Richard, b. June 17, 1779, d. Dec 1863; m. May 22, 1804, Sarah dau. of Hon. Thomas Russell, b. Dec. 1, 1786,
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Taken from gencircles.com on October 2, 2002 -

Owen O'SULLIVAN
Birth: 17 Jun 1690 in Ardea, Kerry Co., Ireland
Death: 20 Jun 1795 in Berwick, York Co., Massachusetts (Maine)
Sex: M
Father: Phillip O'SULLIVAN
Mother: Joanne McCARTHY
Also Known As: John Sullivan
Changed: 30 Jun 2002
Margery BROWNE (Wife)
Marriage: 1735
Children:
1. Benjamin SULLIVAN
2. Daniel SULLIVAN
3. John SULLIVAN
4. James SULLIVAN
5. Mary SULLIVAN
6. Ebenezer Moses SULLIVAN
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Taken from genealogy.com http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=008422&...
on October 2, 2002, The Prominent Families of the United States, Prominent Families, Page 265 -

Daniel O'Sullivan m. Sarah, daughter of Conor O'Brien, 2nd Viscount Clare, and had issue.

Owen O'Sullivan m. Mary, daughter of Owen McSweeney, and his issue

Phillip O'Sullivan (Major), of Ardea Co. Kerry; m Joan, dau of Dermod McCarthy, of Killoween, and had issue -
1. Patrick, whose descendents remain in Ireland
2. Owen, of whom later

Owen Sullivan (1690 - 1795), b., in Limerick, 17 June 1690; emigrated to America, 1723; settled in Berwick, Maine; m 1735, Margery Browne, and, by her (who d. 1801), had issue -
1. Benjamin b 1736; d.s.p.
2. Daniel, of Sullivan, Maine, b 1738; Captain in the Revolutionary War; m 1. Anne Paul; m. 2. Abigail Bean; d. 1781, leaving issue
3. John, of Durham, New Hampshire, b. 17 Feb 1740; Major-General in the Revolutionary Army; and first Governor of New Hampshire; m Lydia Worcester; d. 23 Jan. 1795, leaving issue.
4. James, of whom later.
5. Ebenezer, b 1753; Captain in the Revolutionary Army; m. Abigail Cotton; d 3 June, 1799, leaving issue.
1. Mary, b 1752; m., 1768, Theophilus Hardy; d. 1827, leaving issue.

He d. 20 June 1795

Jame Sullivan (1744 - 1808), of Boston, Mass., b 22 April 1744; LLD Harvard, 1780; member of the Provincial Council, 1775; Judge of the Superior Court 1776-1782; Attorney General, 1790-1807; Governor of Mass, 1807-1880; m 1. 22 Feb 1768 Mehatable, dau. of William Odiorne, and, by her (who d. 26 Jan. 1786), had issue -
1. James, b 6 Jan 1769; d.sp. 29 June 1787.
2. William b. 30 Nov 1774; Member of the Massachusetts State Legislature and Council for many years; Bridadier-General of Militia; LLD (Harvard), 1826; m., 1801 Sarah Webb Swan; d. 3 Sept 1839, leaving issue.
3. John Landon, of whom later.
4. Richard, b. 17 June 1779; m., 1804, Sarah Russell; d. 11 Dec 1861, leaving issue.
5. William Bant, b. 16 March 1781; d unm. 4 Dec 1806
6. George, b 21 Feb. 1783; m., 1809, Sarah Bowdoin Winthrop; d. 14 Dec. 1866, leaving issue.
1. Avis, b 8 Oct 1771; d. in infancy
2. Mehatable, b 29 July 1772; m. 1. 1793, James Cutler; m. 2. 1801, Jonathan Amory; d 24 March 1847, leaving issue.
3. Nancy, b 24 April 1784; d. in infancy.

He d. 10 Dec 1808

John Langdon Sullivan (1777 - 1865), of New York city; b 9 April 1777; M.D. Yale, 1837; m. 1. 10 Oct 1797, Elizabeth Russell, and, by her (who d. 16 April 1854), had issue: -
1. Thomas Russell, of whom later.
1. Elizabeth, b 27 Jan 1800; d num 16 Jan 1871.
2. Emily, b 4 Aug 1801; d unm 8 April 1880

He d. 10 Feb 1865, having m. 2, 1861, Susan Macash, who d.s.p
_____________________________________________________________


Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 04:03:34 -0600
From: "Larry Nicodemus" <m318619@mail.airmail.net> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book
To: "Angie Sullivan" <sullivanangie_spider@yahoo.com>
Subject: <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mail/clip.gif>; General Sullivan

Lydia: Information from DAR Record 17655.
Children:
i Margery Sullivan b. FEB 02 1761, died in infancy, d. APR 10 1764.
11. ii Lydia Sullivan b. MAR 17, 1763.
iii John Sullivan b. OCT 29, 1767, d. 1819, Baton Rouge, Lousiana. graduated from Harvard 1790. Died Unmarried.
iv James Sullivan b. SEP 01, 1768, d. JUL 1796, Georgetown, South Carolina. graduated from Harvard 1790. Died Unmarried
12. v George Sullivan b. AUG 29, 1771.
vi Margery Sullivan b. 1775, 1777.
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Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 04:03:34 -0600
From: "Larry Nicodemus" <m318619@mail.airmail.net> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book
To: "Angie Sullivan" <sullivanangie_spider@yahoo.com>
Subject: <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mail/clip.gif>; General Sullivan

Clearly, some of the most conspicuos and distinguished of our family are the Sullivans of New England. Patriarch of the family was Owen Sullivan, born circa 1714 in Limerick. Apparently nursing a great personal hurt, he left the nation swearing that he was going where they should never see or hear from him again, and they never did. He secured passage on a ship bound for America where he became a schoolteacher and farmer in a frontier town in Maine. He later married Cork-born Margery Browne, whom he had met on the voyage over. In 1796 the family received a letter from Ireland inquiring about relationship. The letter was received in 1796 from Philip O Sullivan.
"Sir, A grand Uncle of myne having gone to America about sixty years back or something over, whose relations suffered greatly by being without the means of finding out his doom, till now that by great look I am inform’d you are a son of his. If you find by the under acc that I have not been misinformed, I submissively expect you’ll let me know hyow you and the rest of his Children are. I am , S. yours, Respectfully, Philip O Sullivan, Ardea, May 16, 1796. An exact copy of his reply reads,: "I am the son of Major Philip O Sullivan of Ardea in the County of Kerrey and Parish of thouougaisty by the River of Kilmare and Barony of Glanorough in said County. His father was called Owen O Sullivan, originally Descendant from the second son of Daniel O Sullivan called Lord of (sic) Beer Heaven. He married with Mary MacSweney, Daughter of Col. Owen MacSweney of Musgrey, and sister to Capt. Edmond MacSweney, a noted man for anecdotes and witty syings. I heard often tell that my Grandfather had four Countesses to his Mothers and Grandmothers. How true that was or who they were I know not. My father died as they told me of an ulcer raised in his breast occasioned by a wound he received in France where he fought a duel with a French officer, and when he wounded his antigonist (sic) another run’d a sword through his back so that the point appeared at his breast. They were all a short lived family, they either died in the bloom or went out of the Nation. I never heard of any of the men kind to arrive at sixty and don’t remember but of one to be a live when I left the Nation. My mother’s name was Joane McCarthy, daughter to Dermod McCarthy of Killowen. She had three brothers and one sister, her mother’s name I forget but that she was Daughter to MacCarthy Reak of Carbery. Her oldest brother Col. Florence alas Mac finnin. He and his two brothers Capt. Charles and Capt. Owen went in the defence of the nation against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim (July 12, 1691). Florence had a son who retains the title of Mac finnin. Charles I just remember he had a charge of powder in his face at the Siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellina Sullivan of the Sullivans of Bannabe; his brother Owen married to Honora Mahony, daughter to Dinish Mahony of Droummere in the Barony of Dunkerrane or Cappenecussiss. He also died in the prime of life much lamented. They were short lived on both sides. but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is added to the length of mine. My mother’s sister was married to Dermod O Sullivan, eldest son of Daniel O Sullivan, Lord of Dunkerane. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the pretender in Scotland in the year 1745. That is all that I can say about my origin. But I shall conclude with a Latin sentence which occured to my mind at the conclusion of this genealogical narration." Owen lived to be 105 years old. It is written that in his later years he learned French. He was apparently quite functional physically and mentally up to the year before his death. He regularly saddled his own horse and rode the twenty five miles to visit his son John.
His son John was a three-time governor and was appointed a Major General of the Continental, lived in a house at 2 Newmarket Rd that was built in 1740. On Decembe 13, 1774, when Paul Revere announced "The British are coming", the Sons of Liberty made plans to attack and secure the stocked mmunition from the fort of William and Mary in the harbor of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Captaining the fort was John Cochran. Governor John Wentworth ordered its defense. By 3:00pm the following day four hundred patriots approached the fort. A shot was fired from within but before anything else could be done the fort was taken. One hundred barrels of gunpowder were taken. The following day Captain Langdon and Major John Sullivan retured with seventy men and removed cannons, muskets and other supplies. On January 6, 1776 the sons of Liberfty issued their own declaration of independence, a full six months before the official one.
On April 19, 1776, the commander of British forces in America, Lieutenant General Thomas Gage, ordered his troops to confiscate a store of gunpowder allegedly stockpiled by the rebels at Lexington and Concord. During a confrontation there were casualties. The British retreated back to Charlestown and by that time they suffered two hundred and seventy-three casualties. The following June the Iroquis league of Indians voted amongst themselves to fight the Americans on behalf of the English.
ON August 27, 1776, under the command of Major General Putnam at the Battle of Long Island, Sullivan was taken prisoner. He was taken aboard the "Eagle", the flagship of Lord Howe, the British Admiral. As was the pratice in those times, he was exchanged for another British officer of the same rank, General Richard Prescott. He rejoined Washington at Westchester.
On Christmas Day, 1776, he was engaged in the Battle of Trenton, leading the left. He wintered at Valley Forge with Washington and the patriot Army, most of who were barefoot and without blankets. The following campaign season found him at the Battle of Brandywine, September, 1777, where he had his horse shot out from under him. In October, commanding the right wing of Washington’s Army, he attacked the British at Chestnut Hill, about two miles north of Germantown. In Washington’s report to Congress about the battle he said, "In justice to General Su llivan and the whole right wing of the army, whose conduct I had an opportunity of observing, as they immediately came under my own eye, I have the pleasure to inform you that both officers and men behaved with a degree of gallantry that did them the highest honor."
During this period Sullivan was present, or commanding forces, during the seige of Boston, Battle of Long Island, Trenton, Princeton, Staten Island, Brandywine and Rhode Island.
In New York, at the Council with the Oneidas and Tuscaroras the principal chief of the Mohawks determined the Iroquois league should not take any part in the struggle betweden England and America. After the council broke up Steyawa and his Mohawk followers went directly to the annual Grand C ouncil in Onondaga, New York at the time of the annual Council Fire of the Harvest Moon. Here, when the chiefs present learned of what Steyawa had done they unanimously denounced him, declaring the death of the Iroquis League. By April, 1779 George Washington knew he had to eliminate the Iroquios as a military irregular force. The Contnental Congress authoried him to protrect Pennsylvania’s and New York’s settlers. Washington intende3d to carry the war into the heart of the country of the Six Nations, cutoff their settlements, destroy their next years crops. Major General Horatio Gates turned the command down because of ill health. A contingency letter was sent to the enxt in line, thirty-nine year old John Sullivan. Sullivan’s Indian Campaign began when he assembled his forces at Easton, Pennsylvania, on the border of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. However, this campaign was somewhat unpopular with some segments of the young American nation. The Quakers, for example, opposed the expedition. Farmers in the rich Wyoming Valley, members of the Pennamite Party, were tremendously wealthy and possessed great political power. As one could expect, they were not very happy with settlers from Conencticut and Pennsylvania authorities were not happy about providing Sullivan with necessary troops and materials. During August the force caught up with the British and Indian allies. Incredibly, their firing took the lives of six indian chiefs; Gu-cinge, Rozinoghyata of the Onondagas, Kayingwaurto of the Senacas, Captain John of the Mohawks and Queen Esther. The entire force left in full flight, barely escaping the pincer movement designed to catch them all. . He resigned his commission on 30 November 1779. At Elmira, New York, three miles East on State Route 17, is a monument dedicated to General John Sullivan. It is the site of the Newton Battlefield. Occasional battle re-enactments are presented throughout the year. Hiking and biking trails are enjoyed today. There are picnic areas, campsites and playgrounds. It’s open daily from 10:00am to dusk, May 28 - October 10, Admission is free. Telephone is (607) 939-1352.
After the war Sullivan served as a Delegate to Congress and as Attorney General of New Hampshire. In January of 1795, at the age of 55, he was laid to rest behind the house where he had resided for thirty years. In ‘The Wilderness War’, by Allan W. Eckert, a detailed epic is reported on General John Sullivan’s Indian War against the Five Nations, begun in 1779. In the bibliography is mentioned the Journals of John Sullivan, Auburn, N.Y.,1887.
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Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 04:03:34 -0600
From: "Larry Nicodemus" <m318619@mail.airmail.net> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book
To: "Angie Sullivan" <sullivanangie_spider@yahoo.com>
Subject: <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mail/clip.gif>; General Sullivan

4. John Sullivan b. FEB 18 1740, Berwick, York County, Maine, m. 1760, Lydia Remick Worster, b. OCT 14, 1738, Kittery, Maine, d. MAR 22, 1820. John died JAN 23 1795, buried Family Plot Durham, NH. Read law with energetic Samuel Livermore probably in early 1758. Moved to Durham NH around 1763. Information from DAR Record 17655.

Sullivan, John (N. H.). Brigadier-General Continental Army, 22d June, 1775; Major-General, 9th August, 1776; taken prisoner at Long Island, 27th August, 1776; exchanged December, 1776. By the Act of 9th September, 1778, it was "Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General Sullivan, and to the officers and troops of his command, for their fortitude and bravery displayed in the action of August 29th (Quaker Hill), in which they repulsed the British forces and maintained the field." By the act of 14th October, 1779, it was "Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General Sullivan and the brave officers and soldiers under his command, for effectually executing an important expedition against such of the Indian nations as, encouraged by the councils of his Britannic majesty, had perfidiously waged an unprovoked and cruel war against these United States, laid waste many of their defenseless towns, and with savage barbarity slaughtered the inhabitants thereof." Resigned 30th November, 1779. (Died 23d January, 1795.)
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----- Original Message ----- From: Todd C. Yetter <mailto:tyetter@cumberlandcollege.edu> To: Angie Sullivan <mailto:tyetter@cumberlandcollege.edu> Sent: 9/18/02 1:08:19 PM Subject: Gen. John Sullivan
Hi Angie,
I have been eagerly reviewing your recent posting on the Sullivan list. You have provided much information that I didn’t have – thanks!
One of your statements (in quotes, below) indicated that John Sullivan was a governor of NH, something I hadn’t seen referenced before.
"June 1788 became the month of decision. Virginia's convention met on the second, New York's on the seventeenth and New Hampshire's on the eighteenth. Although they started latest, the Granite Staters surged to the head of the pack because they had thrashed out a lot of disagreements in their earlier convention - and because Governor John Sullivan had gone from mediocre general to first-class politician. During the months of adjournment, he and his right-hand man, John Langdon (inserted note: John Langdon was the governor immediately preceding John Sullivan, and would be governor immediately after), had worked tirelessly to change minds and hearts. One June 21, only three days after the delegates reconvened, the Constitution prevailed 57 to 46.
After doing a little research online, I found the following: The "decision" being debated was that of statehood. From "The New Hampshire Almanac, Fast New Hampshire Facts", <http://www.state.nh.us/nhinfo/fastfact.html>;, we find:
"Statehood: New Hampshire became the 9th state on June 21, 1788. It was one of the original 13 colonies. "
and from “The New Hampshire Almanac <http://www.state.nh.us/nhinfo/index.html>;, New Hampshire's Governors”, <http://www.state.nh.us/nhinfo/gov.html>;, we find:
John Sullivan was Governor of the State of New Hampshire from 1786 - 1788.
I didn’t know if you had this information, but thought I would pass it on.
Todd
Dr. Todd Christian Yetter
7196 College Station Dr.
Department of Biology
Cumberland College
Williamsburg, KY 40769
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Taken from http://www.publicbookshelf.com/public_html/The_Great_Republi... on September 16, 2002 -

General John Sullivan: Attack on Portsmouth

America was aroused by expectation of awful conflict and mighty change. New England, upon which the first violence of the storm seemed likely to descend, was agitated by rumors and alarms, of which the import and the influence strikingly portrayed the sentiments and temper of the people. Reports that Gage had commanded his troops to attack the Massachusetts militia, or to fire upon the town of Boston, were swallowed the avidity of rage and hatred, and instantly covered the highways with thousands of armed men, mustering in hot haste, and eager to rush forward to death or revenge. Everything betokened the explosion of a tempest; and some partial gusts announced its near approach, and proved the harbingers of its fury. In the close of the year there reached America a proclamation issued by the king, prohibiting the exportation of military stores from Great Britain. The inhabitants of Rhode Island no sooner received intelligence of this mandate than they removed from the public battery about forty pieces of cannon; and the Assembly of the province gave orders for procuring arms and martial stores, and for the immediate equipment of a martial force. In New Hampshire, a band of four hundred men, suddenly assembling in arms, and conducted by John Sullivan, an eminent lawyer and a man of great ambition and intrepidity, gained possession by surprise of the castle of Portsmouth, and confined the royal garrison till the powder-magazine was ransacked and its contents carried away.
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Taken from http://www.netvaly.org/sullivan.htm on September 16, 2002 -

Sullivan County is Tennessee's sixth largest county in population and was created in 1779 from Washington Country. The county is named in honor of John Sullivan (1740 - 1795). John Sullivan was a Revolutionary War Officer, member of the Continental Congress, attorney general, legislator, U.S. district judge and governor of New Hampshire.
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Taken from http://www.rootsweb.com/~cenfiles/me/york/1790/1908indx/berw... on September 16, 2002 -

York County, Maine 1790 Federal Census Berwick Town
The USGenWeb Archives provide genealogical and historical data to the
general public without fee or charge of any kind. It is intended that
this material not be used in a commercial manner. All submissions
become part of the permanent collection.
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Top of Form 1 Re: GEN. JOHN SULLIVAN
Posted by: Robert G. Sullivan </cgi-genforum/email.cgi?516979966> Date: October 22, 1998 at 17:28:49
In Reply to: GEN. JOHN SULLIVAN </sullivan/messages/433.html> by Barb Fleming of 6886
Bottom of Form 1

HI,
I believe I'm a direct decendant of John J. Sullivan. I've just this week started to check on my ancestory. I'm 62 and relying on a distant memory of grandparents talking. I realize you are looking for a Tibbets connection in the Berwick, Maine area.I'm not any help there. Here is the very scant information I have, most of it from memory and undocumented. John J sullivan was from Exeter, NH. He had one brother, but not positive on that. He was a general during the revolutionary War, then a Federal judge, or sorts. He was also "President" of New Hampshire, after the Revoultionary War, and prior to the actual United States as we know it today. He was a heavy drinker, became deeply indebted and died broke.. My fathers grand father or great-grandfather was one of John Sullivan's children. My father had a set of silver cuff links that belonged to John. My daughter has a ring made from one of the cuff links. My father was William Joseph Sullivan, born in Gloucester, Mass on May 28, 1908. Died at the Mass Gen Hospital, Boston, on 7/4/58.My grandfather was Micheal J. Sullivan, POB or DOB unkn. He died in Peabody, Mass around 1948. He was approximaely 63 when he died. He was married to Sarah Connor, who died in 1945. She was approx 58 when she died. She was born in Exeter, NH, but DOB is unknown.Getting back to John J sullivan, either hhis brother or son was governor of Mass in the very early 1800's. Again, all of the above is from memory of stories told years ago.
Maybe the aovbe information will give you some clues in your search. Good Luck
Bob Sullivan
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Ahnentafel Chart for General John Sullivan


First Generation

1. General John Sullivan was born on 7 Feb 1740 in Somersworth, Strafford, New Hampshire or Berwick, Maine. He died on 23 Jan 1795 in Durham, New Hampshire. He was buried in Sullivan cemetary on family farm.

John married Lydia Remick Worster or Wooster or Worchester daughter of John Worster and Lydia Remick in 1760. Lydia was born on 14 Oct 1738. She was christened on 13 Jan 1741/1742. She died on 21 Mar 1820 in Durham, New Hampshire. She was buried in Sullivan cemetary on family farm.


Second Generation

2. Master John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan was born on 17 Jun 1690/1691 in Limerick or Ardea, Kerry Co., Ireland. He died on 20 Jun 1795 in Berwick, York, Maine. He married Margery or Merjery Brown or Browne about 1730.

3. Margery or Merjery Brown or Browne was born in 1714 in Cork, Ireland. She died in 1801.


Third Generation

4. Major Phillip O'Sullivan was born about 1640 in Ardee, Louth, Ireland. He died after 1691 in wound received in a duel in France. He married Joane McCarthy Mor.

5. Joane McCarthy Mor was born in 1641/1668 in Of Killoween, Ireland.


Fourth Generation

8. Owen O'Sullivan was born about 1620. He married Mary or Marganne McSweeney.

9. Mary or Marganne McSweeney .

10. Dermod McCarthy Mor .Dermod married Daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery McCarthy Reagh.

11. Daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery McCarthy Reagh .


Fifth Generation

16. Lord of Bearehaven Daniel O'Sullivane or O'Sullivan was born about 1600. He married Sarah O'Brien.

17. Sarah O'Brien was born - .

18. Colonel of Muskerry or Musgrey Owen McSweeney .Owen married Honora McCarthy.

19. Honora McCarthy .


Sixth Generation

32. Philip O'Sullivan Beare was born about 1580. He married Daughter of Lord Muskerry Honora Clancarthy.

33. Daughter of Lord Muskerry Honora Clancarthy .

34. Conor O'Brien .

39. Florence McFinnen was born in of Ardtelly.


Seventh Generation

64. Daniel O'Sullivane or O'Sullivan was born about 1560 in Ireland. He married Margaret Clancarthy.

65. Margaret Clancarthy .

66. Earl of Clancarthy Donogh Clancarthy died in 1666. He married Lady Ellen Butler.

67. Lady Ellen Butler .


Eighth Generation

128. (the Tanaiste) Son of Lord of Bearehaven Philip O'Sullivan Beare was born about 1540 in Dunboy Castle, Munster, Ireland. He married Daughter Earl of Thomond Sarah O'Brien.

129. Daughter Earl of Thomond Sarah O'Brien .

130. Earl of Clancarthy Clancarthy died in 1640. He married Margaret.

131. Margaret .

134. Lord Thurles Thomas Butler died in 1619.


Ninth Generation

256. 11th Lord Beare & Bantry Dermond O'Sullivan Beare ""The Powdered"" was born about 1520. He died in 1549 in killed accidently at his castle, Dunboy. He married Lady Julia or Sheela? MacCarthy.

257. Lady Julia or Sheela? MacCarthy was born 1500 - 1530. She died about 1550 in Dunboy Castle, Munster, Ireland. She was buried about 1550 in Ireland.

258. Cormack O'Brien .

262. 4th Earl of Thomond Donogh .


Tenth Generation

514. Prince of Carberry Donnel Mac Fineere Mac Carthy-Reagh was born about 1500. He married Lady Eleanor FitzGerald.

515. Lady Eleanor FitzGerald was born about 1500.


Eleventh Generation

1029. Daughter of Donnell was born about 1480.

1030. 8th Earl of Kildare Gerald FitzGerald was born about 1465. He married Lady Allison Eustace.

1031. Lady Allison Eustace was born about 1470.


Twelfth Generation

2058. 9th Lord of Bearehaven Donnell was born about 1460. He died in 1520.

2060. 7th Earl of Kildare Thomas FitzGerald died in 1478. He married Lady Joan Butler.

2061. Lady Joan Butler .

2062. Baron of Portlester Rowland Eustace was born about 1440.


Thirteenth Generation

4120. 6th Earl of Kildare John-Cam FitzGerald died in 1427.

4122. 7th Earl of Desmond James Butler .


Fourteenth Generation

8240. 5th Earl of Kildare Gerald FitzGerald .Gerald married Lady Margery Rocheford.

8241. Lady Margery Rocheford .


Fifteenth Generation

16480. 4th Earl of Kildare Maurice FitzGerald .Maurice married Lady Elizabeth Burghersh.

16481. Lady Elizabeth Burghersh .

16482. Sir John de Rocheford .


Sixteenth Generation

32960. Thomas FitzGerald .Thomas married Lady Joan de Burgh.

32961. Lady Joan de Burgh .

32962. Sir Bartholomew Burghersh .Bartholomew married Lady Maude Mortimer.

32963. Lady Maude Mortimer .


Seventeenth Generation

65922. 2nd Earl of Ulster Richard de Burgh was born in 1259. He died in 1326. He married Margaret de Burgh.

65923. Margaret de Burgh .


Eighteenth Generation

131846. Baron of Lanville John de Burgh .


Nineteenth Generation

263692. Baron of Connaught Walter de Burgh .Walter married Maude de Lacie.

263693. Maude de Lacie .


Twentieth Generation

527384. Lord of Connaught and Trym Richard Mor de Burgh the Great .Richard married Lady Hodierna de Gernon.

527385. Lady Hodierna de Gernon .

527386. Earl of Ulster Hugh de Lacie .


Twenty-first Generation

1054768. Lord Governor of Ireland William Fitz-Andelem de Burgh .William married Lady (widow of Llewelyn, Prince of Wales) Isabel.

1054769. Lady (widow of Llewelyn, Prince of Wales) Isabel .


Twenty-second Generation

2109536. Steward to King Henry II of England Adelem de Burgh .Adelem married Princess of France Agnes.

2109537. Princess of France Agnes .


Twenty-third Generation

4219074. Louis VI was born in of France. He married daughter of Hubert II, Count of Piedmont Adelaide.

4219075. daughter of Hubert II, Count of Piedmont Adelaide was born in of Savoy.


Twenty-fourth Generation

8438148. Philip I was born in of France. He married daughter of Florient Count of Holland Bertha.

8438149. daughter of Florient Count of Holland Bertha .


Twenty-fifth Generation

16876296. Henry was born in Of France. He married granddaughter of the 1st Czar Vladimir I Svyatoslavich Anne.

16876297. granddaughter of the 1st Czar Vladimir I Svyatoslavich Anne was born in of Russia.

Twenty-sixth Generation

33752592. Robert the Pious .Robert married Constance of Provence Constantia.

33752593. Constance of Provence Constantia .


Twenty-seventh Generation

67505184. Hugh Capet was born in Of France. He married daughter of Otto I Adele or Adelaide.

67505185. daughter of Otto I Adele or Adelaide .


Twenty-eighth Generation

135010368. Duke of France Hugh Capet .Hugh married Princess Hedwidge.

135010369. Princess Hedwidge .


Twenty-ninth Generation

270020738. Emperor Henry I the Fowler .Henry married daughter of the Saxon count Thiederick Matilda of Ringelheim.

270020739. daughter of the Saxon count Thiederick Matilda of Ringelheim .


Thirtieth Generation

540041476. Duke of Saxony Otto .Otto married daughter of Arnolph Princess Hedwige.

540041477. daughter of Arnolph Princess Hedwige .


Thirty-first Generation

1080082952. Duke of Saxony Ludolph .Ludolph married Countess of Burgundy Princess Adelheid.

1080082953. Countess of Burgundy Princess Adelheid .


Thirty-second Generation

2160165906. Count of Burgundy Eberhard .Eberhard married Princess Giselda (Giselle or Gisela).

2160165907. Princess Giselda (Giselle or Gisela) .

_________________________________________

Modified Register for General John Sullivan


First Generation

1. General John Sullivan was born on 7 Feb 1740 in Somersworth, Strafford, New Hampshire or Berwick, Maine. He died on 23 Jan 1795 in Durham, New Hampshire. He was buried in Sullivan cemetary on family farm.

John married Lydia Remick Worster or Wooster or Worchester daughter of John Worster and Lydia Remick in 1760. Lydia was born on 14 Oct 1738. She was christened on 13 Jan 1741/1742. She died on 21 Mar 1820 in Durham, New Hampshire. She was buried in Sullivan cemetary on family farm.

They had the following children:

2 F i. Margery Sullivan was born on 2 Feb 1761. She died on 10 Apr 1764.

+ 3 F ii. Lydia Sullivan was born on 17 Mar 1763. She died on 9 Apr 1842.

+ 4 M iii. John Sullivan was born on 29 Oct 1767. He died in Jul 1819/1796.

5 M iv. James Sullivan was born on 1 Sep 1768. He died in Jul 1796 in Georgetown, South Carolina.

+ 6 M v. Delegate House of Representatives George Sullivan was born on 29 Aug 1771. He died on 14 Apr 1838.

+ 7 F vi. Mary Sullivan was born in 1775.


Second Generation

3. Lydia Sullivan (John) was born on 17 Mar 1763 in Berwick, York County, Maine. She died on 9 Apr 1842.

Lydia married Jonathon or Johathan Steele . Jonathon was born on 5 Sep 1760. He died on 3 Sep 1824.

They had the following children:

8 F i. Margaret Steele was born on 5 Aug 1788. She died on 15 Jan 1807.

9 F ii. Janet Steele was born on 14 Jun 1791. She died in 1869.

10 F iii. Lydia Steele was born on 3 Sep 1794. She died on 30 Jun 1799.

11 M iv. Richard Steele was born on 6 Jan 1797. He died in 1870.
Richard married (1) Harriet King Pierce . Harriet died on 11 Apr 1823.
Richard married (2) Mary Amanda Smith after 1823.

12 M v. John Steele was born on 9 Apr 1799. He died on 8 Sep 1800.

13 F vi. Margaret Steele was born on 29 Dec 1801. She died on 4 Mar 1803.

14 M vii. Jonathan Steele was born on 25 Jun 1803. He died on 28 Aug 1819.

15 F viii. Caroline Steele was born on 1 Sep 1804. She died on 9 Apr 1806.

4. John Sullivan (John) was born on 29 Oct 1767. He died in Jul 1819/1796 in Baton Rouge, Lousiana or Georgetown, S.C..

He had the following children:

16 M i. Isaac Sullivan .

6. Delegate House of Representatives George Sullivan (John) was born on 29 Aug 1771 in Durham, Strafford, New Hampshire. He died on 14 Apr 1838 in Exeter, New Hampshire. He was buried in Old Cemetery (Winter Street).

George married (1) Clarissa Lamson on 6 Aug 1799 in Exeter, New Hampshire. Clarissa was born on 29 Aug 1780 in Exeter, New Hampshire. She died on 11 Mar 1824.

They had the following children:

17 M i. John Sullivan was born on 23 May 1800. He died on 17 Nov 1862.
John married Olivia Rowe . Olivia was born in Exeter, New Hampshire. She died on 7 Jan 1875 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

18 F ii. Martha Lamson Sullivan was born on 11 Jan 1802 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire. She died on 22 Dec 1831.

19 F iii. Clarissa Lamson Sullivan was born on 9 Aug 1804 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire. She died on 18 Sep 1809.

20 F iv. Lydia Sullivan was born on 4 Oct 1806 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire. She died on 2 Jun 1849.
Lydia married David A Gregg in Mar 1844. David was born in Derry, New Hampshire.

21 M v. George Sullivan was born on 18 Oct 1808 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire. He died on 11 Jan 1830.

22 M vi. James Sullivan was born on 6 Dec 1811 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire. He died on 21 Aug 1878.
James married (1) Nancy Morrison in 1842.
James married (2) Sarah Elizabeth Beckwith in 1848.

23 M vii. William Henry Sullivan was born on 28 Jan 1814 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire. He died in 1864.
William married Mary S Neale in Jan 1845 in St Joseph, Michigan.

24 F viii. Clarissa Lamson Sullivan was born on 31 Dec 1815/1816 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire. She died in 1870.

25 F ix. Margaret Wood Sullivan was born on 19 Jul 1818 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire.

26 M x. Edward Sullivan was born on 21 Jul 1820 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire. He died on 13 May 1843.

27 F xi. Mary Frances Sullivan was born on 23 Aug 1822 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire. She died on 30 Aug 1825.


George married (2) Phillippa Call . Phillippa was born in Newburyport.

7. Mary Sullivan (John) was born in 1775.
Mary married Gideon Rowser Jr. in 1795. Gideon was born in 1770.

They had the following children:

28 F i. Lydia Rozwer Rouser Rowser was born on 5 Feb 1802.

SubjectAuthorDate Posted
Sharon 28 Jan 2004 5:01PM GMT 
Diana Arney 29 Jan 2004 12:13PM GMT 
angiesullivan... 30 Jan 2004 4:40AM GMT 
phonelady1279 28 Apr 2004 9:07PM GMT 
James R. Sullivan 29 Jan 2004 3:18PM GMT 
phonelady1279 28 Apr 2004 9:35PM GMT 
angiesullivan... 30 Jan 2004 3:57AM GMT 
angiesullivan... 30 Jan 2004 5:20AM GMT 
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