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Henry Waddell b 1770-1780 Madrid Twp, St. Lawrence Cty NY 1820-1840

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Waddell History and emigrants Glasgow, Scotland to Lanark, Ontario

Lynn Gill (View posts)
Posted: 9 Dec 2004 11:06AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Waddell, Dalton
I was able to pin down the father of Ellen Waddell as George Waddell b. abt. 1772 and his father as William Waddell b. abt. 1750 both from Scotland.
Here's my Waddell file; you may enjoy the history. It says that a number of Waddell families settled in Ireland back when! Some of the Waddell listed in Misc. were from Ireland.

Generation No. 1

1. COMMON ANCESTOR1 WADDELL was born Bet. 800 - 900 in Scandinavia.

Notes for COMMON ANCESTOR WADDELL:
The Waddell's are descended from the Vikings. They first landed in the Orkney Islands and Northern Scotland around 870 under their king, Stirgud the Stout. The surname Waddell is believed to be a 'place name' from the Wedale in the Parish of Stow in the Southern Uplands. It emerged as a notable family name in the 9th century in the County of Midlothian, where the first bearer of the name was Adam de Wedale, a Norman (descended from Vikings in France), who settled in Stow after holding lands in England. Adam was referred to as an outlaw of the king. By 1296 however, the de Wedale clan appears to have gained acceptance, and Lawrence de Wedale of Roxburghshire rendered homage to King Edward 1 of England - the so-called 'Hammer of the Scots'.

Simon Wedale was Abbot of Holyrood palace from 1296 to 1327, later becoming Bishop of Galloway in the west. Sir Thomas Waddell was head of the clan in 1372 and the clan continued to have vast interests in England through the 1600's. They branched south to Walmer in Kent about this time. A branch of the family were celebrated brewers at Liff for 200 years. The Waddell's made significant contributions to the affairs of England and Scotland in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. The dawn of the 16th century heralded the beginning of over 200 hundred years since immigration.

Twelve Waddell families resettled in Ireland between 1700 and 1800. Other branches of the clan immigrated to America including the families of James Waddell who settled in Maine in 1745 and William Waddell who settled in San Francisco in 1852. William, along with Russell and Majors, founded the Pony Express in 1860. Other famous Waddell's include baseball's hall of fame George Edward 'Rube' Waddell. During the War of Independence, some Waddell's claimed loyalty to the crown and moved to Canada and became known as the United Empire Loyalists. Today, of course, the Waddell's are found all over the world.

The Waddells are recorded as being a member of clan Fraser and Macduff and Macdougall. Waddell is a distinct name but is a part of the clans in a time of help and honor of respect of their holdings and cattle. In records, the Waddels were a fierce clan of Norman origin in Midlothian and Fife, and around Edinburgh and in Gallway, and Lanarkshire and Stirlingshire in Scotland.

Children of COMMON ANCESTOR WADDELL are:
2. i. WILLIAM2 WADDELL, b. Abt. 1750, Prob. Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
3. ii. MISC. WADDELL, b. Aft. 1800.

Generation No. 2

2. WILLIAM2 WADDELL (COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born Abt. 1750 in Prob. Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland. He married ELLEN THOMPSON April 17, 1772 in Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland. She was born Abt. 1750 in Prob. Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.

Notes for WILLIAM WADDELL:
According to "The Lanark Society Settlers, 1820-1821," by Carol Bennett, Publisher: Renfrew, Ontario: Juniper Books, 1991, p. 40,
"George Waddell was born in Glasgow, a son of William Waddell and Ellen Thompson."

There is a record in Ancestry.com indicating that William and Ellen Thompson Waddell of Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland are the parents of George Waddell and grandparents of Ellen Waddell b. 1810. According to this record, William Waddell and Ellen Thompson were married April 17, 1772 in Glasgow. They either waited a long time for kids (from 1772 to 1788), or more likely there are more kids or a missing generation! It is also possible that George Waddell was born earlier than 1782.

Waddell Surname History and Origin
Waddel, Waddell, Waddle, Waddles, Weddel, Weddell, Weddle, Woddell, Weddal, Veddel, Weddale, Wooddell, Wydall are believed to derive from Wedale, the old name of the parish of Stow in Midlothian (near Edinburgh), Scotland. The surname was a way to identify a man who hailed "from" Wedale, i.e., de Wedale. The earliest known bearer of the name is a Norman, Adam de Wedale, "an outlaw of the King of Scots land", who appears in 1204 (Bain, Vol. I, page 342).

Wedele may mean "the valley where woad grows." Woad is a plant that produced a vibrant indigo blue dye which was popular during the Middle Ages, i.e., the Scots used it as a body die or warpaint. The second element of the placename is evidently Old English "dael" (dale) or Old Norse "dair" (valley). Woad-dale therefore became Wedale. In Scotland, the stress normally falls on the first syllable of the surname, but elsewhere the name is often accented on the second syllable to avoid association with the vocabulary word "waddle".

The first element also might conceivably be the Old English "wedd" (to pledge) security or its Old Norse cognitive "ved" (although this is not found elsewhere as a place name element). Or, one who came from Wada, i.e., Wadley (Wada's wood or meadow) in Berkshire. Three meanings have been found for Wada: [1] Wada or Wad may be a pet form of Waldtheof, which means variously - power, serf, foreign, thief. [2] Wada or Wad could also be a variant of woad . Lastly, a reference was found that mentioned Wada was the name of a legendary sea-giant (A Dictionary of Surnames].

The Waddell family, according to one theory, came originally from Normandy. They were landowners in Sussex and then moved north to Otterburn on the border. There is a woolen mill in Otterburn which was owned by a Robert Waddell. Some members apparently moved north and they are recorded at Wedale (Stowe) in the 13th century, where they held land. They were then known as "of Wedele, " or de Wedele. From Stowe, another move was made to the Whitburn district of West Lothian where they are recorded over a long number of years, and all in farming.

In one theory, the Waddell family traces to Vital de Bernay in Normandy. In 1066, the coat of arms for Vital de Bernay was three white rampant lions on a red shield, like the duke Robert of Normandy. The Waddell arms are blue with a checkered X gold and red bewteen four buckles argent, the crest are lions head with a blue tongue. A Norman named Adam de Wedale or Vedale settled in Stowe after holding lands in England in 1100 or earlier. Adam de Wedale was referred to as "an outlaw of the king."

By 1296, however, the family appears to have gained acceptance and Lawrence de Wedale of Roxburghshire rendered homage to King Edward I of England - the so-called 'Hammer of the Scots'. When Scottish King Alexander III died in 1286 while crossing the river Forth to Fife at Queensferry, he was succeeded by Queen Margaret, the "Maid of Norway" (Alexander's grandaughter and daughter of King Erik II of Norway). But Margaret died in 1290, en route from Norway to Scotland. There were a number of claimants to the Scottish throne at that time and King Edward I of England "volunteered" to hear their case and decide who had the most valid claim. Those involved met Edward at Norham on Tweed in 1291. It soon became apparent that Edward was seeking to select someone who would owe allegiances to the English crown and John Balliol was selected to accede to the Scottish throne.

But when Balliol began to resist the demands of Edward in 1296, the English King over-ran Berwick-upon-Tweed and defeated the Scots at the Battle of Dunbar. He then marched across Scotland as far as the Moray Firth, capturing castles and removing such precious items as the Stone of Destiny, the Scottish crown, the Black Rood of St Margaret (believed at the time to be remnants of the true Cross) and huge archives of Scotland's national records. On 28 August, 1296, Edward held a "parliament" at Berwick. All the prominent Scottish landowners, churchmen and burgesses were summoned to swear allegiance to Edward and sign the parchments and affix their seals, many of which had ribbons attached. In addition to such prominent people as Robert Bruce, 6th Lord of Annandale, his son, the 2nd Earl of Carrick and William Wallace's uncle, Sir Reginald de Crauford, 2,000 signatures were inscribed, making it a most valuable document for future researchers. It is suggested that the term "Ragman Rolls" derived from the ribbons attached to the seals on the parchments but the name may also have been derived from an earlier record compiled for the purposes of Papal taxation by a man called Ragimunde, whose name was corrupted to Ragman. Among the 2,000 nobles and clergy who signed the Ragman Rolls of 1296 (and 1291) are:
Weddale (Wedale), Laurence de (del counte de Rokefburg).
Weddale, vicaire del Eglife de, Edward (del counte de Edeneburgh).

The Trial of the Medieval Order of the Knights Templar in Scotland - 1309
According to the Processus jactus contra Templarios in Scotia, in Wilkins' "Concilia," a work of great rarity, it was in the month of December, 1309 when the south of Scotland was overrun by the English, Irish, Welsh, and Norman troops of Edward II. Robert Bruce, succeeding to the power and popularity of Wallace, was in arms in the north. Master John de Soleure, otherwise styled of Solerio, " chaplain to our lord the Pope," together with William Lamberton, Bishop of St. Andrews, met at the Abbey of Holyrood "for the trial of the Templars, and two brethren of that order undernamed, the only persons of the order present in the kingdom of Scotland, by command of our most holy lord Clement V." The eighth witness at the trial, Adam of Wedale (now called Stow), a Cistercian, accused the Templars of selfishness and oppression of their neighbours, and John of Byres, a monk of Newbattle, John of Mumphat and Gilbert of Haddington, two monk of Holyrood, entirely agreed with him The rector of Ratho maintained that the Scottish Templars were not free from the crimes imputed to the order, adding " that he had never known when any Templar was buried or heard of one dying a natural death, and that the whole order was generally against the Holy Church." The former points had evident reference to the rumour that the order burned their dead and drank the ashes in wine! On the suppression of the Templar order throughout Scotland, their vast possessions were given to their rivals, the Knights of St. John at Torphichen.

Simon Wedale was Abbot of Holyrood palace from 1296 to 1327, later becoming Bishop of Galloway in the west. Sir Thomas Waddell was head of the clan in 1372 and was a excutioner or royal enforcer of the border. The clan continued to have vast interest in England through the 1600's. They branched south to Walmer in Kent about this time. A branch of the family were celebrated brewers at Liff for 200 years. The Waddell's made significant contributions to the affairs of England and Scotland in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries.

The dawn of the 16th century heralded the beginning of over 200 hundred years of immigration. Twelve Waddell families resettled in Ireland between 1700 and 1800. Other branches of the clan immigrated to America including the families of James Waddell who settled in Maine in 1745 and William Waddell who settled in San Francisco in 1852. William, along with Russell and Majors, founded the Pony Express in 1860. Other famous Waddell's include baseball's hall of fame George Edward 'Rube' Waddell. During the War of Independence, some Waddell's claimed loyalty to the crown and moved to Canada and became known as the United Empire Loyalists. Today of course, the Waddell's are found all over the world.

There is no Waddell clan or tartan, as such. The Waddells are recorded as being a sept of clan Fraser and Macduff and Macdougall in Midlothian and Fife and around in Edinburgh in Lanarkshire and Stirlingshire.

Sources:
"Surnames of Scotland," Black, George F. (Edinburgh: Birlinn, 1993); "New Dictionary of American Family Names," by Elsdon C. Smith, Harper & Row Publishers, page 534; "Surnames of Scotland," and "A Dictionary of Surnames;" "A Dictionary of Surnames," by Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges; "New Dictionary of American Family Names"

Children of WILLIAM WADDELL and ELLEN THOMPSON are:
4. i. GEORGE3 WADDELL, b. Bet. 1772 - 1782, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland; d. August 30, 1872, Ontario, Canada.
ii. ELLEN WADDELL, b. Abt. 1788, Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland; d. April 27, 1874, 2d Line, Lanark, Ontario; m. ROBERT FLEMING, Bef. 1814, Scotland; b. 1788, Ireland, Of Bridgeton, Barony Parish, Lanark, Scotland; d. Bef. 1874, Lanark, Ontario.

Notes for ELLEN WADDELL:
Ellen WADDELL was born about 1788 in Scotland, a daughter of William WADDELL and Ellen THOMPSON. She came to Canada in 1820 at age 32 (born 1788) aboard the "Commerce" with her husband Robert Fleming and three two??] children. Lanark Society Settler, Bridgeton Canadian Emigration Society. ("The Lanark Society Settlers, 1820-1821," by Carol Bennett, Publisher: Renfrew, Ontario: Juniper Books, c1991, p. 66).

Marriage 1 Robert FLEMING b: 1788 in Ireland. Occupation: Weaver
Children
Ellen FLEMING b: ABT. 1814 in Scotland
James FLEMING b: ABT. 1819 in Scotland
Mary (Margaret) FLEMING b: 1821 Lanark
Agnes FLEMING b: ABT. 1826 Lanark
Robert FLEMING b: 1829 in Lanark Twp
Lilly FLEMING b: ABT. 1832 Lanark

Emigration:
Residence: Settled on October 3, 1820 on Lot 13 East Conc 1, Lanark Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario. Her brother, George Waddell, settled on the adjoining lot 13 W on October 25, 1820.

Perth Courier May 1, 1874
Fleming - Died, at her residence, 2nd Line Lanark, on the 27th inst., Helen (Fleming), relict of Robert Fleming, in her 89th year [would indicate a birthdate in 1785]. Deceased was born in Linlithgow (?) Scotland and was one of Lanark’s earliest settlers. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church in connection with the Church of Scotland and died in the full hope of entering the glory of a future state.

Notes for ROBERT FLEMING:
Robert FLEMING was born 1788 in Ireland. Occupation: Weaver. He came to Canada aboard the "Commerce," N. Cloverdale, Master in 1820, leaving with 402 passengers from Greenock, Scotland June 21, 1820, and arriving Quebec August 5, 1820. He was in the Bridgeton Canadian Emigration Society. The passenger manifest lists Chas. Fleming, who may be the head-of-household and possibly Robert's father.

Robert and his wife Ellen Waddell Fleming and children settled October 3, 1820 on Lot 13 East Conc 1, Lanark Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario. His brother-in-law George Waddell who arrived shortly after on the "Brock" settled next door on October 25, 1820 at Lot 13 West. ("The Lanark Society Settlers, 1820-1821," by Carol Bennett, Publisher: Renfrew, Ontario: Juniper Books, c1991, p. 66).

Note: Robert Fleming was five feet seven inches tall and fair haired. Accompanied by his wife, Ellen Waddell, age 32 (born 1788) and three [two?] children.

Marriage 1 Ellen WADDELL b: 1788 in Scotland
Children
Ellen FLEMING b: ABT. 1814 in Scotland
James FLEMING b: ABT. 1819
Mary (Margaret) FLEMING b: 1821 in 2nd conc of Lanark, Lanark Co, Ont
Agnes FLEMING b: ABT. 1826
Robert FLEMING b: 1829 in Lanark Twp
Lilly FLEMING b: ABT. 1832

Other Fleming families settling in Lanark County:
FLEMING, Charles, settled at Dalhousie 3 8W September 18, 1820
FLEMING, James, settled at Lanark 2 19W August 10, 1821
FLEMING, William, settled at Ramsay 3 21W July 24, 1821

According to "The Lanark Society Settlers, 1820-1821," by Carol Bennett, Publisher: Renfrew, Ontario: Juniper Books, c1991, p. 66, a Helen Fleming married John McLellan in 1835 and Margaret Fleming married Samuel McFarlane in 1845. These likely are the daughters of Robert Fleming. A James Fleming is listed in the 1851 census with his wife Mary.

3. MISC.2 WADDELL (COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born Aft. 1800.

Notes for MISC. WADDELL:
In the 1871 census for Ontario there are 65 Waddell/Waddle families, including:

Lanark North:
John Waddell 1827 Scots
James Waddell 1796 Scots

Lanark South:
James Waddell 1811 from Ireland

Perth "Courier" 12 Feb 1886 Death Notice:
At Perth, Tuesday, 9th February, Mr James Waddell, aged 83 years. Late residence Drummond St. to Elmwood Cem. settled on well-known Waddell farm in North Elmsley. Native of North Ireland. Both he and Mrs Waddell were called away not many months apart. Member St Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Perth. Leaves 2 daughters, both living Perth, and 4 sons - John A, Edwin and William of Brooklyn, NY and James A., banker, Key West, Florida.

Lambton:
John Waddle 1822 Scots
James Waddle 1824 from England. Still there in 1881.

Not all families are Scots. None are a match for George's children. James b. 1796 living in Lanark North in 1871 could be a brother.

Children of MISC. WADDELL are:
5. i. DAVID3 WADDELL, b. Of Plympton Twp, Lambton County, Ontario.
ii. HENRY WADDELL, b. Bet. 1770 - 1780, Scotland, Of Madrid Twp., St. Lawrence County, NY; d. Bef. 1850, Madrid Twp., St. Lawrence County, NY; m. UNKNOWN, Prob. Scotland; b. Bet. 1780 - 1790, Prob Scotland.

Notes for HENRY WADDELL:
Henry Waddell is in Madrid Twp., St. Lawrence County, NY in 1820. There are two men in the household, one 26-45 and one over 45; 3 girls 0-10, 1 girl 16-26, and one woman 26-45. My guess that this is Henry and wife, both between 26 and 45 years of age (born 1775 to 1785) and his father 45+ born before 1775. Henry was not there in 1810 or before.

There are also seven foreigners not naturalized and and two people engaged in agriculture listed in other columns. The official enumeration day of the 1820 census was 7 August 1820. All questions asked were supposed to refer to that date. The count was due within six months, but the due date was extended by law to allow completion within thirteen months.

Madrid Twp. is the same township in which Ellen Waddell lived in 1830, after she married John Dalton about 1827. Henry may be a relative, and she may have visited him in Madrid where she met her husband, Joh Dalton. Interestingly, Ellen named two sons John Henry Dalton and Henry James Dalton, and Henry persists in the Dalton family in following generations.

In 1830, Henry (spelled Waddle this time) is still in Madrid Twp.: 2 boys under 5, 1 man 50-60; 2 girls 5-10, 1 girl 10-15, 2 girls 15-20, 1 20-30, and a woman 40-50. The man would be born 1770 to 1780 and the woman 1780 to 1790.

Still hangin' in there in 1840: 1 boy 10-15, 1 man 60-70; 1 girl 5-10, 2 girls 15-20, 1 woman 20-30, and one woman 40-50. The man would be born 1770-1780 and the woman 1780-1790. He's not there in 1850, perhaps he has died.

iii. JOHN WADDELL, SR., b. 1795, Airdie, Scotland; d. December 22, 1893, Pakenham, Lanark County, Ontario.

Notes for JOHN WADDELL, SR.:
Came to Canada in 1831 (Perth Courier).

iv. JAMES WADDELL, b. 1796, Of Pakenham, Ontario circa 1820; d. December 15, 1893, Pakenham, Lanark County, Ontario.
v. GEORGE WADDELL, b. Bef. 1800, Of Pakenham, Ontario circa 1820.
6. vi. WILLIAM WADDELL, b. Abt. 1800, Scotland.
vii. WALTER WADDELL, b. Bet. 1800 - 1810, Of Delavan County, Wisconsin.

Notes for WALTER WADDELL:
Walter Waddell may have arrived in Delavan County, Wisconsin about 1840. Perhaps a relative of Ellen?? I don't find him in the 1840 or 1850 census, though (Waddell, Waddle, Soundex).

7. viii. JAMES WADDELL, b. 1803, North Ireland, Of N. Elmsley, Lanark N., Ontario; d. February 09, 1886, Perth, Lanark County, Ontario.


Generation No. 3

4. GEORGE3 WADDELL (WILLIAM2, COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born Bet. 1772 - 1782 in Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland, and died August 30, 1872 in Ontario, Canada. He married MARGARET ANDERSON February 04, 1803 in Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland, daughter of WILLIAM ANDERSON and ELIZABETH WILSON. She was born October 05, 1778 in Lanark, Lanark, Scotland, and died in Ontario, Canada.

Notes for GEORGE WADDELL:
According to "The Lanark Society Settlers, 1820-1821," by Carol Bennett, Publisher: Renfrew, Ontario: Juniper Books, 1991, p. 40,
"George Waddell was born in Glasgow, a son of William Waddell and Ellen Thompson." There is an IGI record of a christening of George Waddle, son of William Waddle and Helen Thomson on July 22, 1782, Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland. Another record indicates that George Waddell was born in Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland to William and Ellen Thompson Wadell, who were married in 1772. Indications are that he was born about 1772 - 1782. He married Margaret Anderson in Glasgow on February 04, 1803.

George was employed as a weaver, either working at home on a rented loom, or in a city weaving mill. After peace broke out following the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, the demise of the war industry brought on an economic depression. Weavers were particularly hard hit, as uniforms and blankets were no longer in demand, and purchases of civilian clothing could be deferred. Wages of weavers plummeting by almost 80 percent. In the spring of 1820, many of the unemployed workers in Lanark and Renfrew began to form emigration societies, in order to petition the government to allow them to emigrate to Upper Canada.

George Waddell and his family were among the lucky ones who drew lots to emigrate, and they departed in 1820 with the Ambercrombie Street- Trans Atlantic Bridgeton Society. They were assisted in their passage by money raised in London, as they were too impoverished to pay their own fares. They were not allowed to take furniture; only pots and pans, bedclothes, personal clothing, and books were allowed.

The Waddell family left Greenock, Scotland on July 9, 1820 aboard the "Brock," carrying 176 passengers. Dougal Cowan was master, and the Brock arrived in Quebec six weeks later on August 20, 1820 (Note: the Brock is sometimes listed as Broke or Brooke). They were then taken by steamship from Quebec to Montreal, and thence to Lachine (just east of Montreal). From there, they proceeded for five days to Prescott on a flotilla of bateaux, or flat-bottomed boats, each carrying three families. Next was a five day trip by wagon for 74 miles from Prescott to Lanark, over a rough road cleared through the forest. They were plagued by mosquitos and other insects, and often only contaminated water was available. Understandably, many settlers did not survive the journey.

Arriving in Lanark, settlers drew slips of paper from a hat which determined the 100 acre parcel they would receive. They then hired guides to take them through the wilderness to their homestead. On October 25, the Wadells settled in Lot 13W, Con. 1, Lanark Twp., Lanark County, Ontario, Canada ("1820-1822 Settlers Lanark County" lists "George Waddle," Lanark Township, Con 1 Lot 13W, 25 October 1820).

George's sister Ellen [Helen] Waddell Fleming and her husband Robert Fleming and children lived next door on Lot 13E. ("The Lanark Society Settlers, 1820-1821," by Carol Bennett, Publisher: Renfrew, Ontario: Juniper Books, 1991, p. 40). Sailing with the Fleming family on the "Commerce" in 1820 were William Anderson, Robert Anderson, and James Anderson- possible relatives of Margaret Anderson Waddell.

The Ambercrombie Street- Trans Atlantic Bridgeton Society consisted of 8 men, 6 women, and 31 children. James Horn was the initial leader, but George Waddell and John Gunn succeeded him in that role. There were 25 familes altogether on the Brock: Johnston, McLaren, McCallum, McNeil, Orr, Turnbull, Whitelaw, Baird, Gunn, Hannah, McLachlan, McClean, Urquart, Geo. Waddell, Blain, Boss, Campbell, Moulton, Morris, Codd, Flinn, Fair, Lawrin, Lamont, and McLeland. The Brock carried a total of 176 passengers, not all of whom were in the Lanark Societies.

There are questions about the children of George and Margaret Waddell:
"A Dictionary of Scottish Emigrants to Canada Before Confederation," by Donald White, Ontario Gen. Society, Toronto, 1986 lists children:
1. Elisabeth b. 1803, 2. Helen [Ellen] 1806, 3. Jean died infant 1806, 4. William 1808, 5. Matilda Mary b 1810, died young, 6. Matilda 1812, 7. John 1814, 8. Margaret 1816, 9. George 1819. I have used the birthdate 1806 for Ellen, although census information indicates 1808-1810.

Carol Bennet, Lanark Society Settlers, p. 40 does NOT list Elizabeth b. 1803, Jean d. infant 1806 or Matilda Mary b. 1810, died young.
Bennet's list is: Matilda 1812, John 1814, Margaret 1816, George 1819, William died in Scotland, and Ellen [no date] m. John Dalton. Since William married Minerva Miracle in Canada, it's obvious that he did not die in Scotland.

A descendant, Helen Read, checked Waddell birth records in Scotland and found: David Waddell born or christened on 11 dec 1803, who she believes remained in Scotland. From the records, he was a son of George Waddell and Margaret Anderson, and the birth was registered in Glasgow. Checking the parish records, she also found Jean Waddell, born or christened 16th Feb 1806, and William born or christened 7th (not 12th) April 1808, John born or christened 14th May, 1814. Also, of course, is listed Helen [Ellen] Waddell, born Glasgow, daughter of George and Margaret, born or christened 14th May 1806. Jean and Ellen are therefore both listed born or christened in 1806. From the source, www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk site, it's not obvious without viewing each record whether these are birthdates or christening dates.

Also, a Margaret Anderson [wife of George] was born in Lanark, 5th October 1778, parents William Anderson and Elizabeth Wilson.

George evidently was still in Lanark Township, Ontario in 1834, although some of the Waddell family had moved to Plympton Township, Lambton County, Ontario (near Detroit, Michigan). The 1834 inspection report on George Waddell, Sr. states: "15 good acres, the rest rocks. Hopes to join his two sons in Plympton soon." One of these sons evidently is William; the other either David, John or George. There is a David Waddell who is buried in Plympton Cemetery.

George is listed in Lanark in the 1842 census. George Waddell died August 30, 1872 at age 90, which points to a birth in 1782 (One account says he moved to Plympton and lived to the age of 99 years and 8 months. That would make him born in 1772). I do not, however, find him listed anywhere in the 1871 Ontario census.

Lanark County is inland from Leeds County, which is across the St. Lawrence River from St. Lawrence County, New York. I'm not sure how George's daughter Ellen and John Dalton were able to get together in Ogdenburg, New York, given the distance. There was a Henry Waddell living in Madrid Twp., St. Lawrence County, NY in 1820, near Ogdenburg. Ellen may have lived with him while her father was clearing a farm in Lanark.

At the close of the War of 1812 in 1814 and the Napoleonic wars in 1815, the British government was faced with two major problems- industrial depressions and unemployment at home, and an uneasy peace with the Americans abroad. Upper Canada was still vulnerable to invasion and it was thought the interior should be settled as a second line of defense against further hostilities.

An emigration scheme was put into action to settle the great wilderness north and west of the Rideau River that flows into the Ottawa. The British Government, in 1812, originally designated all of Lanark County, Ontario as a potential landing point for European immigrant settlers. From Scotland came soldiers and their families in 1815 to found the Perth military settlement.

In 1815 a proclamation was issued in England to any person in Great Britain who might be desirous of settling in Canada. As an inducement, they were to get free provisions during the voyage and also after their arrival, until such time as the land could be made to support them. The land was to be given free to each male immigrant over twenty-one, and they were also provided with ten pounds
sterling as loan. Each family was to receive an adze, a handsaw, drawing-knife, a shell-augur, two gimlets, doorlock and hinges, scythe and snath, reaping-hook, two hoes, hay-fork, skillet, camp kettle, and a blanket for each of its members. Then to each group of four to twelve families there was given a grindstone, a cross-cut and a whip-saw.

With the establishment of Perth as a military town, Lanark Township, Dalhousie Township and North Sherbrooke Township were opened for even greater settlement in 1820. From the outset, Lanark Village was designated to be the chief local administrative base for Northern Lanark. The earliest settlers tended to be Scottish citizens who came from impoverished conditions in Scotland, who left the overpopulated areas of Glasgow and Lanark.

In 1820, approximately 400 families arrived in Lanark Village, bringing with them skills in cotton weaving, carpentry, blacksmith and shoemaking. It is noteworth that these were city-dwellers, often not prepared for the rigors of rural living as would be the case with pioneering settlers whose families had generations of experience in making a living in the wilderness. Tools such as axes, hoes, etc. were typically heavy and of poor quality, and draft animals such as oxen were few and beyond the financial reach of these settlers.

The first settlement was by Scotsmen from Glasgow and Paisley who formed themselves into colonization groups before leaving Scotland. The ship "Commerce" left Greenock, Scotland in June 1820 with the Bridgeton Canadian Emigration Society. On this ship were George's sister Ellen Waddell and her husband Robert Fleming and their children. The Lesmahago society (which is a district in Scotland) followed, with thirty-three families or about three hundred immigrants. These sailed from Greenock, Scotland in the ship "Prompt" July 4, 1820, and arrived at Quebec two months later. Their journey continued as they made their way up the St. Lawrence River from Quebec on huge flat-bottomed boats to Brockville or Prescott, then overland on a rough road to Perth; from there, mostly on foot through dense forests to the site where a sign on a tree read "This is Lanark".

Five days after the departure of the Prompt, on July 9, 1820, another vessel, the "Brock" [Brooke, Broke], bore away from the same port. On board were the twenty-five Transatlantic Society families, including that of George Waddell. The passengers of the Brock were not able to pay for their own fare, and money had been raised for their passage. The Brock arrived in Quebec some days ahead of the Prompt, and the Transatlantic society found themselves in Lanark County at about the same time as the Lesmahago society, and were actually the first to settle.

Several families were displeased with the appearance of Lanark County and went across the American border. The remainder went on, "backing" in all their supplies. Or, if the article did not suit their back, they carried it on their head; for instance carrying a grindstone all the way from Perth on their head.

Arriving at the frontier, they met James Breden on lot 5, concession 2, Lanark Township, living in a wigwam - the only white man seen since leaving Drummond. Of the settlers who did arrive in the village, all males over 21 years of age were each granted a 100 acre parcel of land; they drew their location by lot, taking from a hat a slip of paper with a number of a certain lot on it. The lots were divided up using the traditional grid system - a grid which is still evident in the current land use pattern and property boundaries.

George Waddell received his grant of land in Lanark Township, Con 1 Lot 13W, on 25 October 1820. Since it was already late in the season, he must have worked very diligently to get a shelter built before snowfall! Living in tents made of bark and branches or rude log shanties, the women and children had to wait in Lanark Village while the men followed the survey crew's vague slash mark on trees along the concession lines or "walked the blazes" to their drawn lots. With the few tools dispensed by the government supply depot, the settlers began to build rough shelters and to clear small patches of land using grub hoes to dig holes in the ground among the stumps. Potatoes, oats, and grass for meadows were planted. As the trees were felled, the hardwood was burned and the ashes were collected to make potash, which at that time was the only product that could be exchanged for cash.

The men returned for their families and they settled on their land. The huge trees daunted many but gradually, with neighbors helping neighbors, the land was cleared and schools, churches, and mills sprang up. One of the settlers in the first few years killed eighty-two wolves and sixty-eight bears, as beasts of prey were plentiful at that time. The first rough trails became tracks and eventually the roads of the township.

Early industrial activity typically included grist mills, flour mills, pork-packing and tanning establishments - these were soon followed by an introduction of maple syrup operations, lumbering, saw mills, furniture activities and fishing. A flourishing timber industry began to create markets for farm produce. Though all the settlers took up land, many worked entire winters in the lumber camps; others were able to carry on in their former trades. The town of Lanark was serviced by weavers, coopers, tanners, millers, carpenters and carriage makers. In time, the village became a thriving community, with churches, schools and many successful businesses.

More About GEORGE WADDELL:
Christening: July 22, 1782, Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland
Occupation: Bef. 1820, Weaver in Glasgow

Notes for MARGARET ANDERSON:
Margaret Anderson was born Ocober 5, 1778 in Lanark, Scotland. "Scottish Settlers to Bathurst Area," J.R. Ernst Miller, 1987, lists Margaret Anderson b. 1780....2 years older than her husband George Waddell. It also shows a Beatrice Anderson b. 1777 in Lanark who came to the Bathurst area in Canada in 1820 with her husband Archibald Nairn. It seems reasonable that Margaret and Beatrice were sisters. Records at Family Search do not show the parents of Margaret....but they do show the parents of Beatrice as William Anderson and Elizabeth Wilson. There is a record (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk) for Margaret Anderson born in Lanark 5 October 1778, parents William Anderson and Elizabeth Wilson, which confirms the relationship. Also, an IGA record.

Sailing on the "Commerce" in 1820 with the Robert and Ellen Waddell Fleming family were William Anderson, Robert Anderson, and James Anderson- possible relatives of Margaret Anderson Waddell.



Children of GEORGE WADDELL and MARGARET ANDERSON are:
i. ELISABETH4 WADDELL, b. 1803, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
8. ii. DAVID WADDELL, b. Abt. December 11, 1803, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.
iii. JEAN WADDELL, b. February 16, 1806, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland; d. 1806, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
9. iv. ELLEN WADDELL, b. Abt. May 14, 1806, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland; d. January 13, 1876, Delavan, Walworth County, Wisconsin.
10. v. WILLIAM WADDELL, b. Abt. April 07, 1808, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland; d. January 14, 1883, Blue Earth County, Minnesota.
vi. MATILDA MARY WADDELL, b. 1810, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland; d. Bet. 1810 - 1812, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
11. vii. MATILDA WADDELL, b. February 24, 1812, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
viii. JOHN WADDELL, b. Abt. 1814, Scotland.
ix. MARGARET WADDELL, b. Abt. 1816, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland; m. JAMES BROOK; b. Abt. 1807.
x. GEORGE WADDELL, JR., b. Abt. 1819.


5. DAVID3 WADDELL (MISC.2, COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born in Of Plympton Twp, Lambton County, Ontario.

Notes for DAVID WADDELL:
Descendant of David Waddell, Karen Read, believes that David Waddell b. 1803, son of George Waddell, stayed in Scotland. However, we know that at least two of George Waddell's sons moved to Plympton Twp, Lambton County, Ontario. We find David Waddell listed in "Plympton Twp's Rural Cemeteries", which would be consistent with a son of George moving to Plympton:
OBAN/JACKSON
McIntosh Emily Isabella (Waddell)
WADDELL David
" Ellen Jane
" Emily Isabella
" George
" Isabella
" James
" John
" Lizzie E. (King)

This David is listed under Misc. until more is learned.

More About DAVID WADDELL:
Burial: OBAN/JACKSON, Plympton Twp, Lambton County, Ontario

Children of DAVID WADDELL are:
i. ELLEN JANE4 WADDELL.
ii. EMILY ISABELLA WADDELL, m. UNKNOWN MCINTOSH.
iii. GEORGE WADDELL.
iv. ISABELLA WADDELL.
v. JAMES WADDELL.
vi. JOHN WADDELL.
vii. LIZZIE E. WADDELL.


6. WILLIAM3 WADDELL (MISC.2, COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born Abt. 1800 in Scotland.

Children of WILLIAM WADDELL are:
12. i. JAMES4 WADDELL, b. 1838, London, London, Middlesex, England; d. New York, New York.
ii. WILLIAM WADDELL, b. 1846, London, London, Middlesex, England; d. Prob. New York; m. KATE ANNIE UNKNOWN; b. 1853, London, London, Middlesex, England; d. Prob. New York.

Notes for WILLIAM WADDELL:
1881 Census
Wm. WADDELL Head M Male 35 London, London, Middlesex, England Accountant
Kate Annie WADDELL Wife M Female 28 London, London, Middlesex, England
Georgina ROGERS Serv U Female 30 Poplar, Middlesex, England Cook Dom
Sarah E. CLIFTON Serv U Female 21 Burrington, Hampshire, England Housemaid Dom
Sarah A. ASHTON Serv U Female 25 Wyton, Huntingdon, England Parlour Maid Dom
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Dwelling 11 St Mary Abotts Ter
Census Place London, Middlesex, England
Family History Library Film 1341006
Public Records Office Reference RG11
Piece / Folio 0027 / 137
Page Number 15


Notes for KATE ANNIE UNKNOWN:
William Waddell b. 1846 and his wife Annie took in James Waddell III upon the death of his parents. She was essentially my dads (Don Waddell speaking) "mother" and the two of them went off to live in Denmark for 3 years from 1917 -1920.


7. JAMES3 WADDELL (MISC.2, COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born 1803 in North Ireland, Of N. Elmsley, Lanark N., Ontario, and died February 09, 1886 in Perth, Lanark County, Ontario.

Notes for JAMES WADDELL:
Perth "Courier" 12 Feb 1886 Death Notice:
At Perth, Tuesday, 9th February 1886, Mr. James Waddell, aged 83 years. Late residence Drummond St. Settled on well-known Waddell farm in North Elmsley. Native of North Ireland. Both he and Mrs Waddell were called away not many months apart. Member of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Perth. Leaves two daughters, both living in Perth, and four sons - John A. , Edwin and William of Brooklyn, NY; and James A. , banker, Key West, Florida. To Elmwood Cemetery.

According to e obituary of his son John, he came to Canada from Scotland in 1831.


More About JAMES WADDELL:
Burial: Elmwood Cemetery
Census: 1881, Packenham, Lanark N., Ontario
Occupation: Farmer
Religion: Presbyterian

Children of JAMES WADDELL are:
i. JAMES A.4 WADDELL, b. 1836, Ontario, Canada; d. November 25, 1904, Key West, Florida; m. MARGARET UNKNOWN; b. 1841, Ontario, Canada; d. August 22, 1879, Oriakasy, New York.

More About JAMES A. WADDELL:
Burial: Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

More About MARGARET UNKNOWN:
Burial: Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

ii. JOHN A. WADDELL, b. 1827, Airdie, Scotland; d. January 12, 1906, Canada.
iii. EDWIN WADDELL.
iv. WILLIAM WADDELL.


Generation No. 4

8. DAVID4 WADDELL (GEORGE3, WILLIAM2, COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born Abt. December 11, 1803 in Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland. He married MARY MAGDELINE SCOTT March 10, 1822 in Abbottshall, Scotland, daughter of JAMES SCOTT and ELIZABETH EWAN. She was born January 01, 1804 in Abbottshall, Scotland.

Notes for DAVID WADDELL:
A descendant of David Waddell, Karen Read, believes that David Waddell b. 1803 stayed in Scotland. This record is for that David.

However, we know that at least two of George Wadell's sons moved to Plympton Twp, Lambton County, Ontario. We find David Waddell listed in "Plympton Twp's Rural Cemeteries", which would be consistent with a son of George moving to Plympton. This second David is listed under Misc. until more is learned.

More About DAVID WADDELL:
Christening: December 11, 1803, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland

Child of DAVID WADDELL and MARY SCOTT is:
i. JAMES5 WADDELL, b. 1824, Scotland; d. June 21, 1890, Kinghorn, Fife, Scotland; m. ISABELLA WILKIE, December 07, 1855, Castle Portburg, Edenburgh, Scotland; b. Abt. 1826, Kinglassie, Fife, Scotland; d. December 04, 1907, Scotland.

More About JAMES WADDELL:
Occupation: Farm labourer


9. ELLEN4 WADDELL (GEORGE3, WILLIAM2, COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born Abt. May 14, 1806 in Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland, and died January 13, 1876 in Delavan, Walworth County, Wisconsin. She married JOHN DALTON Bef. 1827 in Ogdenburg, St. Lawrence County, New York, son of WILLIAM DALTON and MARY UNKNOWN. He was born June 02, 1800 in England, and died January 05, 1887 in Delavan, Walworth County, Wisconsin.

Notes for ELLEN WADDELL:
Ellen Waddell was born or christened May 14, 1806 in Glasgow, Lanakshire, Scotland ( 1850 census indicates 1808, 1860 and 1870 indicvate 1810). Her name is listed as Helen in her birth-record and in the 1850 census, and Ellen thereafter.

In 1820, Ellen emigrated to Lanark Village, Lanark County, Ontario with her father George Waddell, a Glasgow weaver, with the Ambercrombie St-Trans Atlantic Bridgeton Society aboad the "Brock." She married John Dalton, probably in Ogdenburg, St. Lawrence County, New York before 1827. Together they had ten children. John and Ellen Waddell Dalton lived for seventeen years on a farm in St. Lawrence County, New York before moving their family to Wisconsin in the spring of 1844. ("The Lanark Society Settlers, 1820-1821," by Carol Bennett, Publisher: Renfrew, Ontario: Juniper Books, c1991, p. 40 verifies that Ellen is a daughter of George Waddell and that she married John Dalton.)

There is a family listing in Ancestry.com for George Waddell, son of William Waddell and Ellen Thompson. George married Margaret Anderson, and had a daughter named Ellen Waddell about the right time (1810). In the record, this Ellen married John Dalton. This appears to fit known facts.

There is a Waddell family, that of Henry Waddell, in Madrid Twp., St. Lawrence County, NY in 1820. Madrid is about ten miles from Ogdenburg. That is the same township as the one in which John and Ellen Waddell Dalton are believed to have lived in 1830. It's possible that Henry Waddell (Waddle) was her father. Another possibility is that Larark, Ontario was in the wilderness in 1820. Perhaps George Waddell sent his wife and children, including 12 year old Ellen, to live with a relative Henry Waddell while he cleared a farm and made a life for his family in Larark. Ellen named two sons John Henry and Henry James, and one sonGeorge Waddell Dalton.

"The Delavan Republican," Thursday, January 13, 1876, Vol Xll, No. 8, WSHS Cat. # P 42907:

" A painful, and perhaps fatal, accident occurred to the aged couple who two months ago celebrated their golden wedding, Mr. and Mrs. John Dalton. They had been on a visit to their son-in-law, Wm. Redford, and were returning Tuesday afternoon, with their son, Henry Dalton, when near the residence of Thomas Williams, the back seat, on which they were riding, became detached in some manner, turned backwards, and threw the unfortunate pair backwards to the ground. Their injuries are very severe, and they now lie in a very precarious condition at the residence of Mr. Thomas Williams."

"The Delavan Republican," Thursday, January 20, 1876, Vol Xll, No. 9, SHS Cat. # P42907:

" Mrs. Dalton, the old lady who was thrown from a buggy at East Delavan, last week, died at the residence of Thomas Williams, on Thursday. She was buried in the East Delavan cemetery, on Saturday. Old Mr. Dalton is slowly recovering."

More About ELLEN WADDELL:
Burial: Old Pioneer Cemetery, East Delevan, Wisconsin

Notes for JOHN DALTON:
John Dalton was born June 02, 1800 in England, emigrated to America with his parents William and Mary Dalton, and settled near Ogdenburg, St. Lawrence County, New York. His obituary says he arrived in 1824; other sources point to his arrival with his parents about 1808. He married Ellen Waddell in New York before 1827. She emigrated from Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland in 1820 with her parents George and Margaret Anderson Waddell. John and Ellen lived for seventeen years on a farm in St. Lawrence County, New York before moving their family to Delavan County, Wisconsin in the spring of 1844. Together John and Ellen had ten children in New York.

Ogdenburg is located on the St. Lawrence River, across the river from Prescott in Grenville County, Ontario. Ogdensburg was the first white settlement in the wilderness that became northern New York State. In 1748, the French Abbe Francis Piquet, a Sulpician missionary, arrived to establish Fort La Presentation and a mission. Located at the confluence of the St. Lawrence and Oswegatchie Rivers, the fort served as church, school, trading post, Indian village, and citadel.

In 1760, the fort was taken by the British during the French-Indian War, renamed Fort Oswegatchie (Oswego), and became a busy stopping place for traveling soldiers. The area continued to flourish as settlers from Europe, Canada, New England, other parts of the world found their way here. Ogdensburg became an important border community, and was seen as a strategic location during the War of 1812. The residents were able to look across the river and observe the British troops in Prescott. In fact, Ogdensburg was attacked and suffered severely at the hands of the British on February 22, 1813. After the war, it became an important port, and the City was incorporated in 1817.

In the 1830 census, a John Dolton (sic) is in Ostwegatchie Twp., St. Lawrence County, NY with 1 boy 10-15, 1 man 40-50; 3 girls under 5, 1 girl 5-10, 1 girl 10-15, and a woman 40-50. Right township, but their ages and the ages of the kids don't match.

In the 1830 census, a John Dalton is in Madrid Township, St. Lawrence County, New York: 2 boys under 5, 2 boys 6-10, 1 boy 11-15, 1 man 40-50, and his wife 40-50. All those kids don't fit with their marriage about 1827. John and Ellen should be about 30 in 1830.

John Dalton is listed in the 1840 census for St. Lawrence County, Louisville Twp., New York: 3 boys under 5, 2 boys 10-15, 1 boy 15-20, one man 40-50, 1 girl 10-15, and his wife 40-50 (same age groups for John and Ellen as in 1830?!) John and Ellen would be about 40 in 1840, so this works. Ages of the kids are problematic!

John and Ellen Dalton were among the early settlers of the Delavan area of Walworth County, Wisconsin in about 1844 (near the Illinois border). The "History of Walworth County," p 432 indicates that they arrived there in 1842 and that a G.W. Dalton arrived in 1844.

In the 1850 census for Delavan Twp., Walworth County, Wisconsin: John Dalton 37 ENGLAND, Helen W. 42 SCOTLAND, John, Jr. 23 NY, Margaret 22 NY, Matilda 14 NY, Geo 16 NY, Wm 12 NY, James 9 NY, Ellen J. 7 NY, Nathan 5 WI, Washington 2 WI. From the birthplaces of the children, it would appear that the family moved from New York to Wisconsin after 1843 and before 1845, supporting 1844 as their arrival year. There is an alleged daughter named Donna [see notes for Donna] that does not appear here.

A James Dwire and John Dalton of Walworth County, Wisconsin Terretory received a land grant for 80 acres on March 25, 1841. There was a second John Dalton in Walworth County, Wisconsin in 1837 ("Pioneer History of Walworth County," p. 461), who most likely was the recipient of the 1841 land grant. This "other" John Dalton is in Geneva Twp. in 1840 and in Delaware Twp. in 1850.

John G. Dalton of Walworth County, Wisconsin received a land grant for 40 acres on March 3, 1843. It may be possible that John came ahead from New York to Wisconsin to clear a farm in 1843, leaving the family in New York until 1844? Or he may have actually arrived in 1842. Or, he could be the "other" John Dalton!

Other Dalton families in Walworth County in 1850 are: Maria C. Dalton (probably somebody's widow) in 1850 and 1855 listed in Bloomfield Twp.; George Dalton in Delaware Twp. (probably the son of the "other" John). They are listed under Misc.

In the 1860 census for the town of Delavan, Walworth County, Wisconsin: John Dalton 60 ENGLAND, a farmer; Helen 50 SCOTLAND, William 21 NY, Helen 17 NY, Nathan 14 WI, and Washington 12 WI.

In the 1870 census for Delavan, Walworth County, Wisconsin, John 70 ENGLAND and his wife Ellen 60 SCOTLAND are living with son George Dalton 36 NY and his wife Helen 23 WI and baby Herbert 9/12 WI.

In the 1870 Delavan census, there is a Susan Dalton 26 WI (born 1844) working as a domestic for the Matthew Buckley family. She is most likely the daughter of John Green Dalton.

Interestingly, Moses Dexter, the father of Amanda Dexter who married John Dalton, Jr. was in Walworth County in 1880 (see notes on Moses Dexter). There also are several Harringtons in Delavan (Moses married Ama Hatrrington).

The Delavan Republican, Thursday, January 13, 1876, Vol Xll, No. 8, WSHS Cat. # P 42907:
" A painful, and perhaps fatal, accident occurred to the aged couple who two months ago celebrated their golden wedding, Mr. and Mrs. John Dalton. They had been on a visit to their son-in-law, Wm. Redford, and were returning Tuesday afternoon, with their son, Henry Dalton, when near the residence of Thomas Williams, the back seat, on which they were riding, became detached in some manner, turned backwards, and threw the unfortunate pair backwards to the ground. Their injuries are very severe, and they now lie in a very precarious condition at the residence of Mr. Thomas Williams." Unfortunately, Ellen Waddell Dalton died from her injuries on January 13, 1876.

In the 1880 census for Delavan Village, Wisconsin, we find that John Dalton 80 ENGLAND is living with his daughter Mary M. Hollister 43 NY, her husband Mason A. Hollister 52 NY, and sons Hart 18 WI and Guy 14 WI.

John Dalton died in Delavan Janaury 19, 1887. He is buried in Old Pioneer Cemetery, East Delevan, Wisconsin.

OBITUARY: John Dalton, "The Delavan Enterprise," Wednesday, January 19, 1887, Vol lX, #46, WSHS Cat. # P72-2343

"Mr. John Dalton, who departed this life January 5th, 1887, was born in England the 2nd day of June 1800, and was therefore 86 years, 6 months and 26 days old. In 1824 he came to the United States and settled at Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence county, New York, where he formed the acquaintance of Miss Ellen Waddell, of Glasgow, Scotland, with whom he was soon united in marriage [bef. 1827]. The fruits of that union was 10 children, all of whom, with one exception, survive. In the spring of 1844, he arrived in Walworth county and soon after purchased the farm which C. Q. Fisk now owns, where he lived many years. Since his first arrival, he has always been a resident of the town of Delavan. Mrs. Dalton died in 1876, since which time he has been a lonely traveler on the downward pathway of life. He united in early life with the M. E. [Methodist Episcopal] church and remained a member to life's close. Of Mr. Dalton it can be truly said that he was an honest, upright man in all his dealings, a good neighbor, a fond husband, an indulgent parent, a friend to all, an enemy to none. None ever applied to him for assistance without receiving it, if, it was in his power to aid. Thus the pioneers of Walworth county drop away and the place which knew them shall know them no more forever."

"The Independent," Elkhorn, Thursday, Jan. 20, 1887, " John Dalton, an old settler and esteemed citizen of East Delavan, died at the home of his son, Henry Dalton, January 5, 1887."

More About JOHN DALTON:
Burial: Old Pioneer Cemetery, East Delevan, Wisconsin

Children of ELLEN WADDELL and JOHN DALTON are:
i. JOHN HENRY5 DALTON, b. October 1827, Ogdenburg, St. Lawrence County, New York; d. 1908, Leland Township, Leelanau County, Michigan; m. AMANDA R. DEXTER, September 1853, N. Manitou Island, Leelanau County, Michigan; b. 1835, Vermont; d. 1896, Leland Township, Leelanau County, MI.

Notes for JOHN HENRY DALTON:
John Henry Dalton was born October 1827 in Ogdenburg, St. Lawrence County, New York. His father John Dalton, Sr. is from England and his mother Ellen Waddell is from Scotland (as stated in the1880 census). In 1844, when he was 17 years old, John moved with his family from New York to Walworth County, Wisconsin. In 1848 he went to North Manitou Island, Michigan. He married Amanda Dexter there in 1853, and evidently returned for a while with her to Wisconsin, as their first child John Henry, Jr. was born there in 1855. The family was back on the island by 1857 when daughter Orilla Amanda was born.

His biography is found in "The Traverse Region," published by H. R. Page & Co., Chicago 1884, p. 245,
"John Dalton, foreman for the Leland Iron Company, of Leland, Leelanaw County, Mich., was born in New York in 1827. The first seventeeen years of his life were spent on a farm. He then left home and went to Wisconsin, where he remained until 1848, being mostly engaged in running a threshing machine and in breaking land. In 1848 he went to the Manitou Islands, where he was employed in the wood business [for Pickard] and in charge of the dock. Came from North Manitou to Leland in 1866, and since the Iron Works were started has been yard foreman and in charge of the wood business of the Leland Iron Company. Has been several years justice of the peace and now holds that office. He was married in September 1853 to Amanda Dexter. They had eight children, of whom seven are living. Mrs. Dalton is a daughter of Moses H. Dexter, who settled on North Manitou in 1849. He is now living in Walworth County, Wisconsin at age of eighty-four."

According to "North Manitou Island: Between Sunrise and Sunset," by Rita Hadra Rusco, BookCrafters, 1991, pp. 29 ff., "John Dalton came to the island [N. Manitou] in 1848 and was employed as manager on one of Pickard's docks. A year later [1849] Moses H. Dexter settled his family on the island. He was a blacksmith and no doubt found a ready demand for his services.The wooding station and sawmills were dependant on a large number of horses and oxen to haul heavy loads." Both John Dalton and Moses Dexter were among the earliest pioneers of Leelanau County.

North Manitou Island was occupied on a seasonal basis by Native Americans and, after 1634, were touched upon by French traders. After steamships, both paddle boats and "propellers," began to appear on Lake Michigan, by 1834 forty-eight were plying the lakes. Manitou Island was a good place to obtain wood from early inhabitants, and by 1843 there were references to wood-cutters living on the island. Cordwood was cut into 4 foot sections for fuel.

Arriving about 1842, Nicholas Pickard (b. 1817 in Madison County, New York, moved to Niagra County in 1826) by 1846 had started a wooding station there to provide fuel to the propellers passing through the Manitou Passage. His younger brother, Simeon Pickard, joined the business in June 1847. They are sons of Adam N. Pickard, born in Madison County, NY in 1792 and moved first to Niagra County, NY, then to Leland about 1864.

Cornelius Jones built a sawmill on the eastside of N. Manitou, which he operated until 1855. Other sawmills were constructed later.

Nazaros Dona, a French trapper born in Canada in 1794, relocated to the island from the mainland where he lived near Leland at the Ottawa village. Dona engaged in fishing, packing salted or dried whitefish and laketrout in barrels for sale in Chicago and Detroit. According to a report written by Simon Pickard, the Indians used birchbark canoes to visit the island to trade and buy goods. There was no other trading-place closer than Mackinac Island.

In the 1850 census, the Pickard families are living on N. Manitou Island in Michilimackinac County (northern Michigan was one big county) in a household with Henry T. Stringham, a wood-dealer from St. Croix, the West Indies. Michilimackinac County at the time covered a huge area including Mackinac County in the Upper Peninsula, Emmet County, Charlevoix County, Leelanau County, and N. and S. Manitou Islands.

At the time of the 1850 census, on July 22, 1850 John Dalton 23 NY was also living on N. Manitou Island. He was living with seven single men in what appears to be a boarding house, identified as house 15, Family 15. John Dalton was a teamster, and John Korval was listed as the head of household. John is living a few doors down from the family of his future wife, Amanda Dexter.

"Two of the island's first families were joined in 1853 when Amanda Dexter, daughter of Moses Dexter, married John Dalton. Amanda and John Dalton had eight children." (Ibid, "North Manitou Island," by Rita Hadra Rusco, p. 30)

In the 1850 census for District 33, town of Delavan, Walworth County, Wisconsin, John Dalton, Jr. 23 NY is shown as living with his father on August 29, 1850; a farmer. He seems to be listed twice in 1850, or traveled between Michigan and Wisconsin between July and August, a relatively easy trip by lake steamer. He's also listed in the 1854 census on the island.

On December 7-8, 1854, the propeller WESTMORELAND went down with seventeen souls in the Manitou passage off North Manitou Island (Location given variously as Sleeping Bear Pt, Platte Bay, North and South Manitou.) Her cargo was supplies for Mackinac Island - wheat, flour and barrelled beef. It must have been quite exciting for the residents, and for the men in the life saving stations on the Manitous. She capsized and foundered due to heavy weather and an overload of ice in her superstructure. She sank one of her own lifeboats as she went down. The survivors were picked up by the schooner WHIRLWIND. She was reportedly also carrying liquor and $100,000 in gold. Divers have looked for her and her treasure often, but cargo and safe were probably recovered in 1872 or 74. The Westmoreland was built in 1853 by Lafrenier & Stevenson, Cleveland. Specs: 200x28x12, 665 tons, constructed of wood, for passenger & package freight. Owned primarily by Anson D. Ellis, Buffalo (Ellis & Ball).

At some point, John and Amanda are evidently back in Wisconsin, as census records indicate that his first child, Henry was born there in 1855. He likely returned across the lake to Wisconsin to work in the lumber industry that was flourishing in Janesville on the Rock River.

In 1860, John Henry Dalton was back living on North Manitou Island, then a part of an extinct county named Manitou. He didn't move, rather the county name changed. This county was in existence from 1860 to 1905 and comprised all the islands in the Upper Peninsula archipelago. In 1861, Manitou County was attached to Mackinac, and in 1865 the island was attached to Leelanau County, then back to Mackinac in 1869. In 1895, North and South Manitou and the Fox Islands were attached to Leelanau County for good.

In the 1860 census for North Manitou Island John Henry Dalton is listed twice, as John Dolton 34 NY in House 612, Family 606 on July 26, 1860; and a day later as Henry Dolton 33 NY in House 634, Family 624. In the first, John Dolton 34 NY was farmer with a worth of $100, married to Manda 24 VT; Children John H. 5 WI, Manda 3 MI, Ellen A. 1 MI, Edward 2/12 MI. In the second, Henry Dolton 33 NY is a day laborer with personal property worth $150, married to Amanda 24 VT; children John Henry 5 WI, Mary 3 MI, Sophia 1 MI, and Emmy 2/12 MI. I'm guessing that John talked to the enumerator one time and Amanda the second time, as facts differ slightly-- especially the names of the kids! The baby is identified as Edward (a boy) and Emmy (a girl) in the two sessions. This is cleared up in 1870, with Edward definately a boy! I wonder about the two house numbers, though? There are only 53 households on N. Manitou Island in 1860, so it's hard to see how the census-taker made a mistake and counted the same family twice!

There are many John Dalton's listed in the Civil War rosters for Michigan, Wisconsin, and New York. A John H. Dalton enlisted as a Private on November 22, 1864 in Company G, 37th Infantry Regiment Wisconsin ("Roster of Wisconsin Volunteers: War of Rebellion," published 1886). This John H. Dalton was honorably discharged in Washington, D.C. 27 July 1865. Records indicate that this John H. Dalton was an invalid after the war and received a penison in 1893. "Alias" John Egan appears after his name. In November 1864, John Dalton and his wife Amanda were living on North Manitou Island in northern Michigan and had five children, one a new infant (Clara). Evidently, John Dalton or his family arranged for John Egan to serve in the Army on John Dalton's behalf. This was frequently done during the Civil war, costing about $300 (where do I sign up?).

The 37th Infantry Regiment was organized in the spring of 1864 at Camp Randall, Madison, Wisconsin and joined the Army of the Potomac under Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. The Regiment fought battles at Weldon Railroad, VA in December 1864 and battles in and around Petersburg, VA from December 1864 to April 1865. In the final assault, it supported the brigade picket line against Fort Mahone, and three companies of the Regiment were the first to enter the Confederate works. The Civil War finally ended with the surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Courthouse on April 9, 1865. John Egan, enlisted as John Dalton, mustered out July 27, 1865.

In 1869 a company of Detroit men organized the Leland Lake Superior Iron Company with a capitalization of $150,000 and began the construction of an iron furnace, which was put in operation in 1870. The furnace was built on the north side of the creek below the dam. It was of brick, ninety feet high, and had a large frame casting house and an equally large stock house in connection. A flume was constructed from the dam to the furnace, the water being used to drive the air blast for the furnace, and six scows were built for the purpose of bringing cordwood to town, the price being two dollars per cord at the water's edge, paid to the farmers who had settled around the shores of the lake.

Fourteen round and dome-shaped bee-hive kilns for "burning" the wood to make charcoal were constructed in a double row along the bank of the river above the bridge. Nine more were later erected just east of the narrows at Provemont, and thousands of cords of the maple and beach which predominated in the area were converted into charcoal before being hauled to Leland by small steam-powered tugs burning wood for fuel. Ore for the furnace was brought down from the Upper Peninsula in barges and unloaded by Indians. In many instances limestone was procured from the neighboring farmers, who dug it out and burned it themselves with logs from their own land. The resulting 40 tons of iron produced per day was shipped to Detroit.

By 1870, John "Dolton" 33 NY (born 1827) and his family had moved from North Manitou Island to the mainland, and he was living in Centerville Township, which then included the present Leland Township. He was in House 102, Family 98. He was working for the Leland Iron Furnace, and his personal property had increased to $1215. With him is his wife Aminta 33 NY (born 1837), Henry 15 WI, Auretia 13 MI, Emma 11 MI, Edwin 10 MI, Clarra 7 MI, and Walter 1 MI. Note that Amanda, who previously listed her birthplace as Vermont, now lists it in New York.

Expansion of the village was rapid at this point, though the presence of kilns made living somewhat unpleasant because of the clouds of smoke from the smoldering wood that hovered over the village at all times. The Iron Company was importing men to work for them, many of which were Bohemians, who later moved to the ridge east of Carp Lake and created a farming community which came to be known as the Bohemian Settlement.

In 1880, John Dalton's residence was given as the Village of Leland (House 240, Family 241) and he had become the foreman of the Leland Iron Company. It is to be presumed that he had been here ever since his move from the island. The listing is John "Dolton" 53 NY (born 1827). He says that his father is from England and his mother from Scotland. With him is his wife Amanda 44 VT (born 1836 and back to being born in VT). She says her father is from Wales (he's actually from Vermont), and her mother is from Vermont. Children: Henry 25 WI, Clara 17 MI, William 14 MI, Walter 11 MI, and Warren 5 MI.

By 1884 the population of Leland Township, which included the village of Provemont, had grown to number 839, with 370 persons living in Leland. During this period the iron furnace burned down twice and was rebuilt. It also changed hands once, the original incorporators having spent all their capital before the furnace got well started and selling out in 1872. The new management was more successful. It not only succeeded in operating at a profit but managed, by promising to build a court house and exerting political pressure, to have the county seat moved from Northport to Leland in 1883. The court house still stands on its original site, erected there because the iron furnace properties, including the kilns, occupied what is now the center of the village.

The year 1884 saw the beginning of the end of the iron furnace. The business of making charcoal iron so far from the sources of iron ore became unprofitable. In that year the property, including an acreage of land, was sold to four local men who incorporated under the name of Leland Lumber Company and began to operate the saw mill. The furnace was demolished, and the bricks were used to build a county jail, now the home of the Leelanau Historical Museum.

In the 1900 census for Leland Township, John 72 NY (Oct 1827) was living with his son William 34 MI. His wife Amanda Dexter Dalton passed on in 1896. John died in 1908, twelve years after Amanda died. John Dalton shares a headstone with his wife Amandy Dalton in Beechwood Cemetery, Leland, Michigan. The stone is enscribed John Dalton 1827-1908 and Amandy Dalton 1835-1896. We will go with 1827 as the birth year of John Dalton.

More About JOHN HENRY DALTON:
Burial: Beechwood Cemetery, Leland, Leelanau County, Michigan

Notes for AMANDA R. DEXTER:
Amanda Dexter 15 NY with her father, mother, and sisters and brothers are listed in the 1850 census for N. Manitou Island. She is still there in 1860, listed with her husband John Dalton and children.

"The Traverse Region," published by H. R. Page & Co., Chicago 1880, p.245 is the source of the fact that Amanda Dexter married John Dalton September 1853.

In the 1870 census, John and Amanda Dexter Dalton 33 NY are living in Leland, two doors down from Andrew Harrington 28 born in NY (1842). Has to be a relative of her mother Ama Harrington. I have listed Andrew for the record.

"Amandy" Dalton (1835-1896) shares a headstone with her husband John Dalton.

More About AMANDA R. DEXTER:
Burial: Beechwood Cemetery, Leland, Leelanau County, Michigan

ii. MARGARET DALTON, b. 1828, St. Lawrence County, New York; m. (1) SMITH BRADLEY; b. 1815; m. (2) AZARIAH WEST.
iii. ELIZABETH CLARK DALTON, b. March 08, 1832, Ogdenberg, Saint Lawrence County , New York; d. February 15, 1905, Brookings, Brookings, South Dakota; m. AZARIAH SMITH WEST, September 07, 1848, Geneva, Walworth County, Wisconsisn; b. November 07, 1825, Minerva, Essex county, New York; d. October 1904, Brookings, Brookings, South Dakota.
iv. GEORGE WADDELL DALTON, b. June 12, 1835, Morristown, Saint Lawrence County, New York; d. January 10, 1907, Oshkosh, Wisconsin; m. HELEN CORDELIA JEWETT, September 23, 1868, Lake Geneva, Walworth County, Wisconsin; b. January 21, 1848, Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin; d. Aft. 1907.

Notes for GEORGE WADDELL DALTON:
See notes for Henry James Dalton for the story of George Waddell Dalton's gold rush trip to California in 1849. George W. Dalton enlisted November 27, 1861 to November 27, 1864 in the Union Army and served with Company A, 1st Cavalry of the Oregon Volunteers. The Company primarily soldiered out of Fort Walla Walla in the Southeast Washington Territory. This information is found on index cards compiled by a member of Oregon Genealogical Forum from records of payroll bonds kept by the State Adjutant General.

The 1st Regiment, Oregon Cavalry was organized at large in Oregon February to April, 1862. The Regiment concentrated in Williamette Valley and was ordered May 1862 to Walla Walla Country and the Mining Districts of Nez Perce and Salmon River Countries to protect emigrants and miners. Headquarters at Fort Walla Walla, Washington Territory.

Company "A" moved from near Oregon City to Fort Dallas; thence to Fort Walla Walla, Washington Territory, June 24-July 12, 1862. Left Fort Walla Walla July 25, 1862, for Salmon Falls on Snake River Expedition against Snake Indians in Idaho August 19-October 11, 1862, and protecting emigrant roads till November. At Fort Dalles till April, 1863. Ordered to Fort Walla Walla April 20. Expedition against Snake Indians in Idaho May 4-October 26, 1863. Expedition from Fort Walla Walla to Snake River, Washington Territory, February 16-23, 1864, and to Southeastern Oregon April 30-October 6, 1864. Expedition from Fort Boles to Salmon Falls, Idaho Territory, and skirmishes August 27-October 5, 1864. At Fort Vancouver and other stations in Oregon and Idaho till muster out. Expedition from Camp Lyon, Idaho Territory, to Malheur River, Ore., and skirmish July 2-13, 1865. George Dalton mustered out November 27, 1864.

George was witness to a wedding in 1869: In Delevan, Walworth Co, WI, Feb 3, 1869, between Mr. Joseph T. Brown, farmer, of Walworth, aged 25, and Mrs. Sarah Ann Yost of Delevan, aged 23, in presence of George W. Dalton and Henry Dalton, attesting witnesses. I'm guessing that Sarah is a sister of Celia E. Yost, wife of Henry Dalton.

In the 1870 census for Delavan, Walworth County, Wisconsin, John 70 ENGLAND and his wife Ellen 60 SCOTLAND are living with son George Dalton 36 NY and his wife Helen 23 WI and baby Herbert 9/12 WI.

In 1880, George W. Dalton, age 45, is a farmer living in Lakin Twp., Harvey Co., Kansas [his brother, William, is also in Lakin Twp. at this time; their mother, Ellen Waddell Dalton died in 1876] George says he was born in NY, his father in ENG and his mother in SCOT. With him is his wife, Hellen C., age 32, born in WI. Her parents were both born in MA. Their three children are: Herbert G. 10; Maud E. 6; and, Edmin R. 4. Herbert was born in WI and two younger children were born in KS.

Name: George Waddell DALTON
Birth: 12 JUN 1835 in Morristown, St. Lawrence, NY
Death: 10 JAN 1907

Father: John DALTON
Mother: Ellen WADDELL

Marriage 1 Helen Cordelia JEWETT b: 21 JAN 1848 in Bloomfield, WI
Married: 23 SEP 1868 in Lake Geneva, Walworth, WI
Children of GEORGE DALTON and HELEN JEWETT are:
1) GEORGE HERBERT DALTON., b. 1870.
2) MAUDE IRENE DALTON, b. December 31, 1873.
3) EDGAR BROWNING DALTON.
4) MAURICE JEWETT DALTON

Birth date for Maude Dalton from the Jewett Family at Ancestry.com. This same file indicates that George died in 1907 in Oshkosh, [Winnebago Co.] WI!

In the 1900 census, Winnebago Co., Oshkosh, Wisconsin, 5th Ward, Wright St., Fam #303
George Dalton June 1835 65 M32 NY ENG SCOT General Farmer
Helen wife ? ? 52 M32 4-3 WI NY MA
Edgar Jan 1876 24 S KS NY WI
Morris J. June 1884 19 S KS NY WI
Maud Ruth dau Dec ? 26 M1 1-1 KS NY WI
Helen gr. dau 2/12 IL IL KS
2 Lodgers: Louisa Kasper WI Norway At Sea and Janice Shaw WI NY WI
[The family is living next door to Walter Jewett and his wife Myra; prob. relatives of Helen (Jewett) Dalton]
"Ruth" appears to be Maud's married name; newspaper mentions that Mrs. George Dalton visited her daughter Mrs. Maud Ruth in Chicago, April 26, 1900. Perhaps for the birth of the baby?

DEATH RECORD: Vol. 5 Reel 144 Image 426
George W. Dalton
Retired farmer
72 yrs. 6 mos. 2 days
Born in New York, June 12, 1834
Wife: Helen Dalton
Died Jan. 10, 1907: exposure to cold and dampness; leak in the mitral valve of heart; death expected for years
Resided: 108 Wright St, Oshkosh, WI
Burial Permit: 5568 1/15/1907 Riverside Cemetery

The Daily Northwester (Oshkosh) Thursday, January 10, 1907
DEATH OF G.W. DALTON: Heart Disease Closes Life of Wright Street Resident at Age Seventy Years
George W. Dalton of 108 Wright street died very suddenly this noon at his home, death resulting from an attack of heart disease, to which he was subject. He was about seventy years of age, and had retired from active pursuits. Surviving are the wife, Mrs. Helen Dalton, one daughter, Mrs. Ruth of Chicago, and two sons, Edgar B., residing in the west, and Maurice of this city. No arrangements have made for the funeral.

Same paper the next day: MR. DALTON'S FUNERAL: It Will Be Held Sunday Afternoon--The Program--List of Survivors of Prominent Oshkosh Resident. The funeral of George W. Dalton, 108 Wright street, will be held Sunday afternoon. There will be a short service at two o'clock at the residence and at 2:30 o'clock at Odd Fellows hall, Algoma street, the funeral service of the Odd Fellows will be given. Mr. Dalton was seventy-two years of age. The survivors are: The widow, two son--Edward B. of Brookins [sic] S.D., and Maurice of Oshkosh; one daughter--Mrs. O. M. Ruth of Chicago, Ill., and brothers and sisters as follows: Henry Dalton of Williams Bay, Wis.; William of Halstead, Kans; Nathan, in Indianapolis, Ind., Washington, of the state of Kansas, and Mrs. William Redford of Seward, Neb., and Mrs. Bradley of White, S.D. [Riverside Cemetery, 1901 Algoma Blvd, Oshkosh, WI 54901]


More About GEORGE WADDELL DALTON:
Burial: Riverside Cemetery, Oshkosh, Wisconsisn

v. MARY MATILDA DALTON, b. 1836, St. Lawrence County, New York; d. December 08, 1884, East Delevan, Walworth County, Wisconsisn; m. MASON ALMON HOLLISTER, September 25, 1857; b. April 20, 1815; d. June 30, 1881, East Delevan, Walworth County, Wisconsisn.

Notes for MARY MATILDA DALTON:
In the 1880 census for Delavan Village, Wisconsin, we find that John Dalton 80 ENGLAND is living with his daughter Mary M. Hollister 43 NY, her husband Mason A. Hollister 52 NY, and sons Hart 18 WI and Guy 14 WI.


vi. WILLIAM DALTON, b. February 19, 1839, St. Lawrence County, New York; d. April 13, 1923, Halstead, Harvey County, Kansas; m. (1) JANE S. FREEMAN, November 17, 1867; b. Abt. 1840; d. Kansas; m. (2) SUSAN INEZ WILLIAMS, May 29, 1879, Newton, Kansas; b. June 23, 1861, Russell County, Alabama; d. 1946, Lakin Twp., Harvey County, Kansas.

Notes for WILLIAM DALTON:
William DALTON, born 19 Feb 1839 in St. Lawrence County, New York , died 13 Apr 1923 in Halstead, Kansas. William Dalton enlisted in the Union Army, Company A, 10th Regiment Infantry, of the Wisconsin Volunteers on August 31, 1861 at Delevan, WI. He was taken prisoner at Chickamauga in September 1863. He was freed November 11, 1863, but was again taken prisoner of war at Richmond, Virginai in December 1863. At the end of the war he was freed and mustered out on November 3, 1864.

William was married to Jane Freeman November 17, 1867 in Wisconsin (History of Walworth County) and with her moved first to Missouri, then to Kansas in 1871. A few months after arrivng in Kansas, Jane died and William returned to Wisconsin. In 1876 he again came to Kansas and in 1879 married Susan Inez Williams.
Children:
1. Bertha Dalton b. 1880 d. as achild in 1890
2. Bertha Ingram Dalton b. August 1886 in Glen Rose, Texas

The following information is from the Williams-Dodson Family file at Ancestry.com:
William Dalton and Susan Inez Williams had a daughter named Bertha born to them in 1880, who died February 21, 1890 at Halstead, Kansas. They later adopted a daughter of William Dalton's sister, Donna [Dalton] Ingram, who had died and left 9 children. They also named her Bertha, and raised her as their own. There is some confusion over who Bertha's real mother was, but according to William Dalton's obituary she was the daughter of his sister Donna who married an Ingram. ["Donna Ingram" as a sister of William does not fit with other information. Bertha lists both of her parents born in Alabama, so this family legend is doubtful. I have listed a Donna Dalton, just in case!]

In the 1870 census, William Dalton 31 NY, living in Missouri, Chariton Co., Salisbury Twp., Fam. # 106 [image 14 at ancestry]. He's a farmer, real estate $1,000, personal $200. Wife Jane [Freeman] is 20 VT.

William Dalton was a Kansas homesteader of 1871 and a civil war veteran. He was born in St. Lawrence County, New York, February 19, 1839 and died at Halstead, Kansas April 13, 1923. At the age of 3 years he moved with his parents to Delevan, Wisconsin where he grew to young manhood. At the beginning of the Civil War he enlisted in Company D, 10th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He served under General Thomas through a number of important battles and after a long service in the field he was captured by the Southerners and was an inmate of the famous prisons at Libby, Florence and Andersonville, Georgia for nearly fifteen months when he was exchanged and reached home in broken health.

In 1880, William Dalton, age 38, is a farmer living in Lakin Twp., Harvey Co., Kansas. He was born in NY, his father in ENG and his mother in SCOT. With him is his wife, Inez, age 19. Inez was born in AL, her father in SC and her mother in GA.

In 1883, William is listed as a Civil War pensioner in Harvey Co., Kansas: dis of kidneys, result of chr. diarr; $10.00. [$10. is in the med/high range of disability compensation on this list]

In 1900, William, age 61, is again farming in Lakin Twp., Harvey Co., Kansas. He says that he was born in February 1839 and has been married for 21 years. HIs wife, Inez, age 38, says she was born June 1861 and has been married for 21 years. Their stated place of birth and the birthplaces of their parents have not changed from the previous census. Inez says she is mother to one child who is no longer living. With them is their "adopted daughter", Bertha, age 13. Bertha was born Aug. 1886 in TX. She says her parents were both born in AL. Also living with them is John [? illegible], a boarder, age 30. He is a teacher born in IN. The census was enumerated on June 11th. Farm schedule #88.

In 1910, the William Dalton family dynamic has changed in Lakin Twp. Bertha B., the adopted daughter, age 23, is now married, and the head of Family #48 is listed as Harry [?] A. Lawrence, age 27, her husband. Harry is a general farmer, born in PA, parents also born in PA. Again, Bertha says she was born in TX and her parents in AL. Harry and Bertha have been married for 6 years and have two children: Paul R. 5; and, Virginia 9 mos. Both children were born in Kansas. The family is living on a rented farm [perhaps rented from William?]. Farm schedule #60. Enumeration date, April 21 and 22. William Dalton, age 71, and his wife, Inez S., age 48 are living with them. They have been married for 31 years. Again, Inez says she is mother to one child who is not living. In the occupation field William lists "own income".

Also living with this extended family is Virginia A. Williams, a widow age 35. She says she is mother to 10 children, 5 of whom are still living. Virginia says she was born in GA, her father in VA and her mother in GA. She subsides on her own income. She says she has no relationship to the family [perhaps a relative to Inez?, perhaps Bertha's birth mother? Bertha's daughter is also named Virginia].

In 1920 the William Dalton family dynamic has again changed. They are still living in LakinTwp., but this time William, age 80 is listed as the head. He is currently a dairy farmer and owns his own farm. His wife, Susie I. [Inez] is now 58. With them is the family of their adopted daughter Bertha, now 30: husband Harry [Henry?] Lawrence 35; and children Paul 14, Virginia 10 and Marjorie [? illegible] 4. Interestingly, Bertha again says that she was born in TX but now says that her parents were both born in MA rather than AL as previously indicated.

William Dalton's farm land is visible on the 1873 plat map from the Combination Atlas Map of Walworth Co., WI by Everts, Baskin and Stewart. His brother Henry's farm, a short distance away on this same map, was directly across the road from Union Cemetery where members of the Dalton family, including their parents, John and Ellen, are buried. The site of William Dalton's farm in Wisconsin is currently called Fantasy Hills Ranch, Ltd. and can be viewed on the web at fantasyhillsranch.com. Address: 4978 Town Hall Rd, Delavan, WI 53115.

USGen Web Archives: SOURCE: The following was transcribed by Faro J. Maniaci. Fourth Annual Reunion book of the Tenth Wisconsin Infantry. Waupun, Wisconsin, Oliver Bros. Printers, 1898. Tenth Wisconsin Infantry Association Fourth Annual Reunion held at Tomah, Wisconsin, July 21 and 22, 1898. ROSTER OF SURVIVORS OF TENTH WISCONSIN INFANTRY, So far as known; with Residence.
Wm. Dalton - Halstead, Kan.

The Regiment fought battles in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Georgia. The highlights of their campaigns include dislodging the Confederates at Huntsville, AL where it captured the military railroad, machine shops, engines, and rolling stock. It defended and saved Painted Rock Bridge, AL. They were under heavy fire in Perryville , KY and Stones River, TN Oct - Dec 1862, and took part at Cahattanooga under terrible fire in June 1863, losing 18 killed, 56 wounded, and 132 missing, many of whom were taken prisoner. In July 1863, they fought in Alabama before a battle at Chickamauga, GA September 19 and 20, 1863 (The Union Army, vol. 4).

IT WAS AT CHICKAMAUGA THAT WILLIAM DALTON WAS TAKEN PRISONER. Of the original Regiment of 916 strengthened to 1034 men through recruits, 219 were killed in action.

Descriptive List of Walworth Co. Soldiers in National Service 1861-1865, [Elkhorn Court House]
Dalton, Wm. private, age 22
Enlisted August 31, 1861
Organization A, 10 WI Infantry
M.O. November 3, 1864 at Milwaukee

Verbatim Notes: Taken prisoner at Chickamauga; at Richmond since Sept. 20, 1863. Returned Nov. 11, 1863. Also missing at Chickamauga and returning from Richmond, reported as "absent with leave." (Note to Co. K, 10 Inf., Madison). In action at Perryville, Bowling Green, Bridgeport, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga. History of Walworth County, Chicago, Western historical company, 1882, pages 371-372.

After the battle of Chaplin Hills, the regiment accompanied the division of Gen. Rousseau in the pursuit of the enemy to Crab Orchard, and thence to Nashville, where they encamped near the city until the latter part of December. On Wednesday morning, December 31, in an engagement near Murfreesboro, John F. Long and Dewitt Griffin, of Company A were killed and Thomas H. Morrison was wounded.

The regiment went into camp after this battle, where it remained until the month of June, then join in the advance of the army against Gen. Bragg it went into camp at Cowan Station on the 13th of July and again on the 6th of August at Anderson where it remained until the 2d of September when the march was commenced into Georgia. On the 11th the regiment took part in an engagement near Dug Gap. Companies A and K were thrown forward as skirmishers and held their place until they found the remainder of the regiment had retired when they fell back and rejoined it.

The 19th was the day of the disastrous battle of Chickamauga. After experiencing a series of reverses through the day the Fourth Brigade, which with the First, formed the extreme left of the line, got out ammunition, broke, and, the other brigade being thrown into confusion, the regiments were scattered over the field. The Tenth being exposed to a terrible fire from thee directions was obliged to retire and made for a point on the left, where they supposed our troops were in position, but, unfortunately, found themselves surrounded and ignorant of the position of the rest of the forces. They could do nothing but surrender, and when too late it was found that they had been contending hopelessly for two hours, nearly all the forces having been withdrawn from the field. Lieut. Col. Ely, commanding the regiment, was mortally wounded, and nearly the whole of the regiment on the field was captured--12 officers and 111 men. Eighteen of the regiment were killed and fifty-six wounded. On the morning of the 21st, the regiment numbered three officers and twenty-six men. The casualties in Company A were reported as follows: Killed--William Mattison. Wounded--Corps. E.P. Sterling and Robert Hall: Privates M. Mulville and George Spurr. Taken prisoners--Capt. Harkness, Lieut. Ellenwood, Sergts. J.S.J. Eaton and E.W. Carver; Corps J. Typer and W. Woods: Privates W.H. Fountain, W. Dalton, P. Adams, W.H. Coburn, T.M. Luce, T. Nicholas, F.V.Smith and W. Hay.

The remnant of the regiment that remained, soon after went into camp at Chattanooga, and were employed on guard duty and work on the defenses of the place until late in November.

Those who were taken prisoners at Chickamauga remained in rebel prisons at Andersonville, Salisbury and other places for thirteen months: many were not exchanged until March 1865 and many never left prison alive. The deaths in Company A are reported as follow: James Snell, at Delavan February 22 1862; William Turner, at Sugar Creek July 6, 1862; Sergt. J.H. Hooper, at Bowling Green, Ky., March 5, 1862; Truman Johns, at Elizabethtown, Ky., March 10, 1862; John McCann, Bowling Green, April 2, 1862; Sibley Brown, Murfreesboro, Tenn., April 5, 1862; Hugh A. Rector, Murfreesboro, April 13, 1862; Luther Lee, Point Rock, Ala., May 19 1862; Henry Roderick, Nashville, Tenn., August 10, 1862, N.H. Fountain, Andersonville, Ga., June 28, 1864; William Osburn, Andersonville: Andrew D. Bovee, Murfreesboro, July 11, 1864, Mortimer Adams, Cincinnati, May 26, 1864; G. Lansing, Andersonville, August 24, 1864: Corp. James S. Watson, Nashville, Tenn, September 1, 1864.

When the army was re-organized in the spring of 1864, the Tenth was assigned to the First Brigade and was under the command of Capt. Roby. The casualties reported in Company A in the summer of 1864 are as follows: Wounded--Private William B. Sayles, June 2; Private Cornelius Bard, June 18. The regiment was stationed at Marietta for a time in the fall and afterwards at Kenesaw Mountain. It was at the latter place until on the 16th of October: the recruits and re-enlisted veterans were transferred to the Twenty-first Regiment, and the remainder of the regiment left for Wisconsin. On the 25th the Tenth reached Milwaukee and was mustered out of service.

Roster of Company A
Officers--Robert Harkness, Captain, Second Lieutenant from muster, promoted First Lieutenant of Company F August 12, 1862; Captain of Company A when mustered out: Warren B. Ellenwood, Second Lieutenant, commissioned June 1, 1863; taken prisoner of war September 20, 1863: Henry O. Johnson, Captain, promoted Major September 1, 1862: Flavius J. Harrington, First Lieutenant, resigned June 1, 1863: Chester A. Burdick, Second Lieutenant, promoted First Lieutenant Company C April 9, 1863.

Sergeants--Charles W. Conklin, appointed November 1, 1862: Edward W. Carver, appointed November 1, 1862: Amos H. Hitchcock, Jr., appointed November 1, 1862: Joseph S. J. Eaton, appointed January 1, 1863: Sherod Eckerson, appointed January 1, 1863.

Corporals--Walter Wood, appointed March 17, 1862: Franklin Sterling, appointed November 1, 1862: Andrew H. Lord, appointed November 1, 1862: Orlando Dewing, appointed May 1, 1864: Josiah Sheldon, appointed May 1, 1864: Otis Wilbur, fifer: Levi W. Norcrass, drummer: David Matteson, wagoner.

Privates--Peter Adams, Charles H. Burr, Patrick Carl, William H. Coburn, George C. Dopp, William Dalton, William H. Fountain, Cornelius Bovee, Wilbur U. Briggs, Pelick Cornell, William J. Devoue, Walter E. Dewing, Albert O. Ewing, George Spurr, William J. Utter, Robert B. Wood, Robert M. Luce, Theodore Nicolai, James B. Ripley, William B. Sayles, Orin C. Sanborn, William H. Wadkins. Discharged: J. Oscar Conrick, Sergeant, October 1, 1862: Alf Winell, February 10, 1863: Plimpton Babcock, December 20, 1862: Mortimer Denel, October 1, 1862: Elon G. Foster, December 20, 1862: William H. German, January 24, 1862: Frank Jokich, April 18, 1863: David Kline, July 21, 1862: Levi Hare, June 18, 1862: Harrison M. Montague, November 8, 1862: Willis B. Moffatt, April 30, 1862: Martin Mulville, June 24, 1864: Corydon M. Perry, April 20, 1862: Elisha Y. Parsons, May 1, 1862: William Redford*, July 5, 1862: Martin V. Shafer, November 8, 1862: Milo K. Williams, May 12, 1862: John M. Thommett, December 20, 1862: Absalom Blakeman. Transferred--William Brandt, to invalid corps, August 5, 1863: Humway Conant, corps, August 5, 1863: James M. Goff, to Sergeant Major: Stephen Everts, permanently detached.
* William Redford married Ellen Dalton, sister to William Dalton, on May 20, 1866 in East Delavan, WI.

More About WILLIAM DALTON:
Appearance: Blue eyes, brown hair, light complexion

vii. HENRY JAMES DALTON, b. June 17, 1842, St. Lawrence County, New York; d. 1930, East Delavan, Walworth County, Wisconsisn; m. CELIA E. YOST, June 03, 1866, East Develan, Walworth County, Wisconsin; b. July 11, 1843, New York; d. 1927, East Delevan, Walworth County, Wisconsisn.

Notes for HENRY JAMES DALTON:
Notes for HENRY JAMES DALTON:
Henry James Dalton was born on June 17, 1842, in Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence County, New York, the son of John Dalton and Ellen Waddell. The History of Walworth County, Wisconsin says that he was one of the best known and most highly honored pioneers of this locality, who, after a long, active, influential and useful life here, spent principally in agricultural pursuits, retired in the city of Delevan.
Henry J. Dalton, grew to maturity on the home farm where he assisted with the general work during crop seasons, and he tended the district schools during the winter months. On June 3, 1866, he married Celia Yost, daughter of John and Ester (Hollister) Yost, natives of the state of New York. The Yosts migrated to Wisconsin in 1844. John Yost died July 3,1890 and Ester Hollister Yost died January 16,1908. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Dalton, namely: Maud Frances Dalton, who married and moved to Beloit, Wisconsin; Ervin Dalton, who farmed at East Delevan; Dr. Charles Dalton of Albion, Wisconsin and Harold Dalton who was a lawyer and lived at Bowden, North Dakota.

Mr. Dalton was a veteran of the Civil War. Having been in the West when the war broke out, he enlisted at Jacksonville, Oregon in Company A, First Oregon Cavalry on November 27, 1861. The Regiment was organized at large in Oregon February to April, 1862. Regiment concentrated in Williamette Valley and ordered May 1862 to Walla Walla Country and the Mining Districts of Nez Perce and Salmon River Countries to protect emigrants and miners. Headquarters at Fort Walla Walla, Washington Territory.

Company "A" moved from near Oregon City to Fort Dallas; thence to Fort Walla Walla, Washington Territory, June 24-July 12, 1862. Left Fort Walla Walla July 25, 1862, for Salmon Falls on Snake River Expedition against Snake Indians in Idaho August 19-October 11, 1862, and protecting emigrant roads till November. At Fort Dalles till April, 1863. Ordered to Fort Walla Walla April 20. Expedition against Snake Indians in Idaho May 4-October 26, 1863. Expedition from Fort Walla Walla to Snake River, Washington Territory, February 16-23, 1864, and to Southeastern Oregon April 30-October 6, 1864. Expedition from Fort Boles to Salmon Falls, Idaho Territory, and skirmishes August 27-October 5, 1864. At Fort Vancouver and other stations in Oregon and Idaho till muster out. Expedition from Camp Lyon, Idaho Territory, to Malheur River, Ore., and skirmish July 2-13, 1865.

Henry Dalton rank of Cpl. 7-26-63, "Oregon Soldiers During the Civil War," Genealogical Forum of Portland, Oregon, Inc.

Henry served three years in the west against the hostile Indians of the Pacific coast, being discharged on November 27, 1864, at Fort Vancouver, Washington, with the rank of corporal under Capt. William Rinehart, being then nineteen years of age. After his discharge he went to Walla Walla, Washington, where he had charge of a pack train, freighting to the mines for one year. Then he returned to East Delevan, Wisconsin and was married soon after. About this time he purchased a 110 acre farm in Section 35, Delevan township which he later sold to his son Erwin.

In the 1880 census for Delavan County, we find: Henry Dalton 38 NY, Celia 29 NY, Maud 12 WI, Earvin 8 WI, and Charles 2 WI. Also, a hired hand Henry Gailard 22 WI. He's just a few farms from where his father 80 ENG is living his sister Mary M. Hollister and family.

The following excerpt is from the Beloit Daily News, March 24, 1923 and was sent to Norman A. Delap by Harold W. Dalton:

DELAVAN PIONEER LAST OF DARING PARTY THAT CROSSED PLAINS IN 1859
H. J. Dalton is sole Survivor of Walworth County Men Who Answered Gold Lure.

DELAVAN, March 24.- Memories connected with an oxen trek in covered emigrant wagons overland to California 64 years ago was refreshed today in an interview with Henry J. Dalton, 118 Ninth Street, the last survivor of a party of 16 Walworth County young men who started from East Delavan on April 11, 1859. The lure of California gold and the urge of Horace Greeley to go west and grow up with the country was the motive which gave these young men the encourage to attempt the perilous journey, Mr. Dalton declared. They left here boasting to their friends that it was a case of "Pike's Peak or Bust." The determination to push on to the Pacific coast was reached when their number grew through the addition of other travelers as they progressed westward.

SIXTEEN IN PARTY
Those comprising the party from this community were: Henry and George Dalton [sons of John Dalton and Elizabeth Waddel), Milan; Nelson and Lyman Brigham; Zinah Cotton; Amos Johns and Adam Scrafford, all of East Delavan; James Jones, Jefferson Prairie; William and James Dunbar of Elkhorn; Anthony Delap, Cyrus and Lige Marble, and Robert Campbell [married to Mary Jane Delap] of Geneva; and Isaac Brown, of Delavan.

Henry and George Dalton (Henry was at that time a youth of 17 years) drove two teams of oxen hitched to a heavy covered wagon. The Daltons paired off with Adam Scrafford and James Jones, who also had a double team of oxen. Henry Dalton and Scrafford took turns in cooking the meals which were prepared and eaten along the roadside. From the time they left East Delavan until their arrival in
Yreka, Cisco County, California, six months later, they spent their days and nights out of doors.
Jones and Scrafford included two cows in their outfit so that party was able to enjoy something better than the ordinary fare before the animals played out and had to be sacrificed later on in the journey.

GO THROUGH IOWA
The Walworth County adventurers headed for Dubuque, where they were ferried across the Mississippi, landing at Council Bluffs [after crossing the state of Iowa]. Here they struck out for Omaha, at that time a settlement of only a few buildings and the outpost of the western wilderness. Leaving Omaha the party was strictly on its own resources although its number had been augmented by the addition of many emigrants at Council Bluffs and other cities through which they passed. It was slow traveling, the oxen making about ten miles in a good day. Following a route north of the Platte River, they made their way to Fort Laramie, harassed at time by marauding Pawnee Indians through the Nebraska prairies. Dalton and others swam the river at Laramie one night to hear Horace Greeley speak. The picturesque editor, limping as the result of being thrown from his mule, was preaching is "Go West!" doctrine and succeeded in sending the youngsters back to their camp on the other side of the fiver full of new enthusiasm for their project. They followed the old California route after leaving Laramie, taking what was known as the "sublet cutoff" [Sublette] just before reaching Salt Lake City. In this manner they saved themselves a trip through the great American desert.

COME UPON MASSACRE
While following their new trail, they came upon the scene of the Shepherd massacre, near the Humboldt River only three days after the Sioux had killed all but one member of the party. Partly burned wagons, slaughtered animals and other signs of carnage were all about the site. An emigrant train just in advance of theirs had rescued the sole survivor, Mrs. Shepherd, and had buried the dead. The Shepherds were Missouri people returning from California where they had acquired wealth. The Sioux, led by unscrupulous white outlaws, learned of their treasure and massacred them. Mrs. Shepherd was left for dead by the marauding party. The Sioux stampeded the herd of the party to which the Walworth County youths had attached themselves one night as they were corralled near the Raft River. Fortunately, Captain William Home of Shyullsberg, who was acting as leader of the caravan (having made the trip before) heard the stampede, mounted his horse and circled the herd, driving it back to camp. He was shot at by some of the Indians as he performed his perilous task.

TWO OF THE PARTY KILLED
Two members of the party were shot and killed as they stood guard over the camp at night. Their bodies are buried somewhere along the trail, Dalton declares, as were those of many other pioneers who lost their lives in the California rush. When the party disbanded at Yreka, the Daltons and their friends, Scrafford and Jones, had a single yoke of oxen and the rear half of a wagon left of the four yokes, two milk cows and two wagons with which they left Delavan. They were penniless and hungry. Dalton and his partner finally obtained a job clearing wood for a Frenchman. Later on, Dalton earned 12 cents a day as a mason in Yreka, where a large brewry was being built. This was unprecedented wages for a lad of eighteen at that time.

BECOMES A COWBOY
The life of a cowboy appealed to the new comer and in March 1860, Dalton became a range rider in Ashland, Jackson County, Oregon where he remained for a year. He then decided to embark in the raising of milch cattle and had a good start when the Civil War put a stop to this project. In the company with his brother, George and other young men of the vicinity, Dalton enlisted on November 27, 1861, in company A, First Oregon Cavalry. They were on their way south when an Indian outbreak caused them to be detailed to range duty where they soldiered until November 1864 when they mustered out.

FIGHT INDIANS
These enthusiastic westerners purchased horses, saddles and rifles before volunteering and Dalton rode his horse, a particularly fine animal, during his entire term of service. They found the Redskin, aided and abetted by the Mormons, a tricky foe. Casualties were particularly heavy. At one time a party of 80 men sent to break up a band of the Sioux returned to the fort with 37 survivors. The Delavan man returned to his old home in 1866 and took a farm near East Delavan, where he lived for many years. This farm is still owned by him and is now worked by a son. Mr. Dalton, although 82 years old, is active and makes daily trips to the business section of the city. He is a member and twice served as commander of the George H. Thomas Post 8, G.A.R of this city.

Henry was a witness to a wedding in 1869: In Delevan, Walworth Co, WI, Feb 3, 1869, Mr. Joseph T. Brown, farmer, of Walworth, aged 25, and Mrs. Sarah Ann Yost of Delevan, aged 23, in presence of George W. Dalton and Henry Dalton, attesting witnesses.

From The Janesville Gazette, April 17, 1930; DELAVAN VETERAN OF '61 IS DEAD:
Death of Henry J. Dalton, 89, Reduces G.A.R. Post to Four
Delavan--Leaving but four old comrades remaining in Delavan and immediate vicinity, Henry J. Dalton, 89, veteran of the Civil War, died in his home on Ninth street here early Thursday following an illness of three weeks due to the infirmities of old age. Mr. Dalton was a native of Ogdensburg, N.Y., where he was born June 17, 1841. At the age of two years, he moved to Wisconsin with his parents who settled on a farm in East Delavan. In 1859, he went west, travelling from East Delavan to California with an ox team, and remaining in the west until the Civil War broke out. He enlisted in Company A. First Oregon Cavalry, and served until peace was declared, when he was mustered out at Ashland, Ore., and returned to Wisconsin in 1865. On June 3, 1866, he married Miss Celia Yost of East Delavan. The couple remained at East Delavan until 20 years ago, when they moved to this city and have resided here since. Mr. Dalton is survived by three children: Mrs. L. A. Francis, Beloit; E. H. Dalton, East Delavan; and H. W. Dalton, Delavan. Five grandchildren and four great-grandchildren also survive. Funeral services will be held in the Dalton home at 2 p.m. Saturday, the Rev. Henry Wise, Edgerton, to officiate. Burial will be in East Delavan. The four remaining Civil War veterans are: David Phelps, Delavan Lake, S. L. Jackson, Timothy Shanahan and Capt. A.E. Smith all of Delavan. Capt. Smith is past 90 years old, and the others are past 80.



More About HENRY JAMES DALTON:
Military service: Bet. 1861 - 1865, First Oregon Cavalry, Union Army

viii. ELLEN JANE DALTON, b. 1844, New York; d. Prob. Seward, Nebraska; m. WILLIAM REDFORD, May 20, 1866, East Develan, Walworth County, Wisconsin; b. March 07, 1841, Lincolnshire, England; d. December 06, 1904.

Notes for ELLEN JANE DALTON:
In the 1870 census for Develan, Walworth County, Wisconsin, Ellen 25 WI and daughter Lillie 2 WI are living with her husband William Redford 27 ENGLAND. In 1880 she changes her birthplace to New York which is consistent with other facts.

In 1880 Precinct F, Seward, Nebraska is: Ellen J. REDFORD, Wife 36 NY Keeping House Parents ENG SCOT; Lillian M. REDFORD Dau 11 WI; Mezzie T. REDFORD Dau 7 WI


Notes for WILLIAM REDFORD:
William Redford served as a Private in Company A., 10th Wisconsin Infantry. See William Dalton notes for Regiment History.

William Redford, WI 10th Inf. Co. A:
Enlisted Aug. 31, 1861 for a 3 yr. term of service.
Mustered in Oct. 5, 1861 in Milwaukee, 20 years old.
Blue eyes, sandy hair, light complexion, 5' 9 1/2" tall
Blacksmith
Discharged July 5, 1862
Absent from July Muster - sick
Discharged July 5, 1862, Louisville, KY
July 8, Nashville, TN

He's listed in the 1870 census for Delavan County, Wisconsin: Wm Redford 27 ENGLAND, Ellen 25 WI, Lillie 2 WI. He's a farmer.

ix. NATHAN FORD DALTON, b. March 15, 1845, Delavan, Walworth County, Wisconsin; d. November 1924, Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin; m. MARY R. TEST, March 27, 1873, Marion County, Indiana; b. March 27, 1849, Indiana; d. January 1925, Prob. Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin.

Notes for NATHAN FORD DALTON:
NATHAN FORD DALTON, son of JOHN HENRY and grandson of WILLIAM Dalton, was born in 1845 in Delavan, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, and died November 1924 in Wauwatosa, Milwaukee Co., Wisconsin. He married MARY R. TEST March 27, 1873 in Marion Co., Indiana. She was born March 27, 1849 in Indiana, and died January 1925.

Notes for NATHAN FORD DALTON:
Marriage record on file at Ancestry.com

The 1880 census for Vincennes, Knox Co., Indiana lists "Nathun" F. Dalton, age 35, as a lumber dealer. Nathan was born in WI, his father in ENG, and his mother in SCOT. His wife, Mary [Test] Dalton, age 30, was born in IN, and her parents in DE and OH. With them are their two children: Charles, age 4, b. in WI; and, Elizabeth, age 2 b. in IN. Also with them is Anna Miller, an 18 year old servant from Prussia.

[Smith Family Tree at Ancestry.com]
"Nathan F. Dalton, the son of John Dalton and Ellen Waddell was born in Walworth County, Wisconsin March 15, 1845. At the age of 19 he left home and accepted a position as clerk in the commission business in Chicago, where at a later period, he engaged in the lumber business. In 1877, he moved to Vincennes, Indiana and followed the same occupation with T.U. Lamport as partner. He married Mary R. Test, the daughter of the Honorable C. H. Test of Indianapolis. Their children were Charles T. Dalton, Elizabeth H. Dalton, and Natalie F. Dalton. He was the first president of the Vincennes Board of Trade and a president and stockholder with Spring Lake Ice Company and the president of the Indiana Lumber Dealers' Association."

The following obituary is from The Indianapolis Star, November 29, 1924:

NATHAN F. DALTON DIES IN WISCONSIN

Nathan Ford Dalton, formerly of Indianapolis, died Tuesday at Wauwatosa, Wis., and was buried from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Norman Peck, according to word reaching relatives in Indianpolis. Mr. Dalton was 76 years old. He had been engaged in the lumber business in Indianapolis until twelve years ago, when he retired. Before coming to Indianpolis he was in the lumber business in Vincennes, Ind. In Indianpolis he maintained his yard at South Noble and Washington streets.

He had been president of the Retail Lumberman's Association of Indiana and a member of the finances committee of the Capital National bank of Indianapolis. He was a charter member of the city's first country club and a member of the Columbia Club. Mr. Dalton was an active member of the Christ Church, having served as a vestryman and on the committee for the diocese of the state of Indiana and a thirty-second degree mason.

He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Mary Test Dalton, and two daughters and one son, Mrs. [Norman] Peck and Mrs. Frank Kimball of Milwaukee, and Test Dalton of Indianpolis; a brother, Harry [sic] Dalton of Delavan, Wis., and a sister, Mrs. Nellie Redford of Seward, Neb.

From USGen Web Achives: Wauwatosa Cemetery 2405 Wauwatosa Avenue Wauwatosa, WI 53213 Offices: 7725 West North Avenue Wauwatosa, WI 53213 Ph 414-258-4910 The cemetery was established in 1854 and is operated by the Wauwatosa Cemetery Association.
The cemetery is located approximately 2 miles east of Exit 42 on US 45, one block north of the intersection of W. North Avenue and Wauwatosa Avenue (Highway 181). The following burials are from 1822 to 1999.
Dalton May Test 03/27/1849 1/16/1925 4-6-6 1292
Dalton Nathan Ford ??/??/1846 11/25/1924 4-6-6 1282

More About NATHAN FORD DALTON:
Burial: Wauwatosa Cemetery, Milwaukee Co., Wisconsin

More About MARY R. TEST:
Burial: Wauwatosa Cemetery, Milwaukee Co., Wisconsin

Children of NATHAN DALTON and MARY TEST are:

1) CHARLES TEST "Test" DALTON, b. 1877; d. 1945; m. MARGARET UNKNOWN.

2) ELIZABETH H. DALTON, b. Abt. 1878.

Notes for ELIZABETH H. DALTON:
California Death Index at Ancestry:
Elizabeth Dalton Test [sic]
born May 23 1880 Indiana
died Feb. 11 1951 Los Angeles, CA
mother's name Test
father's name Dalton

Birth year on primary information per 1880 census.

3) NATALIE F. DALTON.

One daughter married a man named Norman Peck and the other Frank Kimball, both of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.



More About NATHAN FORD DALTON:
Burial: Wauwatosa Cemetery, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

More About MARY R. TEST:
Burial: Wauwatosa Cemetery, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

x. WASHINGTON THEODORE DALTON, b. March 15, 1848, Delavan, Walworth County, Wisconsisn; d. October 02, 1922, Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas; m. (1) MARY CATHERINE BONEWITZ, November 08, 1876, Great Bend, Barton, Kansas; b. Abt. 1856, Pennsylvania; d. Bef. 1920; m. (2) ELLEN UNKNOWN, Bef. 1920; b. Abt. 1854, Ohio.

Notes for WASHINGTON THEODORE DALTON:
WASHINGTON THEODORE DALTON, son of JOHN HENRY DALTON, was born 1848 in Delavan, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, and died October 2, 1922 in Hugoton, Stevens Co., Kansas. He married MARY CATHARINE BONEWITZ November 08, 1876 in Great Bend, Barton, Kansas. She was born Abt. 1856.

In 1880, Washington Dalton, age 31, is a farmer living in Pleasant Valley, Pawnee, Kansas. He was born in WI, his father in ENG and his mother in SCOTLAND. With him is his wife, Mary, age 24. Mary and both of her parents were born in PA. Also with them are their two children: Alice 2; and George 1. Both children were born in KS.

In 1920 Washington, age 71, is in Center Twp., Stevens Co., Kansas. He's a general farmer who owns his own mortgaged farm. Again, he is born in WI, his father in ENG and his mother in SCOT. In this census he's married to a woman named Ellen, age 66. Both she and her parents were born in OH [this is a different wife from the 1880 census above]. The census was enumerated on Feb. 26th; farm schedule #92. Wife's name and marriage date from Huff & Peterson Ancestors at Ancestry.com. This same file indicates that Washington's middle name was Theodore and gives his complete birthdate as 15 MAR 1848.

Family Search: affirms above info and adds death date of Oct 1922 in Hugoton, Stevens Co., KS. [film # 458357].

Death Notices of Members of Fraternal Orders,
Dalton, W. T. , 2 October 1922, IOOF Woodsdale Lodge no. 334 (Hugoton, Stevens Co.)

Children of WASHINGTON DALTON and MARY BONEWITZ are:
1) ALICE DALTON, b. Abt. 1878; d. Abt. 1883.

Notes for ALICE DALTON:
Family Search: correct parents but lists birthdate as abt. 1881 in Halstead, Harvey, KS which does not match 1880 census info; same file lists death date as abt. 1883.

2) GEORGE R. DALTON, b. January 13, 1879, Halstead, Harvey Co., Kansas; d. July 07, 1940, Merced Co., California.

GEORGE R. DALTON (WASHINGTON3, JOHN HENRY2, WILLIAM1) was born January 13, 1879 in Halstead, Harvey Co., Kansas, and died July 07, 1940 in Merced Co., California. He married GRACE UNKNOWN July 1940. She was born Abt. 1885 in Kansas.

The 1920 census for Mount King, Mariposa Co., CA lists George R. Dalton, age 39, as the head of family #14. He is a general farmer, born in KS. His father was born in WI and his mother in PA. With him is his wife, Grace, age 35 [? hard to read] a postmaster. She was born in KS and her parents in Il. Also with them are their two children: Jennie 11 and George R. Jr. age 9.

In 1930 George Dalton, age 51, is living in Nevada, Merced Co., CA with his wife Grace, age 44. George was 28 and Grace was 21 years old when they married. Their place of birth information remains the same as the previous census. George is a hog farmer.

Next door in 1930 are "Richard" and Rebecca A. Dalton. Richard, age 20, is presumably the George R. Jr. from the previous census. It's noted, however, that George Sr.'s middle name is Ray, per the CA Death Index record below. Richard was born in CA, his father in KS and his mother in PA. He was 19 when he married and Rebecca A. was 17. Rebecca A. and her parents were born in KS. Richard lists his occupation as mechanic at a garage. This census was enumerated on April 5th. CA Death Index at Ancestry: George Ray Dalton, b. 13 Jan 1879, d. Jul 7 1940 in Merced Co.. mother's maiden name Bonewitz. Marriage date from file at Family Search, spouse's name "Unavailable"; also affirms Jul 1940 death date.
Children of GEORGE DALTON and GRACE UNKNOWN are:
i. JENNIE DALTON, b. Abt. 1909, California.
ii. GEORGE R DALTON, JR., b. Abt. 1911, California.



xi. DONNA DALTON, d. Bet. 1886 - 1890; m. UNKNOWN INGRAM.

Notes for DONNA DALTON:
According to William Dalton's obituary, William and his wife adopted a daughter they named Bertha who was the daughter of his sister Donna Dalton, who married an Ingram. Donna Ingram died and left 9 children. There is some confusion over who Bertha's real mother was. This is the only reference to a Donna Dalton Ingram. She is not listed in the 1880 census.



10. WILLIAM4 WADDELL (GEORGE3, WILLIAM2, COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born Abt. April 07, 1808 in Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland, and died January 14, 1883 in Blue Earth County, Minnesota. He married MINERVA MIRACLE March 26, 1841 in Sarnia, Lambton, Ontario. She was born 1820 in Middlesex, Ontario, Canada, and died Bet. 1863 - 1864 in Missouri.

Notes for WILLIAM WADDELL:
William Waddell was born 12 APR 1808 in Glasgow,Scotland. About 1820, he emigrated with his father George Waddell, a weaver, with the Ambercrombie Street-Trans Atlantic Bridgeton Society aboad the "Brock," and settled in Lot 13, Con. 1, Lanark Twp., Lanark County, Ontario, Canada.

According to "The Lanark Society settlers, 1820-1821," by Carol Bennett, Publisher: Renfrew, Ontario: Juniper Books, c1991., p. 40, William died in Scotland. The record, however, indicates otherwise!

Death: 14 JAN 1883, ,Blue Earth, MN
Family 1: Minerva Miracle
Marriage: 26 MAR 1841, Sarnia, Lambton, ON, CANADA
Children:
George Waddell
Hiram Lawrence Waddell
John Waddell
Clarinda (Clara E.) Waddell
William Waddell
Joseph N Waddell b. 1845 Canada
Margaret E Waddell

The Waddells migrated to Iowa abt 1866, then to Missouri, and in 1868 to Blue Earth County, MN. In the 1880 census, there are 16 Waddell/Waddle families living in Blue Earth, Minnesota (go forth and multiply!). William Waddle 72 b. 1808 SCOTLAND is a retired farmer living with his son Joseph 25 CAN, a farmer, and Joe's family.

Notes for MINERVA MIRACLE:
Minerva Miracle /Markel/Merckel
Birth: 1820, Middlesex, ON, CANADA
Death: 1863/1864
Father: Lourents Markel
Mother: Clarinda Hatheway

Family 1: David Hawley
Marriage: 13 MAR 1838, Lambton, ON, CANADA

Family 2: William Waddell
Marriage: 26 MAR 1841, Sarnia, Lambton, ON, CANADA
Children:
George Waddell
Hiram Lawrence Waddell
John Waddell
Clarinda (Clara_E.) Waddell
William Waddell
Joesph N Waddell
Margaret E Waddell

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_Johann Friedrich Merckel
_John Matthias Merckel __|_Anna Barbara Unknown
_Willem Merckel
| | _Georg Wilhelm Kahl
| |_Margaretha Kehl _______|_(Anna) Gertraud Winnen
_Lourents Markel ___|
| |
| | _Zacharias(?) Bakker
| |_Rachel Bakker __|
| | _Harmanus Stephen Hommel
| |_Catrina Hommel\Hummel _|_Anna Margaretha Snider
|
|--Minerva Miracle
I
| _Zenas Hathway
| |
| |
|_Clarinda Hatheway






Children of WILLIAM WADDELL and MINERVA MIRACLE are:
i. GEORGE5 WADDELL, b. 1842, Ontario, Canada.
ii. HIRAM LAWRENCE WADDELL, b. 1844, Ontario, Canada.
iii. JOSEPH N. WADDELL, b. 1845, Ontario, Canada.
iv. JOHN WADDELL, b. 1846, Ontario, Canada.
v. CLARINDA WADDELL, b. 1848, Ontario, Canada.
vi. WILLIAM WADDELL, JR., b. 1850, Ontario, Canada.
vii. MARGARET E. WADDELL, b. 1858, Ontario, Canada.


11. MATILDA4 WADDELL (GEORGE3, WILLIAM2, COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born February 24, 1812 in Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland. She married (1) UNKNOWN HEMMELL. She married (2) AMOS LYMAN KINNEY Abt. 1837 in Port Huron, St. Clair County, Michigan. He was born Abt. 1810.

Notes for MATILDA WADDELL:
"The Lanark Society settlers, 1820-1821," by Carol Bennett, Publisher: Renfrew, Ontario: Juniper Books, c1991., p. 40 says she married a man named Hemmell.

ID: I37748
Name: Matilda WADDELL
Birth: 24 FEB 1812 in Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland

Father: George WADDELL b: in Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland
Mother: Margaret ANDERSON

Marriage 1 Amos Lyman KINNEY
Married: ABT 1837 in Port Huron, St. Clair Cnty, MI USA
Children
Charles B. KINNEY b: 31 AUG 1847

Child of MATILDA WADDELL and AMOS KINNEY is:
i. CHARLES B.5 KINNEY, b. August 31, 1847.


12. JAMES4 WADDELL (WILLIAM3, MISC.2, COMMON ANCESTOR1) was born 1838 in London, London, Middlesex, England, and died in New York, New York. He married ROSINA UNKNOWN. She was born 1840 in London, London, Middlesex, England, and died in New York, New York.

Notes for JAMES WADDELL:
According to Donald Waddell:
My great-Grandfather James Waddell born in London in 1838, son of William Waddell of Scotland. Had a brother named William Waddell also born in 1838. Went to the Charterhouse School in London sponsored by an accountant who was a member of the Bookeepers Guild. His father William was a musician in the Queens Lifeguard, the Royal bodyguard militia. Obviously it was intended that he use his instrument as a weapon. He married the daughter of a poet, but can't find anything he is credited with writing. They had 2 children - James in 1876 and Lillian in 1878 - in London.

The elder James and William were both in accountancy in London in 1877 when panic set in throughout Europe, then hightailed it to New York (after 1881) with their families and took up business in NYC in independent practice. My grandfather James hooked up with a coffee broker who must have been a client of his father and he traveled all over South America buying coffee beans. At age 39 he married my grandmother who had been recently divorced from an heir to the Macmillan publishing family. My father James was born the next year in 1914. But his father died a year later at age 41 of a jungle illness, and his mother died a few years later of alcoholism (note this is during Prohibition). His aunt Lillian never married (assumed to be a closet homosexual). The whole NYC family died out by the 1940s.

1881 census:
James WADDELL Head M Male 43 London, London, Middlesex, England Chartered Accountant
Rosina WADDELL Wife M Female 41 London, London, Middlesex, England
Rosina H. WADDELL Daur U Female 19 London, London, Middlesex, England Student
Sybil I. WADDELL Daur U Female 7 London, London, Middlesex, England
James H. WADDELL Son U Male 5 London, London, Middlesex, England
Norah L. WADDELL Daur U Female 3 London, London, Middlesex, England
Jane THOMAS Servt U Female 53 Greenwich, Kent, England Housekeeper
Kate I. BAKER Servt U Female 23 Stowmarket, Suffolk, England Nurse
Adele MANCHE Servt U Female 17 (F), France Nurse
John HOLLAND Servt U Male 21 Shoreham, Sussex, England Footman
Marian FORMAN Servt W Female 39 Ashford, Kent, England Cook
Elizth. BURROWS Servt U Female 15 Woodbridge, Suffolk, England Housemaid
Louisa DOBELL Servt U Female 24 Cornwarleigh, Devon, England Housemaid
Elizth. DAY Servt U Female 25 Bruton, Somerset, England Housemaid
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Dwelling 126 Queens Gate
Census Place London, Middlesex, England
Family History Library Film 1341011
Public Records Office Reference RG11
Piece / Folio 0048 / 35
Page Number 46


Children of JAMES WADDELL and ROSINA UNKNOWN are:
i. ROSINA H.5 WADDELL, b. 1862, London, London, Middlesex, England.
ii. SYBIL I. WADDELL, b. 1874.
iii. JAMES H. WADDELL, b. 1876, London, London, Middlesex, England; d. 1915.
iv. NORAH LILLIAN WADDELL, b. 1878, London, London, Middlesex, England.
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