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William John Young 1827-1896

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Re: William John Young 1827-1896

Michael J. Kearney (View posts)
Posted: 24 Jul 2006 10:07PM GMT
Classification: Query
Descendants of (---) Young and (---) (---)

1. (---)1 Young. He married unknown.

Children of (---) Young were as follows:
+ 2 i Jane C.2 Young, born 1825 in Ireland; died aft 1886. She married William M. Hughes.
+ 3 ii William John2 Young, born 27 Feb 1827 in Belfast, Ireland; died 8 Jun 1896 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 11 Jun 1896 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married Esther (Elderkin) Young.
+ 4 iii Courtland Hunter2 Young, born 1840 in Ireland; died 17 Aug 1886 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana. He married Rosa (Green (Wilson)) Young.

Generation 2

2. Jane C.2 Young ((---)1), born 1825 in Ireland; died aft 1886. She married William M. Hughes, born 1820 in Ireland; died aft 1886.

Notes for Jane C. Young
US Census June 5, 1860 Brooklyn Ward 9 District 2 Dwelling 12 Family 21 age 28

Department of Health Heading down to Room 21 crossed out
Office of the Commissioner
Municipal Department Building
Room 21
Brooklyn, N.Y. Aug 18, 1886

Mr. W.J. Young

Dear Brother,

I presume that before this reaches you, you will have been apprised of the death of our youngest brother Courtland H. Which occurred on Monday evening 17th inst at 9 o'clock from sunstroke. It is so sudden and unexpected that we can scarcely realize it but such was the brief telegram received late last night. "Who next shall be summoned away my merciful God is it I." Hoping you are all well. I am your affectionate brother.

William Hughes


William Hughes
Real Estate & Insurance
Loans Negotiated
No. 1436 Atlantic, near Brooklyn Avenue
Coal and Wood at Lowest Prices

Brooklyn, Dec. 29, 1886

Dear Brother William,

Your kind and generous gift I received on Christmas day for which you will please accept my grateful thanks for your loving consideration for my comfort. It was never more acceptable than at this time. It relieved my mind of a very great deal of anxiety for our taxes becomes due on the first of January. And I had not sufficient money to meet the demand. For while William was in a position we paid off as much of the principal debt on the place as was possible leaving but little money on hand when he got out on 21st of last June. Since then he has not made any money. You will see by the heading of this letter the business he has entered upon. He does not expect to do much before spring but his friends tell him not to be discouraged in a short time he will come out all right. There is a great deal of valuable unimproved property in our own ward which will be in demand as soon as the Elevated Road is commenced which will be in the spring. While fortune was rather adverse to his Father He smiled on George. He made a change in the fall and is now receiving a salary of $1200 a year. He is an affectionate and good son. Poor Court has been less fortunate he has been sick for nearly a year and under the care of a doctor for 7 months. When I heard this sad news of dear Brother Court's death I thought he would be the next to follow. I am pleased to say his is feeling better in the past few weeks. And my own health is much improved and my mind quieter. Thank God for all his mercies. I am pleased to know that you and your dear family are in the enjoyment of good health and I sincerely hope it may long continue. You speak of the evil effects of intemperance and its terrible results. I can say thank God for it my family is free from its influence. I would like if you could spare time to write me a few lines occasionaly and it wouold give me an opportunity to tell you how we are getting along.

With much love to your self and your family and wishing you a happy and prosperous New Year.

I remain your ever affectionate Sister Jane

1561 Pacific Street Brooklyn

Notes for William M. Hughes
US Census June 5, 1860 Brooklyn, Ward 9 District 2 Dwelling 12 Family 21 age 32 Baker

1870 Census, 9th Ward, Brooklyn, July 25, 1870
Hughes William, age 40, b. England, occ. clerk store
Hughes Mary, wife, age 35, b. England
Hughes James, age 17, clerk in store b. N.Y.
Hughes William, son, age 15, b. N.Y. occ clerk store
Hughes Cortie, son, age 13, b. N.Y.
Hughes Lavinia, daughter, age 10 b. N.Y.
Hughes George, son, age 8 b. N.Y.
Hughes Walter, son, age 6 b. N.Y.
William HUGHS Self M Male W 50 IRE Clerk IRE IRE
Jane C. HUGHS Wife M Female W 45 IRE House Work IRE IRE
William S. HUGHS Son S Male W 25 NY Sales Man IRE IRE
Courtland HUGHS Son S Male W 22 NY Works In Gro IRE IRE
Lannie HUGHS Dau S Female W 18 NY House Works IRE IRE
George F. HUGHS Son S Male W 17 NY Clerk Dry Goods IRE IRE
Walter M. HUGHS Son S Male W 14 NY At School IRE IRE
Source Information: Census Place Brooklyn, Kings (Brooklyn), New York City-Greater, New York Family History Library Film 1254856 NA Film Number T9-0856 Page Number 470C

1888-1890 Brooklyn Directory
Cortland A. Hughes, 51 Brooklyn Ave., Res. 1561 Pacific St. Street occ. clerk grocery
William M. Hughes 1561 Pacific St. occup. clerk Grocery

Children of Jane C. Young and William M. Hughes were as follows:
5 i Robert J.3 Hughes, born 1851 in New York; died 4 Oct 1896 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried in Brooklyn, New York. Notes: US Census June 5, 1860 Dwelling 12 Family 21 age 9 Isaac BALDWIN Self M Male W 54 NH Lawyer NH NH Elizabeth BALDWIN Wife M Female W 53 PA Keeping House PA PA Sadie BALDWIN Dau Female W 18 IA In Printing Office --- --- F. R. BALDWIN Son Male W 17 IA In Printing Office --- --- Nellie BALDWIN Dau Female W 14 IA At School --- --- Elizabeth BALDWIN Dau S Female W 12 IA At School --- --- Edith BALDWIN Dau S Female W 9 IA At School --- --- Nellie MONROE Other Female W 17 IA Servant IRE CAN Delia O CONNEL Other S Female W 28 IRE Servant IRE IRE Harry LEWIS Other M Male W 29 ENG Photographer ENG ENG Louisa LEWIS Other M Female W 28 ENG ENG ENG Minnie LEWIS Other S Female W 11 ENG --- --- A. B. CLIFFORD Other S Male W 31 MI Deals In Farm Machinery ENG --- T. R. NEWBURN Other S Male W 25 IRE Clerk In Saw Mill IRE IRE I. R. ANDREWS Other S Male W 28 WI Lawyer ENG ENG Levi HANAEUR Other S Male W 27 OH Clerk In Store GER GER Robt. J. HUGHES Other S Male W 28 NY Clerk At Saw Mill IRE IRE F. W LE PROOSH Other Male W 28 OH Supt Iron Works FRANCE FRANCE A. W. BERRY Other S Female W 46 NY School Teacher NY NY S. J. WILSON Other Male W 19 IA Barber IL NY (Continued) Source Information: Census Place Clinton, Clinton, Iowa Family History Library Film 1254334 NA Film Number T9-0334 Page Number 171D Jennie HOWE Other S Female W 42 NY Trimmer NY NY James MCCULLOUGH Other Male W 21 PA Clerk In Store PA PA T. T. ROMER Other S Male W 25 MI Clerk In Store NY WALES J. C. TURNER Other S Male W 24 NY Cabinet Maker NY NY M. F. NOWEL Other Male W 45 NH Printing Home Agt. --- --- J. B. GILBERT Other S Male W 24 PA Druggist PA PA Source Information Census Place Clinton, Clinton, Iowa Family History Library Film 1254334 NA Film Number T9-0334 Page Number 172A Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday October 5, 1896 The death of Robert J. Hughes at Agatha hospital a few minutes before one Sunday morning removes from Clinton a figure that had been familiar on her streets and in her home for 20 years. Everybody knew "Bob" Hughes, and everybody liked him. He had been connected with the office of W.J. Young & Co. for many years, and was a relative of the Young family. Owing to a nervous trouble his eyesight failed him, and for over a year he had been unable to read, and could barely see. Kidney disease attacked him. About a week ago he was sent to the hospital, and there died, probably from chronic inflammation of the kidneys. He was about 44 years of age. His immediate relatives live in Brooklyn. Short services were held Sunday afternoon at the residence ot Mr. W.J. Young, Jr., Rev. Henry Morrill conducting them, and the body was placed on the train for Brooklyn, where interment will take place. Mr. Courtland Young accompanied them.
6 ii William S.3 Hughes, born 1855 in New York. Notes: US Census June 5, 1860 Dwelling 12 Family 21 age 7
7 iii Courtland3 Hughes, born 1858 in New York. Notes: US Census June 5, 1860 Dwelling 12 Family 21 age 4
+ 8 iv Lannie3 Hughes, born 1862 in New York. She married (---) Dunham.
9 v George F.3 Hughes, born 1863 in New York. Notes: GEORGE F. HUGHES Special to T New YORK TIMES.. New York Times (1857-Current File). New York, N.Y.: Nov 26, 1943. pg. 23, 1 pgs Article types: obituary Section: OBITUARIES ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 160
10 vi Walter M.3 Hughes, born 1866 in New York.
11 vii Katie3 Hughes, born 1 Jul 1868; died 22 May 1872.


3. William John2 Young ((---)1), born 27 Feb 1827 in Belfast, Ireland; died 8 Jun 1896 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 11 Jun 1896 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married in 1858 in Richmond, Indiana Esther (Elderkin) Young, born Aug 1837 in Baltimore, Maryland; died 2 Mar 1925 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 5 Mar 1925 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa, daughter of John Elderkin and Esther ((---)) Elderkin.

Notes for William John Young
The Clinton Daily Herald Tuesday June 12, 1877 p. 4 Messrs. W.J. Young and Artemus Lamb, of Clinton, and F. Weyerhauser, of Rock Island, left for the logging regions today, to attend a special meeting of the Mississippi River Logging Company at Beef Slough tomorrow. It is expected to complete an incorporation for the purpose of construction dams to hold the water in check for flooding purposes, thus facilitating the procurement of the log supplies in times of low water.
The Clinton Daily Herald Thursday October 12, 1893 p. 4 The Misses Hall, of Cedar Rapids, and Mr. Rudolph Weyerhaeuser, of Rock Island, are the guests of W.J. Young and family.

The Washington Post May 23, 1879 p.1 Clinton, Iowa, May 22. - A fire broke out yesterday in the dry-house of Lombard Sons' sawmill, which was destroyed, together with the following property : Office of W.J. Young & Co. and immediate lumber yards adjoining, embracing several million feet of lumber, also one million feet belonging to Curtis Bros. & Co. and several dwellings. The loss is estimated at over $100,000. At one time the entire city was threatened, the wind blowing a gale, and the fire department of Lyons was summoned.

Oshkosh, Wisconsin All the pine land owned by Cornell university in the counties of Chippewa, Sawyer, Price, Ashland, Oneida, Taylor, Barron, Bayfield, Barnett, Clark and Villas amounting to nearly 60,000 acres, have been sold to W.J. Young & Co., of Clinton, Iowa.

From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879) Pages 669-697
Biographical Sketches of Clinton Residents W. J. YOUNG, of the firm of W. J. Young & Co., manufacturers of lumber; is one of the most enterprising business men of Clinton; he is a native of Belfast, Ireland, and was born Feb. 27, 1827; he came to Clinton June 7,1858 ; before coming here, was engaged in railroading, and held the position of General Freight Agent of the Cincinnati, Logansport & Chicago Railroad; after coming here, he opened a lumber yard, and continued that for two or three years; in May, 1860, he commenced to remove their saw-mill from La Crosse to Clinton, and the 15th of August, he was cutting lumber; in August, 1866, he began building what is known as his large lower mill, which, with one exception, is the largest mill of the kind in this country; the mills of this company have a capacity of manufacturing yearly 50,000,000 feet of lumber, 30,000,000 shingles, and 10,000,000 laths, employing 350 hands in the mills and yards at Clinton, beside the men employed in their own logging camps and their interest in the Mississippi logging camps; he gives his personal attention; has the entire management of his business, which is of great magnitude, his sales of lumber extending over the West, Northwest and South. When Mr. Young began life, he says he had all the capital he required, which was good health; and, by constant attention to his business and good management, he has built up the extensive business of W. J. Young & Co. to its present magnitude. Mr. Young is actively identified with the interests of the city of Clinton; he is one of the Directors of the Clinton National Bank, and is President of the Clinton Savings Bank. He has held the office of Mayor of Clinton, being elected without any opposition.

Iowa Its History and Its Foremost Citizens The S.J. Clarke Publishing Company 1916 p. 1440

1860 US Census Clinton, Iowa July 17, 1860 age 28 Lumberman
1870 US Census Clinton, Iowa age 43 Manufacturer of Lumber
1880 US Census
William J. YOUNG Self M M W 53 IRE Owner Of Saw MilIRE IRE
Esther YOUNG Wife F M W 43 MD Keeping House CT VA
Esther YOUNG Dau F S W 20 IA At Home IRE MD
William J. YOUNG Son M S W 19 IA Clerk In Saw MilIRE MD
Mary YOUNG Dau F S W 17 IA At School IRE MD
Jennie YOUNG Dau F S W 14 IA At School IRE MD
Courtland YOUNG Son M S W 11 IA At School IRE MD
Edward YOUNG Son M S W 7 IA At School IRE MD
Iowa Census December 1887 Clinton, Iowa 333 7th Ave. age 60

Office of Henry Sabin, Superintendent of City Schools

Clinton, Iowa 2 - 8 1886

W.J. Young Esq.

Dear Sir -

I am sorry to say that Courtland is not doing well in school. He has lost eight half days in four weeks, and has been dismissed several times by which he always misses one and sometimes two resitations.
His deportment last month was only 72.
I think his being out so much, has something to do with his deportment.
Anything we can do for the boy we will do very gladly, but he ought to do some for himself. He don't seem to know what hard, dilligent work means.
Yours respectfully,
H. Sabin

Annotated -
Answer Feb. 9"/86

Office of Henry Sabin, Superintendent of City Schools

Clinton, Iowa 2 - 10 1886

W.J. Young Esq.

Dear Sir -

I am in receipt of your note of yesterday. Thank you for the enclosed card - we shall avail ourselves of it during the summer with much pleasure.
Courtland came to the office this morning. I waited until no one was present except us and said "Well Courtland, what is it?" he replied, "Father told me to come here and get a note from you." I said "Is that all he said? It is not what he wrote me in his note," "That is all Father told me to get a note to show I have been here," he said. I did not ---- the matter at all, as I prefer to let him talk it over with you. I dread writing these notes to any parent and sometimes I put them off too long.

Yours respectfully
Henry Sabin

Clinton, Iowa, July 10th 1893

C.H. Young
At Chippewa Lumber Brom C. Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin
My Dear Son Court, If it gives you any joy or comfort to know that you have made my heart sad many days or nights rest assured you have done it. Will you write me some and tell me what more I could have done for your welfare that I did not do. Did I not try to make you happy, did I ever ask you to perform an unreasonable task. If I did tell me what it was, and when, had I not a right at least to expect some comfort after a life of toil and care for you all. Just think of it - I earned my own support from the time I was twelve years old. It will be well for you to think of these questions I ask you, and I think you should answer me. God knows I have worked very hard for you all because I loved you all better than my own life for I have denied myself many comforts & rest that I might do more for you all, now again let me advise you live close to God, pray to him often each day for wisdom do not make a mistake by ridiculing this advice. Honor they father & mother. This is Gods Command and carries with it a promise. I hope and pray God that you will not forget this. You have a better chance than I had. I worked from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. for few dollars per month & board. Don't you think these were long hours, but I was faithful guidance all I could for the best interest of my employer. God bless & protect you in every good work is the prayer of your loving father. W.J. Young

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Tuesday June 9, 1896 W.J. Young, the well-known lumberman of the Mississippi valley, and one of Clinton's most influential citizens, died Monday afternoon at 4:40, at the residence on Seventh avenue. He had been unwell for the past four years, and since his return from the South about two months ago he had been confined to the house. The funeral services will be held at the family residence Thursday morning at 10:30. The body will be interred in Springdale. Those persons who so desire may have the opportunity of seeing the remains Wednesday afternoon, at the house, from three to five. The story of the growth of Clinton and the progress of W.J. Young in his life work are so intimately associated that the one is almost that of the other. Mr. Young's history, however, includes that of Clinton. To him more than to any other man, is Clinton indebted. His generous hand and the influence he wielded were ever enlisted in the city's behalf. No one can fill his place. For all time will Clinton miss him. William John Young was born in Belfast, Ireland, February 27, 1827, and came to America in 1846. He was not supplied with riches when he began the struggle for existence. What he accumulated in later years came to him won by honest endeavor and rugged persistence. He earned what he gained. He came to Clinton in 1858, on June 7th. Previous to this he was general freight agent of the Cincinnati, Logansport & Chicago railroad. On coming to Clinton, he opened a lumber yard to handle the goods turned out by the Ohio Mill company, at LaCrosse, Wisconsin. This undertaking prospered, and with his farseeing shrewdness and business instincts, he determined a mill should be erected at Clinton. In May, 1860, the foundation was laid for the new structure. By August 15 the mill was running. The short space required in the completion of the scheme is indicative of Mr. Young's indomitable energy. In 1866 the great mill, the largest in the country, was begun, and finished within a year. All up and down the Mississippi is the name of W.J. Young well known. Wherever the raft boats penetrate, nay, more, wherever the lumber industry has even the slightest foothold, this is true. Mr. Young it was how introduced the present method of towing rafts. Formerly they were floated down, guided by sweeps. In 1865 the Clinton lumberman made the experiment of pushing the rafts by steamers, and practically revolutionized the industry by the saving of time and expense. This plan did away with the numerous pooins and ropes necessary to hold together the logs, for now they are enclosed in a boom. Thus were born the brail rafts of today. To man with the ingenuity and fine sense of Mr. Young, nothing was impossible, and his rise was rapid. His investments increased, and he became a rich man. He married Miss Esther Elderkin in 1858, in Richmond, Indiana. She survives him. The children are: Mrs. Esther Young Wilson of Chicago, Mrs. Charles T. Hancock of Dubuque, Miss Jane Young, William John, Jr., Courtland Hershey, and Edward Ames. Those who knew the father in outside life, must also know what a kind husband and indulgent parent he was. No man could have gained greater respect and love from his associates and the citizen body alike. There are so many instances of his goodness. It was his princely donations that gave to Clinton the Y.M.C.A. building on Fifth avenue a gift of $20,000 outright. The beautiful Ester Young chapel of the M.E. church, exerting so grand an influence in the mission field, was a grant from Mr. Young. When the Methodist church at Lyons was built, the congregation was surprised and delighted to receive from Mr. Young a sweet-toned bell, which came entirely unsolicited. Cornell college at Mt. Vernon was remembered by a bountiful gift from the same free hand. To his mill employes Mr. Young was a father. No one knows how many needy families have been helped from this source of so much good. Mr. Young never let of his men suffer from poverty. When there was really not work enough to keep all busy, work was made. In the winter time his eye was ever seeking out the poor who might want if he did not aid them. This aid was offered in so courteous a manner it could not be refused. Mr. Young was a gentleman in the true sense of the word. He was unostentatious and affable. In word and action he showed the refinement that was a part of his nature. His fine presence and handsome features distinguished him whereever he might be. So prominent and popular a man could not live in Clinton all these years without becoming closely associated with many business interests. Mr. Young was Mayor in 1864. He was for some time president of the Clinton Savings bank, and a director of the Clinton National bank. He was more or less intimately connected with other institutions, and gave out of his abundance to every project that would result in good. No righteous appeal was ever made to W.J. Young in vain. Three years ago Mr. Young closed his great mills and since then they have run only for special orders. He also disposed of his interests in the Mississippi River Logging company, in which he was a leading factor. Out of respect to his memory, on the day of the funeral the banks will be closed and very probably the business houses.
The Clinton Weekly Age Vol. 26 No. 24 Friday June 12, 1896 p. 3 W.J. Young is dead. Such words passed swiftly over the city Monday evening, from one person to another, telling of the end of life of a man widely known; a man who by reason of great energy and marked financial ability became one of the millionaire kings of America; and the recognized lumber king of the great Mississippi Valley. For years - since 1858 - his home had been in Clinton. Great saw mill interests of his had been here, and for Clinton he possessed all the love for home so strong a nature could give. It was his home. Here he had laid the foundation of the immense fortune. Here his children had been raised. Here business and social intimate friends were, and here he returned, from many a fatiguing business trip, to be greeted by the love of his early life, the wife of his active years. Here he rested, what such an energetic man of great physical powers could rest; and here he did deeds of charity, acts of benevolence, that were not confined to Clinton, but relieved distress in many a town he probably never saw. His was a nature that delighted to give for the good it would do - not for the fame it would bring the giver, for his injunction to many a committee or person asking assistance for another, was that he be not mentioned. He had many thousands at the command of his pen, thousands he had gathered together, and of those thousands he gave thousands for charity. But he sleeps that quiet sleep, and his home on Seventh avenue is hushed with the presence of death; the blinds are drawn, the family are face to face with the greatest sorrow they have ever known. A chair is vacant; the husband and father is dead. Not alone does the sorrow fall on the family. Friends were many. In business circles last night the first greeting were followed by words of the man who was gone; in homes the conversation reverted, to something of his life. In church circles he will be greatly missed. He was considered a pillar there - especially to the First M.E. church, to which society member of his family belonged. Esther Young M.E. church, he builded and furnished, and dedicated to the church work in the name of his wife, and when the chimes wring out, it will be in tones of sorrow, as though each member of his family, for whom they are named, were speaking to the city. Benevolent societies, hospitals and others will remember him for the generous acts he has done for their maintenance. When the services are held that precede the laying of his remains in the great tomb in Springdale, there will be cessation from business, and a cortege of hundreds paying a last mark of respect to one whom to know was to respect. W.J. Young was born in Belfast, Ireland, February 27, 1827. He came to America in 1846, and labored at different work. At one time he clerked in a grocery at $2 per month. While there he gathered some knowledge of bookkeeping. He became bookkeeper for a railroad contractor, and becoming a contractor himself; drifting into railroading, so that previous to his coming to Clinton he was general freight agent of the Cincinnati, Logansport and Chicago railroad. Leaving this he came to Clinton June 7, 1858, thirty-eight years and one day to his death. Here he engaged in conducting a lumber yard and in May 1860, began the erection of a saw mill here, and the 15th of August of the same year was cutting lumber, this mill growing into two of the largest saw mills in the world, one said to be the largest. He was heavily interested in pine lands north, in banks here and in other ways, selling his logging interests two years ago, since which time he had run his mills only to cut special orders, or dress up shipments from the great stock in the yards. Politically he was a man of no aspiration. He served one term as mayor of Clinton, being elected without opposition, and he had deep interest in the schools, and in the improvement of the city. In 1858, the same year he came to Clinton he was married to Esther Elderkin, in Richmond, Indiana. He leaves to mourn his death, a widow, three daughters and three sons: Mrs. Esther Wilson of Chicago; W.J. Young, Jr., of Clinton; Mrs. Mary Hancock, of Dubuque; Miss Jane Young, Courtland Hershey Young and Edward Ames Young of Clinton. The funeral services will be held Thursday morning at 10:30, from the late residence, to which service friends of the family are invited. Those wishing to do so may view the remains Wednesday afternoon from 3 to 5.
The Clinton Weekly Age Vol. 26 No. 24 Friday June 12, 1896 p. 3 part two Isaiah III. .1.2.3: - For behold, the Lord of Host doth take away the stay and the staff. The mighty man and the prudent; and the honorable man and the counselor. The above text so appropriate, was taken by the Rev. S.C. Bronson of Burlington, at the service over the casket of the late W.J. Young Thursday forenoon, when hundreds gathered in and about his late residence on Seventh avenue to do honor to his memory; to pay the last token of respect to the earthly casket of clay. His remarks were brief, but heart-felt and tender, for the divine stood beside the bier of a man whom he had leaned on for counsel and advice when he had charge of the church here. He was assisted in this duty by Rev. J.A. Truesdale, of Chicago, a pastor of the First M.E. church in the late '60s, and by Rev. Mr. Miller, of Des Moines, also a pastor of the same church, way back in the early '70s. Each of these spoke words of comfort and consolation' words of wisdom and advice to the living. Two touching hymns were rendered at the house by Prof. W.L. McArthur, tenor; Miss Eliza Rogers, soprano; Mrs. F.M. Carson, contralto; Mr. Robt. Arnold, basso - "Lead Kindly Light," and "Jesus My All." The spirit of sorrow permeated through the house, where grief stricken relatives, and friends of years bowed their heads in the presence of death, as the benediction fell upon them, and the sorrow was noticeable on the lawn, in the avenue, into the park across the paving where hundreds stood in silent respect to the memory of a great man - "The mighty man and the prudent; the honorable man and the counselor." When the house services had ended, out into the bright sunlight, out under a beautiful blue June sky, they bore the casket, foremen of different departments of the great mills of W.J. Young & Co., being selected to bear the precious burden. They were: John L. Duff, W.J. Brown, Wm. Mitchell, James Donahue, J. Loring Pollock, John Taylor, Wm. Lundgren, R. Truesdale. Tenderly they carried the body to the funeral car between two line of honorary pall bearers: Joseph C. Young, S.B. Gardiner, Wm. D. Walden, Edward H. Thayer, Julson Hyde, Phillip Howes, J.B. Johnson, Oliver Messer, E.A. Wadleigh, Judge C.W. Chase, Chancy Lamb, Dr. P.J. Farnsworth, Col. Milo Smith, John Morris, Peter Barr, John Smith, Capt. J.D. Fegan, Hon. L.A. Ellis, Wm. Taylor, Fred P. Wilcox. With heads bowed low with sorrow these men with whitening crown saw the remains of a long time friend and business associate pass them, and impressive it appeared to the young people present. Under the direction of Mr. C.C. Coan and Hon. L.B. Wadleigh, to whom the family had given the care of all arrangements, assisted by Mr. A.O. Champlin in charge of the carriages, the procession formed rapidly to begin the march to the grave, in the following order: Carriage of pall bearers. Seven carriages of honorary pall bearers. Funeral car. Landau with ministers. Landau with family. Landau with choir. Landaus and carriages of friends. Thus the solemn cortege proceeded, over sixty teams being in line - a line extending a mile in length. "At the mausoleum, just as the casket was passing through the door the noon bells and whistle from the city marked the activity of the world - the world of business the dead had been so prominent in. Then the impressive Methodist Episcopal funeral service was followed as it had been at the house, after the casket had been borne up the marble walk, fringed with bright colored cut roses, and deposited in the imposing tomb that had been erected on the sightly place in new Springdale. Then a prayer, a few words, the chanting of the Lord's Prayer, a benediction, and the mourning friends turned away into the bright world, saddened for them while memory retains its power. The death of the widely known honored man brought friends from many places to attend the funeral services, among those from out of town being. Mrs. John T. Hancock, Dubuque, Miss Adele Hancock, Dubuque, Frank Hancock, Dubuque, Mrs. and Mrs. Frederick Weyerhaueser, St. Paul, Chas. Weyerhaueser, St. Paul, Mr. and Mrs. Suiter, Cedar Rapids, Rev. Mr. Brush, Dubuque, President King, Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, H.M. Young, Chicago, Rev. Emery Miller, Des Moines, Rev. J.A. Truesdale, Chicago, Rev. S.C. Bronson, Burlington, Robert Quayle, Chicago. The esteem in which the departed was held was noticeable about the city in the forenoon of the day the body of W.J. Young was laid to rest by the banks remaining closed until noon, and the mills of C. Lamb & Sons, Curtis Bros. & Co., W.T. Joyce, The Clinton Lumber Co., the Fish Bros. Wagon Works and others. That fate that seems to rule unkindly at times prevented one of the dearest friends of the deceased from being present at the obsequies George W. Forest, who has been the head of the office force of the W.J. Young & Co. business for years, a man whom Mr. Young trusted most completely, and whom he looked upon with great esteem, found it imperative a few days before Mr. Young departed, to travel to endeavor to recuperate his health. No immediate fear of the final rapid dissolution was felt when he left, so he answered nature's call and went east. Telegrams have been sent him, letters have been written, yet to the time of the funeral messages had not reached him, no word had come from him that he had heard of the demise. One can readily feel the shock that will come to the hearted George Forrest when he does learn that he can see the familiar face no more on earth.

The Clinton Herald Friday June 26, 1903 p. 3 The W.J. Young Sold Will Be Taken South To Be Used In Excursion Business

1911 Wolf's History of Clinton
Young, Edward E., 893
Young, Joseph C., 888
Young, William E., 662
Young, William J., 488

The Clinton Herald Monday February 23, 1953 p. 3 Clinton Church of Christ, 1312 Camanche avenue, is the new owner of the pipe organ which for over half a century graced the reception hall of the former C.H. Young home on Seventh avenue, South. The organ was presented to the church by Ray Dodge, who recently sold the property to United Supermarkets (Tennenbohm's) as the site for a new super-market. Specialists are engaged in dismantling the organ, preparatory to storing it. Officials of the church have some building plans under consideration and they explain they do not want the organ installed in the present quarters until a final decision is made. Meantime, the mechanism of the organ will be repaired and rehabilitated. The instrument was installed at the time the home was built for Mrs. W.J. Young Sr., mother of C.H. Young, in 1901. By the time the Amvets purchased the home in 1946 however it was inoperative and never was repaired. It is a two-manual organ with a pedal keyboard.

Notes for Esther Elderkin
US Census September 4, 1850 6th Ward Cincinnati Dwelling 917 Family 1180 age 12 born Maryland
1860 US Census Clinton, Iowa July 17, 1860 age 21
US Census 1870 Clinton, Iowa age 32
Iowa Census December 1887 Clinton, Iowa 333 7th Ave. age 50
US Census 1900 337 Seventh Avenue born Maryland Aug 1837 age 62 married 43 years 6 children 6 living
US Census 26 & 27 April 1910 337 Seve nth Avenue Dwelling 264 Family 276 Young, Esther age 69 6 children 5 living B. Maryland

Clinton Daily Herald Tuesday February 15, 1898 p. 8 Mrs. W.J. Young, Miss Jane Young and Court Young left for Florida today to spend the remainder of the winter.

Obituary: Iowa City Press Citizen Tuesday March 3, 1925 p. 8 Clinton - Mrs. William J. Young, widow of the late W.J. Young, pioneer lumbermanof the Mississippi Valley, died at her home here.

The Davenport Democrat Tuesday March 3, 1925 p. 15 Clinton, Ia., March 2 - Funeral services for the late Mrs. William J. Young, pioneer Clinton resident, who died here yesterday will be held at the late home Thursday afternoon and will be private. The deceased was the widow of the late William J. Young, who was one of the most prominant lumbermen in the Mississippi valley, and was one of the earliest settlers here, coming to Clinton in 1858. Left to mourn the death of Mrs. Young are five sons and daughters, William J. Young, jr., Mrs. Esther Young Burgesser, Mrs. Mary Young Hancock, Edward A. Young, and Courtland Young, in addition to five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

The Clinton Herald Mrs. William J. Young, pioneer resident of Clinton, passed away at her home, 337 Seventh avenue, Monday afternoon. Private funeral services will be held at the late residence Thursday afternoon and will be conducted by the Rev. S.C. Bronson of the Garrett Biblical Institute, Chicago, who was Mrs. Young's pastor during his ministry at the First Methodist Episcopal church, Clinton. Following the services, the body will be placed in the family mausoleum in Springdale cemetery. Friends are requested to kindly omit flowers. Mrs. Young was born in Baltimore, Maryland, the daughter of John and Esther Elderkin, and had been a resident of Clinton since 1858, in which year she was married to the late William J. Young. Coming to Clinton from the east that year, they established the family home that has remained here since Mr. Young engaged in the lumber business and becoming one of the most prominent lumbermen in the Mississippi valley. Surviving Mrs. Young are five sons and daughters, five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. The sons and daughters, all of whom were in Clinton at the time of their mother's death, are William J. Young, Jr., Mrs. Esther Young Burgesser, Mrs. Mary Young Hancock, Edward A. Young and Courtland H. Young. Mrs. W.J. Young The qualities for which Mrs. Young is memorable are rare in any age, rarest of all perhaps in ours. They were the qualities of essential womanhood as it was understood in the days before feminism became synonymous with unrest. Eager always in private benefaction, and efficient in all she undertook, she brought to every cause a heart brimming with sympathy, manners of simplest and most gracious a mind the sure comprehension of which was softened and illumined by infinite subtlety and charm. All this was obvious to those with whom she came in contact, the humblest no less than the most discerning; yet one conspicuous trait was recognized by comparatively few. It was the originality and the energy of the pioneer - no movement for the care of the sick and the weak, and especially of children, appealed to her in vain. The keeness of her sympathies and the peculiar originality of her mind found perhaps their happiest and most forcible expression in quiet deeds. Her conversation was remarkable alike for high intelligence and for the plan of humoresque fancy. Doubtless this city has its own precious qualities, but with Mrs. Young has passed one of the few remaining personalities of nineteenth century Clinton.

The Clinton Herald Friday March 6, 1925 p. 6 Funeral services, paying final tribute to the memory of the late Mrs. William J. Young, were held at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the family residence, 337 Seventh avenue, where the casket reposed amidst a great profusion of magnificent flowers, reflecting the high esteem in which Mrs. Young was held by friends and relatives, who sought thus to express their regard for the pioneer Clinton resident who passed away Monday afternoon. Many of the flowers came from out-of-town friends, relatives and intimate acquaintances. The services, which were private, were conducted by the Rev. Dr. S.C. Bronson of Garrett Biblical Institute of Evanston, Ill. Mrs. Young's pastor when he was minister at the First Methodist Episcopal church in Clinton, and followed the Episcopal funeral ritual, with appropriate Bible selections, read by Dr. Bronson. Musical numbers during the services in the home, where A.L. Schuler was in charge, included pipe organ selections, played by Mrs. Fred S. Haines, Jr., and vocal numbers, "Lead Kindly Light," sung by a quarter composed of Harry Yeazelle Mercer, Dr. C.P. Huey, Eugene Zacher and Jasper Morgan, and "Perfect Day," a solo, sung by Mr. Mercer. Following the services at the home, the body was placed in the family mausoleum in Springdale cemetery, where the services also were private. Pallbearers were F.W. Ellis, G.E. Lamb, A.B. Rathbun, Thomas Crawford, Edmund Burke, George W. Wilson, Jr., J.B. Thosoe, Vincent Mooney, B.H. Bohnson and J.Q. Jefferies. Relatives from out of the city present, in addition to members of the immediate family, included S.S. Stratten, of Chicago, a nephew; Mr. and Mrs. A.H. Hutchinson, of Chicago, the latter a granddaughter, and John Young of Oglesby, Ill.

Children of William John Young and Esther Elderkin were as follows:
12 i Hattie3 Young, born 1859 in Iowa. Notes: 1860 US Census Clinton, Iowa July 17, 1860 age 1
13 ii Esther Eliza3 Young, born 1860 in Iowa; died 13 Jul 1936 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois. She married (1) on 17 Jun 1885 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa Dr. John H. Wilson, born 18 Sep 1857; died 11 Aug 1892 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois; buried 14 Aug 1892 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; (2) on 19 Oct 1896 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa George Edward Burgesser, born in Massillon, Ohio; died 27 Jun 1924 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois, son of Samuel Burgesser and Elizabeth (Weast) Burgesser. Notes: US Census 1870 Clinton, Iowa age 11 The Clinton Daily Herald Monday January 4, 1885 Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Wilson, of Dubuque, are visiting Mrs. Wilson's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Young. In February 1909 donated an elaborately carved grandfather clock to the Clinton YMCA. Obituary: The Clinton Herald Tuesday July 14, 1936 p. 8 Mrs. Esther Young Burgesser, eldest daughter of the late William J. and Esther Elderkin Young, early settlers in Clinton where Mr. Young was a pioneer lumberman, died at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon in Chicago, where she had made her home many years. Her death culminated an illness of about six weeks' duration. Funeral plans have not been completed except that the body will be cremated in Chicago and the committal will be in the Young family mausoleum in Springdale cemetery. Born in Clinton, Mrs. Burgesser spent her early years here, where she was educated in the Clinton schools. In the early eighties, she was married to Dr. John Wilson of Dubuque and made her home in the latter city until after the death of Dr. Wilson. Following her marriage to Edward Burgesser, who was identified with Marshall Field & Co., she resided in Chicago and traveled extensively with Mr. Burgesser, an expert fur buyer. At the time of the outbreak of the World war in 1914, Mr. and Mrs. Burgesser were in Paris. They returned to the United States where Mr. Burgesser died in 1924. Members of the family left to mourn her death are a sister, Mrs. Mary Young Hancock of Clinton and Chicago, and the following nieces and nephew: Mrs. Arthur Notman, nee Miss Florence Hancock, of Staten Island, N.Y., daughter of Mrs. Hancock; Courtland Y. Hancock of Clinton, son of Mrs. Hancock; Mrs. C.L. Aman, nee Miss Katherine Young, of Havana, Cuba, and Mrs. A.H. Hutchinson, nee Miss Esther Young, of Chicago, daughters of the late W.J. Young, Jr., and Mrs. Jerome C. Burke, nee Miss Molly Jane Young, of Clinton, daughter of the late Edward A. Young. Preceding her in death were her father, June 8, 1896, her mother in 1925, a sister, Miss Jane Young, in 1905, and her brothers Edward A. Young, November 12, 1931, Courtland H. Young, February 4, 1932, and William John Young, Jr., May 31, 1935. Illinois Death Records BURGESSER ESTHER EY F/W UNK 6021140 1936-07-13 COOK CHICAGO 36-07-14 MARRIAGE: Clinton County Marriages Book 2 1872-1893 p. 448 #10325 Young, Esther Eliza and John H. Wilson Joseph A. Burrell Minister Lyons Mirror - Saturday June 20, 1885 Married - At the residence of the bride's parents, Wednesday evening, June 17th, Dr. John H. Wilson, of Dubuque, and Miss Esther Eliza Young, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Young. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. J. D. Burrell, in the presence of about one hundred guests. The newly married couple took the midnight train for a tour of the East, and on their return will reside in Dubuque. MARRIAGE: Clinton County Register of Marriages Book 2 page 159 No. 14604
+ 14 iii William John3 Young, born 31 Mar 1861 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 31 May 1935 in Tucson, Arizona; buried 4 Jun 1935 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married (1) Katherine Choate (Paul) Young; (2) Edythe (Choate) Young.
+ 15 iv Mary3 Young, born 1863 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 5 Aug 1941 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 7 Aug 1941 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married Charles Thomas Hancock.
16 v Jane3 Young, born 1866 in Iowa; died 24 Aug 1905; buried 26 Aug 1905 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. Notes: US Census 1870 Clinton, Iowa age 4 Iowa Census December 1887 Clinton, Iowa 333 7th Ave. age 21 Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday August 28, 1905 p. 1 The funeral service of Miss Jane Young was held at the family residence on Saturday at 3 p.m., conducted by Prof. S.C. Bronson of Evanston, Ill. The pipe organ was presided over by Mr. Claudius Joens, who rendered a prelude, "Andanta," by Inglis Bervon, "Antienne" and "Communion in G," by Batiste. The choir, consisting of Messrs. John Lines, Harry Sievers, Miss Bohart and Miss Frahm beautifully rendered the hymns "Lead Kindly Knight," and "Softly Now the Light of Day," selected by Miss Young. The scripture selections and remarks were suggested by the poem, "He Giveth His Loved Ones, Sleep," which was read by request of Miss Young. The service was brief, simple, but exceeding impressive, to which only friends of the family were invited. The burial, which was private, took place at the family Mausoleum. The pall bearers were Messrs. L. Lamb, G.E. Lamb, F.W. Ellis, C. Jonsson, E. Worth and W.F. Coan.
17 vi Courtland Hershey3 Young, born 23 Sep 1870 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 4 Feb 1932 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 8 Feb 1932 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. Notes: US Census 1870 Clinton, Iowa age 10/12 Iowa Census December 1887 Clinton, Iowa 333 7th Ave. age 18 US Census 1900 337 Seventh Avenue born Iowa Sep 1869 age 30 Lumberman US Census 26 & 27 April 1910 337 Seventh Avenue Dwelling 264 Family 276 Young, Courtland H. age 40 b. Iowa Applied for admission to Cornell, Yale and Princeton (College of New Jersey) Obituary: The Clinton Herald Friday February 5, 1932 p. 1 & 5 Courtland H. Young, 61, active executive of W.J. Young & Co. and the varied interests of that company, died unexpectedly at his home, 337 Seventh avenue, South, at 11:40 o'clock last night. Mr. Young's death was caused by a recurrence of a heart attack suffered some months ago and from which it was believed he was convalescing. Funeral services will be held at the home Monday afternoon, after which the body will be placed at rest in the family mausoleum in Springdale cemetery. W.J. Young, Jr., president of W.J. Young & Co. will arrive Sunday from his home in Tucson, Ariz. A sister, Mrs. Esther Burgesser, will arrive today from her home in Chicago. Other members of the immediate family are a sister, Mrs. Mary Young Hancock of Clinton, a nephew, Courtland Y. Hancock of Clinton, and four nieces, Mrs. C.L. Aman of Havana, Cuba, Mrs. A.H. Hutchinson of Chicago, Mrs. Arthur Notman of Staten Island, N.Y., and Mrs. Jerome Burke of Kansas City, Mo. His sister, Mrs. Hancock, and nephew, Mr. Hancock, were with him at the time of his passing. Clinton was shocked today as the word of the passing of Mr. Young circulated about the city. In spite of his illness, he had continued to maintain interest in the affairs of business and in civic activities and the general public was little aware of the handicap under which he labored. Respecting the orders of his physician, however, he was preparing to relinquish some of the more exacting details of his varied interests. On every hand in Clinton, citizens stopped to express their sense of personal loss and grief in the death of Mr. Young. As the news was sent out on press wires, too, messages came streaming in from various parts of the country, sent by men who knew Mr. Young personally or because of association with his associates were cognizant of his importance to the community. Clinton today recalled Mr. Young's interest as a city and civic builder, his pride in all of his undertakings, his insistence that business institutions with which he was connected should serve the public honestly, giving always a full measure of service. Citizens called back to mind the untold hours of time he had given to kindly counsel on a multitude of public questions. They were particularly mindful of his interest and pride in recent public improvements, the enlarged park system, the swimming pool and the incinerator, to which he had devoted time and energy. Many others considered his interest in their personal affairs. They could tell of instance after instance in which he had given unstintingly of good counsel, good office and of financial aid to persons in distress. All were unanimous in picturing him as a typical gentleman, with a heart of charity and a never failing desire to be helfpul. Loyalty to family and friends was so pronounced in him that it was an inspiration to all with whom he came in contact. Mr. Young was a native of Clinton. He was born here September 23, 1870, the son of the late William J. and Esther Elderkin Young, who came to Clinton when the city was in its infancy. He was educated in the Clinton public schools and in the Coulter school in Chicago. Returning to Clinton, then, he became associated with his father, who had founded the lumbering interests of W.J. Young & Co., which he built into one of the greatest business concerns of the Mississippi valley. About 1893, when the father's health failed, C.H. Young took over the active management of the business. The father died in 1896 and two years later the family retired from the lumber manufacturing business in Clinton. The family interests, however, were continued in W.J. Young & Co., of which W.J. Young, Jr., is now as he was then president and C.H. Young secretary and treasurer. Because of his interest in W.J. Young & Co., a corporation, Mr. Young became identified as an officer with various interests in which the corporation was a dominant factor. These included the Clinton National bank and the Clinton Savings bank, of both of which institutions Mr. Young was president at the time of his death and in which W.J. Young & Co., headed by W.J. Young, Jr., hold heavy investments. Other institutions in which W.J. Young & Co. investments are dominant include The Clinton Herald Co., of which C.H. Young was president; Maquoketa Light & Heat Co., of which Mr. Young was president; Clinton-Illinois High Bridge Co., of which he was president; Springdale Cemetery association, of which he was president; Great Western Copper Co., of which Mr. Young was treasurer with W.J. Young, Jr., as president; Clinton Street Railway Co., in which Mr. Young was a director and a former president. W.J. Young & Co. also was long interested in the gas and electric business in Clinton. The corporation came into control of the Clinton Gas & Electric Co., which it was reorganized in about 1912. At that time, C.H. Young was elected treasurer and continued in that capacity until 1926 when the gas and electric franchise was sold to the Interstate Power Co. In the same manner, investments in the Chicago & North Western Railway Co., are held in the name of W.J. Young & Co. Mr. Young was a member of the Chicago club and in Clinton of the Wapsipinicon and Clinton Country clubs. Messages of sympathy and of tribute to the memory of Courtland H. Young poured into the city today from friends, associates and acquaintances, who were shocked by word of the death of Mr. Young. In every walk in life in the city, itself, tribute was spoken and not a few citizens communicated their grief to Mr. Young's family and business associates. From Congressman B.M. Jacobsen came a message of sympathy and tribute, in which he said he would come from Washington to attend the funeral services. Officers of Clinton Typographical union early expressed their sympathy and spoke feelingly of the fine relations that have always existed between Mr. Young as president of The Clinton Herald Co. and the union. From Fred W. Woodward, publisher of the Dubuque Telegraph-Herald and Times-Journal, came the following message: "Entire staff of Telegraph-Herald and Times-Journal extends sympathy in death of Courtland Young. Journalism loses a real leader and Iowa a distinguished citizen. Joseph V. Connolly, president of Internation News Service, sent this telegram from New York: "For our entire organization permit me to express our sincere sympathy in the loss suffered by The Herald and by your city and state in the untimely death of Mr. Young." John T. Miller, correspondent of The Associated Press, telegraphed from Des Moines: "Please convey to the family of Mr. Young our deepest sympathy. His death removes an outstanding citizen and will be keenly felt in the community for the growth and prosperity of which he gave so much of his time, energy and substance." COURTLAND H. YOUNG.:Clinton (Iowa) Financier, Philan- thropist and Publisher Dead. Special to THE NEW YORK Tares.. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Feb 6, 1932. pg. 17, 1 pgs Article types: obituary Dateline: CLINTON, Iowa, Feb. 5 ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 1862 The Clinton Herald September 20, 1932 Clinton Park board announces gift of South Clinton site by the late C.H. Young. The Clinton Herald Friday March 17, 1933 p. 5 Des Moines, March 17 - An inheritance tax of $34,728.50 was paid by the estate of Courtland H. Young, late publisher of The Clinton Herald, Clinton. The tax was the largest paid by any estate during the last year, it was said at the estate house. Total value of the estate was $405,323.83
+ 18 vii Edward Ames3 Young, born Dec 1873 in Iowa; died 12 Nov 1931 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 14 Nov 1931 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married Molly (Ankeny) Young.


4. Courtland Hunter2 Young ((---)1), born 1840 in Ireland; died 17 Aug 1886 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana. He married on 23 Nov 1871 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana Rosa (Green (Wilson)) Young, born 1851 in New York.

Notes for Courtland Hunter Young
Young Corine Burdick Courtland H. Rosa Green FW 10/16/1877 71 204
Young Robert Hughes Courtland H. Rosa Green MW 12/05/1883 81 1008
Young William Boyd Courtland H. Rosa Green MW 06/14/1882 78 1021

Courtlandt YOUNG Self M Male W 40 IRE Clk. U.S. Govt IRE IRE
Rosa YOUNG Wife M Female W 29 NY Keeping House NY NY
Ellen YOUNG Dau S Female W 6 LA At School IRE NY
Courtlandt YOUNG Son S Male W 5 LA IRE NY
Corinne YOUNG Dau S Female W 3 LA IRE NY
Bonzano YOUNG Son S Male W 1 LA IRE NY
John OGLESBY Other M Male W 65 IN Appraiser Mdse C.H. VA VA
Source Information: Census Place New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana Family History Library Film 1254463 NA Film Number T9-0463 Page Number 88B

MARRIAGE:
New Orleans Marriage Record Index 1831-1925 Vol. 2 p. 424 Young Courtland H. -- Green Rosa -- 11/23/1871 2 424

Notes for Rosa Green (Wilson)
US Census April 18 & 19, 1910 SD 1 ED 200 sheet 4A 12th Ward (part precinct 5) 1312 Maringo St. Dwelling 82 Family 83 age 61 6 children 6 living

MARRIAGE:
New Orleans Marriage Record Index 1831-1925 Vol. 2 p. 424 Young Courtland H. -- Green Rosa -- 11/23/1871 2 424

Children of Courtland Hunter Young and Rosa Green (Wilson) were as follows:
19 i Ellen Stockman3 Young, born 1 Nov 1874 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; died aft 1931. Notes: US Census April 18 & 19, 1910 SD 1 ED 200 sheet 4A 12th Ward (part precinct 5) 1312 Maringo St. Dwelling 82 Family 83 age 36 Teacher Public Schools US Census January 11, 1920 SD 1 ED 213 Sheet 8B 12th Ward (part precinct 5) 1202 Maringo St. Dwelling 146 Family 156 age 40 Principal Public Schools 1874 Orleans Parish Birth Index - S through Z Orleans Parish Young Ellen Stockman Charles Rosa Green F - 01/11/1874 62 191
+ 20 ii Courtland Hunter3 Young, born 15 May 1875 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; died 3 Dec 1930 in New York, New York. He married (1) u ((---)) Young; (2) Dorothy Rosabelle (Campbell) Young.
+ 21 iii Corine Burdick3 Young, born 16 Oct 1877 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; died aft 1931. She married Charles Campau.
22 iv Bonzano Ogsley3 Young, born 8 Sep 1879 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; died aft 1931. Notes: 1879 Orleans Parish Birth Index - Q through Z Orleans Parish Young ----- C. H. Rosa Green M W 09/08/1879 74 458
23 v William Boyd3 Young, born 14 Jun 1882 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; died aft 1931. Notes: Birth: New Orleans birth index 1790-1899 Vol. 78 p. 1021 Young William Boyd Courtland H. Rosa Green M W 06/14/1882 78 1021 US Census April 18 & 19, 1910 SD 1 ED 200 sheet 4A 12th Ward (part precinct 5) 1312 Maringo St. Dwelling 82 Family 83 age 27 Clerk Hardware US Census January 11, 1920 SD 1 ED 213 Sheet 8B 12th Ward (part precinct 5) 1202 Maringo St. Dwelling 146 Family 156 age 37 Salesman Typewriter
24 vi Robert Hughes3 Young, born 5 Dec 1883 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; died in aft 1931. Notes: Birth: New Orleans birth index 1790-1899 Vol. 81 p. 1008 Young Robert Hughes Courtland H. Rosa Green M W 12/05/1883 81 1008 US Census April 18 & 19, 1910 SD 1 ED 200 sheet 4A 12th Ward (part precinct 5) 1312 Maringo St. Dwelling 82 Family 83 age 26 Clerk RR Office US Census January 11, 1920 SD 1 ED 213 Sheet 8B 12th Ward (part precinct 5) 1202 Maringo St. Dwelling 146 Family 156 age 34 Merchant Wire & Rope

Generation 3

8. Lannie3 Hughes (Jane C.2 Young, (---)1), born 1862 in New York. She married (---) Dunham.

Notes for Lannie Hughes
US Census June 5, 1860 Dwelling 12 Family 21 age 1

Children of Lannie Hughes and (---) Dunham were as follows:
25 i (---)4 Dunham, born 14 Oct 1883 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York.


14. William John3 Young (William John2, (---)1), born 31 Mar 1861 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 31 May 1935 in Tucson, Arizona; buried 4 Jun 1935 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married (1) on 6 Dec 1883 in Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, divorced Katherine Choate (Paul) Young, born 13 May 1860 in Kenosha, Wisconsin; died aft 1945, daughter of George Howard Paul and Pamela Susan (Joy) Paul; (2) Edythe (Choate) Young.

Notes for William John Young
US Census 1870 Clinton, Iowa age 9
US Census 7 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 9B Second Ward 541 5th Avenue Dwelling 185 Family 195 Young, William G. b. Mar. 1860 age 40 Married 16 years b. Iowa President Lumber Co.

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Saturday June 1, 1935 p. 5 William J. Young, Jr., son of the late Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Young of Clinton, died at 3:16 o'clock, central standard time, yesterday afternoon in his home in Tucson, Ariz. Mr. Young, a native of Clinton, was president of W.J. Young & Co., The Clinton Herald Co., Maquoketa Light & Heat Co. and the Great Western Copper Co., the latter of Tucson, chairman of the boards of directors of the Clinton National bank and the Clinton Savings bank and treasurer of the Clinton Street Railway co. Funeral services will be held probably at 11 o'clock Tuesday morning in the home of L.J. Schuster, 1230 North Second street, vice president of W.J. Young & Co., with the Rev. THomas Horton, rector of St. John's Episcopal church, officiating. Following the services, the body will be cremated and the ashes placed in the W.J. Young family mausoleum in Springdale cemetery. Definite determination of the funeral hour awaits word from a daughter, Mrs. C.L. Aman, nee Miss Katherine Young, of Havana, Cuba, as to whether she will be able to attend the services. A funeral party composed of Mrs. W.J. Young, Jr., and Mr. Schuster left Tucson this morning, bringing the body, and will arrive here early Monday morning. Mr. Schuster went to Tucson, leaving here late Tuesday night when the condition of Mr. Young became critical. Mr. Young was born in Clinton, March 31, 1861, the son of William J. and Esther Elderkin Young, early Clinton settlers. For many years he was associated in business with his father, a pioneer Clinton lumber manufacturer, who established the business of W.J.Young & Co., here in 1858, operating great mills until 1898, when the family retired from the lumber business. Despite the fact that Mr.Young had not been a resident of Clinton for many years, his death brought expressions of regret from large numbers of the older residents of Clinton who remember him for his kindness, geniality and interest in personal and civic matters. Reared and educated in Clinton, Mr. Young, Jr., was active in many fields and, like his father, and other members of the family, was identified with substantially all community undertakings. With retirement from lumber manufacturing the firm name of W.J. Young & Co., was retained and its resources invested in various enterprises, including, in addition to those in which Mr. Young, Jr., was an officer, the Springdale Cemetery association, the Chicago & North Western Railway Co., and from 1912 to 1925, the Clintoon Gas & Electric Co., now the Interstate Power Co. For a period Mr. Young, Jr., made his home in Chicago but in recent years had resided in Tucson. Mr. Young, Jr., served nine years as a member of the board of directors of the Clinton independent school district. He was a charter member of the WApsipinicon club and was for many years a member of the club's rowing crew, a member of the crack running team of the old Neptune, No. 2, volunteer hose company, a charter member of Clinton lodge, 199, B.P.O. Elks, and was a member of the Chicago club, the Pueblo club of Tucson and of Masonic bodies. Left to mourn his death are his widow, Mrs. Edythe Choate Young, and the latter's daughter, Miss Doris Oesting, of Tucson; two daughters, Mrs. Aman of Havana, and Mrs. A.H. Hutchinson, nee Miss Esther Young, of Chicago; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Young Hancock of Clinton and Mrs. Esther Young Burgesser of Chicago; a nephew, Courtland Y. Hancock , of Clinton, and two nieces, Mrs. Arthur Notman of Staten Island, N.Y., and Mrs. Jerome C. Burke of Clinton. A former wife, the former Miss Katherine Paul, mother of Mrs. Aman and Mrs. Hutchinson, also survives. Mr. Young, Jr., was preceded in death by his father in 1896, his mother in 1925, a sister, Miss Jane Young, in 1905, a brother, Edwin A. Young, November 12, 1931, and a brother, Courtland H. Young, February 4, 1932.

Notes for Katherine Choate Paul
US Census 7 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 9B Second Ward 541 5th Avenue Dwelling 185 Family 195 Young, Catherine b. May 1860 age 40 Married 16 years 2 children 2 living b. Wisconsin

Children of William John Young and Katherine Choate Paul were as follows:
+ 26 i Katherine Stockman4 Young, born 20 Feb 1887 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 22 Jul 1967 in Evanston, Cook, Illinois; buried 24 Jul 1967. She married Clarence Lincoln Aman.
+ 27 ii Ester Paul4 Young, born 31 Jan 1888 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 17 Jul 1968; buried 19 Jul 1968. She married Alfred Henry Hutchinson.


15. Mary3 Young (William John2, (---)1), born 1863 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 5 Aug 1941 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 7 Aug 1941 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married on 21 Apr 1886 in Clinton, Iowa, USA Charles Thomas Hancock, born 16 Mar 1860 in Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa; died 29 Dec 1912 in Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa, son of John Thomas Hancock and Bertha (Enz) Hancock.

Notes for Mary Young
US Census 1870 Clinton, Iowa age 7

Dubuque Sept. 2, 1886
My Dear Papa,
I have just a moment to write you a line. Charlie told me Friday to be sure and hand you a box of grapes this afternoon. Think they are very nice and we have an abundance of them. I am very busy today making tomato ketchup and cannot write a long letter. I received a letter form Jennie this morning Charlie joins me in sending ----- love to you Your loving daughter.
Marie
Sept. 2, 1886

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Wednesday August 6, 1941 Mrs. Mary Young Hancock, daughter of the late W.J. and Esther Elderkin Young, Clinton pioneers, and widow of the late Charles T. Hancock of Dubuque, died in Mercy hospital, Clinton at 7:30 o'clock last night, following a brief illness. Mrs. Hancock, who had been residing in the Lafayette hotel, entered the hospital Monday afternoon. Private funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon in the home of Mrs. Hancock's son, C.Y. Hancock, Breezy Point, with the Rev. Thomas Horton, rector of St. John's Episcopal church, officiating. Committal will be in the Young family mausoleum in Springdale cemetery. Born in Clinton, Mrs. Hancock was educated in the Clinton public schools and in Miss Grant's School for Girls in Chicago. Following her marriage to Charles T. Hancock, she made her home in Dubuque until after the death of Mr. Hancock. The latter was a son of a pioneer Dubuque wholesale grocer, who established the family business in Dubuque in the middle fifties, and Charles T. Hancock continued to operate that enterprise until his own death. Two children, Courtland Y. Hancock, now of Clinton where he is president of The Clinton Herald Co. publisher of the Herald and identified with other Clinton business interests, and Florence, now Mrs. Arthur Notman of Staten Island, N.Y., were born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Hancock in Dubuque and were educated there. After the death of Mr. Hancock, Mrs. Hancock resided for a period in Pasadena, Calif., but returned to Clinton in 1925 and had made her home here and in Chicago since that year. She was vice president of W.J. Young & Co., founded by her father, an early day Clinton lumberman, and of the Clinton & Illinois Bridge Co. and was interested in other Clinton business institutions. Of her immediate family, Mrs. Hancock leaves her son and her daughter; three grandchildren, Arthur Notman, Jr., and John H. Notman of Staten Island, and Mary Elizabeth Hancock of Clinton; and three nieces, Mrs. J.C. Burke of Clinton, Mrs. A.H. Hutchinson of Chicago and Mrs. C.L. Aman of Havana, Cuba. Mrs. Notman arrived in Clinton early this morning from her Staten Island home. Preceding Mrs. Hancock in death were her husband, her parents, and her brothers and sisters, the late W.J. Young, Jr., C.H. Young, E.A. Young, Mrs. Esther Young Burgesser and Miss Jane Young.

Clinton County Death Record book 2 Jan. 1934 - Jun. 1947 page 101 Cause of death Intestinal Obstruction Carcinoma of Uterus Cremation Davenport.

MARRIAGE:
Clinton County Marriages Book 2 1872-1893 p. 448 No. 10673 Maria Young & C.T. Hancock Joseph D. Burrill Minister

Notes for Charles Thomas Hancock
US Census 1880 page 250B 4th Ward Dubuque, Iowa age 20 born Iowa Clerk in Store

John T. Hancock & Son
215 to 2229 Main Street
Grocers Established 1858
Dubuque, Iowa Sept. 30, 1886

Dear Father and Mother,

We received your very welcome note yesterday, and I fully intended to answer it, but felt so poorly it was all I could do to attend to business matter I am feeling much better today, although not well, but I trust I shall be soon. Marie and I enjoy kaving Jane with us, and we shall keep her just as long as she will stay. She is talking of ging home next week, but unless it is necessary we will not let her it is so pleasant for darling Marie to have her with her for it is lonely enough for her when I am at the store. Although she never says anything, I cant help but fear she gets lonesome, but as long as Jane can stay with her it wont be so bad, so if it is not necessary for her to return next week, I wish you would write her to stay two or three weeks longer. The last news from the travellers was my father, Blanche and Frank were in Senden, and my mother and Adele in Dresden and all well. They sail for home Oct. 20. On the same steamer they went over. I do hope they will have a safe and pleasant voyage acorss the ocean. We should enjoy very much going down to Clinton to spend a few days with you, but until my father returns I feel I cannot get away. We hope however to enjoy that pleasure a little later in the Fall. With a great deal of love for you both, as also Will, Kate, Court & Eddie from both Marie and Jane, as well as myself.

Your devoted son,
Charles


The Clinton Herald Wednesday July 16, 1902 p. 1 Chas. A. Hancock on Speakership Dubuque Republican Leader Assured That Henderson Will be Re-elected.

MARRIAGE:
Clinton County Marriages Book 2 1872-1893 p. 448 No. 10673 Maria Young & C.T. Hancock Joseph D. Burrill Minister

Children of Mary Young and Charles Thomas Hancock were as follows:
+ 28 i Courtland Young4 Hancock, born 11 Jun 1889 in Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa; died 10 May 1967 in Jackson, Iowa; buried 12 May 1967 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married Elizabeth (Corman) Hancock.
+ 29 ii Florence4 Hancock, born 9 May 1891 in Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa; died 3 Feb 1985 in Dongan Hills, Staten Island, New York; buried Jun 1985 in Norton Cemetery, Keene Valley, New York. She married Arthur Notman.


18. Edward Ames3 Young (William John2, (---)1), born Dec 1873 in Iowa; died 12 Nov 1931 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 14 Nov 1931 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married on 12 Nov 1908 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa Molly (Ankeny) Young, born 27 Dec 1869 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 24 Jan 1959 in Mexico City, D.F., Mexico; buried in Mexico City, D.F., Mexico, daughter of Dr. Augustus Lafayette Ankeny and Valeria M. (Perrin) Ankeny.

Notes for Edward Ames Young
Iowa Census December 1887 Clinton, Iowa 333 7th Ave. age 15
US Census 1900 337 Seventh Avenue born Iowa Dec 1873 age 26 Lumberman
US Census 21 April 1910 Clinton Twp. Bluff Road Dwelling 75 Family 77 Young, Edward A. age 37 Married 1 year b. Iowa Own Income

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Friday November 13, 1931 p. 5 Edward A. Young, son of the late William J. and Esther Young, pioneer residents of Clinton, passed away Thursday evening at the home of his brother, C.H. Young, 327 Seventh avenue, south, long the family residence. Private funeral services are to be held at the house at 3 o'clock Saturday afternoon. The body will be laid to rest in the Young family mausoleum in Springdale Cemetery. Mr. Young succumbed to an illness which had its inception in Chicago in March, 1930. In June of that year he was brought to the home of his brother here and had been recuperating. A relapse, suffered Tuesday of this week, however, was so severe that it failed to respond to medical attention. A native of Clinton, Mr. Young had been active in Clinton business interests throughout the years of his majority. At the time of his demise, he was president of the Clinton National bank, vice president of the Clinton Savings bank, treasurer of the Clinton Street Railway Co., vice president of W.J. Young & Co., founded by his father in the summer of 1858 and which became one of Clinton's largest and most prominent lumber industries. He also had various other business connections and interests. Possessed of a pleasing, affable disposition, a keen consciousness of fair-dealing in business and of kindliness in public contacts, he surrounded himself with a wide circle of sincere friends, who today expressed profound sorrow over his passing. One of his delights was found in travel and as a result he had visited practically every country in the known world. He found some of his greatest happiness in discussing his trips with friends who were likewise interested in world travel. His love for association with his fellow men was reflected in his club and fraternal connections, which included membership in the Wapsipinicon club, the Clinton Country club and the Clinton lodge, 199, B.P.O. Elks, in Clinton and the Chicago club in Chicago. Left to mourn his passing are his wife, nee Molly Ankeny; his daughter, Mrs. Jerome C. Burke, now of Kansas City, Mo.; two sisters, Mrs. Esther Young Burgesser of Chicago and Mrs. Mary Y. Hancock of Clinton; and two brothers, William J. Young, Jr. of Tucson, Ariz., and C.H. Young of Clinton. W.J. Young passed away in 1896 and Mrs. W.J. Young, in 1925. A sister, Miss Jane Young, died in 1905. Pallbearers for the funeral tomorrow will be selected from banking and other business institutions with which the deceased was connected. The family today requested that flowers be omitted.

The Chicago Tribune November 14, 1931 p. 14 Clinton, Ia., Nov. 13. - Special. Edward A. Young, president of the Clinton National bank, vice president of the Clinton Savings bank, Clinton Herald company and W.J. Young & Co., died at the home of his brother, C.H. Young, here. He was a son of the late William J. and Esther Young, a pioneer family. His father founded W.J. Young & Co., which became one of the largest lumber industries on the Mississippi river, in 1858. Funeral services will be held in Clinton Saturday.

Notes for Molly Ankeny
US Census 21 April 1910 Clinton Twp. Bluff Road Dwelling 75 Family 77 Young, Molly A. age 40 Married (2) 1 year 3 children 3 living b. Iowa Own Income

The Clinton Herald Tuesday May 8, 1900 p. 8 Mrs. Dwight Lamb, Mrs. Artemus Lamb, Mrs. Marvin Gates and Mrs. W.E. Young went to Chicago last night to visit for a few days.

The Clinton Herald Monday January 3, 1938 p. 3 Society events for the gay holiday season at the Clinton Country club came to a climax last evening when Mr. and Mrs. Artemus Lamb of Los Angeles and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smith, Jr., of Hammond, Ind. guests of Mrs. E.A. Young and Dr. and Mrs. J.C. Burke at "Woodlands" entertained at a cocktail party for eighty friends. Mrs. J.A. Johnson and son, David and George McCarthy of Oak Park, Ill., and Dr. P.J. Burke and daughter, Miss Dorothy, of Davenport, were among the guests.

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday January 26, 1959 p. 11 Mrs. E.A. Young, a native of Clinton and mother of Mrs. J.C. Burke of Santa Fe, N.M., also formerly of this city, died Saturday evening in Mexico City, Mexico. Funeral services were to be held today. The daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Augustus Ankeny, Mollie Ankeny was born here over 90 years ago. Her first husband, Dwight Lamb, was killed in a boating accident. She later married E.A. Young, who also preceded her in death. In addition to Mrs. Burke, other surviving children are Mrs. Hayden Nichols (Valeria) of Mexico City and Artemus Lamb of El Salvador. One daughter, Celeste, died in 1924. Three sisters, one brother, nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren also survive.

MARRIAGE:
The Clinton Daily Herald Thursday October 6, 1892 p. 3 Never did the full moon of autumn look down upon a more brilliant social event than that of last evening - the marriage of James Dwight Lamb to Mollie Valeria Ankeny, of this city, at St. John's Episcopal church at 8 o'clock. For weeks the occasion had been looked forward to with eager expectation, and the fulfullment was perfect as to every detail of arrangement. Never had this cozy, graceful edifice assumed a more beautiful garb. There was a soft simplicity about all of the decorations - which were made under the direction of M.F. Gallagher and assistants, of Chicago - that rested the eye and enchanted the beholder. Green and white were the only two colors used. In each window were palms, beneath whose drooping foliage were large bunches of white dahlias. The chandeliers were draped with Alabama smilax. The organ retreat was hedged with palms and ferns, dotted here and there with dahlias. At the left of the chancel, the fountain was filled with dahlias, from which hung daintily festoons of smilax. The chancel itself was a bower of beauty. At each side of the entrance stood palms, surrounded at the base bu loose flowers. The sides, back and ceiling were covered with palms and ferns. On the altar were bouquets of dahlias, while the altar rail was entwined with smilax with a border of dahlias at the top. From the arches were suspended long, sweeping festoons of smilax, caught up here and there in a bewilderingly artistic manner - one could scarce se how. This filmy network was bespangled with handsome white orchids. The effect produced was one of the most delightful to be imagined. It seemed as though a section of the starry firmament had been brought within the church and were floating before the eyes of those in the pews. Mrs. T.F. Molt presided over the great organ and played during the arrival of the guests, until the church was crowded. The white ribbons were drawn by the ushers - Messrs. B.F. Ankeny of Deadwood; C.E. Dickson, of Jacksonville, Ill.; Marvin Gates, of Cedar Rapids,\; and G.H. Hobart, of this city - and just preceding the arrival of the bridal party, the nuptial song, an Ave Maria, was sung by Miss Von Schrader, of Ottumwa. As the last sweet tone floated out upon the air, the organ modulated into the stately Lohengrin wedding march, and Rev. E. Jay Cooke of Cleveland, O., entered from the right of the chancel and knelt before the altar. The ushers advanced up the west aisle; the groom and his best man, B.F. Ankeny, from the left of the chancel, and took their places. The bridesmaid, Miss Clara Lamb, came first, followed by Misses Emma Lamb and Annie Cassell, approaching the altar from the west aisle. Miss Ankeny of Des Moines, as maid of honor, preceded the bride, entering by the east aisle. Last of all came the bride. She was met at the chancel by the groom, and together they advanced and knelt before the minister. The beautiful and deeply impressive Episcopal ring service was used in pronouncing the two young people man and wife, her brother giving the bride away. This ended, the strains of the Mendelsshon march awoke the stillness and the party left the church, passing down the west aisle. The bride wore a Paris gown, one of Wourth's creations. It was of white satin, covered with tulle, dotted with clusters of pearls, high at the neck, with long train. The trimming was pearl fringe. The veil was fastened with a diamond ornament, the gift of the groom. She carried a bunch of lilies of the valley. Miss Ankeny's the maid of honor, gown was a white satin rhadame, over which was white chiffon, cut high at the neck, with a watteau train. A large bow of broad white ribbon was fastened at the shoulders, the ends of which hung to the full length of the train. She carried a bouquet of bride's roses and ferns. The bridesmaid's wore gowns of white satin rhadame, and over the pale green chiffon, round neck, and loose elbow sleeves. The waists were trimmed with white chiffon. Each carried bride's roses. This wedding has joined together for better or for worse the lives of two of the most popular young people of Clinton, those whose friends are unlimited and whose congratulations are sincere. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. A.L. Ankeny and her haome has been in this city for years. The groom is the second son of Mr. Artemus Lamb, who has already begun to take an active part in themanagement of the mills of C. Lamb & Sons. Both have been leaders in society, and will continue to be, in their own home now. Mr. and Mrs. Lamb left at 1:50 this morning for Chicago, New York , Washington, and other Eastern points of interest. After a bridal trip lasting one month they will be at home at 433 Sixth avenue. Following the wedding at the church, a reception was given at the home of the bride's mother 433 Sixth avenue, where thronged the guests to shower their best wishes. Here also was the work of skilled decoraters visible. The bridal party received in the drawing room beneath a canopy of smilax and roses. The mantel in this room was banked with pink roses; those of the remaining rooms, with dahlias. The center table of the dining room was appropriately trimmed with white roses. The refreshments were served by Kinsley of Chicago. From the library above, at the head of the stairs, was stationed Tomasso's Mandolin orchestra, of Chicago. Here, too, were displayed the numerous presents, rich and elegant, which testified so strongly to the esteem and love of the friends. As each one took his departure he was presented with a neat box of wedding cake. ONe the box was the monogram "A.L" The dreams of the joyous occasion must have been pleasant for all. A large number were present from other cities, among whom were: Miss Sue Ankeny, Des Moines. Miss Cassell, Jacksonville, Ill. Miss Waite, Brooklyn. Miss Grace Cassell, Jacksonville, Ill. Mr. and Mrs. C.L. Bonney, Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Welker Given, Des Moines. Mrs. Frank Stanley, Chicago. MIss Von Schrader, Ottumwa, Miss Benson, Springfield, O. Mr. and Mrs. Carson, New York. C.E. Dickson, Jacksonville, Ill. E.W. Brown, Des Moines. Marvin Gates, Cedar Rapids. Miss Eals, Dixon, Ill. Mr. and Mrs. W.G. Bevier, Tipton.

Children of Edward Ames Young and Molly Ankeny were as follows:
+ 30 i Jane Elderkin4 Young, born 2 Dec 1910 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 24 May 1978 in Santa Fe, New Mexico; buried 26 May 1978 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She married Dr. Jerome Carroll Burke.


20. Courtland Hunter3 Young (Courtland Hunter2, (---)1), born 15 May 1875 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; died 3 Dec 1930 in New York, New York. He married (1), divorced u ((---)) Young; (2) in 1920, divorced Dorothy Rosabelle (Campbell) Young, born 1900/01.

Notes for Courtland Hunter Young
Birth: New Orleans birth index 1790-1899 Vol. 66 p. 264 Young Courtland Hunter, Jr. C. H. Rosa Green M - 05/15/1875 66 264

US Census January 28, 1920 SD 38 ED 156 Sheet 34B Ward 5 Stamford, Fairfield Co. Connecticut Newfield Avenue Dwelling 670 Family 730 age 42 born Louisiana Publisher Magazine

C.H. YOUNG, PUBLISHER, LEFT $681,390 ESTATE:Family Will Share in Property -- $25,000 Charitable Bequests Made by Louis Goldstein. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Jun 1, 1932. pg. 8, 1 pgs Article types: article ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 419 First Paragraph Courtland H. Young, head of the C.H. Young Publishing Company, who died on Dec. 3, 1930, from suffocation in a fire in his apartment at 110 West Fifty-fifth Street, left an estate of $1,338,713 gross, reduced by debts and expenses to $681,390 net, according to the transfer tax appraisal filed yesterday. Mr. Young owned all the outstanding capital stock of the publishing company, which was appraised at $625,583. Three-quarters of the net estate goes in trust to Mr. Young's daughter, Rosabelle Corinne Young of 81 Seventy-first Street, Brooklyn. Four brothers and sisters share the remaining fourth. The are B. Oglesby Young, 3,569 Broadway, and Robert B. and Ellen S. Young and Corinne B. Campau, all of New Orleans. By order of the Surrogate's Court, provision was made for a son, Neil Campbell Young of the Brooklyn address, although in his will Mr. Young cut off both his divorced wife, Mrs. Dorothy R. Young, and "a certain male child to which I am informed she gave birth on or about Dec. 26, 1924." The boy recieves a contingent three-eights interest in the estate if the daughter dies before receiving the principal of her trust at the age of 45.

BOY CONTESTS YOUNG WILL:Son of Publisher Wins Right to Sue for Share in Estate. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Jan 19, 1932. pg. 19, 1 pgs Article types: article Section: BOOKS ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 124

DAUGHTER, 9, GETS C.H. YOUNG'S ESTATE:Five Brothers and Sisters of Publisher Share in One-fourth of $1,000,000 Property. WILL CUTS OFF HIS EX-WIFE Trust Company Obtains Letters to Act in Pending Stock Deals-- Mrs. Blair's Will Filed. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Dec 7, 1930. pg. 28, 1 pgs Article types: article ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 540 First Paragraph
The will of Courtland H. Young, principal owner of the Young Publishing Company, who died of suffocation last Wednesday during a small blaze in his apartment at 110 West Fifty-fifth Street, was filed yesterday in Surrogate's Court. It leaves his estate, estimated at more than $1,000,000, to his 9-year-old daughter and five brothers and sisters, and makes no provision for his former wife, Dorothy H. Young, whom he divorced in 1928. The daughter, Rosabelle C. Young, of 7,001 Ridge Boulevard, Brooklyn, is to receive not more than $250 monthly for her support and education until she is 21 years old. She is to receive the net income of three-fourths of the residuary estate until she becomes 30, when she gets one-fourth of the principal. At 35 she gets one-third of the balance; at 40, one-half, and at 45, the rest of the principal. The remaining one-fourth is divided equally among the brothers and sisters, B. Oglesby Young, 3,569 Broadway; Mrs. Corrine B. Campau, Miss Ellen S. Young and Robert H. and William B. Young, all of 1,202 Marengo Street, New Orleans, La. B. Oglesby Young and the Bankers Trust Company of New York are named executors and trustees and Mrs. Campau is named as guardian of the daughter during her minority. "Since my wife, Dorothy R. Young," wrote Mr. Young, "has seen fit to separate from me after having deceived me in many respects when I still had complete confidence and faith in her, and I am now suing her for absolute divorce in New York, I am intentionally omitting to make provision for her in this, my last will and testament." The document, executed on March 5, 1925, also makes no provision for Mrs. Young's 6-year old son, Neal. Simultanously with the filing of the will, the Bankers Trust Company, as an executor, obtained from Surrogate Foley letters of temporary administration so that Mr. Young's stock brokerage accounts could be handled without loss to the estate. The company told the Surrogate that Mr. Young had several marginal accounts and that some of them had debit balances due amounting to more than $450,000. Insomuch as H. Oglesby Young is now in the South in connection his brother's funeral, the trust company said, it was unable to file a petition for probate of the will and obtain letters testamentary permitting them to handle the stock accounts. The temporary letters of administration were necessary, the company added, in case of a call for additional margin if the stocks declined or if an immediate sale was necessary. Mr. Young, who was born in New Orleans in 1876, was the founder and publisher of Young's Magazine, Breezy Stories and the Yellow Book, although the last periodical was not published by him at the time of his death. He and Mrs. Dorothy H. Young separated in 1922 after two years of marriage. He obtained a divorce in 1928 and Mrs. Young appealed the decree unsuccessfully. His first wife divorced him in 1911.

C.H. YOUNG FUNERAL TODAY:9-Year-Old Daughter to Get Bulk of $1,000,000 Estate. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Dec 5, 1930. pg. 25, 1 pgs Article types: article ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 119 Practically all of the estate of Courtland H. Young, owner of the Young Publishing Company, who died Wednesday, will go to his 9-year old daughter, Rosebelle Corinne, it was learned yesterday. The estate is said to be valued at more than $1,000,000. Mr. Young's divorced wife, the former Dorothea Campbell, a Ziegfield show girl, is ignored in the will. Funeral services for Mr. Young will be held this afternoon in New Orleans. Mr. Young's native city. The body left this city on Wednesday night by train and is due in New Orleans this morning. Burial will be in the family plot.

C.H. YOUNG KILLED IN FIRE IN HIS HOME:Publisher Is Suffocated by Smoke From Small Blaze in West 55th St. Apartment. RESCUER IS DRIVEN BACK Janitor Overcome by Fumes as He Tries to Reach Magazine Man Then Standing in Doorway. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Dec 4, 1930. pg. 27, 1 pgs Article types: article ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 638 First Paragraph Courtland Hunter Young, principal owner of the Young Publishing Company, died of smoke suffocation yesterday morning during a small blaze in his apartment at 110 West Fifty fifth Street. The fire, which indirectly caused his death, did little property damage, except in the living room of the apartment, and was quickly extinguished by firemen. The blaze - of undetermined origin, although possibly caused by a cigarette - started a little before 9 A.M. Other tenants in the building smelled smoke and notified Nelson Bruce, the superintendent. He went to the door, let himself in with the pass-key and found the living room in flames. Looking through the blaze and smoke, Mr. Bruce saw Mr. Young standing at the door of his bedroom, which adjoins the living room. He called to him, but the publisher apparently did not hear. When Bruce then tried to go to hia assistance he himself was overcome by smoke and had to be helped out. By this time neighbors had called the Fire Department, and the apparatus arrived under the command of Battalion Chief James Roche. They had to play streams of water on the living room for several minutes before they could enter. When they did, a fireman found Young's body - clothed only in his underwear - lying on the floor near the door. He was not burned. When only one room of the four-room apartment was injured by the fire, water seeped down to the sixth-floor apartment of Harry Rosen, an attorney, and dripped on the gold-leaf walls. Mr. Rosen refused to say whether there had been any damage there. The police said that Mr. Rosen had several valuable paintings in his rooms and carries $250,000 fire insurance, while Mr. Young had $50,000 insurance. The police said it seemed likely that Mr. Young had been sitting in a chair in his bedroom and then, sensing something wrong, had opened the door into the living room, only to be overcome by the smoke. Mr. Young had lived in the apartment for about a year, it was said. He had been divorced from his wife, a former show girl, who lives with their daughter in Brooklyn. His body was identified by a brother, Bonzao Young, who lives at 3,569 Broadway. The brother ordered that it be sent to a private funeral chapel, and it will later be taken to New Orleans for burial. An autopsy performed yesterday by Dr. Charles Norris, chief medical examiner, showed that death was caused by carbon monoxide poisoning from smoke inhalation. A further analysis will be made, Dr. Norris said. Mr. Young was born in New Orleans May 15, 1876. He was the founder and publisher of Young's Magazine, established in 1897; of Breezy Stoies, founded in 1915; the Yellow Book, from 1910, and of Droll Stories, begun in 1917 but no longer published by him. He was a member of the New York Athletic Club and the Newspaper Club. Mr. Young's marital troubles kept him in the public eye for several years. His marriage to Dorothea Campbell in 1920 was followed by a series of legal actions lasting for almost eight years. In 1922 the couple separated and two years later he tried to gain the custody of his small daughter, Rosebud Corinne. He failed in this, but obtained a divorce in December, 1928. Mrs. Young appealed the decree unsucessfully. His first wife divorced him in 1911. In addition to Bonzana Young and his daughter, the publisher is survived by two brothers and two sisters living in New Orleans. They are William and Robert, Nellie and a Mrs. Campau. He was the son of Courtland H. Young and Mrs. Rosa Wilson Young.

His body was identified by a brother, Bonzao Young, who lives at 3,569 Broadway. The brother ordered that it be sent to a private funeral chapel, and it will later be taken to New Orleans for burial. Mr. Young was born in New Orleans May 15, 1876. He was the founder and publisher of Young's Magazine, established in 1897; of Breezy Stories, founded in 1915; the Yellow Book, from 1910, and of Droll Stories, begun in 1917 but no longer published by him. He was a member of the New York Athletic Club and the Newspaper Club. Mr. Young's marital troubles kept him in the public eye for several years. His marriage to Dorothea Campbell in 1920 was followed by a series of legal actions lasting for almost eight years. In 1922 the couple separated and two years later he tried to gain the custody of his small daughter, Rosebud Corinne. He failed in this, but obtained a divorce in December, 1928. Mrs. Young appealed the decree unsuccessfully. His first wife divorced him in 1911. In addition to Bonzana Young and his daughter, the publisher is survived by two brothers and two sisters living in New Orleans. They are William and Robert, Nellie and a Mrs. Campau. He was the son of Courtland H. Young and Mrs. Rosa Wilson Young.

The Bee Danville, Virginia Wednesday December 3, 1930 p. 1 Courtland H. Young, wealthy magazine publisher was found dead in his apartment in West 55th street, apparently asphyxiated by smoke from a fire which swept the living room. He was discovered on the floor of his bedroom, his head almost on the threshold of the lving room door. Mr. Young, who was 54, founded "Young's Magazine" in 1899 and had published it since. "Breezy Stories," "Yellow Book" and "Doll Stories" were others in the list of publications. He was born in New Orleans in 1876 and educated there but came to New York many years ago.

C.H. YOUNG AGAIN IN COURT:Publisher Facing Contempt Charge Over Divorce Counsel Fees. Special to The New York Times.. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Mar 25, 1930. pg. 26, 1 pgs Article types: article ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 132 Paterson, N.J., March 24. - Vice Chancelor Vivian M. Lewis in Chancery Court here signed today an order requiring Courtland H. Young, magazin publisher, of Weehawken, to show cause next Monday in the Chancery Chambers in Jersey City why he should not be held in contempt of court for failing to pay his wife's counsel fees of $2,500 as ordered by the court when Young received his divorce several months ago. Mrs. Young was the former Dorothea Campbell, an ex-Follies beauty. The Vice Chancellor also signed an order requiring Mr. Young to show cause why he should not contribute toward the support of his two children, Rosabelle, 11 years old, and Neal.

C.H. YOUNG WINS DIVORCE.:Publisher Gets Decree In New Jersey Court After 2-Year Litigation.
Special to The New York Times.. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Dec 11, 1928. pg. 59, 1 pgs Article types: article Section: Business & Finance ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 129 Paterson, N.J., Dec. 10. - Following litigation that had lasted two years in New Jersey, Courtland H. Young, magazine publisher, obtained a divorce here today from Dorothea R. Campbell Young in the Court of Chancery. Action in New Jersey was brought by Mr. Young after one suit filed in New York had been dismissed and another had resulted in a disagreement. Disposition of the 7-year-old daughter, Rosadelle Corinne Young, who is now with her mother would be decided later, the court announced. No mention of Neil Young, 5 years old, was made by the court. The couple were married in 1920. Mrs. Young was an actress and dancer.

POSTPONES YOUNG HEARING:Court Hears Testimony on Wife's Cross Petition in Divorce Suit.
Special to The New York Times.. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Jan 6, 1928. pg. 14, 1 pgs Article types: article ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 145

YOUNG ARRAIGNED TWICE.:Publisher Failed to Pay Taxi Bill, "Pushed" Policeman and Had Gin. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Jun 22, 1927. pg. 16, 1 pgs Article types: article ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 212 First Paragraph Courtland H. Young, wealthy magazine publisher, whose unsuccessful attempts to obtain a divorce from Dorothy H. Young, former "Ziegfeld Follies" beauty have brought him wide publicity during the last three years, was arraigned in two courts yesterday on charges of refusing to pay a taxicab driver, assaulting a patrolman and having liquor in his possession. Young was arrested at Seventh Avenue and Fifty-sixth Street last Monday evening by Patrolman Rosenberg of the West Forty-seventh Street Station. According to Rosenberg, Young refused to pay a $1.20 taxicab bill to Daniel Columbus, a taxicab driver, of 425 East 166th Street. When he was called by the taxicab driver and tried to adjust the matter Rosenberg said Young assaulted him. In West Side Court yesterday Young paid the taxicab driver and the nonpayment charge was dropped. On the second charge, he admitted "pushing" Patrolman Rosenberg and received a suspended sentence. The publisher was taken to the Federal Building for a hearing on the liquor charge. He pleaded guilty and was released on $500 bail for a hearing June 29. Rosenberg, who appeared as a witness, testified he had found a bottle partly filled with gin in Young's posession at the tme of his arrest.

Arrested in Taxi Dispute. Prisoner Calling Himself Charles Young Has Cards of Publisher. A man who gave his name as Charles Young, an agent, 49 years old, of 709 Sixth Avenue, was locked up last night in the West Forty-seventh Street Station charged with disorderly conduct and striking a policeman. In his pockets were found several business cards bearing the name "Courtland H. Young," who is publisher of Young's Magazine, according to the police. Daniel Columbus, a taxicab driver, of 425 East 166th Street, charged that the prisoner had refused to pay a meter charge of $1.20. Patrolman Rosenberg said the man slapped him as he attempted to make the arrest.

COURTLAND H. YOUNG AGAIN ASSAILS WIFE:Testifies to Raid on Aportment in New Suit for Divorce on Trial in Paterson. Special to The New York Times.. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Mar 4, 1927. pg. 26, 1 pgs Article types: article Dateline: PATERSON, N.J., March 3
Section: SOCIAL NEWS ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 304 First Paragraph PATERSON, N.J., March 3. -- The fourth legal action between Courtland H. Young of New York, magazine publisher, and his wife, who was Dorothy R. Campbell of the Ziegfeld Follies, was commenced in the Chancery Court today when the publisher brought suit for divorce. He is 51 years old, and she is now 26. The couple were married in July, 1921, and have two children, Rosebud, five and a half years old, and Neal, two and a half. In 1923 Mrs. Young sued for separation in New York and her petition was granted but afterward was set aside. In the following year Young sued for divorce in New York and she replied with a counter suit. Both these actions were discontinued. Young testified today that his wife led a "high, fast life," despite his efforts to persuade her to settle down. He said that on June 30 of last year he made a raid on her apartment at 245 Central Park West and a man's shirt with cuff links engraved "M.S.E." and other articles were found in the apartment. These were produced in court. Other testimony in support of Young's suit was given by his brother, B. Ogsley Young, and Elizabeth Goodson, a negro maid once employed by Mrs. Young. Under cross-examination by Jacob Van der Block, attorney for Mrs. Young, the publisher admitted that in Connecticut he had been convicted twice of operating a vehicle when intoxicated. A hearing in Mrs. Young's counter suit will be held in a month, Vice Chancellor Vivian M. Lewis allowing that time for her counsel to prepare an answer to Young's allegations. The Court allowed her $500 to defend her interests.

YOUNG ASKS DIVORCE IN NEW JERSEY COURT:Publisher Who Failed to Win a Decree Here Names Another Corespondent. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Oct 5, 1926. pg. 29, 1 pgs Article types: article Section: AMUSEMENTS HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 229 First Paragraph Cortland H. Young, magazine publisher, who twice failed in the Supreme Court in Manhattan in attempts to obtain a divorce from Mrs. Dorothy R. Young, former chorus girl, has instituted similar proceedings in the New Jersey Chancery Court.

COURT GIVES CHILD TO MRS. C.H. YOUNG:Justice Levy Warns Publisher's Wife to Keep Baby in "Atmosphere of Refinement." New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Sep 21, 1924. pg. 12, 1 pgs Article types: article ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 569 First Paragraph Mrs. Courtland H. Young, wife of a magazine publisher, will retain the solute guardianship of her 2 1/2-year-old child. Rosabelle Corinne Young, it was decided yesterday by Supreme Court Justice Levy. Justice Levy dismissed the writ of habeas corpus filed by Mr. Young against his wife, who was Dorothy Campbell, a Follies chorus girl, before for their marriage, and told the mother to "take the child and go." Four hours previously Mrs. Young, as she entered the courthouse, had been served with a summons in a suit for divorce. She told reporters on receiving the summons that she would file a counter-claim. Her attorney, Charles Eno, said later that Mrs. Young had intended to sue for divorce and the publisher was "just one jump ahead of us in serving the summons." "We are prepared to go ahead with the divorce case against Mr. Young." declared Mr. Eno, "naming four co-respondents." In announcing his decision permitting Mrs. Young to retain the custody of the child Justice Levy explained that the publisher "had removed homself form the possibility of holding custody." "The fundamental question here," said the Justice, "is what are the child's best interests. The father has made it impossible by his record of arrests for intoxication for me to place her in his care. The mother has done almost the same thing, but in dismissing the writ and continuing her guardianship I advise her to discontinue her companionship with certain persons mentioned in the testimony in this case." "You lead a decent life," he concluded, speaking directly to Mrs. Young, "and keep the child in an atmosphere of refinement. Take the child and go." Mrs. Young took Rosabelle in her arms and burst into tears. On Wednesday she had fled from the courtroom when Justice Levy said that he feared he might have to send the little girl to a Roman Catholic institution. Both Mr. and Mrs. Young took the stand during the hearing. Mrs. Young was cross-examined by Benjamin F. Schreiber, her husband's counsel, regarding certain incidents which took place at Bradley Beach. She also told how she had been earning her living for the last three months. During July, she said, she had appeared in a vaudeville revue, receiving $60 a week. She also testified that she had posed for an artist and a photographer during August, and had pawned many valuable pieces of jewelry to insure a livelihood for herself and child. In summing up the case Mr. Eno stated that the publisher's present proceeding was not undertaken to obtain custody of the child but to obtain from the court "an adjudication that Mrs. Young was an immoral person and to use the same in his divorce action." He characterized the stories of Mrs. Young's misconduct as preposterous. Mr. Schreiber denied any intention of using the custody hearing evidence in the coming divorce case. "There is not a scintilla of evidence," asserted Mr. Eno, "that points a guilty finger at Mrs. Young. She had a right to her pleasures. She had a right to attend the movies and go to the theatre with her friends if she so desired."

MRS. YOUNG SEIZES CHILD, FLEES COURT:Fears Separation When Judge Talks of Putting Daughter in Private Institution. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Sep 18, 1924. pg. 25, 1 pgs Article types: article Section: SHIPPING AND MAILS STEAMSHIPS AND TOURS ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 1036 First Paragraph Mrs. Dorothea Campbell Young, former Follies chorus girl and wife of Courtland H. Young, magazine publisher, who is defending proceedings brought by her husband before Supreme Court Justice Levy to prove that she is not a proper person to have the custody of their child. Rosabelle, 2 1/2 years old, fled from the witness stand yesterday, after two hours' questioning, when Justice Levy expressed the opinion that neither she nor her husband should have the care of the child but that she should be sent to a Roman Catholic school where each parent could visit her freely. Mrs. Young grasped the child in her arms and ran out of the room. When the attorneys and others followed her out they heard her crying, "My baby, my poor little baby, to an institution!" The child kissed her mother and said, "Why do you cry, mamma?" Mrs. Young then sank to the floor in a faint, but revived shortly and returned to the courtroom. Justice Levy then decided to hear further testimony in the case on Saturday after other testimony has been taken in New Jersey. The scene took place just after Charles Eno, attorney for Mrs. Young, stated that she would forgive her husband's treatment of her and would return to him for the sake of their child if he would give up drinking and stop abusing her. "We were willing, in fact, we were the parties anxious for a reconcillation, although Mrs. Young says that she was," retorted Benjamin F. Sereiber, attorney for Mr. Young, "but not now, after this proceeding." "My very definite impression is that if any progress can be made in the matter of bringing this man and woman to a state of mind where they can live together for the sake of their child, and for their own sakes, it should be done," said Justice Levy. "We ought to work hard to bring it about." Attorney Screiber said he felt that the court would agree that Mr. Young had proved his case against his wife after evidence to be taken in Asbury Park had been submitted, which led the court to say" "My great fear is that you have both proved your case, and that is the great difficulty. Would you welcome, pending the outcome of this hearing, having the child committed to a good school with the right of visitation equally for both parents?" When Mr. Young's attorney nodded affirmatively Justice Levy continued: "It occurs to me now that in this courtroom yesterday afternoon during the hearing I observed this little girl walk up to a woman in the courtroom open her handbag and take out a lipstick. She touched this to her lips and then took out a vanity case and applied a power puff to her face." Justice Levy remarked that he was not making a tirade against cosmetics, but that the incident led him to the belief that the child should be sent to a school and custody given to neither parent. "When it comes to such things in the hands of her baby years -" The Court did not complete the sentence, but remarked that the parents should take steps to assure such a child "growing up amid refinement and culture." "That is just what we want to be sure of," said Mr. Young's attorney. "We are prepared to send the child to one of the best institutions in the country - Catholic, because that is her religion; but we would like to have her father designated as the person in whose custody she is leaglly placed." "Of course, a Catholic school," said the Court, "but if I make such an order I will provide that neither shall have the custody, but that the child is to remain where she is placed." At this point Mrs. Young fled from the courtroom and took the child with her. She had testified during the morning that she learned to drink from her husband and denied that she had attended any improper parties. She also denied that she had stayed all night at the Mamaroneck home of William J. Jackson or that she had been intoxicated or hilarious at parties during the Summer in her apartment in West Ninety-fourth Street, as previous witnesses had said. The testimony to be taken in New Jersey was said to involve a visit of Mrs. Young and her chauffeur, Edward Nooney, with the little girl, to Bradley Beach. One of the proposed witnesses is the proprietress of a rooming house. Mrs. Young said that she and Nooney had been friends from childhood, when the attended a Catholic school together. She testified that nothing improper took place.

PUBLISHER YOUNG ADMITS FLIRTATION:Ceased After His Marriage, He Swears in Suit to Regain His Child. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Sep 17, 1924. pg. 13, 1 pgs Article types: article ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 352 First Paragraph Courtland H. Young, magazine publisher, who is sueing before Supreme Court Justice Levy to compel his wife to give up the custody of their 3-year-old daughter Rosabelle on the ground that she is not a fit person to care for the little girl, was on the defensive when he testified yesterday in answer to questions by his wife's attorney, Charles Eno. He admitted that he was conviced in Special Sessions in 1917 of the fatherhood of a child, but insisted that he was not the father. The mother was a woman named Porter whom he had known for six years, he said, and whom he had met in a cabaret. Replying to questions as to whether he was "in the habit of picking up young women," Young testified that before he was married he was likely to do so if they flirted with him. He said he had not flirted with a woman since he was married. He admitted that he and his wife frequently quarreled before they separated, and said that one of the reasons was that his wife stayed out late at night without fiving a proper explaination and associated with persons he did not think were proper companions for her. Young testified that he had visited his wife after she left him and pleaded with her to return to him but she declined, chiefly because he would not give her as much money as she wanted. He said that when they lived together their expenses were $20,000 a year. He said that she once stayed out all night and admitted afterward that she had not been with a school chum as she said she would be when she left thome. Molly Fitzpatrick, a nurse employed by Mrs. Young for a year and a half, testified in her behalf that Mrs. Young was not away from home over night while the nurse was employed there. The hearing will continue today.

PUBLISHER SUED FOR SEPARATION:Wife of C.H. Young to Receive $725 Monthly Alimony and $3,500 Counsel Fee. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Jul 12, 1923. pg. 8, 1 pgs Article types: article ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 687

First Paragraph
Cortland H. Young, chief owner of the C.H. Young Publishing Company, which publishes Young's Magazine, Breezy Stories and Droll Stories, was directed yesterday by Supreme Court Justice Lydon to pay $725 a month allmony and $3,500 counsel lee to his wife, Mrs. Dorothy Rosabelle Young, pending a suit for separations.

Commercial Leases. New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: May 24, 1922. pg. 32, 1 pgs Article types: article Section: Resorts ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 255 First Paragraph
Courtland H. Young leased the entire five-story building at 430 Columbus avenue, on a lot 25 by 130. The lease is for a term of twenty-one years, at a total rental of $250,000. The lessee is the Wilder Development Company, Inc., which will make extensive alterations to the property. Heil & Stern were the brokers in the transaction.

Bridgeport Standard Telegraph Saturday May 10, 1919 p. 21 In a decision handed down yesterday in the Common Pleas court, Judge John J. Walsh held that Courtland H. Young of Stamford, is the father of the child of Ann J. Porter, also of Stamford. Young was ordered by the court to pay $6 weekly for 10 years toward the support of the child. The Judge estimated that the cost of raising the child would be $13 weekly, but cut the amount in half because it was shown that the plaintiff had been earning between $25 and $75 a week. Young must also pay half the expenses preceding the trial which totaled $670.22. He must also furnish bond of $1,500 to ensure weekly payments.

Children of Courtland Hunter Young and Dorothy Rosabelle Campbell were as follows:
31 i Rosabelle Corinne4 Young, born 17 Apr 1921 in New York; died 29 Jun 1992 in Los Angeles, California. She married (---) Varga. Notes: California Death Index Varga Rosabelle C Campbell Young F New York Los Angeles (19) 6/29/1992 554-70-5736 71 yrs
32 ii Neal Campbell4 Young, born 26 Dec 1924 in New York.


21. Corine Burdick3 Young (Courtland Hunter2, (---)1), born 16 Oct 1877 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; died aft 1931. She married Charles Campau, born 1867 in Michigan.

Notes for Corine Burdick Young
Birth: New Orleans birth index 1790-1899 Vol. 71 p. 204 Young Corine Burdick Courtland H. Rosa Green F W 10/16/1877 71 204

US Census January 11, 1920 SD 1 ED 213 Sheet 8B 12th Ward (part precinct 5) 1202 Maringo St. Dwelling 146 Family 156 age 39

Notes for Charles Campau
US Census January 11, 1920 SD 1 ED 213 Sheet 8B 12th Ward (part precinct 5) 1202 Maringo St. Dwelling 146 Family 156 age 53 Secretary Race Track

Children of Corine Burdick Young and Charles Campau were as follows:
33 i Cornie4 Campaw, born 1904 in Michigan. Notes: US Census January 11, 1920 SD 1 ED 213 Sheet 8B 12th Ward (part precinct 5) 1202 Maringo St. Dwelling 146 Family 156 age 16

Generation 4

26. Katherine Stockman4 Young (William John3, William John2, (---)1), born 20 Feb 1887 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 22 Jul 1967 in Evanston, Cook, Illinois; buried 24 Jul 1967. She married on 20 Sep 1919 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa Clarence Lincoln Aman, born May 1887 in Wayne, Pennsylvania; died 1950/51 in Highlans, North Carolina, son of George M. Aman and Anne (Lincoln) Aman.

Notes for Katherine Stockman Young
The Clinton Herald Tuesday February 22, 1887 A little daughter was a Sunday arrival at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Young, Jr.

US Census 7 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 9B Second Ward 541 5th Avenue Dwelling 185 Family 195 Young, Catherine b. Feb. 1887 age 13 b. Iowa At school

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday July 24, 1967 p. 5 Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. today in St. Augustine Episcopal church at Wilmette, Ill., for Mrs. Katherine Young Aman, 80, a native of Clinton. Mrs. Aman was the daughter of William J. Young Jr., whose father built and operated the world's largest sawmill in Clinton in the late 1890's and who founded the holding company of W.J. Young & Co. W.J. Young & Co. owns The Clinton Herald and has a major interest in the Clinton National bank. Mrs. Aman died Saturday in Evanston, Ill., where she had been residing. Her husband, Clarence Lincoln Aman, preceded her in death. Survivers include one daughter, Mrs. Philip A. (Katherine) Scheuble Jr., of Wilmette, and a sister, Mrs. Alfred H. Hutchinson of Beverly Hills, Ill. Also surviving are four grandchildren in Wilmette.

1967-07-23 Chicago Tribune (IL) Aman Edition: Chicago Tribune
Katharine Young Aman of 100 Broadway, Wilmette, July 22, widow of Clarence Lincoln Aman; mother of Mrs. Philip A. Scheuble Jr.; grandmother of James, Paul, Katharine and Pamela Scheuble; sister of Mrs. Alfred H. Hutchinson of Beverly Hills, Ill. Service Monday, 11 a.m., at St. Augustine Episcopal church, 1140 Wilmette avenue, Wilmette. Visitation Sunday, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at William H. Scott Funeral Home, 1100 Greenleaf avenue Wilmette. AL 1-8200.
Copyright 1967, Chicago Tribune. For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune.
Record Number: 19670723dn028


SS Death Index KATHARINE AMAN 20 Feb 1887 Jul 1967 60091 (Wilmette, Cook, IL) (none specified) 337-38-2132 Illinois

MARRIAGE:
Clinton County Marriages Book 12 p. 95 No. 24417 Clarence L. Aman res. Gambou, Cuba age 33 born Wayne, Pennsylvania Father George Aman Mother Anne Lincoln Katherine S. Young m. 20 September 1919 Whitnesses George A. Lincoln, George A. Lincoln, Jr., Esther Young

Notes for Clarence Lincoln Aman
MARRIAGE:
Clinton County Marriages Book 12 p. 95 No. 24417 Clarence L. Aman res. Gambou, Cuba age 33 born Wayne, Pennsylvania Father George Aman Mother Anne Lincoln Katherine S. Young m. 20 September 1919 Whitnesses George A. Lincoln, George A. Lincoln, Jr., Esther Young

Children of Katherine Stockman Young and Clarence Lincoln Aman were as follows:
+ 34 i Katherine5 Aman, born 15 Jul 1921 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois; died 17 Mar 1981 in Glenview, Cook, Illinois. She married Philip Arthur Scheuble.


27. Ester Paul4 Young (William John3, William John2, (---)1), born 31 Jan 1888 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 17 Jul 1968; buried 19 Jul 1968. She married on 2 Jun 1911 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa Alfred Henry Hutchinson, born 1882 in Illinois; died 11 Nov 1969 in Oak Lawn, Cook, Illinois; buried 14 Nov 1969.

Notes for Ester Paul Young
The Clinton Age Vol. 20 No. 42 Friday February 3, 1888 On Tuesday Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Young Jr. were blessed with an addition to their family in the way of a lovely daughter.

US Census 7 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 9B Second Ward 541 5th Avenue Dwelling 185 Family 195 Young, Ester b. Jan. 1888 age 12 b. Iowa At school

US Census January 13, 1920 Chicago 32nd Ward SD 1 ED 2027 Sheet 7B 8944 South Hoyne Ave. age 32

1968-07-18 Chicago Tribune (IL) Hutchinson Edition: Chicago Tribune
Esther Y. Hutchinson, beloved wife of Alfred H.; mother of Edward M., William Y., and Richard P.; grandmother of 15; great-grandmother of 12; sister of the late Katherine Aman. Funeral Friday, 1 p.m., at the Fern Chapel, S. Western avenue at 100th street. In lieu of flowers, memorials to the Cancer society. Visitation after 2 p.m. Thursday.
Copyright 1968, Chicago Tribune. For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune.
Record Number: 19680718dn038

1968-07-19 Chicago Tribune (IL) Mrs. Alfred H. Hutchinson Edition: Chicago Tribune
Services for Mrs. Esther Y. Hutchinson, 80, of 8949 Hamilton av., wife of Alfred H., chairman of the board of Continental Scale corporation, 5701 S. Claremont av., will be held at 1 p.m. today in the chapel at 10001 Western av. Mrs. Hutchinson died Wednesday in Presbyterian St. Luke's hospital. She is survived by the three sons, Edward M., William Y., and Richard P.; 15 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.
Copyright 1968, Chicago Tribune. For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune.
Record Number: 19680719ob006

1968-07-19 Chicago Tribune (IL) Hutchinson Edition: Chicago Tribune
Esther Y. Hutchinson, beloved wife of Alfred H.; mother of Edward M., William Y., and Richard P.; grandmother of 15; great-grandmother of 12; sister of the late Katherine Aman. Funeral Friday, 1 p.m., at the Fern Chapel, S. Western avenue at 100th street. In lieu of flowers, memorials to the Cancer society. Visitation after 2 p.m. Thursday.
Copyright 1968, Chicago Tribune. For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune.
Record Number: 19680719dn064

Notes for Alfred Henry Hutchinson
US Census January 13, 1920 Chicago 32nd Ward SD 1 ED 2027 Sheet 7B 8944 South Hoyne Ave. age 38 born Illinois President Scale Factory

1969-11-13 Chicago Tribune (IL) Alfred H. Hutchinson Edition: Chicago Tribune
Services for Alfred H. Hutchinson, 82, of 8949 Hamilton av., founder and board chairman of Continental Scale corporation, 5701 Claremont av., will be held at 2:30 p.m. tomorrow in the chapel at 10001 Western av. He died Tuesday in an Oak Lawn nursing home. He was a former alumni trustee of Cornell university. He is survived by three sons, Edward, William, and Richard; 15 grandchildren; and 15 great-grandchildren.
Copyright 1969, Chicago Tribune.[br]For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune.
Record Number: 19691113ob006

1969-11-13 Chicago Tribune (IL) Hutchinson Edition: Chicago Tribune
Alfred H. Hutchinson, beloved husband of the late Esther Y.; father of Edward M., William Y., and Richard P.; grandfather of 15; great-grandfather of 15. Member of Board of Trustees, Cornell university. Funeral Friday, 2:30 p.m., at the Fern chapel, S. Western avenue at 100th street. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Chicago Heart association. Visitation after 2 p, M. Thursday.
Copyright 1969, Chicago Tribune. For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune.
Record Number: 19691113dn103

SS Death Index Alfred HUTCHINSON Birth Date: 25 Nov 1886 Death Date: Nov 1969 Social Security Number: 336-09-5050 State or Territory Where Number Was Issued: Illinois Death Residence Localities ZIP Code: 60690 Localities: Chicago, Cook, Illinois

Children of Ester Paul Young and Alfred Henry Hutchinson were as follows:
+ 35 i Edward Morris5 Hutchinson, born 14 Dec 1912 in Illinois; died 9 Apr 1986 in Oak Lawn, Cook, Illinois; buried 12 Apr 1986. He married Maryon ((---)) Hutchinson.
+ 36 ii William Y.5 Hutchinson, born 1916 in Illinois. He married unknown.
37 iii Richard P.5 Hutchinson, born 1917 in Illinois. Notes: US Census January 13, 1920 Chicago 32nd Ward SD 1 ED 2027 Sheet 7B 8944 South Hoyne Ave. age 1971-04-29 Chicago Tribune (IL) Hutchinson Edition: Chicago Tribune Richard L. Hutchinson, formerly of 7710 S. Lowe Av., Chicago, at Paxton, Ill., beloved husband of the late Susan; father of Ruth Hutchinson, Alice [Eugene] Brobst and Margaret [Paul] Carlson; grandfather of Robert and George Brobst, David and John Carlson; great-grandfather of seven. Resting at the Fern Chapel, South Western Avenue at 100th Street, after 2 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Friday 1 p.m. Interment Mount Hope. Copyright 1971, Chicago Tribune. For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune. Record Number: 19710429dn080


28. Courtland Young4 Hancock (Mary3 Young, William John2, (---)1), born 11 Jun 1889 in Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa; died 10 May 1967 in Jackson, Iowa; buried 12 May 1967 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married on 11 Jul 1935 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa Elizabeth (Corman) Hancock, born in LaGrange, Cook, Illinois; died 10 May 1967 in Jackson, Iowa; buried 12 May 1967 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa, daughter of Stephen C. Corman and Agnes (Antonisen) Corman.

Notes for Courtland Young Hancock
The Clinton Herald Tuesday December 27, 1938 p.3 Mr. and Mrs. Courland Y. Hancock entertained a company of guests at a cocktail party and buffet supper last evening at the Clinton Country club. Among the guests from out of the city in attendance were Mrs. A.F. Warren of New York city, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Brackett of Minneapolis, Mr. and Mrs. W.L. Fenn of West Hartford, Conn., Capt. and Mrs. S.W. Towle, Jr., of Fort Leavenworth, Kans., Mr. and Mrs. H.O. Sugg of Forest Hills, Long Island, N.Y., Robert Smith of Hammond, Ind., Mrs. Lyman B. Ellis, Miss Athena Robbins and Mr. and Mrs. Richard Longini of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. John P. Miller of Topeka, Kans., John Ward of Fairfield, Mrs. James Foley, Miss Margaret Carey and Dick Wilson of Evanston, Ill., Jackson Derflinger of Providence, R.I., Robert Duer of Lake Forest, Ill., and Matt Wolfe of Iowa City.

The Iowa Press Association's Who's Who in Iowa 1940 Hancock, Courland Young: Publisher; b Dubuque, Iowa June 11, 1893; s of Charles T Hancock-Mary Young; ed Dubuque HS; Culver Mil Acad, Culver, Ind; Exeter N H Acad; Tome Sch, Fort Deposit Md; m Elizabeth Coman July 11, 1935 Clinton; d Mary Elizabeth; 1913-17 & 1919-25 emp in bank, Pasadena Cal; 1925- publisher The Clinton Herald & pres The Clinton Herald Co, Clinton; secy-treas W J Young & Co; treas Maquoketa Light & Heat Co; during World War ent US army 1917 with battery D 114th field arty, Camp Kearney, San Diego Cal, O/S 8 months witnessed several maj engagements, disch 1919; amer Legion; VFW; IPA; Iowa St Hist Soc; Natl Geographic Soc; Clinton Country Club; C of C; BPOE; hobbies: home,yard & garden; off Clinton Herald; res Breezy Point, Clinton.

The Clinton Herald Thursday May 11, 1967 p. 1 Crash Kills Herald Publisher, Wife Courtland Hancock Dies in Dubuque Accident Fatal To 3 Courtland Y. Hancock, 77, of Caroline Ave., president and publisher of The Clinton Herald, and his wife, Elizabeth Coman Hancock, were killed late Wednesday afternoon in a two-car, headon collision on rain-slick U.S. 52, three miles south of Dubuque. Also killed in the crash was Charles E. Frazier, 26, of rural Bellevue, driver of the other car. Funeral services for Mr. and Mrs. Hancock will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday in First Presbyterian church. Dr. Richard Dempsey, pastor, will officiate. Burial will be in Clinton Memorial Park. Visitation in the Snell-Smith funeral home will begin Friday noon. Pallbearers will be Eugene Machael, Morse Watkins, Everett A. Streit, Ralph E. Long, D.A. Lundgren, Lawrence Mills, Paul B. Holleran, Don Smith, Bruce Townsend, A.J. Goerdt, Dr. George B. Ellison and Eric Hensel. Honorary pallbearers will be E.C. Halbach, A.E. Meyer, I.H. Carnes, Byron R. Pinney, Dr. Clifford D. Grant and Lee F. White. The Iowa highway patrol said there were no witnesses to the crash which occurred on an open section of two lane U.S. 52, three miles south of Dubuque. The Hancocks, who had been in Dubuque, were returning to Clinton. Frazier, who lived in Jackson county, was driving toward Dubuque. Time of the accident was set at 3:55 p.m. Officers said the Frazier car, which was cut in two by the impact, caught fire after the bodies had been removed from the wreckage. Spilled gasoline had been ignited by warning flares. State patrolman Lyle Peters said first word of the accident came from a nearby farm resident who called the Dubuque county sheriff's office. Mr. Hancock was a descendent of a pioneer Clinton family. His maternal grandfather was W.J. Young, founder of W.J. Young & Co., a holding company the assets of which, include The Clinton Herald and an interest in the Clinton National Bank. Mr. Hancock was born June 11, 1889 in Dubuque, the son of Charles T. and Mary Young Hancock. His father was in the wholesale grocery business in Dubuque until shortly before his death in 1910. Mr. Hancock attended Dubuque public schools, Culver Military academy in Culver, Ind., Exeter academy at Exeter, N.H. and Tome School at Fort Deposit, Md. He was employed in the Security National bank in Pasadena, Calif., from 1913 to 1917. During World War I Mr. Hancock served with Battery D, 114th Field Artillery and was stationed at Camp Carney, San Diego, Calif., and was overseas eight months. After his discharge from the army he returned to the Pasadena bank but came to Clinton in 1925. He became president of The Clinton Herald Co. in 1934. His marriage to Miss Elizabeth Coman took place July 11, 1935. He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Robert E. (Beth) Evans; a grandson, Courtland Charles Evans; one sister, Mrs. Arthur Notman of Staten Island, N.Y.; a nephew, John M. Notman, of Clinton and a cousin, Mrs. Molly Young Burke, Wife of Dr. J.C. Burke of Santa Fe, N.M. Mr. Hancock was a member of the Chamber of Commerce, Elks lodge, the Clinton Country club, Izaak Walton League, the Minocqua, Wis., Country club, American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars. He had served as a trustee of Jane Lamb Memorial hospital and was deeply interested in the current fund campaign. During World War II, Mr. Hancock served on the Clinton County panel of the Office of Price Administration, was president of the Clinton United Service Organization council and served as chairman of the Clinton County Victory Loan drive. He was one of the originators of the Quad County 4-H club baby beef show. Mrs. Hancock was born in LaGrange, Ill., daughter of Stephen C. and Agnes Antonisen Coman. She was graduated from Clinton high school and Grinnell college. In addition to her daughter and grandson, Mrs. Hancock is survived by one brother, Stephen C. Corman of Tampa, Fla.; an uncle (see Hancock, page 2)

SS Death Index COURTLAND HANCOCK 11 Jun 1889 May 1967 52732 (Clinton, Clinton, IA) (none specified) 480-05-6120 Iowa

Honorary pallbearers for the funeral of Frank Ellis were E.J. Curtis, C.A. Armstrong, W.T. Oakes, W.H. Iten, H.H. Hobart, I.J. Derflinger, Bruce Townsend, Victor Sorenson, F.H. Van Allen, C.L. Bell, Dr. C.D. Grant, C.Y. Hancock, Dr. F. O. Kershner, David Ogden, E.H. Christy, Dr. J. R. Jowett and R.W. Armstrong. Active pallbearers were Charles F. Curtis,Thomas Oakes, Louis Iten, Robert Bickelhaupt, George M. Curtis, John Van Allen, Charles Bell and David Clizbe.

MARRIAGE:
Marriage: The Clinton Herald Friday July 12, 1935 p. 7 With the Rev. H.E. Harned, pastor of the First Congregational church, reading the nuptual service, Courtland Y. Hancock and Miss Elizabeth Coman, both of Clinton, were united in marriage at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon in the presence of members of the immediate family of the bride and a few close friends. Immediately after the ceremony, which took place in the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. S.C. Coman, 804 Melrose court, Mr. and Mrs. Hancock departed for points in Wisconsin. Upon their return, the will reside temporarily in the Lafayette hotel. Mrs. Hancock, who came to Clinton about twenty years ago with her parents, is a graduate of Clinton High school and of Grinnell college. She has a large circle of friends in Clinton, where she is prominent in school and other activities. Recently she was instrumental in the organization of the newly formed Grinnell college club. Mr. Hancock is the son of Mrs. Mary Young Hancock, residing in the Lafayette hotel but temporarily in Chicago, and is a grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Young. He is treasurer of The Clinton Herald Co., co-publisher of The Clinton Herald, secretary of the W.J. Young & Co., and treasurer of the Clinton & Illinois Bridge Co., in addition to having other business connections in Clinton. He also is active in various fields of civic and community endeavor in Clinton.

Notes for Elizabeth Corman
MARRIAGE:
Marriage: The Clinton Herald Friday July 12, 1935 p. 7 With the Rev. H.E. Harned, pastor of the First Congregational church, reading the nuptual service, Courtland Y. Hancock and Miss Elizabeth Coman, both of Clinton, were united in marriage at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon in the presence of members of the immediate family of the bride and a few close friends. Immediately after the ceremony, which took place in the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. S.C. Coman, 804 Melrose court, Mr. and Mrs. Hancock departed for points in Wisconsin. Upon their return, the will reside temporarily in the Lafayette hotel. Mrs. Hancock, who came to Clinton about twenty years ago with her parents, is a graduate of Clinton High school and of Grinnell college. She has a large circle of friends in Clinton, where she is prominent in school and other activities. Recently she was instrumental in the organization of the newly formed Grinnell college club. Mr. Hancock is the son of Mrs. Mary Young Hancock, residing in the Lafayette hotel but temporarily in Chicago, and is a grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Young. He is treasurer of The Clinton Herald Co., co-publisher of The Clinton Herald, secretary of the W.J. Young & Co., and treasurer of the Clinton & Illinois Bridge Co., in addition to having other business connections in Clinton. He also is active in various fields of civic and community endeavor in Clinton.

Children of Courtland Young Hancock and Elizabeth Corman were as follows:
+ 38 i Mary Elizabeth5 Hancock, born 1 Aug 1936 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married Robert Edward Evans.
39 ii (---)5 Hancock, died 9 Oct 1937, buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa.
40 iii (---)5 Hancock, born 12 Feb 1940 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 12 Feb 1940 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 13 Feb 1940 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. Notes: Obituary: The Clinton Herald Tuesday February 13, 1940 p. 5 Committal services were held at 3 o'clock this afternoon in Springdale cemetery for Baby Hancock, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.Y. Hancock, Breezy Point, who died shortly after birth last night in Mercy hospital. The Rev. H.E. Harned, First Congregational church pastor, officiated.
41 iv Courtland Coman5 Hancock, born 27 Jun 1943 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 28 Jun 1943 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 28 Jun 1943 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. Notes: Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday June 28, 1943 p. 8 Courtland Coman Hancock, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. C.Y. Hancock, Breezy Point, died this morning in Mercy Hospital, where he was born at 1:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Committal services will be held in Springdale cemetery at 4 o'clock this afternoon with the Rev. Robert A. Bentley, pastor of First Congregational church, officiating. Left to mourn the death are the parents, a sister, Beth Hancock, and the maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. S.C. Coman, Clinton. Clinton County Death Record Book 2 Jan. 1934- Jun. 1947 p. 104 lived 18 hours Cause of Death Congenital Attlestosis - Premature.


29. Florence4 Hancock (Mary3 Young, William John2, (---)1), born 9 May 1891 in Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa; died 3 Feb 1985 in Dongan Hills, Staten Island, New York; buried Jun 1985 in Norton Cemetery, Keene Valley, New York. She married on 22 Apr 1913 in Pasadena, Los Angeles, California Arthur Notman, born 28 Apr 1883 in Brooklyn, New York; died 19 Jul 1961 in New York, New York; buried 1961 in Keene Valley, New York, son of George Notman and Katharine Parker (Howard) Notman.

Notes for Florence Hancock
Transcript of a letter to FHN from an unidentified relative, on stationery of the MacDonald Hotels, Inc. - Lincoln and McKay, Duluth, Minn. Sept. 5th Dearest Florence - Your good letter has just been read and enjoyed as always dear, and I am sending this line to you now, and will mail it from this hotel about 6 this evening (Friday) and do let me know when you receive it. They are slow about the mail here, and I have an idea I am not getting all my mail. Last year they were too, and this year they have had more visitors. Every plase (sic) has been crowded. It has just started to rain again. We had a week of rain, and I guess we are in for another. If you like the family data, I will copy more & send it to you dear. David Daniels wants me to send him more of it, and it is nice the younger generations are interested in it. And I must copy it while I can. I have a lot more, if I had a typewriter it would be better. Perhaps your John will type it for you, and put it in Book form so it will be easy to read, and not lost. The data has been gotten from many people in the South & North thro the the years, and it has taken time, and money, but I am only too happy to pass it on to the dear nieces & nephews, for in the future I believe it will be of more value. When I joined the D. A. R. I had to look up a lot of things, and so did your Aunt Mary, and Cousin Nellie Brennan. Am glad we did. Helen also did. She has joined the Colonial Dames also. So could you. I have a big book of the Thomas family. The Newberry library in Chicago, is a good place to look up your family tree. A letter from home tells of Angie Peaslee having a stroke. Bessie Bradley Lewis (?) is ill in Dubuque, I believe, also Elliott Kimball & Miss Helbig, a neighbor of mine . Jessie Hetherington

The Clinton Herald Monday January 31, 1938 p. 7 Mrs. Arthur Notman left today for a week's visit in Dubuque, en route to her home in Staten Island, N.Y., culminating a two week's visit here with her mother, Mrs. Mary Y. Hancock, who is living at the Lafayette hotel, and with her brother, C.Y Hancock and family, 1501 North Fourth street.

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Thursday February 7, 1985 p. 14 Mrs. Arthur Notman, 93, died Sunday in New York City from an extended illness. Mrs. Notman was a former owner of the W.J. Young Co., Clinton. The body was cremated. Inurnment will be in a Keene Valley, N.Y., cemetery, at a later date. Mrs. Notman was born May 9, 1891, in Dubuque. She married Authur Notman, a mining engineer, in 1913. She was the granddaughter of W.J. Young Sr., a pioneer Clinton lumberman, banker and Clinton businessman. In 1966, Mrs. Notman sold her interest in the business. Survivors include a son, John H. Notman of Clinton; two grandsons and three great-grandchildren.

SS Death Index FLORENCE NOTMAN 09 May 1891 Feb 1985 10304 (Staten Island, Richmond, NY) (none specified) 055-52-9885 New York

Notes for Arthur Notman
2 EXPERTS OPPOSE A TARIFF ON COPPER:Prof. E.S. Agger and Arthur Notman Declare Producers Need No Protection.New York Times (1857-Current File). New York, N.Y.: Mar 9, 1925. pg. 31, 1 pgs Article types: article Section: FINANCIAL ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 810 First Paragraph
Argument against the bill of Representative James of Michigan providing a tariff of 6 cents a pound on copper metal are presented by Professor E.E. Agger of the Department of Economics, Columbia University and Arthur Notman, consulting mining engineer of this city, in the current issue of Mining and Metallurgy.

Who's Who in America Vo. 27 1952-1953 p. 1818 Notman, Arthur, mining engr.; b. Brooklyn, N.Y., Apr. 28, 1883; s. George and Katherine Parker (Howard) N; ed. Brooklyn Poly. Inst., 1897-99; B.C. Harvard, 1903. E.M., 1908; grad. study, Columbia, 1905-7; married Florence Hancock, Apr. 22, 1913; I son, John Hancock. Mining engr. and geologist Phelps Dodge Corp., Ariz., 1908-17, asst. gen. supt. and gen. supt., Bisbee, Ariz., 1917-22; consulting engr. In New York since 1923; pres. Kenne Valley Water Co.; pres., dir. Verde Exploration, Ltd.; dir. New Jersey Zinc Co., Pioneer Gold Mines, Ltd., of Brit. Columbia. Magma Copper Co. Mem. Harrison Mission and Mission for. Econ. Affairs in London, representing War Shipping Administrn. and Combined Prodn. and Resources Bd., 1942-44. Mem. Am. Inst. Mining and Metall. Engrs. (past pres.), Mining and Metall. Soc. America, Soc. Econ. Geologists, Acad. Polit. Sci., N.Y., Am. Acad. Politic. Science, A.A.A.S., Canadian Inst. Mining and Metallurgy. Democrat. Presbyterian. Mason (32). Clubs; Harvard, University, Down Town Assn., Mining, Richmond County. Editor; (chmn. editorial com.) Copper Resources of the World, 1935. Contbr. numerous articles to mining and metal. jours. Home: 3 Circle Rd., Dongan Hills, Staten Island 4. Office: 40 Wall St., New York 5.

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Thursday July 20, 1961 p. 16 Arthur Notman, 78, of Staten Island, N.y., father of John H. Notman, general manager and co-publisher of The Herald, died at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday in New York hospital following a lingering illness. A nationally prominent consulting mining engineer, Notman also maintained business interests in Clinton, including a directorship in the W.J. Young Co. Services are planned at Keene Valley, N.Y. He was born April 28, 1883, in Brooklyn, the son of George and Catherine Notman. He attended Brooklyn Poly Institute ad received a bachelor of science degree from Harvard University in 1903. After completing two years of graduate study at Columbia University in New York, he returned to Harvard for special study which earned him a second degree. He married Florence Hancock on April 22, 1913. Before establishing an office in New York in 1923, Notman was a minning engineer in Arizona. He contributed numerous articles to mining journals and traveled widely in his capacity as a special consultant. Earlier this year he had been in Africa. He held a number of directorships in mining firms, including Verde Exploration Ltd., New Jersey Zinc Co., San Manuel Copper Co., Campbell Chibougamau Mines Ltd., Magma Copper Co., Chibougamau Mining and Smelter Co. Surviving are his widow; one son John, of Clinton; one sister, Mrs. David Chandler Prince of Schenectady, N.Y.; one brother, Howard of Topamga, Calif.; a brother-in-law, C.Y. Hancock of Clinton, president and publisher of The Herald; and two grandchildren. He was preceded in death by one son, Lt. Arthur Notman, Jr.

ARTHUR NOTMAN, ENGINEER, 78,DIES:Consultant Here Was Expert on the Mining of Copper
New York Times (1857-Current file). New York, N.Y.: Jul 21, 1961. pg. 23, 1 pgs Article types: obituary ISSN/ISBN: 03624331 Text Word Count 389 Arthur Notman, a consulting mining engineer and geologist at 55 Liberty Street, died Wednesday in New York Hospital. He was 78 years old and lived at 123 Circle Road, Dongan Hills, S.I. Mr. Notman, who was an authority on copper, was consulted by numerous mining companies, individuals and brokerage houses. In 1932 he was president of the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America. Hewas born in Brooklyn, a son of George Notman, secretary-treasurer of the Phelps Dodge Corporation. Mr. Notman received a B.S. degree from Harvard College in 1903, studied mining engineering at Columbia University and received a mining engineering degree from Harvard in 1908. For the next nine years Mr. Notman was a mining engineer and geologist in copper mining operations of Phelps Dodge in Arizona. In 1917 he became assistant superintendent of a Phelps Dodge copper mine at Bisbee, Ariz., and later its general superintendent. He established himself as a consultant here in 1923. At his death, Mr. Notman was president of Verde Exploration, Ltd., a copper mining exploration concern in Arizona. He was a director of the New Jersey Zinc Company, the Magma Copper Company in Arizona and of a subsidiary, the San Manuel Copper Corporation, and the Campbell Chiboigamau Mines, Ltd., in Canada. In World War II Mr. Notman served in London with the Mission for Economic Affairs. In 1944 he was planning director of the War Shipping Administration for the United Kingdom and Continental Europe. Mr. Notman, a summer resident of Keene Valley, N.Y., was president of the Keene Valley Hospital at the time of his death. He was a member of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, the Society of Economic Geologists, the American Academy of Political Science, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. His clubs included the Harvard, University and Mining, the Down Town Association and the Richmond Country Club. Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Florence Hancock Notman; a son, John H. of Clinton, Iowa; a sister, Mrs. David Prince of Schenectady, N.Y.; a brother, Harold of Topanga, Calif., and two grandchildren.

Children of Florence Hancock and Arthur Notman were as follows:
42 i Lt. Arthur5 Notman, born 1 Oct 1914 in Pasadena, Los Angeles, California; died 6 Sep 1941 in Fort McClellan, Alabama. Notes: Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday September 8, 1941 p. 5 Lieutenant Arthur Notman, Jr., Company E, 102nd Engineers, New York National Guard, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Notman, Staten Island, N.Y, died Saturday of wounds received in an accident that morning in Fort McLelland, Alabama. Lieutenant Notman was a grandson of the later Mrs. Mary Young Hancock and a nephew of Courtland Y. Hancock of Clinton. His mother is the former Miss Florence Hancock.
+ 43 ii John Hancock5 Notman, born 5 Nov 1919 in Bisbee, Arizona; died 26 Mar 2006 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married (1) Patricia Dutton (Burdine) Notman; (2) Gertrud Wilhelmine Marie (Genske) Notman.


30. Jane Elderkin4 Young (Edward Ames3, William John2, (---)1), born 2 Dec 1910 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 24 May 1978 in Santa Fe, New Mexico; buried 26 May 1978 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She married on 13 Aug 1931 in Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri Dr. Jerome Carroll Burke, born 20 Feb 1906 in DeWitt, Clinton, Iowa; died 19 Oct 1971 in Santa Fe, New Mexico; buried 22 Oct 1971 in Santa Fe, New Mexico, son of Dr. Thomas Jerome Burke and Margaret Ellen (Carroll) Burke.

Notes for Jane Elderkin Young
Obituary: The Clinton Herald Wednesday May 24, 1978 p. 9 Mrs. J.C. (Molly) Burke of Santa Fe, N.M., formerly of Clinton, died at 5 a.m. today in St. Vincent's Hospital in Santa Fe after a long illness. The funeral is tentatively set for 10:30 a.m. Friday in Memorial Chapel in Santa Fe. Burial will be in Rosario Cemetery. Mrs. Burke, the former Molly Jane Young, was born in Clinton, daughter of Edward A. and Molly Ankeny Young and granddaughter of the founder of W.J. Young & Co., which owns The Clinton Herald and has a controlling interest in the Clinton National Bank. She was married Aug. 13, 1931, in Kansas City, Mo., to Dr. J.C. Burke. They lived in Clinton until Dr. Burke joined the U.S. Air Force during World War II. They had lived in Santa Fe since 1946. Mrs. Burke is survived by one son, Thomas Burke of Alexandria, Va., three daughters, Mrs. Donald Vansolen and Mrs. L.A. Boggs of Santa Fe and Mrs. Michael Thomson of Bethlehem, Pa., and several grandchildren.

MARRIAGE:
The Clinton Herald Saturday August 15, 1931 p. 6 Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss Jane Young, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Young of Clinton, to Dr. Jerome C. Burke, son of Dr. and Mrs. T.J. Burke of Davenport. The ceremony took place August 13 in Kansas City. The were attended by Mr. and Mrs. Donald Feeney of Kansas City, (Miss Clare McCarthy of Davenport). Dr. Burke is a graduate of the State University of Iowa, Liberal Arts, 1927, Medical school, 1931, and is now an intern in St. Joseph's hospital, Kansas City. Mrs. Burke attended Bennett school, Millbrook, N.Y., and graduated from Marlborough school, Los Angeles, after which she had a year's study abroad. She is visiting in the home of her uncle, C.H. Young, for a week after which she will go to Kansas City where the new home will be.

Notes for Dr. Jerome Carroll Burke
Clinton County Birth Record Book 6 p. 123 No. 150

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Wednesday October 20, 1971 p. 12 Dr. Jerome C. Burke, 65, former practicing physician in Clinton, died at 10 p.m. Tuesday in Santa Fe, N.M., following a short illness. Dr. and Mrs. Burke moved to Santa Fe in 1946. Previous to that time Dr. Burke had served as Clinton city health officer and was a member of the staff at Mercy Hospital. A funeral mass will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m. Friday in Our Lady of Guadalupe Church. Burial will be in Santa Fe. The body reposes in Memorial Chapel, Santa Fe. Robert E. Evans of Clinton will be an active pallbearer. Honorary pallbearers will be E.C. Halbach, George Curtis, Everrett A. Streit, Lee F. White, Dr. Robert Dwyer, George Speer, A.J. Goerdt and D.A. Lundgren, all of Clinton. Dr. Burke was born in DeWitt on Feb. 20, 1906, the sone of Dr. Thomas J. Burke and Margaret Ellen Carroll. He received his BA and MD degrees from the University of Iowa where he graduated in 1931. He married Jane Young on Aug. 13, 1931 in Kansas City, Mo. During World War II he was commissioned a lieutenant in the Army Air Force. He attended a school for specialized training in aviation medicine at San Antonio, Texas. In 1943 he was promoted to captain and served in the Southwest Pacific. While in Clinton, Dr. Burke was a member of the Clinton County and Iowa State Medical societies and the American Medical Association. Surviving are his wife; four children, Thomas E. of Washington, D.C., Mrs. D.D. (Valeria) Van Soelen, Mrs. L.A. (Connie) Boggs and Barbara, all of Santa Fe; six grandchildren; one brother, Charles of Davenport and Anthony, Kan., and one sister Dorothy of Davenport.

MARRIAGE:
The Clinton Herald Saturday August 15, 1931 p. 6 Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss Jane Young, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Young of Clinton, to Dr. Jerome C. Burke, son of Dr. and Mrs. T.J. Burke of Davenport. The ceremony took place August 13 in Kansas City. The were attended by Mr. and Mrs. Donald Feeney of Kansas City, (Miss Clare McCarthy of Davenport). Dr. Burke is a graduate of the State University of Iowa, Liberal Arts, 1927, Medical school, 1931, and is now an intern in St. Joseph's hospital, Kansas City. Mrs. Burke attended Bennett school, Millbrook, N.Y., and graduated from Marlborough school, Los Angeles, after which she had a year's study abroad. She is visiting in the home of her uncle, C.H. Young, for a week after which she will go to Kansas City where the new home will be.

Children of Jane Elderkin Young and Dr. Jerome Carroll Burke were as follows:
+ 44 i Valeria5 Burke, born 9 Feb 1934 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married (1) John Gillian; (2) Donald Donaldsen Van Soelen.
+ 45 ii Thomas E.5 Burke, born 21 Sep 1935 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 22 Apr 1994 in Alexandria, Virginia. He married Marilyn (Wright) Burke.
46 iii Constance Carroll5 Burke, born 28 feb 19--. She married, divorced L.A. Boggs.
47 iv Barbara Margaret5 Burke, born 4 Jan 1952. She married Michael Thompson.

Generation 5

34. Katherine5 Aman (Katherine Stockman4 Young, William John3, William John2, (---)1), born 15 Jul 1921 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois; died 17 Mar 1981 in Glenview, Cook, Illinois. She married on 28 Jan 1946 Philip Arthur Scheuble, born 25 Sep 1916 in New York, New York; died 18 Sep 1991 in Northfield, Cook, Illinois, son of Philip A. Scheuble.

Notes for Katherine Aman
Wilmette Life Scheuble Katharine A. Scheuble 3/19/1981

1981-03-18 Chicago Tribune (IL) SCHEUBLE Edition: Chicago Tribune
Katharine Scheuble, nee Aman, of Glenview, March 17, beloved wife of Philip A.; loving mother of James, Paul, Katharine, Joy Buck and Pamela Susan Scheuble; two grandaughters. Visitation at Wm. H. Scott Funeral Home, 1100 Greenleaf Av., Wilmette, 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday. Memorial Eucharist 11 a.m. Saturday at Church of the Holy Comforter, Kenilworth. Memorials may be made to the church. Info. 251-8200.
Copyright 1981, Chicago Tribune. For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune.
Record Number: 19810318dn079

SS Death Index KATHARINE SCHEUBLE 15 Jul 1921 Mar 1981 (not specified) 60025 (Glenview, Cook, IL) 103-12-1134 New York

Notes for Philip Arthur Scheuble
Wilmette Life Scheuble Philip A. Scheuble Jr., 74, died Sept. 18 9/26/1991, p.183

1991-09-24 Chicago Tribune (IL) PHILIP A. SCHEUBLE Edition: Chicago Tribune
Philip A. Scheuble, 74, former president of G.P.E. Controls in Morton Grove, manufacturer of valves and electronic systems for the petroleum industry, died Wednesday in his Northfield home. Mr. Scheuble was a retired commander in the Navy Reserve and served aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Intrepid during World War II. He also was a past president of Industrial Marketing Associates, and a director of the Foreign Policy Association. Mr. Scheuble is survived by his wife, Faye; two sons, James and Paul; two daughters, Katherine Joy Buck and Pamela; and two grandchildren. Services were held Saturday in Kenilworth.
Copyright 1991, Chicago Tribune. For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune.
Record Number: 19910924OB9103120631


SS Death Index PHILIP A SCHEUBLE 25 Sep 1916 18 Sep 1991 (not specified) (none specified) 087-01-1788 New York

Children of Katherine Aman and Philip Arthur Scheuble were as follows:
48 i James Philip6 Scheuble, born 25 Sep 1946 in Toledo, Ohio; died 15 Jan 1993 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois. Notes: SS Death Index JAMES P SCHEUBLE 25 Sep 1946 15 Jan 1993 (not specified) (none specified) 356-38-3424 Illinois
49 ii Paul Lincoln6 Scheuble, born 6 Jan 1949 in Toledo, Ohio. He married on 23 Nov 1985 in Northbrook, Cook, Illinois Deborah Ann (Storey) Scheuble. Notes: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Aug. 23, 2005 Former New Berlin Ald. Paul Scheuble says all conservation measures must be in place before a decision is made on diverting water. Paul Scheuble · Phone: 952-442-6284
715 E Main St
Waconia, MN 55387
+ 50 iii Katherine Joy6 Scheuble, born 2 Oct 1953 in Shorewood, Wisconsin. She married Dale Buck.
51 iv Pamela Susan6 Scheuble, born 21 Apr 1955/55 in Shorewood, Wisconsin.


35. Edward Morris5 Hutchinson (Ester Paul4 Young, William John3, William John2, (---)1), born 14 Dec 1912 in Illinois; died 9 Apr 1986 in Oak Lawn, Cook, Illinois; buried 12 Apr 1986. He married Maryon ((---)) Hutchinson.

Notes for Edward Morris Hutchinson
US Census January 13, 1920 Chicago 32nd Ward SD 1 ED 2027 Sheet 7B 8944 South Hoyne Ave. age 4

1986-04-11 Chicago Tribune (IL) EDWARD M. HUTCHINSON Edition: Chicago Tribune
Services for Edward M. Hutchinson, 73, a retired manufacturer, will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday in the chapel at 10001 S. Western Ave. Mr. Hutchinson, of the Beverly area, died Wednesday in Christ Hospital, Oak Lawn. He was a retired executive vice president of Continental Scale Corp., Justice, makers of bathroom and medical scales. The firm was founded by his father, Alfred, in 1919. Survivors include his wife, Maryon; three daughters, Patricia Reganall, Pamela Lambotte and Dale Karas; two sons, Michael and James; two brothers; and 11 grandchildren.
Copyright 1986, Chicago Tribune. For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune.
Record Number: 19860411OB8601260690

DECEASED: Hutchinson, Edward M. 'Ted' NEWSPAPER: Southtown Economist DATE: 04/11/1986 CITATION: Sec.1, p.12

Children of Edward Morris Hutchinson and Maryon (---) were as follows:
52 i Patricia6 Hutchinson. She married (---) Reganall.
53 ii Pamela6 Hutchinson. She married (---) Lambotte.
54 iii Dale6 Hutchinson. She married (---) Karas. Notes: Dale Hutchinson, operations manager at SpeedFam Corp., a machine tool manufacturer based in Des Plaines.
55 iv Michael6 Hutchinson. Notes: Michael Hutchinson, a stock analyst for Barrington Research
56 v James6 Hutchinson. Notes: James Hutchinson, who is joining J. Walter Thompson USA Chicago as group management director on new JWT client Princess Cruises


36. William Y.5 Hutchinson (Ester Paul4 Young, William John3, William John2, (---)1), born 1916 in Illinois. He married unknown.

Notes for William Y. Hutchinson
US Census January 13, 1920 Chicago 32nd Ward SD 1 ED 2027 Sheet 7B 8944 South Hoyne Ave. age 3

William Hutchinson · Phone: 708-424-3407
4516 W 101st Pl
Oak Lawn, IL 60453

Children of William Y. Hutchinson were as follows:
57 i Susan6 Hutchinson.
58 ii Carol6 Hutchinson.


38. Mary Elizabeth5 Hancock (Courtland Young4, Mary3 Young, William John2, (---)1), born 1 Aug 1936 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married on 19 Apr 1958 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa, divorced Robert Edward Evans, born 16 Oct 1934 in Rockford, Winnebego, Illinois, son of Charles G. Evans.

Notes for Mary Elizabeth Hancock
The Clinton Herald Monday August 3, 1953 p. 4 10 years ago Aug. 2, 1943 Seventh birthday yesterday of Beth Hancock, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Courland Y. Hancock of Breezy Point, was the occasion for a happy gathering held in the afternoon in the Clinton Country club. Fourteen of Beth's friends shared in the program of games and birthday luncheon. There were favors for the guests and gifts were received by the little hostess.

MARRIAGE:
The Clinton Herald Monday March 17, 1958 p. 6 Mrs. R.W. Beal, Mrs. Edwin S. Beal and Mrs. Paul B. Holleran entertained at a Friday bridal luncheon in the Edwin Beal home at Oakhurst for Miss Beth Hancock, who will marry Robert E. Evans of Rockford, Ill., April 19. Pink and white carnations and daisies graced the luncheon tables with covers for 22 guests.

The Clinton Herald Wednesday April 16, 1958 p. 6 In honor of Miss Beth Hancock, fiancee of Robert E. Evans of Rockford, Ill., Mrs. George T. Peckham Jr., entertained 35 guests at a bridal tea Tuesday afternoon in her home, 415 Oakhurst. Mrs. Byron R. Pinney and Mrs. H.O. Sugg poured at the tea table which was adorned with pink and white carnations and purple heather.

The Clinton Herald Saturday April 19, 1958 p. 3 Sunset Terrace, home of Mr. and Mrs. Courtland Young Hancock, was the setting at half after three o'clock this afternoon for the marriage of their daughter, Mary Elizabeth, to Robert Edward Evans, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Evans of Rockford, Ill. Dr. Bruce McCullough, minister of the First Presbyterian church, heard the marriage vows in the company of close friends and relatives. Nuptial music was by James M. Winn, minister of music of the First Presbyterian church. The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a Rosepoint lace opera length gown designed with a scalloped decolletage neckline embroidered in pearls. The bouffant lace skirt fell from a basque bodice with short scalloped sleeves. Her matching short fitted mitts tapered into points, and her triple tiered French illusion veil was attached to an imported princess crown of orange blossoms with iridescent sequins and pearls. She carried a spray bouquet of stephanotis and phalaenopsis orchids with satin streamers. Miss Lynn Coman of St. Louis, Mo., cousin of the bride, was her only attendent and wore a coral sunrise silk organzine waltz length gown with a decolletage neckline. Her circular skirt fell from a fitted bodice having elbow length sleeves. On her head she wore a matching plateau with a center bow attached to a circular maline blusher. She carried a nosegay of white hyacinth florettes. Joseph R. Ditto of Rockford, Ill., served Mr. Evans as his best man. The reception for the wedding party, relatives and guests followed in the Clinton Country club. Later Mr. and Mrs. Evans left on a northern wedding trip, and after May 1 will be at home at 1001 Garfield, Apt. 2, Rockford, Ill. The bride and bridegroom both attended Rockford college, and Miss Evans is emplooyed by the Illinois State Unemployment office.

Notes for Robert Edward Evans
The Clinton Herald Tuesday January 24, 1967 p. 11 Robert E. Evans, co-publisher and general manager of The Clinton Herald, today was elected to the board of directors of the Clinton National Bank. The board also promoted Ward Riedesel to trust officer to succeed Fred W. Stampe who is retiring after 35 years of service. All other officers and directors were reelected. Evans, who was graduated from Rockford college with a degree in business administration, joined The Herald organization in August of 1960. After gaining experience in the administrative, circulation and mechanical departments, he was named co-publisher and production manager in the fall of 1962. His administrative duties were expanded in 1965 when he was named co-publisher and general manager. Evans has been active in a wide variety of civic activities. He currently is a member of the Clinton Airport commission, a director of the Clinton Devlopment Co. and chairman of the transportation committee of the Chamber of Commerce. Stampe started his banking career in 1922 at the Peoples Trust and Savings Bank. Nine years later he moved to the Clinton National bank. He has been active in a number of organizations, including the Chamber of Commerce, American Cancer society and United Fund. He is a past president of the Gyro club and served as secretary-treasurer for many years. In addition to Evans, the stockholders reelected the following directors: I.H. Carnes, E.C. Halbach, F.O. Kershner, Peter H. Petersen, R.E. Bickelhaupt, John Camp and David Carstensen. Officers reelected were: President, Carnes; vice president (inactive) Kershner and Petersen; vice president and cashier, A.W. Poffenberger; vice president, Robert A. Lothringer; assistant cashier and installment loan officer, Willis J. Grimm; assistant cashier and controller, Gene C. Biermann; assistant cashier and assistant trust officer, Maurice J. Losey.

MARRIAGE:
The Clinton Herald Monday March 17, 1958 p. 6 Mrs. R.W. Beal, Mrs. Edwin S. Beal and Mrs. Paul B. Holleran entertained at a Friday bridal luncheon in the Edwin Beal home at Oakhurst for Miss Beth Hancock, who will marry Robert E. Evans of Rockford, Ill., April 19. Pink and white carnations and daisies graced the luncheon tables with covers for 22 guests.

The Clinton Herald Wednesday April 16, 1958 p. 6 In honor of Miss Beth Hancock, fiancee of Robert E. Evans of Rockford, Ill., Mrs. George T. Peckham Jr., entertained 35 guests at a bridal tea Tuesday afternoon in her home, 415 Oakhurst. Mrs. Byron R. Pinney and Mrs. H.O. Sugg poured at the tea table which was adorned with pink and white carnations and purple heather.

The Clinton Herald Saturday April 19, 1958 p. 3 Sunset Terrace, home of Mr. and Mrs. Courtland Young Hancock, was the setting at half after three o'clock this afternoon for the marriage of their daughter, Mary Elizabeth, to Robert Edward Evans, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Evans of Rockford, Ill. Dr. Bruce McCullough, minister of the First Presbyterian church, heard the marriage vows in the company of close friends and relatives. Nuptial music was by James M. Winn, minister of music of the First Presbyterian church. The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a Rosepoint lace opera length gown designed with a scalloped decolletage neckline embroidered in pearls. The bouffant lace skirt fell from a basque bodice with short scalloped sleeves. Her matching short fitted mitts tapered into points, and her triple tiered French illusion veil was attached to an imported princess crown of orange blossoms with iridescent sequins and pearls. She carried a spray bouquet of stephanotis and phalaenopsis orchids with satin streamers. Miss Lynn Coman of St. Louis, Mo., cousin of the bride, was her only attendent and wore a coral sunrise silk organzine waltz length gown with a decolletage neckline. Her circular skirt fell from a fitted bodice having elbow length sleeves. On her head she wore a matching plateau with a center bow attached to a circular maline blusher. She carried a nosegay of white hyacinth florettes. Joseph R. Ditto of Rockford, Ill., served Mr. Evans as his best man. The reception for the wedding party, relatives and guests followed in the Clinton Country club. Later Mr. and Mrs. Evans left on a northern wedding trip, and after May 1 will be at home at 1001 Garfield, Apt. 2, Rockford, Ill. The bride and bridegroom both attended Rockford college, and Miss Evans is emplooyed by the Illinois State Unemployment office.

Children of Mary Elizabeth Hancock and Robert Edward Evans were as follows:
+ 59 i Courtland Charles6 Evans, born 10 May 1963 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married Rebecca ((---)) Evans.
+ 60 ii Robert6 Evans (adopted), born 5 Jul 1967 in Scott, Iowa. He married Carissa (Hagen) Evans.
+ 61 iii Catherine Elizabeth6 Evans, born 14 Aug 1968 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married (1) Gill Siqueira; (2) Robert Jackson.


43. John Hancock5 Notman (Florence4 Hancock, Mary3 Young, William John2, (---)1), born 5 Nov 1919 in Bisbee, Arizona; died 26 Mar 2006 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married (1) on 29 Dec 1944 in New York City, New York Patricia Dutton (Burdine) Notman, born 29 Dec 1919 in Miami, Dade, Florida; died abt 1990, daughter of Roddy Burdine and Zada (Dutton) Burdine; (2) on 19 Apr 1949 in Mittenwald, Bavaria, Germany Gertrud Wilhelmine Marie (Genske) Notman, born 17 May 1914 in Hamburg, Germany, daughter of Friedrich Wilhelm Genske and Metta Maria (Behrens) Genske.

Notes for John Hancock Notman
Published: March 28, 2006 02:47 pm
John H. Notman
A longtime Clinton resident and veteran newspaper man, John H. Notman, a former general manager of the Clinton Herald and the Trenton (N.J.) Times, died early Sunday. He was 86.
Notman died at Mercy Hospital after a brief lung infection.
A graduate of Harvard University in 1941, he moved to Clinton in 1949 to begin a 16-year career at the Herald. He rose from reporter to general manager, serving in that capacity until 1965. During his tenure, he was president of the Inland Daily Press Association and the Iowa Daily Press Association. He was an advisor to American Newspapers in Panama from 1965 to 1966. After a seven-year stint with the Trenton Times, he retired to Clinton in 1975.
Active in the community, he was a past-president of the Clinton Rotary Club and an active member of the Clinton Development Corporation, the Clinton Chamber of Commerce, United Way, and the Clinton Country Club.
A member of Harvard¿s Mountaineer Club, he was an enthusiastic climber, skier, tennis, and squash player.
His mother, nee Florence Hancock of Dubuque, was the sister of Courtland Hancock, publisher of the Herald when owned by the W.J. Young Co. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Gertrud, sons Dirk Hayo of Clinton and Derek Notman of Minneapolis and four grandchildren, Derek, John, Alexandra, and Scott.
Funeral services are pending. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Clinton Animal Shelter and St. Jude¿s.
John H. Notman
Clinton, Iowa
March 26, 2006

Notes for Patricia Dutton Burdine
Patricia Burdine divorced John Notman in 1947, St Augustine,Florida, USA

Notes for Gertrud Wilhelmine Marie Genske
MARRIAGE:
Gertrud Genske and Helmut Bachmann were divorced on August 13, 1947.

Children of John Hancock Notman and Gertrud Wilhelmine Marie Genske were as follows:
+ 62 i Derek Neale Howard6 Notman, born 11 May 1950 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married (1) Johanna (Vlak) Notman; (2) Gloria (Nelson) Notman.


44. Valeria5 Burke (Jane Elderkin4 Young, Edward Ames3, William John2, (---)1), born 9 Feb 1934 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married (1) abt 1955 John Gillian; (2) on 4 Oct 1958 in Santa Fe, New Mexico, divorced Donald Donaldsen Van Soelen, son of Theodore Van Soelen.

Notes for Valeria Burke
Clinton County birth record book 3 1932-1935 p. 10

MARRIAGE:
Engagement: The Clinton Herald Monday November 29, 1954 p. 6 Dr. and Mrs. Jerome C. Burke of Santa Fe, N.M., formerly of Clinton, have announced the engagement of their elder daughter, Valeria, to John Gilliam, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gilliam of Bettendorf. No date has been set for the wedding. Miss Burke is a granddaughter of Mrs. Molly A. Young of Santa Fe, and the late Edward A. Young, former prominent residents of this city, and also a granddaughter of Mrs. Thomas Burke of Davenport and the late Dr. Thomas Burke, formerly of DeWitt.

MARRIAGE:

The Clinton Herald Saturday October 4, 1958 p. 3 Christo Rey church in Santa Fe, N.M., was the setting at high noon today for the fashionable wedding of Miss Valeria Ann Burke, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Jerome C. Burke of Santa Fe, N.M., formerly of this city, and Daniel Donaldson Van Soelen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Van Solen, Tesuque Santa Fe, N.M. Msgr. Patrick Smith was the officiant and Joaquin Fernandez was the nuptial organist. The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, Dr. Burke, wore the wedding gown her maternal grandmother, Mrs. E.A. Young, now of Mexico City, wore on her wedding day, Oct. 5, 1892. It is of ivory satin with leg-o-mutton sleeves and the fitted bodice outlined with seed pearls and cut steel beads, the same motif carried out on the edge of the court-length train. Over the satin gown is an overdrape of loose fitting illusion tulle embroidered with clusters of seed pearls. The veil worn by the bride also was worn by the bridegroom's grandmother in 1889, it is of fingertip-length tulle with a Rosepoint lace cap. The bride's Rosepoint mitts and the handkerchief she carried have been in her family for years. Her flowers were a modified cascade of white butterfly phaleonopsis ocrhids and stephanotis. In the bridal party were Miss Constance Burke, sister of the bride, as maid of honor, wearing a bronze empire style long satin gown with a short train, with which she wore a matching nosetip veiled bandeau and carried a small bouquet of white orchids and stephanotis. Miss Alicia Otis of Chicago, was the bridesmaid, wearing an apricot satin gown, styled like the maid of honor's with harmonizing headdress and she carried a crescent arm bouquet of shaded bronze hybrid vanda orchids. Miss Barbara Burke, junior bridesmaid, also a sister of the bride, wore an identically-styled dress in blush pink with matching headpiece, and her flowers were a smaller arrangement of shaded orchids. Theodore Van Soelen, Alburquerque, N.M., attended his brother as best man. The ushers were Dr. DeForest Lord, John N. Eddy, Merritt W. Hoge and David C. Davenport, all of Santa Fe. The reception followed in the Santa Fe room of the LaFonda hotel. Later the couple will leave for a wedding trip to Aspen, Colo., and Jackson Hole, Wyo. The will be at home after Nov. 1 at 949 Acequia Madre, Santa Fe, N.M. Mr. Van Soelen is assistant vice-president of the First National bank in Santa Fe. Among the out-of-the-city guests attending the wedding were Miss Dorothy Burke of Davenport, Mrs. Ida Glynn of Cedar Rapids, Charles L. Burke of Anthony, Kan., and Mrs. John Johnsn of Oak Park, Ill.

Notes for John Gillian
MARRIAGE:
Engagement: The Clinton Herald Monday November 29, 1954 p. 6 Dr. and Mrs. Jerome C. Burke of Santa Fe, N.M., formerly of Clinton, have announced the engagement of their elder daughter, Valeria, to John Gilliam, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gilliam of Bettendorf. No date has been set for the wedding. Miss Burke is a granddaughter of Mrs. Molly A. Young of Santa Fe, and the late Edward A. Young, former prominent residents of this city, and also a granddaughter of Mrs. Thomas Burke of Davenport and the late Dr. Thomas Burke, formerly of DeWitt.

Notes for Donald Donaldsen Van Soelen
MARRIAGE:
The Clinton Herald Saturday October 4, 1958 p. 3 Christo Rey church in Santa Fe, N.M., was the setting at high noon today for the fashionable wedding of Miss Valeria Ann Burke, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Jerome C. Burke of Santa Fe, N.M., formerly of this city, and Daniel Donaldson Van Soelen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Van Solen, Tesuque Santa Fe, N.M. Msgr. Patrick Smith was the officiant and Joaquin Fernandez was the nuptial organist. The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, Dr. Burke, wore the wedding gown her maternal grandmother, Mrs. E.A. Young, now of Mexico City, wore on her wedding day, Oct. 5, 1892. It is of ivory satin with leg-o-mutton sleeves and the fitted bodice outlined with seed pearls and cut steel beads, the same motif carried out on the edge of the court-length train. Over the satin gown is an overdrape of loose fitting illusion tulle embroidered with clusters of seed pearls. The veil worn by the bride also was worn by the bridegroom's grandmother in 1889, it is of fingertip-length tulle with a Rosepoint lace cap. The bride's Rosepoint mitts and the handkerchief she carried have been in her family for years. Her flowers were a modified cascade of white butterfly phaleonopsis ocrhids and stephanotis. In the bridal party were Miss Constance Burke, sister of the bride, as maid of honor, wearing a bronze empire style long satin gown with a short train, with which she wore a matching nosetip veiled bandeau and carried a small bouquet of white orchids and stephanotis. Miss Alicia Otis of Chicago, was the bridesmaid, wearing an apricot satin gown, styled like the maid of honor's with harmonizing headdress and she carried a crescent arm bouquet of shaded bronze hybrid vanda orchids. Miss Barbara Burke, junior bridesmaid, also a sister of the bride, wore an identically-styled dress in blush pink with matching headpiece, and her flowers were a smaller arrangement of shaded orchids. Theodore Van Soelen, Alburquerque, N.M., attended his brother as best man. The ushers were Dr. DeForest Lord, John N. Eddy, Merritt W. Hoge and David C. Davenport, all of Santa Fe. The reception followed in the Santa Fe room of the LaFonda hotel. Later the couple will leave for a wedding trip to Aspen, Colo., and Jackson Hole, Wyo. The will be at home after Nov. 1 at 949 Acequia Madre, Santa Fe, N.M. Mr. Van Soelen is assistant vice-president of the First National bank in Santa Fe. Among the out-of-the-city guests attending the wedding were Miss Dorothy Burke of Davenport, Mrs. Ida Glynn of Cedar Rapids, Charles L. Burke of Anthony, Kan., and Mrs. John Johnsn of Oak Park, Ill.

Children of Valeria Burke and John Gillian were as follows:
63 i Thomas6 Gillian.
64 ii Karen6 Gillian. She married Paul Fizzle.
65 iii (---)6 Gillian.


45. Thomas E.5 Burke (Jane Elderkin4 Young, Edward Ames3, William John2, (---)1), born 21 Sep 1935 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 22 Apr 1994 in Alexandria, Virginia. He married Marilyn (Wright) Burke.

Notes for Thomas E. Burke
Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday April 25, 1994 p. 9 The funeral will be 10 a.m. Wednesday in St. Mary's Catholic Church, Alexandria, for Thomas E. Burke, 58, of 316 Prince St., Alexandria, who died Friday in Washington Hospital Center, Washington, D.C., of natural causes. Mr. Burke was president of the W.J. Young Co., which owns Clinton National Bank. Visitation will be from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday in Demaine Funeral Home in Alexandria. Burial will be in Ivy Hill Cemetery. Mr. Burke was born Sept. 21, 1935, in Clinton, to Jerome C. and Jane Young Burke. He married Marilyn Wright. He was a retired economist with the U.S. Treasury Department. He had been president of W.J. Young Co. since 1986, and was president and an avid participant in Alexandria Crew Club. (The family name of "Young" has been associated with Clinton National Bank since its founding in 1865. W.J. Young played a vital role in the early affairs of the bank and his name was associated with virtually every civic enterprise in that period. He was prominent in financial circles, interested in numerous business ventures and served as mayor of Clinton in 1864.) Survivors include his wife; two daughters, Julie Burke Smith of Grosse Point, Mich., and Ann E. Burke of St. Petersburg, Fla.; and three sisters. Death date: April 22, 1994.

SS Death Index THOMAS E BURKE 21 Sep 1935 22 Apr 1994 (not specified) (none specified) 525-78-2286 New Mexico

Children of Thomas E. Burke and Marilyn Wright were as follows:
+ 66 i Julie6 Burke. She married David Smith.
67 ii Ann E.6 Burke. She married Paul Forstchen.

Generation 6

50. Katherine Joy6 Scheuble (Katherine5 Aman, Katherine Stockman4 Young, William John3, William John2, (---)1), born 2 Oct 1953 in Shorewood, Wisconsin. She married Dale Buck.

Children of Katherine Joy Scheuble and Dale Buck were as follows:
68 i Sharon7 Buck.
69 ii (---)7 Buck.


59. Courtland Charles6 Evans (Mary Elizabeth5 Hancock, Courtland Young4, Mary3 Young, William John2, (---)1), born 10 May 1963 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married in 1989 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa Rebecca ((---)) Evans.

Children of Courtland Charles Evans and Rebecca (---) were as follows:
70 i Nicholas7 Evans, born 5 Aug 1999/99 in Scott, Iowa.


60. Robert6 Evans (adopted) (Mary Elizabeth5 Hancock, Courtland Young4, Mary3 Young, William John2, (---)1), born 5 Jul 1967 in Scott, Iowa. He married Carissa (Hagen) Evans, born 1 Feb 1971 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa.

Children of Robert Evans (adopted) and Carissa Hagen were as follows:
71 i Allison7 Evans, born 14 Apr 1989/90 in Iowa City, Johnson, Iowa.
72 ii Emily Elizabeth7 Evans, born Sep 1995 in Iowa City, Johnson, Iowa.


61. Catherine Elizabeth6 Evans (Mary Elizabeth5 Hancock, Courtland Young4, Mary3 Young, William John2, (---)1), born 14 Aug 1968 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married (1) in Nov 1994 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, divorced Gill Siqueira; (2) Robert Jackson, born 26 Jul 1957 in West Mansfield, Ohio, son of (---) Carey and (---) (Jackson) Carey.

Children of Catherine Elizabeth Evans and Gill Siqueira were as follows:
73 i Jeffery7 Siqueira, born 7 Jan 1995 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Children of Catherine Elizabeth Evans and Robert Jackson were as follows:
74 i Eden Elizabeth7 Evans, born 18 Nov 1999 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
75 ii Nathaniel Robert7 Evans, born 21 Jan 2001 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.


62. Derek Neale Howard6 Notman (John Hancock5, Florence4 Hancock, Mary3 Young, William John2, (---)1), born 11 May 1950 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married (1) on 23 Nov 1972 in Princeton, New Jersey, divorced Johanna (Vlak) Notman, born 26 Apr 1947 in South Africa, daughter of Dominic Vlak and (---) (Johanna) Vlak; (2) on 27 Feb 1989 in Sun Valley, Idaho, divorced Gloria (Nelson) Notman, born 31 Oct 1948.

Notes for Derek Neale Howard Notman
DEREK NEALE H NOTMAN MD Location MINNETONKA , MN 55345 Office Phone 952-993-3220 Gender MALE Primary Practice Specialty Self-Designated by Physician DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Medical School UNIV COLL DUBLIN, NAT'L UNIV OF IRELAND, FAC OF MED, DUBLIN Year of Graduation from Medical School 1980 Residency Training FAIRVIEW-UNIV MED CTR , DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Major Professional Activity OFFICE BASED PRACTICE American Board of Medical Specialties Certification
Copyright 2001 American Board of Medical Specialties. All rights reserved. AM BRD OF RADIOLOGY

Notman, Derek and Aufderheide, Arthur C. Experimental mummification and computed imaging. Volume II. Proceedings of the First World Congress on Mummy Studies, Museo Arqueologico y Etnographico de Tenerife, Ogranismo Autonomo de Museos y Centros, Cabildo de Tenerife, February 3-6, 1992. pp. 821-828.

Children of Derek Neale Howard Notman and Johanna Vlak were as follows:
76 i Derek Nicholas Hayo7 Notman, born 16 May 1980 in Dublin, Ireland. Notes: Proposal to
Linda Belote Ph. D.
Submitted by
Bridget Gray
Tara Haynes
Derek Notman
Angie Schmidt
Bill Smith
February 19, 2001
Project title: Ethics in Academic Anthropology
Proposed Project Period: February 19th -May 2nd Investigators:
Bridget Gray
Anthropology Student, Senior
218-724-8214 Tara Haynes
Anthropology Student, Junior
218-729-7619 218-721-3692 Derek Notman
Anthropology/Archaeology Student, Junior
218-724-9091 Angie Schmidt
Anthropology Student, Senior
218-724-6388 Bill Smith
Anthropology Student, Senior
218-721-3692 Abstract The purpose of this project is to gain a better understanding of the ethics involved in academic anthropology. Our goal is to explore the ethics practiced by anthropology professors in the academic setting. This is especially important for anthropology professors because of the many ethical dilemmas faced in situations during field work and the influence of professors' ethical perspectives on their students. The research will be explored by five undergraduate anthropology students by conducting interviews, both in person and by email, of academic anthropologists currently involved in the university setting. Additional information will be gathered through extensive reviewing of literature. Cumulatively, this project should reflect the range of opinions and objective ways in approaching and teaching differences to students and how to deal with it cross-culturally. Project Description
Introduction
This project will be executed by a team of five students of anthropology, under the direction of Professor Linda Belote. We are one of three groups looking at the broader subjects of ethics and anthropology, examining the ethical issues faced when doing academic anthropology. The students in this sub-group include: Bridget Gray,Tara Haynes, Derek Notman, Angie Schmidt, and Bill Smith. Problem and Significance
Anthropologists face certain ethical dilemmas when conducting fieldwork, teaching, and in their publications about the people they study. Cultural relativism is an anthropological concept which recognizes there are many different viewpoints, each equally valid when considered within their cultural context. Therefore, we are going to examine three aspects of this problem: 1) ethics in the classroom 2) ethics in personal field experience 3) ethics in publishing. The AAA Code of Ethics addresses the ethical issues faced by students, professors, subjects, universities, and social scientists. Because anthropology skirts the fine line between science and humanities special ethical problems can arise. We wish to find how professors approach ethical problems while upholding an ethical code. Exploring ethical problems faced by anthropology professorsin all aspects of their work will hopefully help other social science professors gain a better understanding and awareness of their influence on the ethical formation of their students. It will also help anthropology students to begin to formulate their own positions. Another goal of this project is to gain personal, public, and professional awareness of differing perspectives obtained in the classroom and in the field. Background
We have started our research by looking at journal articles on the subject of ethical issues and dilemmas faced both in the classroom and in the field. The list of resources is not yet complete.
Objectives
This study has a number of desired outcomes that include but are not limited to: 1.How social science professors deal with the subject of objectivity versus indoctrination to a certain point of view?
2.What ethical considerations need to be evaluated for subjects used in research?
3.To what degree do students and professors have intellectual freedom?
4.What is professional behavior and how can it be achieved?
5.What behavior in the field is acceptable?
6.What should one disclose about their research, what should not be disclosed and how do you know when to do which?
7.Is it ethical or should it be mandatory to discuss what does or could happen to a culture if you research it and/or expose to another culture?
8.What is informed consent and why is it necessary? Methodology
We feel the most valuable resources to be tapped on this issue will be through interviews of professors having personal experience in dealing with ethical issues and dilemmas faced both in the classroom and in the field. Each individual member in the group will conduct two interviews via email, phone, or letter. In addition, two interviews conducted by two members of the group with a knowledgeable interviewee will increase understanding of ethical issues faced by professors and students. We are approaching the dilemma from a multidisciplinary angle by using the four anthropological subfields of biological, archaeology, cultural, and linguistic anthropology as well as the sociological perspective. By approaching the subject this way, we will be interviewing UMD anthropology professors that specialize in these subfields as well as a sociology professor. Each member of the team will lead the group in a component of the project. All members of the group are responsible for providing full participation in acquiring information for the end product. Leadership Roles
Proposal: Tara Haynes
Interview Questions: Angie Schmidt
Final Report: Bridget Gray
Library Research: Bill Smith
Web Page Design: Derek Notman Time Table
Proposal: February 19, 2001
Final Draft of Interview Questions: February 28, 2001
Interview Period: March 19-April 16, 2001
Field Notes: April 16, 2001
Final Report/Presentation: April 30, 2001
Web Page: May 8, 2001 Personnel and Facilities
Essential to the completion of this project is research and interviewing. These both will be thoroughly utilized by the five team members because of their extensive experience with these two ethnographic methodologies.
1. The University of Minnesota-Duluth's Library, current faculty at UMD, and other Universities, and Internet access will provide our group with the resources needed to complete this research project. Digital cameras will be used for web site photos. Evaluation
Individually, we will be evaluated by our team members and as a team we will refer back to our list of objectives to see that we have accomplished our intended goals. As a finished product, Prof. Linda Belote will give the final evaluation in the form of a letter grade for Senior Seminar May 2nd, 2001
Anth 4653
Dr. Linda Belote
Ethical Considerations in Academic Anthropology
Derek Notman
Bridget Gray
Tara Haynes
Angie Schmidt
Bill Smith
The field of anthropology study's differences in human beings. It is about where they come from, how they live, and what they do. It is holistic, meaning that anthropology looks at every aspect of human culture in order to gain a better understanding of their actions and behaviors. Ethics is an integral part of anthropology. Because we are dealing with human beings it is important that we handle our subjects with the utmost respect and care. Studying ethics helps us achieve this goal. When taking an ethical consideration for the subjects that we are studying, we are making sure there is no physical or mental injury to those helping us gain a better understanding of the human race. For this paper we looked at ethics in academic anthropology. This is considerably important since all future research and fieldwork begins in the classroom. Academic anthropology is the gateway to making sure that ethical considerations are implemented into every anthropological project that will take place in the future. Because there is a massive amount of information that deals with ethics in academic anthropology we have decided to research aspects of this topic that we found to be most important. The first part of the paper will discuss ethical formation in cultural anthropology including: understanding ethics by defining anthropology (humanistic or scientific?); discussing a universal set of ethics; defining cultural relativism; defining moral subjectivism; how one deals with an ethical dilemma in the field; ethical considerations in the classroom; and the role of the researchers informants. The second part of the paper will discuss the ethical formation in archeology including: excavations; considerations of acts and laws; principles of archeology; and archeological ethics. The third and final portion of the paper will deal with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and will include: what the IRB is; whom it consists of; who is affected by the IRB; and what the IRB regulates. We hope that the aspects of this paper will help people gain a better understanding of the ethical issues that need to be considered when dealing with academic anthropology.

Ethics and Cultural Anthropology:
In order to understand anthropological ethics, we must understand our own perceptions and ethical viewpoints. The understanding begins with a definition of anthropology. Is it a humanistic or a scientific endeavor? Our research suggests that cultural anthropologists lean toward the humanistic approach. Dr. Dave Smith defined what it means to have a humanistic approach. It involves having or developing a humane concern in research. The main subjective approach to research is searching for questions of meaning, that is, meaning in reference to subject matter (drama, art, dance, music, philosophy). The approach is the discovery of meaning rather than causation. It is more literary, reflexive, narrative; interpreting a culture lies in using metaphors, humans only understand the world through a conceptual framework. Understanding that the humanistic approach is subjective, and therefore changes between people and across cultures, makes the argument that ethical standards and actions differ cross-culturally. Some would suggest that there are some basic human rights and ethical standards that are universal. Drawing the line is difficult to do when trying to distinguish what is universally ethical and unethical. Most would agree there are some higher criteria to appeal to when forming a universal ethical standard, though there may not be an absolute standard. Dr. Kathy Hytten believes people in cultural studies try to put forth provisional moral referents (a particular conception of democracy) and are open to the fact that these Referents (including as well such things are justice, equity, empowerment) are ever-changing. There may not be an absolute referent (such as the Bible) to refer to when studying other cultures. Understanding your own ethical viewpoints means understanding that they are provisional, that is, we must avoid ethnocentrism. With this in mind, anthropologists can begin to explore the application and formation of differing ethical viewpoints. A good place to start is with the AAA Code of Ethics. The AAA has a Code of Ethics that anthropologists are expected to follow but this falls on the side of theory. It is important to note that theories in the social sciences are not always constant, that is, they do not apply to all circumstances all the time. When an ethical dilemma arises in the field; one must take into account the AAA Code of Ethics, your own personal ethics and the ethics of the culture you are studying! These are three ethical codes that may be extremely different and to do the "right" thing may be impossible because the right thing may not be universal to all three ethical codes. Anthropologists who are preparing to go into the field must be aware of this and must realize that they may find themselves in an ethical dilemma. They should be aware of the AAA Code of Ethics but understand that the right decision may not be clear. Recognizing ethical differences is embodied in the theory of cultural relativism. Opinions differ as to its true definition. Dr. Don Miller says, "Standardly, we must look at a culture different from our own within the context of its own cultural beliefs". Others see it as valuing other cultures as meaningful designs for living (Dr. Donna Chollett) or judging others' by their own cultural standards (Mary Pulford). Dr. Sharon Kemp believes there are two different types of relativism: intellectual and personal, where personal is one's own standards that will universally apply to the one person wherever they are, be it in their own culture (where it may differ from the norm) or in some other culture. Intellectual refers to the tolerance of other cultures ethical practices whether you agree with them or not, simply acknowledging that every culture has a different set of ethical standards and that we are all equal in that regard. She went on to say that the most successful people in any culture are those individuals that adhere to the rules of the culture, if you live with the philosophy of "anything goes," how is one to learn the proper way to live no matter what the standards? There must be something in place to start from. Philosophy defines cultural relativism as what makes an action right or wrong are the cultural norms within whatever is the context of the given action. It is not a matter of etiquette or belief as much as what ought to be done that is the moral thing to do. As a person grows up in a culture, that culture installs values of right and wrong whether you realize it or not. For our purposes we will call these values ethics. As anthropologists we know that cultures are diverse, and with this diversity, comes different perspectives of ethics. Philosophy draws a specific distinction between ethics and morality. Concerning the everyday actions of persons, it should be safe to lump them together as ethics for the purposes of this paper. Interestingly, moral subjectivism stands apart from cultural relativism. It is more a matter of individual endorsement of certain beliefs than it is of society's endorsement. This suggests that what makes a given action right or wrong is the individuals own beliefs about the action. What Kemp refers to as individual relativism, philosophy recognizes as moral subjectivism. This might be a better definition than relativism because there are different moral beliefs across individuals within a culture (and within subcultures), it would encourage tolerating individual's different opinion, and could help deal with the question about whether one's culture determines one's beliefs (Taber 5). Applying cultural relativism, then, as a theory does not seem to hold much weight, it is simply a way of recognizing ethical differences. You cannot rely upon it in any meaningful way. So, then, how should an anthropologist deal with an ethical dilemma in the field? Until the AAA Code of Ethics was drafted, little discussion was given to the idea of ethics in anthropological studies. Dr. Jim Belote recalls it being brought up indirectly but it was always assumed that people would just do the right thing. Sharon Kemp elaborated by pointing out the concept of arrogant perception. We can never assume our ethics are better than the next person's. To be effective anthropologists, we must leave our preconceptions behind. Recognizing our own assumptive shortcomings is critical to anthropology. The role of the anthropologist is observation and to catalogue cultural differences and similarities, in addition, to document how other cultures differ, not to make them like us. The (cultural) anthropologist has to understand their own cultural biases and ethical standards to be able to distinguish whether or not an action seems unethical. Passing judgment and intervention would only seem to invalidate results and compromise trust. Interestingly, in her paper entitled, The Ethics of Cultural Studies, Kathy Hitter takes the viewpoint that the role of cultural studies is to understand particular cultural contexts in order to help the people of that culture transform their culture in a meaningful way (particularly where power structures lead to oppression and economic or political instability)(252). There seems to be agreement concerning the role of some set of universal human rights. In other words, it is based totally on individual perception and individual decisions. Certainly there cannot be a set of universal rights when ethics differs so widely across cultures. Anthropologists must decide for themselves what is right for them and, if asked, what might be right for other cultures. Certainly, the anthropologist as the observer cannot intervene. Anthropologists as individuals, however, have to refer to their set of ethical standards and make their own decisions based on the situation. As a general rule, it seems that the only correct thing to do would be to help out the best that you can if you agree that an unethical practice for that culture seems unethical to you, and most importantly, they ask for your help Smith). Being aware of yourself and your own cultural ethical standards is crucial in deciding on the right actions to take and how to represent that culture effectively and accurately. The awareness of self and culture can be facilitated in the classroom. Some professors were generally not explicitly taught ethics in their own college education-it was simply assumed that they would act morally (Pulford, Belote). This issue is becoming increasingly important to our highly globalized economy. Ethics seems to now be increasingly present on a regular basis in higher education. To tackle such an ambiguous topic, professors begin by asking questions of the students' and then exemplifying those questions with examples drawn from their cultural understanding. They share personal experiences as well as other professors personal experiences, give examples (Kemp, Pulford), watch movies and discuss many "test" questions to help the students learn to deal with ethical issues and understand potential responses (Miller). Even here, it depends upon the ethical viewpoint of the professor in determining how they teach the issues to their students. Hytten believes that all issues raised in the classroom are ethical, she says "everything we do in the classroom, from what we teach to how, is based on choices we make, and therefore all classroom issues have an ethical dimension-we can do something different than we do. Ethics are involved in what books we choose (or don't choose), how we portray knowledge (there is no neutral knowledge-it is all socially constructed), how we interact with students, and how we access students." It seems that the nature of human beings prevents us from being totally rational, that is, objective in our decision-making. Indeed, it is relevant to say that all issues of ethical differences are inherent in all aspects of culture and decision-making. Certainly there are specific ways to address and mention ethics in the classroom. Pulford has a specific "ethics" workbook that includes the AAA Code of Ethics, using it as a base to talk with the student's on how to make choices in their own lives and in the field. She tolerates differing viewpoints in the classroom but comes back to the AAA statement as a foundation for ethical formation. In addition to learning and applying the AAA Code of Ethics, students are also taught to evaluate changes to it (Cholett). In her classes, students must also apply principles from the anthropological principles of professional responsibility to actual case studies. Informants' role in research is critical toward obtaining an accurate and ethical representation of the culture studied. First, it is important to ask yourself what's motivating you (Emad) and how to go about obtaining your goals in as objective way as possible. Theoretically, it is important to be critical in picking your informants. It seems, however, that there are different ways of going about the process. Sometimes Cholett uses a random sample, and at other times she simply finds people who are willing to talk. As defined by informed consent, she explains to them their role and that their participation is voluntary and anonymous. Dependent upon the kind of research to be done, informant's can be chosen very carefully and completely (Miller) or whomever the anthropologist has developed a trusting relationship with (Kemp, Smith). Humanistic anthropologists believe it is difficult to be objective in the field because of the relationships that are formed and because of the differences in informants. Anthropology is a very "human" job, you can not keep your biases out of your field notes (Smith). Trying to keep biases out of field notes comes with practice. Generally, it seems there is no such training to address it (Pulford). Reflexive analysis can help in objectivity, that is, its function is to limit or adjust for our beliefs (Miller). It cannot account for all subjectivity because anthropologists are studying fellow human beings. Intuitively, it seems unethical to treat other humans not as objects to be studied, but subjects to understand. According to Belote, as anthropologist's we must not harm the people we study, we should give something in return and that the informants know what you as an anthropologist are doing. This means that we owe the people of our studies some protection and if things we discover may cause harm to the people we should not disclose that information to the public.

Biological Anthropology: Another issue that must be brought to attention here is the use of animals in research. They too can be used as our informants. Values dominate human moral life. With in biology there is often confusion when dealing with ethics in research. One of the prominent ethical problems in research is the use of animals as subjects. Anthropology uses animals in some biological research of human beings. "Animal experimentation poses ethical problems because we are ourselves animals" said James Pascoe (Rodd, 10). The use of animals brings up the question of whether or not animals have consciousness. Does the human species have the right to dominate and exploit another creature due to the species-predator relationship? With in biological anthropology two cases of ethical dilemmas have arisen. The first deals with the use of primates. For decades scientists have been studying and experimenting with what many would say are our distant relatives. In fact, chimpanzees DNA differ by a two percent fraction from our own human DNA. Should non-human rights be intact when verbal consent does not apply? The second dilemma has to do with the Human Genome Project. A complete map of human DNA has been created. Potentially, harmful acts can come of this new information. In the near future humans will be able to manipulate and study genes in order to find physical malfunctions and abnormal behavior. Exclusion, cloning, and new age genocide could result. What types of ethical questions and concerns need to be brought to peoples' attention is not quiet sure. In this new age of technology and information many ethical questions are sure to be raised. Ethics and Archaeology: Ethics in archaeology can be broken down into a few different definitions'. There are the actual guidelines of the ethics involved with archaeological digs, there are the principles of archaeology, as well as the teaching aspect. We will try to explain and lay out each of these areas to help you better understand this concept of ethics in archaeology. When an archaeologist is conducting an excavation they have a number of responsibilities to which they must adhere if they want to conduct themselves in a respectful and scholarly manner. They have an honest commitment to society to do their research properly. Before an archaeologist can even go into the field, he/she must be familiar with the proper excavation techniques. If one does not completely know how to conduct an excavation, that person will be a big threat to the information lost at the dig, and can also be a big insult to the culture that they are examining. When digging a site, archaeologists are thus destroying it. Precise documentation and care of all relics recovered from the site is essential and crucial to the research being conducted. Archaeologists that we have interviewed have said that in conducting field work for living informants one should not always document all they see or hear due to the fact that it could be harmful to the culture they are studying if the information fell into the wrong hands. We agree with this, but in archaeology your informants for the most part are already dead. Because of this, one does not need to be concerned that their research will harm the subjects that are already dead. Therefore, everything and anything should be documented. This is beneficial for both the current research and for future teams interested in other aspects of the work that you have already completed. How to treat the dead is one of the larger pressing issues within archaeology. Because of the grave robbers exploitation of sites, laws have been created to protect burial sites. The Antiquity Act of 1906 was an early law, which made excavations of graves upon federal land permissible. The Archaeology Resource Protection Act of 1979 also came up with stipulations when dealing with burial sites. The site must be older than one hundred years to be studied. However, this only pertained to sites that were on tribal land. Also, notification and consolation was needed by the tribe before an excavation could begin. The Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1966 (NHPA) and Native American Graves Protection Act of 1990 (NAGPRA) both have tried to equalize the treatment of white and Native American burials. "NAGPRA thus governs the treatment of Indian remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and object of cultural patrimony by imposing certain requirements when such objects are excavated, and by specifying when objects that are in museums or agency collections must be repatriated to descendent tribes and individuals" (Native and Archaeologists, 70). In order to bridge the gap between archeologists and Native Americans, Rose Kluth Kathy Munrell explains her ideas: "We were taught that when we die, we are intended to go back into the earth, and that Mother Earth will take care of us. Burials feed the underground spirits and small creatures through the natural decomposition of the body. This is part of the natural order we all depend on to survive. We must not disturb this cycle" (Native and Archeologists, 113). The western model for science seems to dominate leading to many excavations of burials. After the excavation and curation process, many artifacts remain in boxes for years untouched. For many indigenous people this is a bunch of nonsense and is disrespectful to them as well as their ancestors'. The issues surrounding this debate are grid locked because of the different views between Native Americans and the western train of thought. Now that we have talked about ethics surrounding an archeological dig we will discuss another angle. In 1996, the Society for American Archaeology adopted something known as the "Principles of Archaeological Ethics". There are eight principles in which we will give definitions of: 1) Stewardship: Since the in situ archaeology material and site are irreplaceable, it is the responsibility of all archaeologists to conduct their research for the long term conservation and protection of the archaeological record. "Stewards are both caretakers and advocates for the archaeological record" (American Antiquity, 1996). Archaeologists should promote and preserve the archaeological record for the benefit of all people. 2) Accountability: "Responsible archaeological research, including all levels of professional activity, requires an acknowledgment of public accountability and a commitment to make every reasonable effort, in good faith, to consult actively with affected group(s), with the goal of establishing a working relationship that can be beneficial to all parties involved" (American Antiquity, 1996). 3) Commercialization: This is a big factor in the destruction of the archaeological record. This is because material remains are exploited for personal enjoyment and profit. This results in the loss of sites as well as the contextual information that is a key component of understanding the archaeological record. Archaeologists should therefore, carefully weigh the benefits to scholarship of a project against the costs of potentially enhancing the commercial value of material remains. 4) Public education and outreach: "Archaeologists should reach out to, and participate in cooperative efforts with others interested in the archaeological record with the aim of improving the preservation, protection, and interpretation of the record. In particular, archaeologists should undertake to:
(1) enlist public support for the stewardship of the archaeological record; (2) explain and promote the use of archaeological methods and techniques in understanding human behavior and culture; and (3) communicate archaeological interpretations of the past" (American Antiquity, 1996). 5) Intellectual property: "As contained in the knowledge and documents created through the study of archaeological resources, is part of the archaeological record. As such it should be treated in accord with the principles of stewardship rather than as a matter of personal possession" (American Antiquity, 1996). 7) Records and Preservation: "Archaeologists should work for the preservation of, and long term access to, archaeological collections, records, and reports" (American Antiquity, 1996). 8) Training and resources: "Given the destructive nature of most archaeological investigations, archaeologists must ensure that they have adequate training, experience, facilities, and other support necessary to conduct any program of research they initiate in a manner consistent with the foregoing principles and contemporary standards of professional practice" (American Antiquity, 1996).
These principles should be considered a good guideline for all archaeologists on how they conduct themselves throughout the different aspects of ethics in archaeology. We do not consider these principles a complete list mainly because the probable number of situations in which an ethical dilemma could arise is next to infinite. It would be improbable to know how to handle all situations since we never really know what situations may arise and how they can change from one moment to the next.
The last thing we would like to discuss about archaeology is ethics in the classroom. In the past years of our undergraduate career we have had little exposure to ethics in anthropology and archaeology. Our Senior Seminar class is the first course in which many of our classmates have had in depth discussions about ethics in our field. In the interviews conducted for the research on ethics in academia we asked our informants about teaching ethics. The majority of the responses led us to this conclusion. Professors of anthropology and archaeology do have their own set of ethical beliefs, but they try not to let that side of them come out too much in the classroom. This is because they would like to see their students formulate their own opinions about ethical dilemmas that are discussed. It seems that professors will try to provide a wide body of information to the students from which they can form their own biases and ideas about how to react to ethical situations. We must point out that when teaching students to conduct fieldwork (such as excavations), the teachers must make sure to stick to guidelines that encompass such important work. If guidelines are not followed and a student goes out into the field with lack of knowledge and skills a mishap could occur that could be disastrous to the archaeological record. When teaching ethics, a key factor that should be brought to both the students and the professors attentions should be the context in which ethics will be applied and by whom they are applied by. Institutional Review Boards:
One of the most important aspects of anthropology is field work and research. When pursuing a degree in anthropology (both undergraduate and graduate) research is involved. One of the elements, and what many believe to be an obstacle, in research is getting your project approved by the IRB (Institutional Review Board). In this portion of the paper we will discuss what the IRB is, who is consists of, who is affected by it, and what it regulates among other aspects.
Institutional Review Boards are implemented by the government and are used to protect human beings who are the subjects of research. They work to protect people from physical or mental injury (AAUP, 1). These rules and regulations have been present in some form for over thirty years. IRB's were formed mostly due to concerns about informed consent and risks associated with clinical and biomedical research. The concerns began with the Nuremberg Code of 1948 which formulated standards for researchers who experimented on concentration camp prisoners (AAUP, 2). Another study called the Tuskegee Syphilis Study caused concern. In this study the government purposely and deceptively withheld treatment from poor black men with syphilis from the years 1932-1972, the purpose of the study was to see the progression of the disease to the human body if it wasn't treated (Brainard, 2). Social scientist have been subject to the IRB's regulations almost from the very start. As of the year 2000 there were an estimated 4,000 IRB's working in the United States. In 1995 around 35,000 to 45,000 researchers conducted human subject research under the IRB (AAUP, 3). IRB's are a permanent aspect of research institutions in the United States.
In 1991 the Department of Health and Human Services issued a set of revised rules called the Common Rule to help protect the rights of human subjects in research (AAUP, 1). If a research institution is federally funded an IRB is mandatory to regulate research projects. However, many institutions that are not federally funded have IRB's as well. An estimated 75% of the largest American research institutions (mainly research universities and hospital affiliates of universities) have voluntarily expanded the IRB's to all human subject research (even if they are not federally funded) (AAUP, 3). It was noted that "generally, any university research that uses humans, human tissue, survey of human subjects, or human subjects records requires IRB review, irrespective of its funding source" (AAUP, 3).
The Common Rule that is implemented by the government, which in turn is the rule that the IRB's follow, state that research is "a systematic investigation, including research development, testing, and evaluation, designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge" (AAUP, 6). Along with this human subjects are "a living individual about whom an investigator (whether professional or student) conducting research obtains data through intervention or interaction with the individual, or identifiable private information" (AAUP, 6). On the basis of these definitions an IRB has the responsibility of looking over proposed research and deciding if it should be approved, disapproved, or require modification to research (AAUP,1 ). For an investigator to go on with their research project (that involves human subjects) they must get their research proposal approved. For an IRB to approve a research project it must ensure that: "(1)risks to subjects are minimized; (2)risks to subjects are reasonable in relation to anticipated benefits, if any, to subjects and [to] the importance of the knowledge that may be reasonably expected to result; (3)selection of subjects is equitable;(4) informed consent [has been] sought from each prospective subject or subject's legally authorized representative" (AAUP,2).
According to the Common Rule the most important element of the IRB is informed consent. It was found in a study by the National Institute of Health that very few research proposals are rejected out right by IRB's, but that fewer than 20% of proposals are approved as submitted. The most common need for modification has to do with the portion of the proposal having to do with informed consent (AAUP, 1). IRB's state that "no investigator may involve a human being as a subject of research covered by this policy, unless the investigator has obtained the legally effective informed consent of the subject or the subject's legally authorized representative" (AAUP, 10). It is very important in all aspects of research to make sure that the subjects know what is going on. There are eight elements of informed consent that are stated in the Common Rule as types of information that must be provided to the research subject. These include: 1) Stating that the study involves research, what the purpose of the research is, how long the subject will be needed, what procedures will be followed, and if the procedures are experimental. 2) Letting the subject know of any risks that may be involved. 3) Letting the subject know of any advantages to the subject or others that the research might have. 4) Letting the subject know of alternative treatments that may positively affect the subject. 5) Letting them know how much confidentiality to the subjects records will be maintained. 6) Disclosing to the subjects in higher risk research how they may be compensated if need be, and what other medical treatments are available. 7) Information of who to contact with any questions about the research and about a human subjects rights. 8) A statement that the research participation is voluntary and that they can drop out when and if they want with out penalty (AAUP, 11). As one can see, these criteria do not fit every research project, especially if there is no risk of physical or mental injury involved in the research. The fact that the IRB's rules and regulations are so strict is the reason it has been criticized by different researchers.
One group of researchers that have been particularly critical of IRB's has been social scientists. Many feel that they should not have to be subjected to the same strict rules as researchers in the medical field. Medical studies use human subjects for research that may cause bodily and mental harm, whereas much social science research does not. "IRB's may be prone to implement the Common Rule with too much rigor and too little consideration of the diverse nature of academic research. To the extent that this happens, IRB's can needlessly impede social science research" (AAUP, 13). In April of 2000 many researchers came together in front of the National Bio-Ethics Advisory Commission with current concerns about the federal systems regulations for protecting human subjects involved in research. Professor Murray L. Wax, an anthropology professor from Washington University in St. Louis came forward to the commission about his concerns on this topic. He stated: "The problems that emerge within anthropological research... have to do with human beings, not just as physiological specimens, but also as social creatures, living in families, clans, groups, tribes, or nations. The risks and benefits to the people (that anthropologists study) are very different from those faced by subjects of bio-medical research" (AAUP, 4).
Many other social scientists agree with Professor Waxs' statement. Some go as far to say that the IRB's system of control is a restraint on their freedom to plan and carry out research as they wish, hence their academic freedom. IRB's say, on the other hand, that they are not out to take away one's academic freedom, they are there to protect the rights of human subjects.
There have been calls for closer scrutiny of social scientists by IRB's fairly recently. IRB's are particularly concerned with the research that involves minors. Senior director of cultural studies at Family Research Council, Robert Knight, says some survey questions "seem designed to make students feel like they are dweebs if they haven't tried certain things, and that is dangerous" (Brainard, 2) Knight feels that Universities could do more "to make sure that there won't be intrusive questions that might be unnecessary to the research" (Brainard, 2).
Some of the ways that IRB's feel that subject's rights are met is by following the Common Rule guidelines. One major problem that social scientists have with the guidelines is about informed consent. They have to explain the purposes of the project and the benefits the project might have. The social scientists feel that by doing this they are running the risk of skewing the research results. The subjects may change their behavior in order to help the researcher finds what he/she is looking for (AAUP, 12).
So the question remains. How can we make the process of protecting human subjects more compatible for different types of research. The IRB's have taken steps towards achieving this goal. One way that they have done this is by regulating the content of the IRB boards. There are rules that say that each IRB should have at least five members with varying backgrounds to promote complete and adequate review of research activities. An IRB is not allowed to have it's panel entirely from one profession, no IRB should be all male or all female, and each IRB will have at least one member that is knowledgeable in non-scientific areas (AAUP, 14). There has been a push to have more social scientists serve on IRB's. Donald Ritchie an assistant historian with the U.S. Senate Historical Office states, "At least if you can get somebody on the board who understands historians and journalism, they can argue with the scientists about what is appropriate review, and not have a one-size fits all approach" (Brainard, 4).
Many social scientists are not against rules that protect human subject, in fact in a survey given to social scientists about the IRB they said that "the boards' supervision made them think more seriously about protecting the privacy of their research subjects" (Brainard, 4). There are obvious reasons why considerations for research need to change. Medical research and social science research are two different areas with two different goals. Some compromise should be made to accommodate both of them.
Forming an awareness of ethical differences across cultures and within your own culture is critical to the field of anthropology. Ethics is essential to research integrity because we are dealing with people, the representation of a culture, and their ways of life. Upon completing this course and the research for this paper we have all come to agree as a group that there needs to be a greater emphasis towards informing students about the ethics that are involved in anthropological research, fieldwork, and study. There is too much at risk (people's lives and welfare) to take ethical considerations lightly.
77 ii John Arthur Dominic7 Notman, born 6 Sep 1981 in Coon Rapids, Minnesota, USA.
78 iii Alexandra Nicole7 Notman, born 16 Feb 1984 in Coon Rapids, Minnesota, USA.

Children of Derek Neale Howard Notman and Gloria Nelson were as follows:
79 i Scott Arthur Conan7 Notman, born 28 May 1989 in Minneapolis , Minnesota, USA.


66. Julie6 Burke (Thomas E.5, Jane Elderkin4 Young, Edward Ames3, William John2, (---)1). She married David Smith.

Children of Julie Burke and David Smith were as follows:
80 i Calvin7 Smith.
81 ii Noah7 Smith.

Michael J. Kearney, 200 5th Avenue South #304, Clinton, Iowa 52732, USA, 563-242-0414
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