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The Aroostook War - unique in history

The Aroostook War - unique in history

Posted: 13 Dec 2004 4:50AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 4 Dec 2006 12:09PM GMT
The Aroostook War is unique because there was never a shot fired (though prisoners were taken)! By the treaty of 1783, at th close of the Revolutionary War, one half of the St. John's River belonged to Maine. After the War of 1812, the British claimed about one third of the land that was supposed to belong to Maine. In 1827 there was an agreement to let William, King of Netherlands, arbitrate the disagreement as to which boundary was valid according to the treaty with the British. His decision was that the boundary was not the one sought by Maine according to the 1783 treaty. Conflicts began between British lumbermen and American officers. Governor Harvey of New Brunswick proclaimed that British territory had been invaded and ordered out the militia. Within a week 10, 000 Maine militia were ready for action and the US congress authorized sending another 50,000 troops. Governor Harvey decided not to take military possession of the disputed territory and Governor Fairfiled agreed to not disturb any New Brunswick settlements. In 1842 the boundary dispute was settled by treaty and the "war" was over.

Re: The Aroostook War - unique in history

Posted: 24 Feb 2008 7:23PM GMT
Classification: Query
I noticed that you have posted several messages concerning New Brunswick families as was wondering if you might be interested in a Journal written in Sept/Oct 1825 by Massachusetts Land Agent George Coffin who did a census/survey of the Upper St John/Madawaska settlements. Very detailed and lots of names.
The Journal also made note of the forest fire (they were traveling to Frederickton when it started) that would later be called The Miramachi Fire. It destroyed almost
6,000 acres of prime NB timberlands, destroyed at least 3 settlements, killed hundreds, left thousands homeless and burned Frederickton- resulting in NB needing to take timber from the District of Maine Patent to recover from the disaster when London refused to send aid to Lt Gov Douglass.

Re: The Aroostook War - unique in history

Posted: 24 Feb 2008 11:42PM GMT
Classification: Query
Yes, I am aware of the Coffin Journal but have not read it. I do not see an 1825 census on the Upper Saint John Valley site so am wondering if it is online anywhere?

Regards,
Sharyn
meow8@verizon.net

Re: The Aroostook War - unique in history

Posted: 25 Feb 2008 12:03AM GMT
Classification: Query
I know Chris doesnt have it because I havent sent it to him yet. I was in the middle of photocopying and got sidetracked then never got back to it. Quirk of fate to remind me I need to send it to him. My site is more focused on the Upper Aroostook so anything I discover regarding his region I send to him. Since the journal was in response to a joint legislative resolve from both Maine and Massachusetts and was submitted to the states to account for expenses, Im not sure the one I have is the same work as the known Coffin Journal.

Re: The Aroostook War - unique in history

Posted: 25 Feb 2008 12:57AM GMT
Classification: Query
I would really be interested in seeing it. Please tell us, which is your site?

Regards,
Sharyn

Re: The Aroostook War - unique in history

Posted: 25 Feb 2008 5:08PM GMT
Classification: Query
Thank you. I finally did send the information to Chip Gagnon this morning in the mail so I suspect he will get that census information on line on his site fairly soon. The penmanship is fairly easy to read but I am unfamiliar with many of the French names so didnt even want to try.
My website is www.rootsweb.com/~me1837 my email is
nome1837@gwi.nwt. I also have a Canadian ancestry-my father's father(Henry Earl Bartley) was born in Carleton County, NB 1895 his father's(Havelock Bartley) mother's(Abigail Fulton) father (Fulton) migrated to Mars Hill, Maine in the early 1860's and Havelock joined his maternal grandfather in 1907. I have been able to trace back to Digby, Nova Scotia 1820 but then get stuck.
Bertie

Re: The Aroostook War - unique in history

Posted: 14 Jan 2010 8:01AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Clark, Goss, Cowperthwaite, Heald, Ridenhour
I am interested in any thing from Maine. My family roots Include Clark, Goss, Cowperthwaite and a few more. My Ggrandfather Nathan S. Clark fought with the 20th Maine. please e-mail about your book. Col. Thomas Goss was my GGGfather.

I checked out you web site, not bad but some broken links.

Re: The Aroostook War - unique in history

Posted: 15 Jan 2010 11:09AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Atwood, Chase, Follansbee, Jordan Knowlen, Merrill,
The first draft of the book "The Protectors and Defenders of the Northeastern Frontier" has been submitted to publisher-Picton Press. Of course there are tweeks, so i am in the process of revising and hope to have final draft by early spring. Its approximately 375 pgs and about 95% original document material, mostly Whig & Courier news articles, military rosters, claims, pension requests & William Parrot's journal and letter book while Asst Land Agent at Fort Fairfield, (Ive been able to identify the men stationed at Fort Kent on the 1840 census). I have some deeds, legislative resolves, committee reports, and correspondance between Augusta & Washington DC. I am working on a second volume that deals exclusively with the political aspects- working title "When Governments act in Bad Faith", and a 3rd Volume that hopes to track what happened/where they went after the conflict. My goal is to see that these men are recognized and acquire the right to have veteran's burial markers placed on their final resting place. That involves identifying who they are, and where they are buried. Maine has an organization, Maine Old Cemetery Assn, that is a good resource but Maine Veterans are buried in all 49 other states so a lot of help would be needed, and a lot of Congressmen need to be pushed to get the Act of Congress through.
The great thing about the rosters is that they identify not only the troops that were drafted into the various companies that were published in 1904 but those that were not drafted, along with the towns that the companies originally came from. Im working right now on the Drafted Companies of Capt Hall and Capt Barnard- many of their soldiers came from 1st Reg 2 Brigade 6th Division out of Bethel, Rumford, Greenwood, Oxford, but some of the division rosters show neighbors going into Capt Ludden's company of Light Infantry. Claims show Benjamin Brown transported troops to Augusta, they stayed at Eagle Hotel awaiting deployment to the Aroostook under Col Andrews. Many of these young men do not appear on the 1840 census so I suspect they were single men living and helping on the family farm, thus not identified until the 1850 census when many would have moved, married or died.
And I am sorry about the website. I am techno challenged and am still seeking someone to help update it.
You didnt mention years-Maine's 20th- was that Civil war?
And what are birth-death dates of Col Thomas Goss? GAR Post 149 in Masardis was named Knowlen Post for sacrifices in my family.
Bertie

Re: The Aroostook War - unique in history

Posted: 15 Jan 2010 7:05PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Clark, Goss, Mayhew, Cowperthwaite, Rowe
Hi Bertie, It's great to hear you are compiling what seems to be a great untaking, but rewarding adventure. the dates from Col Thomas Goss B: Gloucester, MA 29 May 1780
Married Elizabeth Hool Whitham 26 May 1998, Durham, ME D: 1872 in Levant while living with his Daughter Tammy Clark and her Family.(My line) When his consort Betsy Nelson died in 1839 in Masardis, he was upset and moved to the Machias River. Then moved again into the wilderness on the road to Fish River. ne died at 92. Buried in West Branch Cem, Levant.
As side note story about the Goss's and the War, Watson Rand Goss was part of the troop from Danville, He came into camp and seeing his new commanding officer blurted out "Hey, there's Pa!".

Asked about Nathan's years of service, Yes Civil War 28 July 1862 to 15 June 1865. He started recruiting in Masardas. His Diary is in the Maine state Achives.
Which Clark in mentioned in the jounal?

If you have other questions or and answers, let me know.

Thanks, Don

Re: The Aroostook War - unique in history

Posted: 17 Jan 2010 7:57AM GMT
Classification: Query
Don, your Clark recruiter must have recruited my Knowlens into the war then. John Nelson and William never returned and Freeman returned less an arm. The Clarks mentioned in the Journal were a Mr David J Clark of Glenburn who was associated with Capt Nye's group at Fort Jarvis on the Fish River (later Fort Kent) in April 1839 and Capt James Clark who was military commander at Fort Fairfield in May, 1839. I did a quick look through rosters to learn more about Capt Clark. He commanded a light infantry company with men from the Hampden/Herman area of Penobscot County. Watson R Goss was a member of Capt William Mills Rifle Co which rendezvoued in Bangor on Feb 20th, 1839. Pay records indicate that he was in Bangor on that day because he was given "0" miles travel. Another unusual note on the muster report-which was created on or about Feb 20th, is that his name appears near the end of the roster, out of alphebetical sequence. He's number 43 after James Young. Also following his name are those members of the rifle co- about 15 who left the company at Fort Fairfield on April 11th to enlist in the Civil Posse. On the pay roster he is placed correctly, No 15. For 2 months and 25 days his pay- less expenses- was $29.75 (that included a clothing allowance of $7.08 of which he only used $4. 25) He mustered out May 15th in Bangor.
My gr gr grandfather's Uncle Thomas Knowlen married the niece of your Goss ancester-Thomas Knowlen 2nd married Clarissa Rowe, daughter of Dorcas Goss and Gilbert Ayers Rowe. Thomas as born 1822 in Levant and Clarissa b 1825 in Levant- both ended up in Masardis in the 1840's and at Portage for the 1850 census. The 100th Anniversary booklet put out by Masardis in 1933 says that Mrs Goss (I presume Elizabeth) joined her husband in Masardis and laughed about the allegations of infidelity he was rumored to be involved in.
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