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BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

Kathryn Stuart (View posts)
Posted: 11 Feb 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query


Name: Peter (Peterus) BANTA / BONTA

Father: Albert Hendrickse BANTA (29 Aug 1728-29 Sep 1810)
Mother: Magdalena VAN VOORHEES (-15 Jul 1810)
Birth 17 May 1760 in State of New Jersey
Chr 25 May 1760 in Hackensack, Bergen Co, NJ (age 0)

Peterus (Peter) Banta married Rachel VAN CLEAVE on
July 8, 1782/83 in Lincoln Co., KY

What settlement did they go to in Lincoln County?

Rachel VanCleave escaped from the Massacre at Long Run (Jefferson County, KY) on September 13, 1781 carrying her little sister, Elizabeth. Their mother, Mary Shepherd Van Cleave, and two small sisters were killed in that massacre.
Any information on this family appreciated.s family appreciated.

Re: BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

Ardis McLeod (View posts)
Posted: 12 Feb 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query


Thank you, Kathryn

Re: BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

Kathryn Stuart (View posts)
Posted: 12 Feb 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query


Rolef Van Cleave was a brother to Mary Shepherd's husband, John. They were the sons of Aaron Van Cleave and Rachel Schenck.

Re: BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

Ardis McLeod (View posts)
Posted: 12 Feb 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query


Can you tell me who Mary Shepard Van Cleave married? Does the name Rolef/Ralph Van Cleave sound familiar?

Re: BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

John Reed La Rue (View posts)
Posted: 20 Mar 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query


There was a Low Dutch settlement at Harrodsburg, Mercer Co.,
started soon after the Revolutionary War. The actual settlement may be just north of the town in Pleasant Hill and Shakerstown. The settlement persisted at least into the 1850s. Mercer Co. was part of Lincoln Co. until 1786. Hope this is the place that you are looking for.

Re: BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

James Sellars (View posts)
Posted: 19 Apr 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query



Peter Banta served in the Revolutionary War and appears on a muster roll of Capt Andrew Kincaid, Lincoln County, Militia. This company served in the Battle of Blue Licks on August 19, 1782. Existing records indicate that only a portion of this company was at the battle. Banta's name has never appeared on a list of participants in the battle. He also served in Capt. Samuel Kirkham's company of militia in September of 1782 "guarding the salt works." Both companies are composed of men who lived near Danville. Banta was most likely living at the Low Dutch Station near Danville.

I had a an ancestor who lived on Beargrass for a while and then the Danville area during the years 1780-1783, his name was John Sellers. He served with Banta in Kirkham's company. I would like to know more about Banta as it may help me learn more about the neighborhood John Sellers lived in. I would also like to see the other account of the attack in Sept. of 1780.ack in Sept. of 1780.

Re: BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

Posted: 19 Apr 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 24 Jun 2001 7:00PM GMT


You are right! The Massacre at Long Run (Creek) was on September 14, 1781. A day or two later [have seen September 15-18, 1781] a party went out to bury the dead. The Indians
had known they would come and were waiting for them; this
was The Battle of Floyd's Defeat.

Following is an account of the Long Run Massacre andFloyd's Defeat as told by G. T. Wilcox, Squire Boone's Grandson in a letter to Hon. Thos. W. Bullitt. (from the Register of The Kentucky Historical Society.)

Eden postoffice (Jefferson County), Ky., July 23, 1880. Mr. Thos. W. Bullitt
Dear Sir:

Having made your acquaintance at the unveiling of the monument erected to the memory of the dead of G. John Floyd's defeat on Floyd's Fork, now in Jefferson County, you requested me to give you a narrative of what I knew of the massacre and Floyd's defeat. I am a representative of Squire Boone, being his grandson, and what I know I learned from
Isaiah Boone, my uncle, a son of Squire Boone. He was at Floyd's defeat. He said that his father had built a station on Clear Creek, two miles east of where Shelbyville now stands, and that his father, with several families, left Boonesborough in 1779, settled in this, then called Boone's station. There was a station on Beargrass, three miles east of Louisville, Called Beargrass (or Floyd's Station), and one eight miles from Louisville, called Lynn's Station. Lynn's Station was on the place afterward owned by Col. R. C. Anderson. Boone's Station at that time was the only station between Harrod's and Lynn's Station. Squire Boone's
station was about twenty-two miles east of Lynn's Station. Bland Ballard and Samuel Wells at that time lived in Lynn's Station, while Gen. Floyd lived in Beargrass Station.

There were two couples to be married in Lynn's Station. Bland Ballard and a man named Carris went from Lynn's Station to Brashear's Station, near the mouth of Floyd's Fork, now Bullitt County, after a Baptist minister, John Whitaker, to marry them. This was to be the first
legal marriage in this part of the country. In going over, Ballard discovered an Indian trail and was satisfied there was a large body of them. He retraced his steps to Lynn's Station, sent word to Beargrass Station, and then went to Boone's Station that night. They held a meeting and agreed to leave the station and go to Lynn's Station. There were a large number of families in Boone's Station at this time, viz: the Hintons, Harrises, Hughses, Hansboro, Bryans, Van Cleves and many others. They could not all get ready to move the next day, but some were determined to go. Squire Boone was not ready and could not prevail on them to wait another day. So Major Ballard conducted this party, leaving Squire Boone and a few families in the station to come the next day. When Ballard's party reached Long Run he was attacked in the rear. He went back to protect the rear. He drove the Indians back and held them in check as long as he could. In going back he saw on the ground a man and his wife, by the name of Cline. He told Cline to put his wife on the horse and hurry on. They were in the bed of Long Run. Ballard returned in a short time, to find Cline and his wife still on the ground. He put her on his horse and gave the horse a tap with his wiping-stick and as he did so an Indian pulled a sack from her horse. Ballard shot the Indian and hurried to the front.

Here he found a great many killed and the people scattered, leaving their cattle and losing their baggage and many horses. Some reached Lynn's Station that night, and a few Boone's. Boone remained in his station for several days after that before he and his party went down to Lynn's Station. I'll give the name of a few of those that were
killed on Long Run: Two Misses Hansboros, sisters of Joel Hansboro; a Mr. McCarby, a brother of Mrs. Richard Chenoweth, and a Mrs. Van Cleve, an aunt of my mother's. The next day General (then Colonel) Floyd, Colonel (then Captain) Wells, and Bland Ballard (afterward Major Ballard) and thirty-four others from Lynn and Beargrass Stations, went up to bury the dead. When they reached Floyd's Fork, Ballard said to them: 'You send a few men and ascertain where the Indians are.' He, however, was overruled and on they went. At the head of the ravine they were surrounded and sixteen of their men were shot down at the first fire. Fourteen of these were buried in one sink. They began to retreat. Isaiah Boone said that when he reached the Fork he discovered an Indian following him. He raised his gun. The Indian stepped behind a tree. Just at this time General Floyd and Colonel Wells came in sight, Floyd on foot and Wells on horseback. Wells said to Floyd: 'Take my horse.'
Floyd, being large and fleshy, was much exhausted.

***********
I have another account of this from the KY Historical Register if anyone is interested. Please contact me.

Re: BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

James Sellars (View posts)
Posted: 19 Apr 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query


Lincoln County Bantas. I need to make a correction to my last e-mail. All of the 1780 dates I gave should actually be 1781.
James

Re: BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

Posted: 19 Apr 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 24 Jun 2001 7:00PM GMT


What I have gleaned on this I will share as well; every
bit helps and fits together. Isn't it great that we can
all work together on this?

In the book titled "The Van Cleef Family" by Wilson V. Ledley he states on page 97, "John married Mary, daughter of Captain Thomas Shepherd and Elizabeth Van Meter of Shepherdstown, VA and so named in her father's will 25 March 1776. She and her two youngest daughters (twins by some accounts) were killed by Indians on September 15, 1781 in the Battle of Floyd's Defeat, near Long Run and Bryant's Station, KY; her daughter Rachel escaped carrying in her arms her younger sister Elizabeth. Son Benjamin in fleeing on horseback across Floyd's Fork fell into the water and only saved himself by grabbing onto the horse's tail."

(The Kentucky Encyclopedia; p 571)

Actually it is more likely that they were killed on September 14, 1781 at the incident which initiated the Battle of Floyd's Defeat, which is known as Long Run Massacre. "The Long Run massacre was a major incident in the series of battles in which early settlers in Kentucky fought Indians and their British allies on the western frontier during the Revolutionary War. Long Run is located near Eastwood in Jefferson County, Kentucky. In September 1781 Major Bland Ballard discovered Indian signs near Squire Boone's Painted Stone Station, near what is now Shelbyville. He warned the settlers there and at Beargrass Station to move to Lynn Station, a more secure area. For unknown reasons, Boone's and several other families delayed moving for two days. When they finally left the station on September 14, 1781, they were surrounded at Long Run Creek by a large party of Indians reinforced by British soldiers under the command of Captain Alexander McKee. An estimated sixty [some accounts say close to 100] people were killed by the Indians; only a handful, including Squire Boone, escaped."

Re: BANTA, VAN CLEAVE

James Sellars (View posts)
Posted: 19 Apr 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query


Lincoln County Bantas. There was actually two Low Dutch Stations in Kentucky during the Revolutionary War. One was located near Louisville (Jefferson County) and the other between Danville and Harrodsburgh (Lincoln County). I have read that Squire Boone in September of 1780 abandoned his station and moved to the Low Dutch Station near Louisville. The settlers were attacked by the Indians during this move. Also Col. Wm. Floyd led a releif party which it too was attacked in September of 1780 in which several were killed. The Low Dutch people who your Banta belonged to sent a petition to the Continental Congress in 1780 requesting help in acquiring land of their own. I have a copy of this but not all the names on the list. Their is a book all about the two Low Dutch Settlements in Kentucky during the Revolutionary War. I do know there is mention of Peter Banta, VanCleaves, and others. I do beleive that Peter Banta was one of the more prominent figures in that settlement. I don't know the reference right at the moment but may be able to find it if you like.
James
like.
James
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