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German-Jewish History 1600-1750

German-Jewish History 1600-1750

Posted: 24 Feb 2009 1:16AM GMT
Classification: Query
I'm not very familiar with German or Jewish history and need some help with my family tree. From the mid-1700 thru the 1600s a large part of my family whom I believe are Jewish and from all over Eastern Europe and Russia lived in Germany. They came from Poland, Jugoslavia, Russia, Slovinia, Austria, Hungary, Romania, everywhere. I can't trace them back further than the 1600s. Is there a reason a large population of my Jewish ancestry from so many different Eastern European countries would be in Germany at that same time marrying and having children? I would appreciate any help.

Re: German-Jewish History 1600-1750

Posted: 24 Feb 2009 8:01PM GMT
Classification: Query
If you are able to trace your family into the 1700's in Germany using last names, it is unlikely that they are Jewish. Jews were not required to take last names in Germany until the first decade of the 19th century. Individuals had Hebrew names: "David son of Joseph", "Sarah daughter of Samuel" No last names.

David

Re: German-Jewish History 1600-1750

Posted: 8 May 2009 6:13AM GMT
Classification: Query
That is the history of the German Jews. Back and forth, welcomed, expelled. The Thirty Years Wars (during the 1600's) uprooted a lot of people as well, although many Jews made their fortunes during this period (as they were not at war themselves) and generally it can be said that because of the Thirty Years Wars that Jews actually finally became assimilated into German society. It is rare to be able to trace back farther than the name change lists in the early to mid 1800s if your family is Jewish because they only took last names as a result of the Napoleonic laws requiring Jews to adopt uniform last names in those regions that became French in the Napoleonic Wars. However, the practice spread across Europe during the rest of the century such that by the end of the century all Jews had last names. However, the name adoption lists can be very helpful in tracing families back as they contained a lot of biographical information. There are other sources as well, but they tend to be harder to find.

Re: German-Jewish History 1600-1750

Posted: 27 Jun 2009 8:03PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Hoffner. Rochow
I am having a similar issue. I found Russian and Hungarian relatives who I believe may be Jewish who moved to sweden in the late 1600's. I cannot trace my family back to any farther than that last eastern european generation. I am suspicious that they were expelled (as has happened often to Jews) and then adopted last names to assimilate. Have you found more information on you family?

Re: German-Jewish History 1600-1750

Posted: 28 Jun 2009 5:55PM GMT
Classification: Query
No, I haven't. Right now I'm working on another problem with Jewish ancestors who were in Switzerland during the same period of time. Please let me know if you have Jewish ancestry in Switzerland. If I find out anything on the German end, I will let you know. Thanks!

Re: German-Jewish History 1600-1750

Posted: 30 Jun 2009 6:25PM GMT
Classification: Query
I have been able to trace my Jewish German family back to 1700 even though the Napoleon decree was mandated in 1808. They had Jewish names but they also often had secular (German names) as well.
As far as my research goes, Jewish records were found in the archives beginning about 1700. I have not found anything before that year. Perhaps there are some in other parts of Germany.

Re: German-Jewish History 1600-1750

Posted: 1 Jul 2009 3:58AM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi,
I also have German-Jewish family roots. More specifically in Bavaria. Our Hebrew family prayer book goes back to 1753 to the family name of Steinhardt, in the kingdom of Floss, Bavaria. I really want to trace my roots back further too, and was always curious if there were relatives that stayed in Germany through the 20th century and experienced the Holocaust. But as far as I know I think my ancestors moved to the east coast in the mid to late 1800's. The family name by then was Freeman, and the Josephson, and Rosenfelt.
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