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Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs!

Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs!

Posted: 3 Oct 2012 6:38AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 3 Oct 2012 6:40AM GMT
I've just spotted a "per" brevigraph in the phrase on the bottom.

"Latus 16 personen" written once in full and once with the brevigraph. It looks like a p with a cross thru the tail.

This is from Latin, I've seen it in Olde (early modern) English parish registers.

Instruction from other projects (Warwick chimney tax) has been to expand the brevigraph to full form since there's no way to key it as seen.


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Re: Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs!

Posted: 13 Oct 2012 7:04AM GMT
Classification: Query
here's one more

a 'us' that looks like a g but isn't.

http://www.textcreationpartnership.org/docs/dox/allchars.htm...

(Sorry i can't find a cleaner list, it's E014)
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Re: Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs!

Posted: 15 Oct 2012 3:40AM GMT
Classification: Query
The surname on this one has me wondering whether there might be a brevigraph (or two?) towards the end of it-- that *almost* looks like a "-rum" followed by a "-us" at the end.

Or is it more straightforward, something like "Pherlute"?

Not that either of those makes sense to me, phonetically.

(The image I'm keying corresponds to Book 1, image 38, and this name is on the left-hand side, 3rd from the bottom.)
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Re: Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs!

Posted: 15 Oct 2012 3:54AM GMT
Classification: Query
I'm leaning more toward the straightfoward.

I don't have a rendering i'm 100% certain of yet. But i do think your guess is rather close.


Re: Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs!

Posted: 15 Oct 2012 7:01AM GMT
Classification: Query
It would say you are right with Pherlute. Not that I have come across that name before.
but Lübeck was a very international city even at that time. And spellings were very different. Phonetically it could be a word.

Re: Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs! -"es" sample

Posted: 16 Oct 2012 5:54AM GMT
Classification: Query
Here's an "es", In Marckes (Marcus)
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Re: Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs!

Posted: 17 Oct 2012 2:19AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 17 Oct 2012 2:58AM GMT
I think I've finally untangled this.

I've come to the conclusion that the mark is greatly disconnected from the u it goes to.

And also the first character isn't p but s. I found samples on other images that are clearer.

I've concluded it was Shultte. Here's to hoping.
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Re: Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs! -partial list

Posted: 17 Oct 2012 6:34AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 17 Oct 2012 6:43AM GMT
Here's the ones i have so for.

I am picking '-man' and not '-mann' on my sheet because when my clerks write it out in full i only see one n.

Mostly i see the -mann names with -man, -mahn, -mhan.
The -sen names are often -ssen, -ssenn, -senn , -ßen or -ßenn

the -es could also be expanded in other ways, -is for instance, or mayyybe -us.

-per will pretty much always be -per,

And now i wish i could go back and fix some of my earlier ones.
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Re: Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs! -partial list

Posted: 17 Oct 2012 9:35PM GMT
Classification: Query
i think the one you call Knopper I think it is "Knopf" (button)

Re: Old lubeck - look out for brevigraphs! -partial list

Posted: 18 Oct 2012 1:06AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Oct 2012 1:22AM GMT
Compare the last character to the -per in 'personen', found on the bottom of many pages, there is a sample in the first post in this tread if you need one.

For what it's worth, Knopper is a real name.

EDIT: I might buy Knoph... but not Knopf, the f's are different.
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