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Moody Slaveowners

Moody Slaveowners

Neli Moody (View posts)
Posted: 19 Sep 2001 4:04PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Moody Slaveowners
If you are a Moody of Caucasion heritage and know that your ancestors owned slaves, you can help African Americans by making information available to them via message boards. It is an ugly part of our history, but the truth is that most African Americans have to research two histories, their own and the slaveowners of their ancestors. This is the greatest gift you can give to people who worked the land for nothing for 200 years.

Re: Moody Slaveowners

Posted: 2 Dec 2005 6:01PM GMT
Classification: Query
I sincerely appreciate this message because I am African American and it is extremely hard to find info about my Moody family heritage. My family was centralized in the Robertson county area and had major growth in the early 1900's and late 1800's. The direct descendant is Mose Moody who is first seen in Robertson county in the 1870 census with his mother who shows as Liza Brook. It shows her birthplace as Texas but on later census' it shows as Alabama and the Carolina's. Please, if anyone has slave records or otherwise, e-mail me at mrs_ricard02@hotmail.com.

Re: Moody Slaveowners

Corinna Blackwood (View posts)
Posted: 3 Dec 2005 1:43AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Moody/Elliott
This isn't what you are looking for, but you might want to try it. There is a Moody DNA project with www.familytreedna.com. If you have a brother with the surname of Moody you could join the project. There would be a cost to have his DNA tested. My Moody ancestor is a brick wall. He was supposebly born in AL and his parents in north or south carolina.

Re: Moody Slaveowners

Posted: 3 Mar 2006 10:05PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 21 Nov 2006 5:54PM GMT
Surnames: Moody
Are you African American? In my family tree, I can go back only to where my family popped up in the 1870 census for Robertson Co., but on the census it shows some of the members of the family as being born in Alabama and N. and S. Carolina. Write back as soon as possible!

Winnie Moody b.1862, TX

Posted: 5 Mar 2006 1:58PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Bean, Wages, Moody, Pippin
This relates to Winnie Moody b.2 Aug 1862. She was likely the granddaughter of Levi Moody b.1801, SC and Rebecca Wages and the daughter of a slave of the family and one of the sons of Levi Moody and Rebecca.

I have always suspected that the Moody Family in Robertson Co, TX is related to the Moody family in San Jacinto Co, TX.

The Moody family in Robertson Co, TX descends from Roger Moody, born about 1785,. He was in Marion Co, SC and the family moved to Covington Co, AL and then to Robertson Co, TX.

Levi Moody was born in 1801, SC. He was the son of Asa Moody and Charity Pippin. This family also moved to Covington Co, AL and then in the 1850s moved to what became San Jacinto Co, TX.

On African-American History… Levi and Rebecca Moody did have a few slaves. I have a copy of a record on the births of Levi and Rebecca’s family written in 1861. It included the names and dates of birth of all their children plus their grandchildren, Jacob, Maranda, and Nancy Moody.

The only child listed that isn’t clearly a child or grandchild of Levi and Rebecca Moody was Winnie Moody (b.2 Aug 1862). Winnie is said to have been a slave who stayed with the family after the Civil War. Winnie (listed as Winnie Moody) was also in the 1870 census of Polk Co in the household of Levi and Rebecca Moody, although her race was listed as white. Winnie was also buried in the Murry-Moody Cem in San Jacinto Co, TX.

Winnie is also listed in the household of Allan J. Murrey and Rebecca (daughter of Levi and Rebecca Moody) the 1880 census of San Jacinto Co, TX as:

Bean, Winnie b.2 Aug 1862, TX Servant, mixed race
Bean, No Name b. Feb 1880, TX Mixed Race

I suspect that Winnie Moody was a son of one of the older sons of Levi and Rebecca Moody. I have no record of her after the 1880 census

Re: Winnie Moody b.1862, TX

Posted: 3 Jul 2006 10:25PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 21 Nov 2006 5:54PM GMT
My Moody family is first seen in the 1870 census of Robertson Co Texas. I t is a very large family and we are all over the country now.The family is not even listed as Moody, but as Brook. The mother of the Moody men was named Eliza Brook. It says that she was born in SC or AL deprnding on which census and some of the sons show to be born in AL. She can bee seen on censuses into the 1920 census. The Moody men were Mose, Mitchell, John, Lon or Lawrence, SIngleton, and I believe there are some others but I can't remember them off hand. If anyone has any info at all please forward it to me.

Re: Winnie Moody b.1862, TX

Posted: 7 Oct 2007 3:57AM GMT
Classification: Query
My great grandfather, Roger Lanier Mills Moody and his brother John Andrew Jackson Moody, are the individuals who moved to Robertson County Texas during the mid-1800's. They were the sons of John Tyler Moody and his wife Mahala D. Mills of Alabama. John Tyler Moody was the son of Roger Moody of Marion County, South Carolina. Roger L. M. Moody and his brother John owned no slaves. Roger Moody of South Carolina did. Roger L. M. Moody's father-in-law, Matthew Anderson, of Robertson County Texas, also owned some slaves. It is possible that we are related to the Moodys who settled in San Jacinto County ... but there was no familial contact between them. I have never known any of my extended family Moody relatives, nor did my father or my grandfather (Roy Polk Moody and Roy Polk Moody Jr. of Robertson County.)

Re: Winnie Moody b.1862, TX

Posted: 7 Oct 2007 1:18PM GMT
Classification: Query
I have seen information on the Roger Moody family before and corresponded with Mary Moody around 1990 about the family. Whe and her husband Virgil wrote the book "The Moodys and Related Families" that dealt with the Roger Moody family. She had a brief section on my family -- John, Asa Moody and Levi Moody. Both of us were convinced that there is a connection back in SC, but we could not figure out the common tie. Members of both families also went to southern AL before coming to TX.

Re: Winnie Moody b.1862, TX

Posted: 7 Oct 2007 7:26PM GMT
Classification: Query
This is absolutely amazing! I was just getting some new information passed down by oral tradition of an "Old Man Anderson" that brought the family to settle in the Brazos Bottom in Robertson County. Are there any legal papers or wills that have the names of the slave that were left to the children in Robertson County. I bet you we are connected in some way. That information has helped alot because I would always see Phoebe and John Moody and automatically write them off because they did not have any slaves by record. I also have on some of the census' showing that the matriarch of my family was an Eliza Brook or Moody. She shows to have been born in South Carolina and some or most of her children in Alabama. If you have anymore info that you would like to share, PLEASE contact me. We are having our annual Homecoming down in Hearne (Red Hill) this coming weekend. I would love to have new info for the family!

Re: Winnie Moody b.1862, TX

Posted: 8 Oct 2007 3:31AM GMT
Classification: Query
What I mainly know about Matthew Anderson is that he came to Texas from Tennessee during the mid-1830's to enlist with Sam Houston's army just before the battle at San Jacinto. He did not have any slaves of his own until he returned to Tennessee just one time a number of years later, to claim his inheritance when his father passed. The Andersons of Tennessee were a large and wealthy family who owned the slaves. So he brought some back with him to his homestead in Robertson County. His approach with and treatment towards them was much like Sam Houston's ... He totally provided for their needs, provided them with their own parcels of land on which to live and farm, he encouraged them to marry and stay together as families, and to be basically educated as far as learning to read and write. One of these was a man named Ben ... who was really more like a man-servant to him than a "slave". He even sent Ben with his oldest son Posey, when Posey insisted on enlisting with the Confederate army. Matthew opposed this, but there was nothing he could do to stop him. Matthew's personal view of the war was that it was a lost cause, and he did not want to sacrifice the lives of any of his children for a lost cause. He made his viewpoint so well-known within the community that a radical group of Southern sympathizers even showed up at his home one evening, prepared to lynch him. His wife, Phoebe, yelled at and shamed the men so much that they eventually decided to take no action, and they left. So Ben accompanied Posey to Shiloh, Tennessee, where Posey was mortally wounded in battle. Posey then died of grangrene a few weeks later in Mississippi. Ben buried him there, and then immediately returned to the Anderson homestead with the news of Posey's death, carrying with him what remained of Posey's personal possessions. Ben and a few of Ben's family members are buried alongside the Anderson family members, in the small family plot on the old homestead. While slavery was indeed a shameful part of our American history ... It is a fact that many African-Americans at the time chose to remain with their so-called "Masters", even after the Emancipation, because that was all they knew in life. And if their "Master" treated them with the dignity and respect which is the birthright of all human beings ... then it was not a difficult decision for many of them to make at the time. The fact that Ben could have run for his "freedom" after Posey Anderson died ... but chose instead to return from Mississippi to the Anderson homestead in Robertson County -- pretty much speaks for itself, in my opinion. And then to eventually be buried right next to Matthew Anderson ... literally side-by-side ... finished the chapter, so to speak. By the way -- Matthew's wife was named Phoebe, and also one of his daughters. The daughter was married to Roger Lanier Mills Moody (originally of Alabama) ... and as a married couple who eventually raised a family of their own in Franklin ... they owned no slaves. Ofcourse ... by that time, that was well after the Civil War (and slavery) had ended. However, they maintained a close and positive association for many years thereafter with the descendants of the African-Americans brought down to Texas from Tennessee by Matthew Anderson. One of them even saved my grandfather's life when he was a newborn, and basically raised him until he was about the age of five. My great-grandmother, Phoebe Anderson Moody, was severely addicted to morphine at the time, and was in a very bad way. So this lady took the baby (my grandfather), weaned him off the effects of the morphine that he was born addicted to because he had absorbed the drug in utero from his mother, breastfed him to keep him alive, and basically raised him herself throughout his young childhood. And this is really all I know about it (or have heard through family lore passed down). Hope that answers most of your questions!
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