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Corley Connections

Corley Connections

Dana Risinger (View posts)
Posted: 12 Apr 2006 11:33PM GMT
Classification: Query
Our Risingers are related to the Corley family through 3 households, but multi-related in each household!! It wasn't easy figuring out the relationships. I have some info on John Frederick Corley from John Harman Nicholson. If any of you connect, I'd love to hear from you!

CHRISTINA CORLEY and FRANCIS SHARPE
Christina Corley was the daughter of John Frederick Corley and Jemima Hipp. She was the granddaughter of Lawrence Corley and Christina Blacken.
Francis Sharpe was the father of Eleanor Elizabeth Sharpe who married Henry Roland. Henry Roland was my husband's gr-gr-grandfather through their son James D. Roland and his wife Barbara Ann Schumpert and through their daughter Emma Pearle Roland and her husband Thomas Joshua Risinger, Sr. Therefore, Francis Sharpe and Christina Corley were my husband's 3rd gr-grandparents, John Frederick Corley and Jemima Hipp were his 4th gr-grandparents and Lawrence Corley and Christina Blacken were his 5th gr-grandparents.

JESSE CORLEY and ABIGAIL ROLAND
He was the son of John Frederick Corley and Jemima Hipp (sister of Christina above) and grandson of Lawrence Corley and Christina Blacken. Jesse Corley was my husband's 4th gr-uncle.
Abigail was the sister of Henry Roland mentioned above, making her my husband's 3rd gr-aunt (and being married to Jesse made her also my husband's 4th gr-aunt!).

ANDREW PETER CORLEY and ELIZA CATHERINE M. SCHUMPERT
Andrew was the son of Jesse Corley and Abigail Roland, making him my husband's 4th cousin through Abigail AND 5th cousin through Jesse (AND gr-gr-uncle through his marriage to Eliza!)
Eliza was the sister of Barbara Ann Schumpert who married James D. Roland (my husband's gr-grandparents mentioned above), making Eliza my husband's gr-gr-aunt (and of course double cousin through her marriage to Andrew).

Think my husband is his own cousin? :o)

Again - if anyone connects, please let me know!
-Dana

Re: Corley Connections - Revised

Dana Risinger (View posts)
Posted: 13 Apr 2006 8:16PM GMT
Classification: Query
I made a couple of typos in my previous post and I have questions about Christina Blacken, first wife of Lawrence Corley.

First of all, my husband's gr-grandfather was James Luther Roland and not James D. Roland. Second, obviously Jesse Corley was the brother of Christina Corley and not her sister!

And - here's something that puzzles me about Christina Blacken. The information that I received from John Harman Nicholson states:
"He first married Christina Blacken, the daughter of Dionysus Blackey; she died 15 Nov. 1806, and is buried in the Corley family cemetery . . ."

According to Harriet Imrey (in part), the following exists for Dionysus Blackey:
Multiple printed and online sources have "identified" Christen's father as one Dyonysius Blakely. . . There was a guy by that name in Lexington Co (under wildly-variant spellings) from ~1784-~1800, and one of his properties (not his residence) was in the Hollow Creek region. . . .Blakeley didn't even get to SC until ~15 years after Corley had married Christen. Irish/Welsh guys virtually never used the English name Christine, and they absolutely never used the common and distinctively-German name Kristen (variants Christian, Christiana, Christina). German-origin women born prior to 1770 maintained the usage of adding the feminine ending to their surnames, whether maiden or married, so a Cathrina Schwartz would sign as Schwartzin. But the local Schwartz family (who intermarried with the same families as did Corleys and Risingers) had anglicized its name by translating it to Black. If you're looking for a Fraulein Black-in who married in Lexington SC in around 1770, there's a much better candidate . . . (than Blakely or Blacken)

John - do you have any further information on Christina? Harriet makes a pretty good point. Since my husband is also related to the Schwartz/Black family, I think this could prove to be very interesting. Any thoughts?

-Dana

Re: Corley Connections - Revised

Posted: 13 Apr 2006 9:07PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Corley
Dana Risinger,

I know John Harman Nicholson but who is this Harriet Imrey that you are saying disagrees about Christina's last name. Christina is one of my 4th great grandmother . And according to the entry on page 3 of the second edition of the Lexington County South Carolina 1850 Census book published by the Lexington Genealogical Assoc, Christina was the daughter of Dionysis Blakley. I have seen her name spelled many ways but never once have I seen her called Fraulein as suggested my Harriet Imrey.

Is Harriet Imrey related to Lawrence Corley or is she just a German expert in general? I truly have my doubts about the statement that Harriet has made a pretty good point.

--- Webb Bays Blackman Jr ---

Re: Corley Connections - Revised

Dana Risinger (View posts)
Posted: 14 Apr 2006 1:21AM GMT
Classification: Query
Harriet Imrey is a well-respected professional researcher, a position which she has held for many years. I respect her opinions, even though I sometimes respectfully disagree with her. She is not related to our Corleys, nor our Risingers. However, she has a wealth of knowledge on early South Carolina (she's a walking library :o) and sometimes sheds a light on things for me - when I haven't even thought of it. I was offering a different opinion and opening the subject up for discussion. The first I heard of Christina was a few days ago, so I'm simply in a discovery period.

The word Fraulein in German means Miss. So, she was referring to Miss Black-in. It helps a great deal to understand Germans and their early handwriting and culture when researching our ancestors who came from Germany - especially when trying to decipher old handwritten documents. I've answered a lot of Risinger questions from my correspondence with researchers in Germany.

And what I meant by - she makes a good point - is her statement concerning that Dionysis wasn't in South Carolina until 15 years after Lawrence Corley married Christina, which would mean that she was here before Dionysis - therefore - he could not be her father. Even if Christina was born around the same time Granny Corley was (1770), she still couldn't have been his daughter. Also assuming that if she was closer to Lawrence's age, then she would have been born around 1742 and couldn't possibly have been his daughter.

Proof (or the reason I'm saying this :o)? In looking at the SC Archives Index, the first mention of him:
Date: 1784/11/17
Description: BLAKLEY, DIANATIOUS, PLAT FOR 100 ACRES ON SAVANAH CREEK, ORANGEBURGH DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY PHILIP WATERS.
Names Indexed: BLAKLEY, DIANATIOUS/WATERS, PHILIP/
Locations: ORANGEBURG DISTRICT/SAVANNAH CREEK/CONGAREE RIVER

There has to be an original land grant for this property - UNLESS - he acquired it from his father. There are several Blakely men before him, as early as 1716. So, this places him as first owning land in 1784 - well after the year Christina would have been born.

According to the info from John, Christina died in 1806. If Dionysis was listed in the 1850 census, Christina was not listed in his household since she was already deceased. It's not impossible that HE was living in 1850. If he was, he was probably in his late 90's, considering he acquired land in 1784, when he could have been as young as early 20's. If he were any older in 1784, he would have been 100 years or older in the 1850 census - possible, but not probable. I searched the 1850 Lexington County Census and there is no Dionysis Blakeley (and all spellings) not only in Lexington County, but the state of South Carolina. If there was a revision made to the 1850 Lexington County Census by the Lexington Genealogical Association, there has to be documented proof that this man and his family were left out of the original 1850 census. But, even if there is proof that he was living in 1850, Christina was not - and would not be listed.

Do you have any birth information on Christina? All I have is her death date (November 15, 1806). It would really help me clear up some of the above if you have her birth information. Have you been to her gravesite? I wonder if her stone states when she was born.

Since I just found out that she is also my husband's 4th gr-grandmother, I really would like to know more about her.

-Dana

Re: Corley Connections - Revised

Posted: 14 Apr 2006 4:14AM GMT
Classification: Query
Dana,

Yes I have been to Christina's grave site many times. I have a picture of her head stone but to the best of my memory, it only has her date of death.

If I implied that her father was in the 1850 census it was not something that I intended to do. I meant to say that one of the son's of Lawrence and Christina had a write up that indicated that they were his parents and it named the father of Christina. I agree that this is only someone's opinion but I respect the opinions of the people who grew up in Lexington and are related to the individuals in question much more than a professional researcher that is not even related to the people in question. I see no reason to believe that the dates of birth of Christina and Anna Barbara Derrick were in any way close. Lawrence married Anna Barbara following the death of Christina with one primary reason that being to look after his young children. I have not seen one item of information that would suggest that the two women were the same age.

If you find any positive proof about the parents of Christina, I am sure that there are many people who will welcome your findings and I include myself in that group.

--- webb blackman ---

Re: Corley Connections - Revised

Posted: 14 Apr 2006 5:55AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks, Webb.

I visited the corner of Harmon and Laurel Streets in Lexington late this afternoon, but I saw no glimpse whatsoever of the gravestones. There are two corners of Harmon and Laurel Streets (Laurel curves to meet Harmon Road twice) and each corner was so over-grown with foliage that I couldn't see any stones. From what I understand, Lawrence is also buried there. If that's truly the case, I can't BELIEVE that the people of Lexington - which many Lexington natives are related to Lawrence, would allow that to happen - since he is the one that originally owned the land that the town of Lexington was built on!!!!! Just because Christina is buried there, I wanted to go home and get my hedge clippers!!! :o)

Can you tell me EXACTLY where these plots are located?

Webb, I truly understand how you feel. It's sometimes a powerful thing to listen to the people that grew up in an area where your ancestors were from. However, some of that information comes from "passed down" stuff, which can be changed over the years. (Remember the "gossip game" we used to play in school?) For instance, the Risinger descendants that live in Leesville, SC today, are mainly descendants from Adam Risinger (son of David and Catherine Black Risinger). They have no idea who David's father was and think David was born in Germany, which is simply not true and has been proven from documents that I have from the SC Archives. They feel that David's grandfather's name was Felix, as that's what's been passed down through their generations. His name was actually Thomas Vitus Reissinger, otherwise known as Tomfit, Feight, (and Fight in his Revolutionary War record where he was a Captain in the SC Loyalists) etc., who immigrated with his parents, Johann Georg Reissinger and Rebecca ? (name found in a land record) in 1752 onboard the Snow Rowand. Herr (meaning Mr. in German) Greim in Germany is looking into his possible birth date as we speak. I have confirmed from my contacts in Germany that the nickname Tomfit means Thomas Vitus. Vitus in German means Holy man. David Risinger's father was actually Thomas Risinger, son of Thomas Vitus, who owned land adjacent to David Risinger when David first married. I also believe that Thomas was the brother of Jacob Mariah Risinger, whom I also believe was the son of Thomas Vitus Reissinger. All of this info comes from documents located at the SC Archives. HOWEVER, I have yet to prove this beyond a shadow of a doubt in my own mind.

Sorry to go off the Corley subject for a moment, but I know you have Risingers in your tree and I just wanted to update you on the information, in addition to what I had previously sent you on our Risingers.

So, you never know. If you REALLY want to prove blood lines, it's best NOT to rely on family folklore, but to prove those stories with documented proof. But, how do you know it's family folklore in the first place? I used to balk at those "professional researchers" that tried to prove me wrong - because I was going on the hard work and YEARS of research performed by other people. However, when someone else is more experienced than me - in any field - I tend to listen to them, use the knowledge, and go on my own merry researching way.

As far as my speculation of the birthdate of Christina, I'm going on the birth and death dates of Lawrence. She HAD to be born sometime between 1742 and 1770. If she was a young bride and Lawrence was a young groom and they were around the same age, then she could have been born around 1742 (and that year is according to the info I received from John), plus or minus a couple of years. If she were much younger than Lawrence, for instance nearly 30 years younger as Granny Corley was (which isn't likely because most men at that time were first married in their early 20's once they acquired a homestead) and he first married in his late 30's or early 40's to Christina? Not impossible, but again - not likely.

SO - since you have a "write up" (an obituary?) from one of the sons of Lawrence and Christina, what does it actually say? What paper was it in? And who was it? Is it possible for you to send me the write up?

Thanks for your thoughts and I hope to hear from you soon!
-Dana

Re: Corley Connections - Revised

Posted: 14 Apr 2006 12:02PM GMT
Classification: Query
Dana,

Lets address one of your questions at a time. You have been talking about the date of birth of Christina. Her oldest son, John Frederick Corley was born before Anna Barbara Drafts. John Frederick was born before 1768 and Anna Barbara was not born until 1770. In my way of thinking, that would most likely put the date of birth for Christina some where in the 1742 to 1746 time frame. A long way from the 1770 that has been suggested.

When you are talking about Christina and Anna Barbara you are talking about two completely different cases. Lawrence and Christina were married when they both were young. Just as Anna Barbara and her first husband John Drafts were also young when they were married. The marriage between Anna Barbara and Lawrence was a second marriage for both of them. Lawrence had a large family at the time and Anna Barbara had three children that I know of. So please understand that this "Granny Corley" was not the grandmother of most of the Corley's who live in Lexington even though she was the one who sold a parcel of land to the town of Lexington where the court house presently stands.

I know what you mean about "folk lore" and like you I use the information only as a starting point. I am just a bit careful about making up data and I do very well know the difference between a fact and an opinion. Way too many professional genealogiest often express their opinions as facts or forget the difference between the two.

The write up that I referred to about Christina and Lawrence came from the 1850 census book for Lexington County. Which has been pointed out is not a primary source but the opinion of those who created the book. But a lot of the material in the book is based on facts and is documented as such.

I hope that you understand that Lawrence and Christina are not buried at the same place. Lawrence and Anna Barbara are buried at the place where you visited. Anna Barbara has a memorial stone in St. Stephen's Lutheran Church Cemetery but is buried with Lawrence. Christina is buried several blocks away from where Lawrence is buried in an earier family cemetery.

I will try to get you better directions to both cemeteries.

--- webb blackman ---


Re: Corley Connections - Revised

Wendell Corley (View posts)
Posted: 16 Jun 2006 3:47PM GMT
Classification: Query
Dana, I just saw the exchange between you and Web Blackman. There are two "Corley" cemeteries in Lexington. The other, I beleive, is on Corley St a couple of blocks over. Looking at Map Quest I do see that Laurel intersects Harmon twice and I don't remember which is the correct location for the cemetery. However, I do remember turning right off Harmon onto Laurel and parking. There is a house to the left and the cemetery is the wooded area to the right of the house. Many of the original markers have either fallen over or have sunk. The easiest marker to find and read is that of Laurence Charles dated April 3, 1976. The original marker for Laurence Corley is also present - at the other end of the grave, presumably at it's head. My line is from Laurence to John Frederick to Joel to Godfrey to Robert Lee to Horace. Godfrey moved to Atlanta, Ga. arount 1890-1900.

Wendell

Re: Corley Connections - Revised

Posted: 17 Jun 2006 3:19PM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks Wendell!! I rode by there this morning and found it. I didn't have a chance to stop by Corley Street. As a matter of fact, I didn't have a clue that there was a Corley Street until I was looking at the 1910 census the other day and found some of our Corleys living there.

I've also found even ANOTHER Corley connection!!!! As in my previous posts, most of our Corleys are connected through John Frederick and his first wife, Jemima Hipp. However, we now have a connection with John Frederick and his second wife, Anna Barbara Wingard - whom your Joel descends from. It goes like this:

John Frederick and Anna Barbara Wingard also had a son named Reuben Franklin, b. 27 Jan 1811 in Lexington. He married Margaret Catherine Sox.
They had a son named Elias Luther "Eli" Corley who married Ella Virginia Tarrar.
They had a son named Harry Graham Corley who married Alma Mary Sox.
They had a son named Arthur Graham "Buck" Corley who married Anne Katherine Risinger - my husband's aunt.
If you know anything about the Red Bank area, Buck Corley Road was named after him. That's where they lived - in the little red house at the top of the hill. My husband's aunt and uncle are buried at Red Bank Cemetery.

Also buried at Red Bank Cemetery are James Isaiah Corley and his wife, Lydia Elizabeth Henderix. James was the son of Andrew Peter Corley (my husband's 4th cousin, 5th cousin and gr-gr-uncle through his wife) and Eliza Catherine Shumpert (my husband's gr-gr-aunt and double cousin through Andrew). (this line is listed in a previous post).

SOOOO - through this newly discovered chain of Corleys, my husband is indeed his own cousin!!

Thanks again for the info on the Corley cemetery on Corley Street. I can't wait to try and find it!

-Dana

Re: Corley Connections - Revised

Wendell Corley (View posts)
Posted: 17 Jun 2006 10:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi Dana! Well, three times I started this off talking about how hard life was in the early years. The men had more than one wife out of necessity to care for his children and produce even more. But, anyone who has done any research into ancestry knows that, so I won't go there. But it is interesting and presented lots of opportunity to marry your cousin.

Dana, although I was born in Atlanta, I did live in Columbia, S.C. for 20 years. My children and grandchildren still live there. About 5 years ago I took my youngest grand daughter to the Corley House at the Lexington museum. To my surprise she was very interested and seemed in awe of how so many people could live in a 2 room house.

Do you have anything on the ancestors of Lawrence Corley (Charles)? Common belief seems to be Lawrence was the son of John George Carle (Karle). Things get a little fuzzy here.

Wendell
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