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Erskine research

Erskine research

Todd Myers (View posts)
Posted: 24 Nov 2002 4:10PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 31 Mar 2004 12:15AM GMT
Karen, Your story of hitting a genealogical brick wall is not uncommon. For example, the United States federal census records for 1890 were all but lost in a fire in the 1920's. This has caused me great problems trying to trace my grandfather's family through Chicago and back to Sweden.

I have heard about the Belfast fire as well. How far have you traced Erskine back in the United States? Have you found the immigration records/ships records? Those records probably exist here in the US and with those records you can begin tracing Erskine back into Ireland and you might then be able to trace Erskine from Ireland back to Scotland. It is impossible to work the other way unless you have some ancient family documents. Don't give up. There are many ways to get around the lost Belfast records to research your Erskine line back to Ireland and hopefully Scotland.
Best regards,
Todd Myers

Re: I'm the new administrator

K Duncan (View posts)
Posted: 24 Nov 2002 11:55PM GMT
Classification: Query
Thank you so much for the info. I've traced the family back to 1833 where they lived in New York for 2 generations. For some reason when I try to go further, records appear showing a Charles Elias Duncan as being the father of the first heir given the Erskine "middle" name. My dad said we could trace our line clear back to Ireland because of that one unique identifier and yet it's missing from the 1833 Duncans. I don't know if it's a mistake in documentation or a mistake on my dad's part. I did learn something rather interesting though. The first surnames were matriarchal. It appears the name "Erskine" was attributed to women in our early days. The thought occured to me that at some point a ggggggrandmother's maiden name was Erskine and rather than giving that up when she got married to a Duncan, (when patriarchal surnames became customary), her name was incorporated into the names of the male heirs. That's kind of wild, huh? Of course, I could be way off base :-)

Karen
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