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Assulf Querderia

Assulf Querderia

Posted: 4 Apr 2002 11:03PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 20 Jan 2003 11:00PM GMT
Hi Carolyn Hill,

I’m a Cordray and I know that some have spelled the name Cordrey and Cordery over the years, so for fun I looked at the message boards for these spellings. I read your post and saw your note, “I have traced the Cordery line back to Normandy-1066 with Assulf Querderai.” This rang a bell with me as I have been loading data from Donald Cordray and he got his data from Paul who got it from Robert L. Cordray.

The first entry from Donald is “Assalf spoke Charter Latin and the surname “Querderia” The only date of record for him was that he purchased property in England in the year 1087. The property included a village (Stainborough), some hamlets and the Chief Ironworks in that part of Yorkshire. He was probably a young man when the Saxons fought the battle of Hastings. No record of wife name or dates.”

I would be glad to exchange information with you and to correspond with you.
Lawrence Cordray.

Re: Assulf Querderia

Richard Cordery (View posts)
Posted: 1 Sep 2002 3:21AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Cordery, Corderoy, Cordrey, Cordray, Cowdery, Cowdrie
Hello Lawrence! I stumbled upon your e-mail to Carolyn Hill with some interest, as it contained some information I had not hitherto been aware, although I think you might benefit from my perspective as well.
Whether the name is Cordray, Cordrey, Cordery, Corderie, Cowdrey, no matter how many ways you slice it, there is only one heraldric name that I am aware of, and that is from the heralds in London themselves, and that is the surname Corderoy, the anglicized version of Corderoi, from Coeur de Roi, translated "Heart of the King." It has been an accepted fact that with a Norman name, the Corderoys came with William the Conqueror in 1066, and for their valiant effort at Hastings King William I gave the family land in the county of Berkshire, the ancestral home of the Corderoys, Corderys and Cordrays. I wonder, how did the name Assulf Querderia come about? And the connection to Yorkshire is most interesting, since the Corderoys are an ancient west country family, having married into the Glanville family in the 17th century. So the connection to the village of Stainborough comes as quite a surprise. Assulf is actually an old anglo saxon name, is it not?
You will note that there is also some considerable geneology, apparently by our Cherokee related brothers and sisters in the states, tracing the actual Corderoy who made the trip with William the Conqueror, whose name was Souchville Cordery, father of an unknown Cordery who was in turn father to Assult, born in 1086, so there is some discrepancy in your findings. Alas, since I began researching the Corderys recently, I have found nothing but discrepancies, especially in the period 1600-1800, when most of my family, the Corderys, wound up as paupers in Union Workhouses. It is not a very uplifting story, although many Cordery's today are quite prominent and successful, no longer playing second the servant class role to the titled, moneyed and landed Corderys. My own direct desendants came to Utah as Mormon converts between 1910-12 from Norwich, Norfolk England. There were Corderoys as well in Jamestown, and they have found there was to Australia, New Zealand and even Bermuda. After all, when you are faced with the poor house, wouldn't you pack your bags and leave?
Unfortunately, I am having difficulty in my research, because of the plague, religious persecution and that lovely gent Oliver Cromwell, who seemed to think he knew what was best for everyone.
I am very grateful to everyone who has submitted this wonderful family tree back to the Normans, as this has always been family lore and legend, but we have never actually been able to trace it. The fact that this information is now accessible is wonderous and no doubt attributable to global communication. Even more wonderful are the google searches, that have enable me to connect with many incredible sources related to my family the Corderys.
Best of luck in all your searches, and lets contibute to our collection knowledge of this great ancestral family! Richard Cordery Rickmalou@aol.com

Thomas Cordery + Susannah Sonicooie

Posted: 5 Oct 2002 2:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 13 Nov 2003 12:31PM GMT
Surnames: CORDERY, SONICOOIE
Hi Lawrence,
Sorry to take so long to reply but have had serious ps problems for the past year. Hope they are finally resolced.

I am always glad to exchange information on the CORDERY, CORDRAY, COURDRY, COWDRY, CORDRAY, etc. o:)
families.
My direct line is of native american descent through Thomas CORDERY of Ga. and his cherokee wife Susannah SONICOOIE, but I have hundreds of other lines and still collecting more.
Carolyn

Re: Assulf Querderia

Posted: 6 Oct 2002 4:40PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 20 Jan 2003 11:00PM GMT
Surnames: Cordrery
Hi Carolyn
i pray that you will continue to get better.
i work construction in the summer road work so i do not have much time in the summer for this.
this year i'm going to working on celacting documantion, i know that this is going to be fun, and have some dead ends for some, but hoply i will be able to go back a ways more than 5 that is.
is Thomas Cordery a part of the Donlad line ?
i now have a stack over 4 inchs deep and growing i had a ant send my a picter of my grat grandmother i have some paper on her, her mother is baered right next to her and i'm haveing problems geting papper on her.

have a good week
Lawrence

Re: Assulf Querderia

Posted: 7 Oct 2002 2:26AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 13 Nov 2003 12:31PM GMT
Surnames: CORDERY, CORDRAY
Hello Lawrence,
So nice of you to reply.
My Thomas Cordery is not part of the Donald Cordray line. His line is from Ohio while mine is from Virginia., but the common line is connected from England.

Donald Cordray is a great genealogist and a truely polite individual. He is always willing to discuss the family line.

If there is anyway that I can help you with your line I will be glad to do so.

Carolyn

Re: Assulf Querderia

Posted: 7 Oct 2002 2:26AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 13 Nov 2003 12:31PM GMT
Surnames: CORDERY
Hello Lawrence,
So nice of you to reply.
My Thomas Cordery is not part of the Donald Cordray line. His line is from Ohio while mine is from Virginia., but the common line is connected from England.

Donald Cordray is a great genealogist and a truely polite individual. He is always willing to discuss the family line.

If there is anyway that I can help you with your line I will be glad to do so.

Carolyn

Re: Assulf Querderia

Posted: 7 Oct 2002 1:38PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 20 Jan 2003 11:00PM GMT
Hi Carolyn
this winter i,m going to work on puting more data in to the family tree, and ging what paper i can from colorado, kansas, ohio, and virinia and that general area, becouse i still get to work i will be more than one year doing this,
do you go back to a Ben in virgina

latter Lawrence

Re: Assulf Querderia

Posted: 8 Oct 2002 10:20AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 13 Nov 2003 12:31PM GMT
Surnames: Cowdrey, Cordray
Lawrence,
I do have some information on the family of Benjamin CORDRAY, COWDREY, in Notrhampton Co., Eastville, Virginia. 1600's

Is this who you are looking for?

Re: Assulf Querderia

Posted: 8 Oct 2002 11:27AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 20 Jan 2003 11:00PM GMT
Hi Carolyn
no i'm not looking for, my line goes back throue him to england. have you started to run down the paper(records) if so how much have you found,
you all have a grate day

Larwence

Corderoys

David Corderoy Belden (View posts)
Posted: 17 Oct 2005 4:25PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Corderoy
I was astonished to see the reference to Coeur du Roi as the origin of the name Corderoy. My grandfather was George Corderoy, of the British surveying company that took his name, George Corderoy & Co, and is now just called Corderoy (www.corderoy.com). My sister and I have inherited the family silver plate cutlery, which has his crest on every piece: a crown on a heart. But we always thought this was his conceit, the effort of a successful man of the professional classes to claim an aristocratic heritage. His eldest son, also George Corderoy, a Treasury Solicitor (legal expert working for the government), known to me as Uncle George, told me he did some research which punctured the aristocratic 'heart of the king' myth; he thought the name might derive from Rue de la Corderie, or street of the rope works. This pleased him - I think he had some buried resentments at his father, who was a real Victorian autocrat. So I am surprised to see the Coeur du Roi origin mentioned in this thread. I would be very glad to be put in contact with any other Corderoys interested in the family history or to see a family tree.
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