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hokes in York, PA

hokes in York, PA

Posted: 28 Dec 2000 5:01PM GMT
Edited: 2 Aug 2001 10:47PM GMT
I am looking for information on Hokes from York Pa. The only information I have is a John Rouss had a spouse with the last name of Hoke. I know of one son, Peter Hoke Rouss. Any information would be helpful.

Peter Hoke Rouss

Posted: 30 Dec 2000 6:00PM GMT
Edited: 4 Jul 2001 11:30AM GMT
Son of Dr. John Rouss (Rouse) a Dr. John Ross is a physician of the hospital connected to the poor house, York Co. Pa c1800.

Married Catherine Hoke Bp. 25 Jan 1767 By Rev. Jacob Lischy, died before 14 Feb, 1809.

Catherine Hoke daughter of Peter Hoke, (1739-1804) and Maria Dorothea Smyster
Son of Johann Jacob Hoke Arrived in this country (US) in 1728, died 1176 in York County.

Have more of the family, if needed.

Clyde

Hoke, York. Pa

Nancy (View posts)
Posted: 5 Jan 2001 5:24AM GMT
Greetings Clyde:

Searching for descendents of Samuel B. Hoke and Barbara Hershey. Samuel is listed on page 385 of Jean Berlecamps book. Have you any data on his sons? Or any idea where I might search for same?

Thanks from Nancy in Ohio wolfsea9@clover.net

Than

Peter Hoke Rouss

Posted: 5 Jan 2001 3:59PM GMT
Edited: 2 Aug 2001 10:47PM GMT
Thanks for the information. Peter Hoke Rouss is my husbands great, great, great, great grandfather. Do you happen to know who John Rouss's parents were? Did Peter Hoke have any siblings?

Peter Hoke Rouss

Posted: 5 Jan 2001 6:43PM GMT
Edited: 4 Jul 2001 11:30AM GMT
Source: Jane Helwig jane@seasonedsystems.com
Searching for information about Peter Hoke Rouss. According to Bushong's "Historic Jefferson County", Peter Hoke Rouss in 1853 moved from Runnymede in Berkeley County to a stone house called Shannon Hill in Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, at the end of Shepherdstown-Martinsville Road, across the river from Shannondale Springs. The house became the property of his grandson Peter Winchester Rouss in 1923. Any information about Peter Hoke Rouss or Shannon Hill would be much appreciated.

The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.
Chicago and New York, Volume II,
Pg. 400

ALEXANDER HAMILTON STEVENS ROUSS, M. D. One of the prominent members of the medical profession in Jefferson County, Doctor Rouss was a medical officer during the war, seeing his chief service on army transports.

His family is one of the old and substantial ones in the Valley of Virginia, and their patriotism in time of war has been matched by the qualities that distinguish good citizenship in times of peace.

Doctor Rouss was born on a farm in Kable Town District of Jefferson County, son of Capt. Milton Rouss, who was born in Frederick County, Maryland, and grandson of Peter Hoke Rouss, a native of York, Pennsylvania, whose father was John Rouss and whose mother was a Hoke. Peter Hoke Rouss from Pennsylvania removed to Frederick County, Maryland, and from there came into the Valley of Virginia, living for several years in Berkeley County and spending the remainder of his life in Kable Town District of Jefferson County. He married Belinda
Baltzell, of Maryland, and both of them attained a good old age.

Capt. Milton Rouss was four years old when his parents came to Virginia and nine years of age when they settled in Jefferson County. He was pursuing his studies in the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington when the war broke out between the states, and at once he returned home and assisted in raising a company for the Confederate Army. It was designated as Company B, and attached to the Twelfth Regiment of Virginia Cavalry. He was commissioned first lieutenant and later, upon the death of his captain, was promoted to captain. He and the company did some valiant service in the early campaigns of the war, and at the
battle of Brandy Station he was captured and was sent as a prisoner to Johnson's Island in Lake Erie and was held there until paroled at the close of the war.

After the war he was in the general merchandise business at Lockport, New York, some four or five years, and then returned to Jefferson County and soon settled on the farm in Kable Town District. This farm was his wife's inheritance, and it provided him the work of his years for nearly half a century, and he still lives there. Captain Rouss married Mary Osburn, a native of Virginia and daughter of Logan and Margaret Osburn. Captain Rouss and wife reared four sons, Doctor Rouss being the youngest and the only one to take up a professional career.
Milton C. is a farmer and orchardist, and was elected in 1916 to represent Jefferson County in the State Legislature. George W. and Frank Hoke are also farmers and orchardists.

Doctor Rouss had rural school advantages when a boy and subsequently entered Washington and Lee University at Lexington, Virginia. He completed his literary education there and then entered the University of Pennsylvania for his medical course, graduating M. D. in 1906. Doctor Rouss first practiced in Frederick County, Virginia, but after six years returned to Jefferson County, and has both a town and country practice, maintaining an office in Charles Town, and he and
his family live at the county seat during the winter months. The rest of the year they have their home in the Kable Town District.

In 1907 Doctor Rouss married Annie Stouch, who was born in York, Pennsylvania, daughter of George and Lulu Stouch. The only daughter of Doctor and Mrs. Rouss is Mary Osburn. The family are members of Zion Episcopal Church in St. Andrews Parish, and he is affiliated with the Jefferson County and West Virginia State Medical Associations.

Doctor Rouss was one of the first medical men in this vicinity to offer his services to the Government at the beginning of the war with Germany. He was commissioned for duty in the Medical Corps in 1917, and for a time was assigned to the Base Hospital at Newport News, Virginia, with the rank of lieutenant.

Three months later he was transferred to the transport service as ship's surgeon, and before the war was over he had made four round trips on transports overseas. He was in this service until May, 1919, when he was given his honorable discharge, and since then he has been devoted to the rounds of his professional duties in his
old home community.


Colonial Families of the United States of America: Volume 2

DAVID LEE of “Rockland Farm,” Harford Co., Md., b. 27th Oct. 1873; m. 18th Oct. 1896, Virginia Duane ROUSS of New York City, dau. of Charles Baltzell ROUSS, who m. Aug. 1858, Margaret KEENAN, of Winchester, Va., dau. of William and Rhoda KEENAN, who emigrated from Ireland and settled near Winchester, Va. Chatles Baltzell ROUSS was the son of Peter Hoke ROUSS of Winchester, Va., by his wife, Belinda BALTZELL of Woodsboro, Frederick Co., Md.

*******************************************************************************
Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume III
VII--Prominent Persons
Peter Hoke Rouss born in Frederick county, Maryland, February 11, 1836, son of Peter Hoke and Belinda (Baltzell) Rouss, and a descendant of Austrian ancestry, various members being prominent in the public affairs of the Empire, notable among whom was George Rouss, a member of the common council of Kronstadt, in 1500. Peter Hoke Rouss in 1841 removed from Maryland to Berkeley county, Virginia, where he purchased in the Shenandoah Valley, twelve miles from Winchester, an estate to which he gave the name of Runnymede. Charles B. Rouss supplemented his public school education by attendance at the Winchester Academy, where he was a student from the age of ten until fifteen, when he took a position as clerk in a store. Three years later he engaged in business on his own account, having accumulated sufficient capital from his earnings, and after another three years was proprietor of the most extensive store in that section of the county. Upon his return from the war between the states, in which he served as a private in the Twelfth Virginia Regiment, he engaged in a mercantile business in New York City, but failed, the result of the then general credit system. Later he opened another establishment, but upon the basis of a strictly cash system. This proved a successful undertaking, and in due course of time he erected a building which cost a million dollars. on Broadway, New York City, and there continued until his death, March 3, 1902. Although a resident of New York City for many years, he was loyal to the South Land, passing his vacations at Winchester, Virginia, and was each year an honored participant in the Agricultural Fair, on "Rouss Day," so named in his honor for his generous benefactions to that and other local institutions. He also contributed generously to other worthy objects, namely, the sum of $30,000 for the establishment of the city water works, $10,000 for the improvement and adornment of the grounds of the Mount Hebron Cemetery Association, the magnificent Rouss Physical Laboratory which he provided for the University of Virginia, and the splendid Confederate Memorial Hall at Richmond, Virginia, with its priceless collection of records and relics illustrating the period of the war between the states. He also erected at Mount Hope Cemetery, near New York City, a monument to the dead of the Confederate Veteran Camp of New York City, and he also presented to New York City a masterly replica of Bartholdi's statutes of Washington and Lafayette, the originals of which are in a park in Paris, France. Mr. Rouss married, in 1859, Maggie, daughter of James Keenan, of Winchester, Virginia.

West Virginia History, Vol. 3
The Rouss family of West Virginia, which is represented in Jefferson county near Charles Town in that state by William Washington Rouss, has been closely identified with the history of the state. The Shannon Hill farm on the Shenandoah river, the present home of William W. Rouss, was a portion of the land granted by Charles the Second to Lord Culpepper, a man who stood high in the favor of his sovereign. One Miss Culpepper married into the Fairfax family and by descent the place came down to Ferdinand Fairfax, who owned it until 1825, when it was sold to Washington Hammond. Mr. Rouss still holds the Charles Town paper in which the place, then named Shannon Hill, was offered for sale by Ferdinand Fairfax. It is said that George Washington, when a young man, surveyed all the land in this part of the state, including the present site of Charles Town, which was so named for Charles Washington. In the year 1840 the present Shannon Hill mansion was built by Mr. Hammond, and the large size and splendid material and construction so reduced his finances, to finish, that he was only able to hold it two or three years, when he sold it to Major George Washington Park Custis Lee Peters, a very cultured and aristocratic man. Mr. Peters lived there about eleven years, during which time it was the scene of great hospitality and many famous men visited there, General R. E. Lee and his family among them, also Eleanor Custis, the step-daughter of George Washington; also President Filmore, who was at that time visiting the Shannon Dale Springs just across the river from Shannon Hill, then famous for its fine water and fishing. Then in 1853 Major Peters sold the Shannon Hill mansion and farm, then containing over six hundred acres, to Mr. Peter Hoke Rouss, who lived there until his death in 1887. The property was then divided into four parts, one to each of the three sons and the fourth part to the heirs of a deceased daughter. The portion which fell to the share of William W. Rouss is the one upon which the old mansion stands.
William W. Rouss, son of Peter Hoke Rouss, was born at Runymeade, Berkeley county, Virginia, June 20, 1846, and in 1853 moved with his father's family to Shannon Hill, where he attended the county schools. In 1866, having finished his education at Catonsville, Maryland, he then went to New York City, where he began the mercantile business, with which he was successfully identified until 1885, when he retired from business and returned to the old home on the Shenandoah, where his parents still lived, their deaths occurring in 1887. From that time until the present, Mr. Rouss has resided there, occupying his time in improving and embellishing the place, until now it is considered the finest as well as the most beautifully situated residence in the county. From its front portico a fine view is obtained of the Shenandoah river and the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia. In 1906 Mr. Rouss obtained the services of the celebrated Japanese artist, T. Aoki, from California, who decorated the interior of his residence, a distinction of beauty found nowhere else in the state. This artist painted for Queen Victoria and had two medals from that most distinguished lady.

Clyde Brinley
Genealogy Research



Peter Hoke Rouss

Posted: 8 Jan 2001 7:00PM GMT
Edited: 2 Aug 2001 10:47PM GMT
Thanks for the information. I have a good bit of informaton on Peter Hoke and his decendents. I am trying to tie him in with the Hokes. I went to the historical society in York, PA this past weekend and checked the Hoke book that stated his mother was Catherine Hoke. According to one of the women that worked at the Historical society, the Catherine Hoke the book was referencing was her relative and she was not married to John Rouse. She married a man named Michael Eichelberger. They had index cards placed in the book to correct the error. This really through me off, since it made sense. However, I ran across a letter Julia Roush Omelia wrote in 1928. It gave a lot of clues and information on the Rouse/Rouss/Roush surnames and it mentioned quite frequently, Peter Hoke and his father, Dr. John. The letter advised, John Rouss was originally married to Barbara King, he then remarried Mary Schreiber. I could not put the connection together, they had a son together and his name was Peter Hoke and it made more sense that his mother was a Hoke, not a Shreiber. My husband and I also went to the Prospect Cemetary and found the stones of some of the Rouses. We found Dr. John and his wife, the stone was rather worn, but it appeared to ready Anna Mary H. Rouss. Tonight, while searching in the familysearch website, I found a record for Anna Marie Hoke. Her parents were also John Peter Hoke and Maria Dorothea Smyser. Just like Catherines. Anna Marie Hoke was married to Andrew Shrieber. Now this is not concrete, but it ties the hokes and shreibers together. Do you have any information on Anna Marie. I am trying to determine if it is possible Andrew Shreiber died and she remarried Dr. John Rouss. It is the only possibility that makes sense at this time. Any help will be appreciated. What information would you like to have on Peter Hoke, I have a good bit, but am still filling in some holes. I have both Peter Hoke Rouss and his wife's Belinda Baltzells obituaries and other various information I have been gathering.

Re: hokes in York, PA

Posted: 28 Jun 2001 6:17PM GMT
My name is Vincent Hoke and I live in Fresno, Ca. I believe my grandfather Frank Hoke came from York County, Pa. He was born in 1902 and I think he had eleven brothers and one sister. He used to tell me that there were twelve boys and each one had a sister. Sounded like there were twenty-four kids. He came to California with two of his brothers (Ben and Jessie). I am not clear on the information about this move except they bought a Model T by matchlight from an old man in Pa. and drove the car to California. My Email is vrh02@csufresno.edu.
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