Search for content in message boards

Murawska family in Lombrow, Biatystok

Murawska family in Lombrow, Biatystok

Posted: 26 Mar 2011 5:32AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 28 Mar 2011 1:24AM GMT
Surnames: Murawska, Turowska, Hisminska, Wisminska, Brymezak
Anne Murawska, from Lombrow, Biatystok,other families are Jasia(Janina)Turowska, from poczta Dobruykow, pow. gostynin, waj Warsaw, Marianna Hisminiska/or Wisminska, Josefa Brymezak from Lomza,Fabryerna. These are translated from return addresses on letters from Poland. Not sure about the spelling of these places. I hope someone will understand Family of my grandmother Jadwiga Murawska.

Re: Lombrow, Biatystok

Posted: 28 Mar 2011 1:42AM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi,

"Biatystok" should be Białystok (not a T but an L with a slash through it). "Poczta Dobruykow, pow. gostynin, waj Warsaw" is probably poczta (post office) Dobrzyków, powiat (county) Gostynin, woj (województwo = voivodship/provice) Warsaw - now in woj. mazowieckie (Mazowsze voivodship), pow. gostynin. I'm wondering if "Lombrow" is actually Zambrów, currently in woj. podlaskie. "Fabryerna" is probably Fabryczna.

-MJ

Re: Lombrow, Biatystok

Posted: 29 Mar 2011 3:14AM GMT
Classification: Query
So my grandparents are said to be from Russia. But aren't these places in Poland? Polish name Steckowski/Murawska, polish language. Lived around the Warsaw area. Very confused by this. Thanks for the clarification on the addresses. I wrote as I saw what was written.

Re: Russia/Poland

Posted: 29 Mar 2011 9:05PM GMT
Classification: Query
From 1795 to 1921, Poland did not exist as a country. The Polish lands were divided (partitioned) between the Austrian, Russian, and Prussian Empires. Therefore, during that timeframe, Poles from Russian-occupied Poland were considered from Russia and not Poland. Which is why you'll see references to Russia on passenger manifests and other records instead of Poland.

You can find more about the history of Poland here:

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~polwgw/ausgeruss.html

-MJ

Re: Russia/Poland

Posted: 31 Mar 2011 3:29AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 31 Mar 2011 1:51PM GMT
Thank you so much for clarifying this! My Mom thought they were from Poland until she saw on her birth certificate stating they were from Russia and as well as other documents I have found.:)

Re: Russia/Poland

Posted: 25 May 2011 8:24PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 7 Jun 2011 2:38PM GMT
Surnames: Murawska, Krajczynski
I too , thank you for this explanation. Can I ask a question ? On some of the records that I have seen there are birth places listed that I am not familiar with at all. One is Josephine Mary Murawska(i) born Wopielsk ,Poland.around 1879
Her husband is Michael Krajczynski born Szczy61, Poland. 20 Sept 1870 They came to the U.S.A about 1910 ..Searching for connection

Re: Russia/Poland

Posted: 7 Jun 2011 3:05PM GMT
Classification: Query
skirussell3:

Checking an online geographical atlas of Polish place names published in the late 1800s, I didn't see an entry for a Wopielsk or anything that began with Wopiel-. Where did you get the spelling from? There are lots of places (past and present) that begin with Szczy- but I can't tell you more than that without a complete spelling. :-)

Have you found passenger records, naturalization records, WW1 draft registration (for Michael), or other sources for their birthplaces? In which partition of Poland were they born?

As a side note, the given names you have are not Polish. Josephine Mary was probably born Jozefa/Jozefina Marya/Maryanna and Michael would be Michał. Re: Murawska(i) - Josephine's surname would be Murawska and her father would use Murawski because he's male. -ski for men and -ska for women.

-MJ

Re: Russia/Poland

Posted: 7 Jun 2011 10:07PM GMT
Classification: Query
Thank you for getting back to me. The information I found for this couple is from their death certificates. On Josephines birth place , Wopielsk , Maybe it could be spelled Wapielsk . The a should have a long tail on it. Is this a special sounding polish letter in their alphabet.? I have looked around on google and found a place called Wapielsk which is a village in Rypin Couty,Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, in north central Poland. It is the seat of the gmina called Gmina Wapielsk. It lies 14 kilometers northwest of Rypin and 46 kilometers east of Torun.
Does any of that make sense to you.
I do realize their names should be more of a polish version. .Have not seen any paper work yet that has anything different. Will be very happy when I get to that point.

Re: Wąpielsk

Posted: 9 Jun 2011 3:06PM GMT
Classification: Query
skirussell3:

Yes, the Polish letter ą is different that a "regular" a. It is pronounced with a nasal sound, very similar to the French word "un." To an English speaker, Wąpielsk may sound more like Wompielsk (since the ą is followed by a p, it gets more of a nasal M sound).

It looks like there has only been once place in Poland (historically and presently) named Wąpielsk. It is the one you mention, which is some distance from the Podlasie province (the topic of this board). In the late 1800s, the Roman Catholic parish that served Wąpielsk was in the village of Radziki Wielkie. Looks like the village may have been renamed Radziki Duże (or was absorbed into Radziki Duże), and it still exists today. Here's a link to a webpage about the church:

http://www.diecezjaplocka.pl/index.php?akcja=spis_wyswietlPa...

They have sacramental records from 1910 forward, so if you're interested in writing to Poland for records for your ancestors, you'd have to send to the Płock diocese for them:

http://www.diecezjaplocka.pl/

Some dioceses will accept request via email and they will inform you of their costs and how to pay them for research.

The LDS church has microfilmed records from the parish of Radziki Duże:

http://www.familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlcatalog/supermain...

It would be much less expensive to order the films from your local Family History Center and look at them yourself. Although the records are in Polish, Russian, and Latin, there are lots of translation aids available both online and in publications that can help you decipher the records yourself.

Good hunting!

-MJ

Re: Wąpielsk

Posted: 10 Jun 2011 8:59PM GMT
Classification: Query
Thank you for your response. I will try what you have suggested.
per page

Find a board about a specific topic

  • Visit our other sites:

© 1997-2014 Ancestry.com | Corporate Information | New Privacy | New Terms and Conditions