Search for content in message boards

Murphy, NC

Posted: 15 May 2004 5:01PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 24 Nov 2004 1:45AM GMT
Surnames: Coker Cheek Bates
Was Murphy, NC ever a part of Tennessee? And did any Cheek folks (Charles Woodson Cheekand wife Sarah A. Bates), (Charles was son of Sintha Coker and William Cheek) ever come up there between 1850 and 1860, and does anyone know about Cokers there during that time period, and were the Cokers Indians or related to the Indians? Is there a Bates Creek there somewhere also, or is that in a neighboring county?

Re: Murphy, NC

Posted: 16 May 2004 4:21PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 21 Jun 2006 7:24PM GMT
I can find no documentation that Murphy (NC) was ever in TN. Eastern TN was part of North Carolina until about 1790.

The only Bates Creek listed in the North Carolina Gazetteer is Bates Creek that rises in central Cherokee County between Bates and Fain Mountains and flows southwest into Hiwassee River.

Murphy is the county seat of Cherokee County, in central Cherokee at the junction of Hiwassee and Valley rivers. Site known first as Christie Fort for an Indian named Christie who lived here. Later called Huntersville for Col. A. R. S. Hunter who established a trading post here with the Cherokee Indians about 1830. Incorporated as Murphy in 1851. Named for Archibald Debow Murphey (1758-1832);, leader for internal improvements in North Carolina.

I find no Coker or Cheek families in Cherokee county in either 1850 or 1860 census index.

Re: Murphy, NC

Posted: 16 May 2004 8:27PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 24 Nov 2004 1:45AM GMT
Surnames: Coker Cheek
THANKS FOR THAT INFORMATION and for your trouble in looking at the census data also!

Re: Murphy, NC

Carolyn Ellertson (View posts)
Posted: 20 May 2004 6:08AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 5 Dec 2006 5:27AM GMT
But there is a Coker Creek in Tennessee, is there not?

Re: Murphy, NC

Posted: 20 May 2004 10:55AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 24 Nov 2004 1:45AM GMT
Surnames: Coker
Yes, there is a Coker Creek and a wonderful website to explain that a John Coker married an Indian lady and later she was called Betsy. That was wonderful information to find out. Now, my next step is trying to figure out who the descendants of this John Coker and Betsy were. I can't figure out from rootsweb, which Coker's these were.

Re: Murphy, NC

Latisha Cole (View posts)
Posted: 28 Jan 2005 6:03PM GMT
Classification: Query
I can't answer all of your questions, but I think I can help you with two. First, I don't remember all of the details from my 8th grade N.C. history, but I believe that at one point many years ago before it ever became Murphy,it was part of Tennessee. I think other parts of western N.C. were included as well Second, there is a Bates Creek in Cherokee County.

Re: Murphy, NC

Jessie Cheek (View posts)
Posted: 28 Jan 2005 10:32PM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks for the information. I heard from a cousin who grew up in Murphy also. All pieces of the puzzle are helpful!

Re: Murphy, NC

Latisha Cole (View posts)
Posted: 29 Jan 2005 3:19AM GMT
Classification: Query
You're welcome. I've been thinking about the question of whether Murphy was part of Tennessee off and on all day, and I think I remember that western NC and part of eastern TN were sort of their own territory for awhile. I also think I know who can answer this question definitively, but it will probably be awhile before I can reach him. Good luck in your search.

Re: Murphy, NC

Jessie Cheek (View posts)
Posted: 29 Jan 2005 3:40AM GMT
Classification: Query
You are correct that this was its own territory for a while. It was called The State of Franklin. The following information was sent to me via e-mail from a relative named Solomon Rich. "Part of Tennessee (before it was a state) in the 1700's was a part of NC. Several people moved from Virginia and NC and went into that area and they formed an independent government and called it the "Watauga Association", then later they called it the District of Washington. In 1777 this district was annexed to North Carolina, then NC ceded the land to the US Govt. in 1784. The settlers of that area organized the State of Franklin, which maintanied a precarious existence for the next four years. NC re-established jurisdiction over this area in in 1788 and in 1789 they again ceded it back to the newly established Federal Governement. It stayed in a state of flux until Jun 1, 1796 and at that tie it was admitted to the Federal Union as the 16th State and they called it Tennessee. The name was derived from Tannasie or Tansi, the name of the ancient capital of the Cherokee Indian tribe. The name was first used in its present form in 1761. The fact is that Tennessee was populated by people from Virginia and North Carolina because they were stimulated by glowing tales of hunters and land agents. Most of them settled along the Watauga, Nolichucky and Hoston rivers in the eastern end of the state."
There was apparently a lot of movement back and forth between North Georgia and Southern North Carolina and Tennessee in those early years. The reason I am interested in this situation is that my father-in-law always grew up thinking that his grandfather grew up in Tennessee and came to Georgia when he was young and the records seem to indicate he was born and raised in Franklin Co., GA, so this family story has been quite suspect. It just made me curious about the history of this area. Thanks for your response, and maybe the above information will help somebody else also.
per page

Find a board about a specific topic