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Barshafsky Immigrant

Barshafsky Immigrant

Posted: 24 Feb 2013 2:18AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Barshafsky
My great great grandfather Samuel Barshafsky was born in 1894 in Lutska, Ukraine. I need to find some information on him coming to America and family in Ukraine.

Re: Barshafsky Immigrant

Posted: 25 Feb 2013 2:50AM GMT
Classification: Query
name: Samuel Barshafsky
event: Draft Registration
registration date year range: 1917-1918
event place: Monmouth County no 4, New Jersey, United States
gender: Male
birth date: 15 Oct 1894
birthplace: Lutze Vilensky, , Russia
country of citizenship: Russia
nara publication title: World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards
nara publication number: M1509
film number: 1712355
digital folder number: 005218901
image number: 02994

Re: Barshafsky Immigrant

Posted: 26 Feb 2013 8:14PM GMT
Classification: Query
Not sure why I was sent this message but can maybe help
Is it Lutsk,Volyn you are interested in?
Is it the Jewish records you are searching for?
Have you searched anywhere else?

www.lutsk.ua
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In 1850 three major forts were built around Lutsk, and the town became a small fortress called Mikhailogorod. During the First World War the town was seized by Austria-Hungary on August 29, 1915. The town sustained a small amount of damage. During more than a year of Austro-Hungarian occupation Lutsk became an important military centre with the headquarters of the IV Army under Archduke Josef Ferdinand stationed there. A plague of epidemic typhus decimated the city's inhabitants.

On June 4, 1916 four Russian armies under general Aleksei Brusilov started what later became known as the Brusilov Offensive. After up to three days of heavy artillery barrage, the Battle of Lutsk began. On June 7, 1916 the Russian forces reconquered the city. After the signing of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk in 1917 the city was seized by Germany on February 7, 1918. On February 22, 1918 the town was transferred by the withdrawing German army to the forces loyal to Symon Petlura. On May 16, 1919 it was captured by Polish forces under General Aleksander Karnicki.

After World War I Lutsk was designated by the newly-reborn nation of Poland as the capital of the Volhynian Voivodeship. It was connected by railroad to Lviv (then Lwów) and Przemyśl and several factories were built both in the city and on its outskirts. The 13th Kresowy Light Artillery Regiment was stationed in the city centre. In 1938 the construction of a large modern radio transmitter began in the city (see Polish Radio Lutsk). As of January 1, 1939 Łutsk had 39,000 inhabitants (approximately 17,500 Jews and 13,500 Poles). The powiat formed around the town had 316,970 inhabitants, including 59% Ukrainians, 19.5% Poles, 14% Jews and approximately 23,000 Czechs and Germans.

In 1939 as a result of the Invasion of Poland and the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact Lutsk, along with the rest of western Volyn, was annexed by the Soviet Union. Most of the factories (including the almost-finished radio station) were dismantled and sent to Russia. Approximately 7,000 of the city's inhabitants (mostly Poles) were sent to Kazakhstan and 1,550 were arrested by the NKVD.

After the start of Operation Barbarossa the city was captured by the Wehrmacht, but not before thousands of Polish and Ukrainian prisoners were shot by the retreating NKVD. Upon Nazi occupation most of the Jewish inhabitants of the city were forced into a ghetto and then murdered at the Polanka hill near the city. During the massacres of Poles in Volhynia approximately 10,000 Poles were murdered by the Ukrainian Insurgent Army in the area.

Following the end of the war the remaining Polish inhabitants of the city were expelled, mostly to the areas sometimes referred to as the Polish Regained Territories. The city became an industrial centre in the Ukrainian SSR. The major changes in the city's demographics had the final result that by the end of the war the city was almost entirely Ukrainian.

As one of the largest cities in Western Ukraine, Lutsk became the seat of a General Consulate of Poland in 2003.[1]

Re: Barshafsky Immigrant

Posted: 26 Feb 2013 8:30PM GMT
Classification: Query
arhiv@lutskrada.gov.ua

Try writing to the archive office

Re: Barshafsky Immigrant

Posted: 26 Feb 2013 8:32PM GMT
Classification: Query
Lutze Vilensky, , Russia
-------------------------
Is this Lutske,Volyn in Ukraine the same place?

Re: Barshafsky Immigrant

Posted: 26 Feb 2013 10:18PM GMT
Classification: Query
Maybe it's Velikiye Luki Pskovskaya Oblast Russia. Nick.

Re: Barshafsky Immigrant

Posted: 26 Feb 2013 10:26PM GMT
Classification: Query
My mistake, it's Lutsk Volynskay Oblast Ukraine. Nick.

Re: Barshafsky Immigrant

Posted: 27 Feb 2013 12:37AM GMT
Classification: Query
I know about him. I need to find info about his family in the Ukraine

Re: Barshafsky Immigrant

Posted: 28 Feb 2013 10:34PM GMT
Classification: Query
It is important to find out the religion/nationality to
find the proper place to find information in Ukraine.
Example, Russian Orthodox, Greek Catholic,Jewish???
How is this person related to you? Are you in the USA?
Are there more Barshafsky that you know that were immigrants?
More information is needed to go forward.

Re: Barshafsky Immigrant

Posted: 28 Feb 2013 10:36PM GMT
Classification: Query
Please confirm that was Lutze Vilensky, , Russia
is Lutsk, Volyn now in Ukraine.
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