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FedDeathRecords a place with records

FedDeathRecords a place with records

Posted: 22 May 2011 10:30PM GMT
Classification: Query
This place of course wants a fee. My question will giving a known SS number get me anything that ancestry doesn't show. The DC might show something about wife. I'm not going to buy DC hopeing to find out. Also this place acts like they have marriage record. Which might be worth the fee since I can look for lots more people. Having a SS number can get you lot stuff if you want pay for it. Lots of places just really want fee and send you to someone that will charge you a excessive amount for a record. I live in MO. and before 1950 or so DC are free if listed.

Re: FedDeathRecords a place with records

Posted: 22 May 2011 10:49PM GMT
Classification: Query
It looks like they send you to other sites that have records. Also, even though they claim to have all records, some more recent records cannot be released, no matter who asks for them. You can order the social security record for someone yourself, which may tell the persons parents and wife. Ancestry does not have the actual records, just the index. You can access the index for free at http://ssdi.rootsweb.ancestry.com/
I would start with sites like http://www.usgenweb.org/ for the states you want, as they usually can tell you what vital records are available and for what price for a certain county. They may also have links to free records and obits.
To find an obit, you can see if the local library has an index. Or you can look for a volunteer at www.raogk.org
Another site I have found helpful is www.linkpendium.com

What state are you looking for records from?

Re: FedDeathRecords a place with records

Posted: 22 May 2011 11:03PM GMT
Classification: Query
You must have joined archives.com.

Re: FedDeathRecords a place with records

Posted: 23 May 2011 1:38PM GMT
Classification: Query
Well that's what I wanted to know. I know you can buy records, lots of places do that. State copy DC are to high unless you had legal need. /They may also have links to free records and obits/ normally that is what I call a lie. Free is fee spelled correct. MO. does have .sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/deathcertificates and its to 1960. Just print or save what you want. WY. is state and death is 1961, which I couldn't get at MO. either. But marriage I thought was free public records. Those wifes last name are hard to get. Then on some you had first husband and her name still is wrong. People at Ancestry will make a big mess of there family. Copy and copy , no look no look on and on. If she died 1795 she didn't have kids 1796 to 1810. Yeah he married the same first name again , oh what a mess this makes. One last thing I guess divorce isn't public record or to be find in Missouri. Anyway I got two someone's that I think is just one. Divorce record would make this true.

Re: FedDeathRecords a place with records

Posted: 23 May 2011 1:40PM GMT
Classification: Query
Only tested no pay. They failed!
They may also have links to free records and obits/ normally that is what I call a lie. Free is fee spelled correct. They are like this!

Re: FedDeathRecords a place with records

Posted: 23 May 2011 9:42PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 23 May 2011 9:43PM GMT
Divorce and marriage records ARE public records in that they are created by governmental entities. But even so, there may be restrictions on who can access them, and for which years. And few of them are online. You'd probably either have to go there; find someone locally to go there; or check with the county of record and see if there are restrictions, what the fee is, and if they will send it through the mail.

Re: FedDeathRecords a place with records

Posted: 25 May 2011 2:29AM GMT
Classification: Query
So it seems and Wyoming is
County research...
Difficulty Level - 5
Researching in Converse County WY is not an easy task. The State of Wyoming has chosen to 'protect' its vital records for a very long time. 50 is normal, that said nothing
But all is not lost! There are many resources available to researchers and hopefully I will be able to identify them for you here. And if you see I am missing something, please send me a message! *Everything* County needed has nothing online!

Birth records are on file since July 1909.
Death records are on file since July 1909.
Marriage and divorce records are on file since May 1941 which is to new anyway.
It's just circle or free fee. They could scan those page one at time and let people look. I suppose that's what ancestry does on some real old stuff. And we know they are not free. And have links poping up all over the internet. A pain
Well for divorce record I need in Missouri. I'll try the county court, we put new one in Jan 1 2011 and we know each other better than normal. The other recorder acted like they didn't have divorce records. I don't know who else would!


Re: FedDeathRecords a place with records

Posted: 28 May 2011 4:29AM GMT
Classification: Query
I didn't know such a site existed until you mentioned it! I have been doing genealogy for a long time, so have found sites over the years. Free or cheap information is always good if you can find it!

Re: FedDeathRecords a place with records

Posted: 28 May 2011 4:31AM GMT
Classification: Query
That last response was supposed to be for poster 11944, don't know why it got out of order.

Re: FedDeathRecords a place with records

Posted: 25 Sep 2011 9:25AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Divorce
Very few "regular folk" actually ever got a "legal" divorce because it was costly, and took so much work to attain. More often than not they just walked away from each other and pretended the marriage never happened (my grandmother's father seems to have had that arrangement with his first wife - married 1891, who went on to marry another man - 1902 - after pretending she was the spouse of yet ANOTHER man in the 1900 census for Michigan. She was a plucky thing. Depending on the location and time period they may also have just made a statement in the newspaper, or - and this is a good one - men sold their wives so they didn't have to care for them any more. Sometimes a man would be happy to turn his wife over to another man, and would even sell her for a paltry sum. Google "Poor Man's Divorce" for a few fun sites and descriptions. I remember reading a case where (approx 1825) a man had written in the paper about how awful his wife was, the things she had done wrong, and how he wanted to divorce her right away (basically). In an unusual turn of events the wife responded with a very public description of the man's lack of prowess, and how she was much better rid of him. Yeah, I laughed.

Don't forget to look at all records - even side records like the marriage of children written up in the paper; deaths of others in the family; wills; census. If you can't find the information one way, go in sideways.
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