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David Johannes Black Sr. -- b. 1742 in Amsterdam, Holland

David Johannes Black Sr. -- b. 1742 in Amsterdam, Holland

Charles Prendergast (View posts)
Posted: 22 Aug 2001 4:52PM GMT
Classification: Biography
Edited: 29 Nov 2009 8:47PM GMT
Surnames: Black, Pyle, Crealman, Hamilton, McCants
Here is Bio #2 of the colonial Black family. Hopefully, someone will find connections. Best regards, Charles & Pat

DAVID JOHANNES & (---) (CREALMAN) & ELIZABETH “BETTY” (PYLE) BLACK SR.

David Johannes Black Sr. was born about 1742 in Amsterdam, Holland. He was a blacksmith by trade; often referred to as "Black Dutch.”

David and his first wife surnamed Crealman were married about 1758 in Holland. Three (3) known children were born of their union: Ester Black born about 1759 in Holland, William Black born about 1762 in Ireland, died on January 18, 1841 at Fayette County, Georgia, and Sarah (Black) Hamilton-McCants born on February 28, 1765 in Ireland, died on June 29, 1858 at Taylor County, Georgia.

The Black family set sail on the vessel, Nancy from Belfast, Ireland to Charleston, South Carolina, arriving in 1771. David’s first wife died and was buried at sea during the voyage to the American Colonies. Upon arrival, the passengers, including David Black, signed a declaration condemning the ship’s Captain because of his cruel treatment towards them during the voyage.

David Sr.’s son from his first marriage, William Black enlisted in the spring of 1778 as a Private for one hundred-ten days under Captain William McCullough and Colonel Neel with the 14th Virginia Regiment. The 14th Virginia was originally organized on February 12, 1777; consisting of ten companies from Halifax, Pittsylvania, Hanover, Bedford, Albemarle, Fincastle, Dinwiddie, Prince George, Goochland, Louisa, Charlotte, and Lunenburg Counties. On May 12, 1779, the unit was redesignated as the 10th Virginia Regiment. William Black re-enlisted in the summer of 1780 under the command of Captain John Foster, fighting at the Battle of Stone Ferry. William was awarded a bounty land grant in Georgia.

William Black married Catherine (Taylor) Black about 1782 in Virginia. Ten (10) known children were born of their union: Callie Black, Charles Black, John Black, Mary Black, Lucy Black, Catherine Black, Margaret (Black) Wilson who married Daniel Wilson, William Black Jr. born in North Carolina, Samuel Wesley Black who married Elizabeth Ann (Trimble) Black and died at Fayette County, Georgia, and Rebecca (Black) Wakefield born about 1805 in North Carolina, who married William Wakefield.

William Black died and was buried on June 18, 1841 at Fayette County, Georgia. Catherine (Taylor) Black died and was buried at Fayette County, Georgia.

David Sr.’s daughter from his first marriage, Sarah (Black) Hamilton-McCants married her first husband, James Hamilton, about 1790 at Greenville, South Carolina. Three (3) known children were born of their union: Elder James Black Hamilton born on August 23, 1800 at Fairfield County, South Carolina, died on May 13, 1887 at Marshallville, Macon County, Georgia, Nancy (Hamilton) Lloyd who on February 23, 1830 married James Lloyd at Crawford County, Georgia, and Margaret Hamilton.

Sarah & James’ son, Elder James Black Hamilton married his first wife, Louisina (Wittington) Hamilton on April 16, 1824 at Crawford County, becoming the parents of three (3) children, Sarah Hamilton born about 1825, an unnamed daughter born about 1827, and George W. Hamilton born about 1830, who about 1881 married Cari (Barfield) Hamilton at Taylor County, Georgia. The Hamilton children were born at Crawford County, Georgia.

Elder Hamilton married his second wife, Martha (McGhee) Hamilton, on January 7, 1836 at Crawford County. Five (5) children were born of their union: Jeremiah Thomas Hamilton born in December 1837, who on July 15, 1856 married Barbara Lucretia “Lucy” (Peacock) Hamilton at Ft. Gaines, Clay County, Georgia becoming the parents of two (2) children, and who was killed in action on February 20, 1864 at the Battle of Olustee, Florida during the Civil War, Georgia Ann (Hamilton) Bryant-Attaway born in 1839, died after 1890 in Texas, who on January 27, 1857 married her first husband, Private John J. Bryant (who served the Confederacy and died on May 24, 1864 at the Richmond, Virginia Confederate Hospital) becoming the parents of two (2) children, and who on February 2, 1867 married her second husband, John T. Cohen Attaway at Taylor County, Georgia, James A. Hamilton born in 1845, who like his elder brother, was killed in action on February 20, 1864 at the Battle of Olustee, Florida during the Civil War, Andrew Jackson “Drew” Hamilton born on September 21, 1847, died on October 9, 1912 at Marshallville, Macon County, Georgia, who on December 14, 1881 married Anna Elizabeth (Hand) Hamilton, the daughter of Joseph & Harriett (Walters) Hand Jr., at Macon County, Georgia becoming the parents of at least one (1) known child, and Rebecca R. “Becky” (Hamilton) Jones-Stalnaker born in September 1851, died on May 7, 1894, who on June 24, 1875 married her first husband, Edmund D. Jones at Taylor County, Georgia, and who about 1886 married her second husband, Joseph Pumphead Stalnaker at Taylor County, Georgia becoming the parents of two (2) children. All of the Hamilton children were born at Talbot County, Georgia.

Elder Hamilton married his third wife, Adaline (Coursey) Hamilton, the daughter of Edmund & Sancil (Castleberry) Coursey, on November 12, 1852 at Taylor County, Georgia. Five (5) children were born of their union: Narcissa Ellen “Cissy” (Hamilton) Bailey born on December 22, 1853, died on March 8, 1937 at Bland Lake, San Augustine County, Texas, who on February 23, 1873 married William Christopher Bailey at Chattahoochee County, Georgia becoming the parents of eleven (11) children, Nancy Hamilton born in 1855, Elizabeth “Lizzie” (Hamilton) Woddail born about 1857, died on February 7, 1894 at San Augustine County, Texas, who on February 6, 1872 married Noel “Nobe” Woddail at Chattahoochee County, Georgia becoming the parents of ten (10) children, John C. Hamilton born about 1859, died on March 13, 1895 at Butler, Taylor County, Georgia, who on February 2, 1881 married Caroline M. “Callie” (Davis) Hamilton at Taylor County, Georgia becoming the parents of five (5) children, and Allie Ida (Hamilton) Stone born on February 15, 1863, died on April 17, 1943, who on February 21, 1885 married Erastus Stone at Box Springs, Taylor County, Georgia becoming the parents of five (5) children. The Hamilton children were born at Chattahoochee County, Georgia except John C. Hamilton who was born at Taylor County, Georgia.

Elder Hamilton married his fourth wife, Anna (Coursey) Hamilton, the sister of Adaline (Coursey) Hamilton, on August 28, 1864 at Taylor County, Georgia. Six (6) children were born of their union: Lucius B. Hamilton Sr. born about 1865, died on February 11, 1950 at Keysville, Burke County, Georgia, who on February 11, 1897 married Katie Lou (Deal) Hamilton at Houston County, Georgia becoming the parents of two (2) known children, Mittie Hamilton born about 1867, who died before 1887, Isabella “Belle” (Hamilton) Bryant born on March 3, 1867, died on April 20, 1946 at Perry, Houston County, Georgia, who on May 3, 1884 married Bray Bryant at Perry, Houston County, Georgia, Emma Lee (Hamilton) Harris born on November 12, 1868, died on July 30, 1938 at Perry, Houston County, Georgia, who about 1887 married George O. Harris becoming the parents of five (5) children, Adeline “Addie” (Hamilton) Gassett born on July 24, 1871, died on December 4, 1954 at Columbus, Marion County, Georgia, who on January 15, 1891 married John Harris Gassett at Taylor County, Georgia becoming the parents of three (3) children, and Edwin N. Hamilton born on February 16, 1874, died on October 9, 1910. The Hamilton children were born at Taylor County, Georgia.

Elder James Black Hamilton died and was buried on May 13, 1887 at Marshallville, Macon County, Georgia. He was interred at the Marshallville City Cemetery.

David Sr.’s daughter, Sarah (Black) Hamilton-McCants married her second husband, John Jeremiah McCants before 1806 at Tarfield, South Carolina. Four (4) children were born of their union: Alexander K. McCants born about 1806, died before May 2, 1835 at Muscogee County, Georgia, a set of twins born on July 8, 1808 - George R. McCants who died on May 24, 1850 at Talbot County, Georgia and Jeremiah Crealman McCants who died on August 10, 1866 at Taylor County, Georgia, and Andrew J. McCants born on November 2, 1811, died on October 15, 1862. All of the McCants children were born at Fairfield County, South Carolina.

Sarah & John’s son, Alexander K. McCants married Elizabeth W. (Brooks) McCants who on February 7, 1828 at Crawford County, Georgia becoming the parents of two (2) children: John A. McCants born about 1829, and George W. McCants born about 1832. Both McCants children were born at Crawford County, Georgia.

Sarah & John’s son, George R. McCants married Margaret A. (---) McCants about 1837 at Talbot County, Georgia becoming the parents of three (3) children: Private Joseph B. McCants born about 1838, who enlisted with the confederacy during the Civil War – dying on June 28, 1861 at Yorktown, Virginia, Sarah L. (McCants) Smith born on September 30, 1842, died on October 27, 1889 at Taylor County, Georgia, who on September 27, 1867 married Zachary Smith at Taylor County, Georgia becoming the parents of three (3) children, and Mary C.E. (McCants) Bateman-Jarrell born about 1844, died on June 17, 1887 at Henderson County, Texas, who on May 14, 1857 married her first husband, John Bateman becoming the parents of two (2) children, and who on January 7, 1872 married her second husband, Thomas Jarell. The McCants children were born at Talbot County, Georgia.

Sarah & John’s son, Jeremiah Crealman McCants married Tabitha (McCrary) McCants on June 7, 1832 at Talbot County, Georgia becoming the parents of twelve (12) children: John A.W. McCants born on October 25, 1833, died on September 17, 1863, who on December 7, 1852 married Martha A. (Bateman) McCants at Taylor County, Georgia, Mary Jane (McCants) Bateman born on December 15, 1835, died on February 7, 1922, who on May 7, 1856 married John Bateman at Taylor County, Georgia, Jeremiah Andrew McCants born on April 28, 1837, died on June 17, 1887 at Henderson County, Texas, who on October 1, 1867 married Martha “Nellie” Rebecca (Edwards) McCants at Butler, Talbot County, Georgia becoming the parents of nine (9) children, Sarah Ann Tabitha (McCants) McCrary born on December 15, 1838, who on December 14, 1854 married Bartlet McCrary, Nancy Saphronie (McCants) Perry born on December 15, 1838 who on May 10, 1874 married Mark Allen Perry, Margaret Adelaide “Addie” (McCants) Fuller born on April 22, 1842, died on January 14, 1929, who on May 15, 1866 married William Zachariah Fuller at Taylor County, Georgia, Jefferson George “Jeffery” McCants born on February 29, 1844, died on January 1, 1913, who on September 7, 1869 married his first wife, Virginia H. (Hayes) McCants at Taylor County, Georgia becoming the parents of one (1) known child, and who on December 17, 1872 married his second wife, Joanna Julia (Murray) McCants at Taylor County, Georgia becoming the parents of six (6) children, Honorable Jonathan Jackson “Jack” McCants born on October 5, 1845, died on March 11, 1920, who on December 23, 1869 married his cousin, Sarah Jane “Jennie” (McCants) McCants, the daughter of Andrew & Elizabeth (McCrary) McCants, becoming the parents of nine (9) children, Georgia Gallispie “Giffie” (McCants) Halley born on August 15, 1847, died on January 12, 1934 at Marion County, Georgia, who on November 5, 1868 married James Madison Halley at Taylor County, Georgia, Kinion Bartley Napoleon Franklin McCants born on December 2, 1849, died on August 3, 1893, who on October 12, 1873 married Alice E. (Gardner) McCants at Taylor County, Georgia becoming the parents of four (4) children, Martha Lenora Lee (McCants) McCants-Stewart born on October 17, 1851, died in April 1888 at Ellaville, Georgia, who on November 7, 1871 married her first husband, a cousin – Bartlet J. McCants, the son of Andrew & Elizabeth (McCrary) McCants, becoming the parents of one (1) known child, and who on December 10, 1874 married her second husband, John L. Stewart at Taylor County, Georgia, and Albertus U. McCants born on September 8, 1853, who died as a child on December 28, 1855; both at Taylor County, Georgia. The McCants children were born at Talbot County, Georgia, except Albertus U. McCants.

Sarah & John’s son, Andrew J. McCants married Elizabeth F. (McCrary) McCants on January 14, 1844 at Talbot County, Georgia becoming the parents of seven (7) children: John B. McCants born about 1845, Andrew Jeremiah Alexander McCants born on May 15, 1846, who died as a child on January 7, 1856 at Taylor County, Georgia, William George D. McCants born in April 1847, who died as an infant on May 11, 1847, Bartlet J. McCants born about 1848, died on September 10, 1872 at Taylor County, who on November 7, 1871 married his cousin, Martha Lenora Lee (McCants) McCants, the daughter of Jeremiah Crealman & Tabitha (McCrary) McCants becoming the parents of one (1) child, Henry G.R. McCants born on July 14, 1850, died on July 16, 1876, Sarah Jane “Jennie” (McCants) McCants who on December 23, 1869 married her cousin, Honorable Jonathan Jackson “Jack” McCants, the son of Jeremiah Crealman & Tabitha (McCrary) McCants becoming the parents of nine (9) children, William Gilly McCants born in March 1853, died on July 11, 1925, and John James Black McCants born in December 1844, who died on July 8, 1863 at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania of wounds received during the Battle of Gettysburg. All of the McCants children were born at Talbot County, Georgia except John James Black McCants who was born at Taylor County, Georgia

Sarah (Black) Hamilton-McCants died and was buried on June 18, 1841 at Fayette County, Georgia. Sarah was interred at the Hays Campground, Taylor County, Georgia.

David Johannes Black Sr. married his second wife, Elizabeth “Betty” (Pyle) Black in 1771 at Charleston, South Carolina. The family settled David’s land grant near Boonesborough. Elizabeth “Betty” (Pyle) Black, most likely the youngest daughter of Samuel & Sarah (Pringle) Pyle, was born on February 23, 1742. Five (5) known children were born of David & Elizabeth’s union: David Black Jr. born in 1772, Nancy (Black) Janes, John Pyle Black born about 1776, died on August 11, 1821 at Lawrence County, Arkansas, Thomas Black born about 1780, died in 1847 at Black’s Ferry, Randolph County, Arkansas, and William R. Black born in 1781 at Chatham County, North Carolina. The family is included on the 1790 Federal Census of Greenville, South Carolina; David’s parents, Hans & Agnus (---) Black and his brother, Jacob Black and his family are shown living next to David.

David Sr. & Elizabeth’s son, David Black Jr. married Thalia (Seaborn) Black, a cousin of his brother Thomas’ wife also named Thalia, about 1798 at Hopkinsville, Christian County, Kentucky. The Seabourn sic. Seaborn family used the given Thalia on a frequent basis, each successive generation carrying on the tradition. Five (5) children were born of David Jr. & Thalia’s union: William A. Black born in 1798, died in February 1852, Jarvis Seabourn Black, Sarah “Sally” (Black) Sloan born on October 31, 1802, died on November 10, 1827, Thomas W. Black born on February 2, 1809, died in 1847, and Seaborn Black. All of the Black children were born at Hopkinsville, Christian County, Kentucky.

David Jr. & Thalia’s son, William A. Black, married Elizabeth (Janes) Black in 1820 at Black’s Ferry, Randolph County, Arkansas. Elizabeth (Janes) Black was born in the Ohio territory in 1802. Six (6) known children were born of William A. & Elizabeth’s union: Captain John Pyle Black born on October 1, 1822, David Crealman Black born in 1827, Thalia Black born in 1832, 2nd Lieutenant Rufus H. Black born on December 4, 1836, died on September 5, 1908, Lt. Colonel Thomas Black born in 1837, killed in action in May 1864 at the Battle of Murphesboro during the Civil War, and William Black Sr. born in 1842. All of the Black children were born at Black’s Ferry on the Eleven Points River, Randolph County, Arkansas.

During the Revolutionary War, Elizabeth (Janes) Black’s father, John Janes served as a Private with the South Carolina Line under the command of Lt. Colonel Lythe. He was wounded at the Battle of Yorktown. John’s wife, Margaret (Arming) Janes, was also a native of Virginia. In 1800, the Janes family came down the Ohio River in canoes and settled on a Spanish land grant on the Merrimac River, near St. Louis, where they remained until 1809.

The Janes family then immigrated to Randolph County, Arkansas and settled on Janes Creek, where they became the first settlers in the section. In 1823, John created a horse-powered gristmill at Janes Creek.

John Janes died and was buried in 1826 at Janes Creek, Randolph County, Arkansas.

William A. & Elizabeth’s son, John Pyle Black, worked with his father on the farm in Randolph County, and received his education in Randolph County schools. John began managing the farm at the age of eighteen years, continuing until the age of twenty﷓two, when he went to work for a New Orleans exporting house at Powhatan, Arkansas.

Powhatan was little more than a wide place on the Black River when in 1820 John Ficklin established a ferry there. Originally named Ficklin’s Ferry, the town became an important, year-round port and shipping point for the Territory. Powhatan also became an embarkation point for steamboats on the Black, White and Mississippi Rivers.

The Black River, which flowed through the towns of Powhatan and Pocahantas, was ideal for the growth of the particular fresh water clams farmed for their pearls. The pearls were harvested and shipped to northern factories to be made into shirt buttons, jewelry, and other decorative items. Historians compare the discovery of the pearl beds to the discovery of gold in California. The “pearl rush” lasted about twenty years, dying out shortly before the Civil War; never to be revitalized.

In 1849, John Pyle Black moved to Pocahontas, Arkansas where he became a merchant for the export of fresh water pearls. John P. Black married his first wife, Mary Isabella (Waddel) Black, in 1855; his second wife, Clara (Inman) Black in 1859; his third wife, Lottie (Inman) Black in 1868, the younger sister of Clara Inman; and his fourth wife, Flora (Kebler) Black in 1873. John & Flora (Kebler) Black were the parents of six (6) children: Charley Black, Guy Black, Hattie Black, Irene Black, Lulu Black, and Blanche Black.

Captain John Pyle Black served two years with the 1st Arkansas Cavalry under the command of General Fagan during the Civil War. Following the war, John P. Black returned to his farm in 1872; remaining there a few years and then returning to Pocahantas, where he interned at the law office of Thomas Ratliff.

John Pyle Black was admitted to the Arkansas bar in 1875, practicing law for over thirty years.

William A. & Elizabeth’s son, Rufus H. Black was educated at private schools at Randolph County, Arkansas and Shelbyville, Kentucky. In 1861, Rufus enlisted as a Private with the 1st Arkansas Cavalry under the command of the Ex-Governor of Arkansas, Colonel Churchill. In 1862, he was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.

2nd Lieutenant Rufus H. Black participated in the Battle of Chickamauga, the Battle of Murphesboro and the Battle of Richmond, and numerous other skirmishes during the Civil War. He served until May 14, 1864, when he was severely wounded at the Battle of Resaca, Georgia. He lost his right arm to the shoulder joint due to a gunshot wound. After his discharge, he returned to Pocahantas, and began the study of law. Rufus was admitted to the Arkansas bar in 1866.

Rufus H. & Virginia L. (Criddle) Black were married on November 14, 1867 at Randolph County, Arkansas. Five (5) children were born of their union: Edward Black, Marvin Black, Waldo Black, Blanche Black, and Ina Black. Rufus owned and operated over 1,000 acres of land. He & Virginia were involved in a variety of community and social organizations and committees for the masked balls, dress balls and opera events held in Pocahantas.

In 1873, Rufus Black was appointed as Prosecuting Attorney for Judge George Baxter at Randolph County. He served two terms as the presiding attorney of the 2nd Judicial District of Arkansas, and in 1879 he served as the Representative for Randolph County in the Arkansas General Assembly. Rufus was a member of the firms, Mitchell & Black, and Marvin & Black & Black & Crenshaw, retiring at sixty-five years of age in 1901. He was reputed to be a strong criminal attorney.

Virginia L. (Criddle) Black died and was buried on December 26, 188. Rufus H. Black died on September 5, 1908 of complications derived from a fractured hip received when he was thrown from a mule he was riding. Both Rufus & Virginia were interred at the Masonic Cemetery, Pocahontas, Randolph County, Arkansas.

William A. & Elizabeth’s son, Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Black was killed in action on December 6, 1864 at the Battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. In November 1864, Confederate General John Bell Hood led the Army of Tennessee north toward Nashville in a desperate attempt to force Major General William T. Sherman’s army out of Georgia. Although Hood’s army suffered a terrible loss at Franklin, he decided that destruction of the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad and disruption of the Union army supply depot at Murfreesboro, Tennessee would help his cause.

On December 2, 1864, Hood sent Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest with an expedition, composed of two cavalry divisions and Major General William B. Bate’s infantry division, to Murfreesboro. The Battle of Murfreesboro went back and forth from December 4th through the 7th, until two Federal brigades under Brigadier General Robert Milroy caused some of Forrest’s troops to break and run causing disorder in the Confederate ranks; even entreaties from Forrest and Bate did not stem the rout of these units. The rest of Forrest’s command conducted an orderly retreat from the field and encamped for the night outside Murfreesboro. Forrest’s forces eventually destroyed railroad tracks, blockhouses, some homes and generally disrupted Union operations in the area, but he did not accomplish much else.

In 1835, William A. Black was elected as the first Sheriff of Randolph County. William served two terms as Sheriff until 1840 when he was elected as an Arkansas State Senator, serving two terms. He acquired a reputation as a diligent, liberal legislator; noted for his public spiritedness, hospitality, especially to new settlers, and his willingness to do all he could to promote any and all enterprises for the good of the Randolph County and the State of Arkansas.

Elizabeth (Janes) Black died and was buried in 1850 at Davidsonville, Lawrence County, Arkansas.

David Jr. & Thalia’s daughter, Sarah “Sally” (Black) Sloan married James Sloan, the brother of Fergus Sloan, on July 18, 1820 at Black’s Ferry, Randolph County, Arkansas. Two (2) known children were born of their union: Thomas Black Sloan born in 1823, died on August 13, 1882, who on September 17, 1846 married Missouri (Hudson) Sloan at Randolph County, Arkansas, and William Stephenson Sloan born in 1826, died on February 27, 1860 at Clark County, Arkansas, who on November 16, 1848 married Leonora Josephine (Browning) Sloan becoming the parents of two (2) known children. The Black children were born at Black’s Ferry, Randolph County, Arkansas.

Sarah “Sally” (Black) Sloan died and was buried on November 10, 1827 at Gwendon, Randolph County, Arkansas. Their children were raised by their father, James and his second wife, Anna Carolina (McKinney) Sloan, and later, his third wife, Annie (Tyree) Sloan

James Sloan married his second wife, Anna Carolina (McKinney) Sloan on January 22, 1829 at Clark County, Arkansas becoming the parents of four (4) children: Ashley L. (Sloan) Bass born in 1830, died in 1862, Elizabeth J. (Sloan) Bass born on May 27, 1831, died on February 16, 1882, who on March 2, 1848 married John W. Bass, Eliza Carolyn (Sloan) Ross born on October 23, 1832, died on November 24, 1866, who on February 8, 1849 married William B. Ross, and Mary Anna (Sloan) Browning born on September 13, 1834, who on October 16, 1851 married James M. Browning. The Sloan children were born at Clark County, Arkansas.

James Sloan married his third wife, Annie (Tyree) Sloan on May 9, 1838 at Clark County, Arkansas becoming the parents of four (4) children: Josiah Clay Sloan born in 1840 who on December 19, 1867 married Martha A. (Clavens) Sloan, James Sloan born on March 11, 1842, died on January 2, 1913, who in 1869 married his first wife, M. (Stewart) Sloan, and who on March 7, 1888 married his second wife M.L. (Wood) Green-Sloan, Josephine (Sloan) Ross born in 1844, who on October 14, 1865 married John Ross, and Donald Sloan born in 1846. The Sloan children were born at Clark County, Arkansas.

David Jr. & Thalia’s son, Thomas William Black married Mary (Boyler) Black before 1831 becoming the parents of one (1) known child: William Seaborn Black born in 1831, who before 1850 married his first wife, Sarah (Walker) Black. Seven (7) children were born of their union: Robert Black born in 1850, Nannie Black born in 1851, Fannie Black born in 1852, Molly Black born in 1853, James Black born in 1859, died in 1903 at Cotter, Arkansas, John Noble Black born on December 19, 1860 at Bedford County, Tennessee, died on January 14, 1934 at Flippin, Arkansas, Thomas Andrew Black born in 1864, and William Black born in 1869.

Thomas W. & Mary’s son, James Black married Sallie Ann (Coleman) Black becoming the parents of five (5) children: Lee Ora Black born in 1884, Willie Maude Black born on July 1, 1888, died on October 31, 1955 at Cotter, Arkansas, Ethan Black born in 1890, who married Jessie (Pearl) Black, Flora May (Black) Lockwood born in 1894, died at Dupo, Illinois, who married Xavier Lockwood, and Johnny Howard Black born in 1896, died in 1930 at Cotter, Arkansas.

Thomas W. & Mary’s son, John Noble Black married Mary Shelby (Talley) Black on December 19, 1886 at Union, Fulton County, Arkansas becoming the parents of six (6) known children Sarah Nancy Black born on September 24, 1888, died on January 320, 1913 at Kingdom Springs, Arkansas, Anibell Black born on October 27, 1894, died as an infant on November 1, 1894, James F. Black, born on October 9, 1895, died on December 15, 1932 at Flippen, Arkansas, who on July 5, 1927 married Cora Evelyn (Miser) Black, William Austin Black born on July 5, 1898, John Shelby Black born on January 21, 1900, Stella M. (Black) Aubuchon born on November 11, 1903, who married Homer Lawrence Aubuchon, and Thomas Henry Black born on February 22, 1906, died on September 25, 1972. The Black children were born Union, Fulton County, Arkansas.

On May 16, 1893, sixty-two-year-old William Seaborn Black married his second wife Emma J. (Talley) Black, the sister of Mary Shelby (Talley) Black.

David Black Jr. died and was buried in 1838 at Davidsonville, Lawrence County, Arkansas at sixtyï·“six years of age. Thalia (Seabourn) Black died and was buried at Davidsonville, Lawrence County, Arkansas.

David Sr. & Betty’s daughter, Nancy (Black) Janes married Joseph Janes, the brother of Elizabeth (Janes) Black and wife of Nancy’s first cousin, William A. Black, at Lawrence County, Arkansas.

David Sr. & Betty’s son, John Pyle Black married Sally (---) Black at Lawrence County, Arkansas. John P. Black died and was buried on August 11, 1821 at Lawrence County, Arkansas. At John’s death, his estate was valued at $1,279.63½.

David Sr. & Betty’s son, Thomas Black married Thalia (Seaborn) Black on February 13, 1809 at Christian County, Kentucky. Their descendants are discussed at length in Chapter 10.


David Sr. & Elizabeth’s son, William R. Black married Margaret (Armstrong) Black about 1811 at Greenville County, South Carolina becoming the parents of seven (7) children William Russel Black born in 1812 at Logan County, Kentucky, died on June 6, 1852 at Todd County, Kentucky, John Black born in 1813, Nancy (Black) McColpin born on November 1, 1820, died on March 28, 1855 at Todd County, Kentucky, James P. Black born in 1824, died about 1900 at Polk County, Missouri, Mary Elizabeth (Black) Stinnet born in 1827, Joyes Benjamin Black born in 1832, and Rachael (Black) Ragsdale born on March 26, 1833, died on November 24, 1895.

William R. & Margaret’s daughter, Nancy (Black) McColpin married Barnett McColpin on November 21, 1843 at Todd County, Tennessee becoming the parents of five (5) children: William W. McColpin, Martha H. (McColpin) Carpenter, Mary E. (McColpin) Rolston, Margaret Ann McColpin, and Josephine L. McColpin.

William R. & Margaret’s son, James P. Black married Mary (Hawkins) Black, the daughter of Benjamin & Sarah (McCord) Hawkins discussed in the previous chapter, in 1859 in Kentucky becoming the parents of seven (7) children: Mary Black born in 1860, James Black born in December 1862, Robert Walton Black born in March 1, 1866, died on October 21, 1955 at Doniphan, Ripley County, Missouri, Emma (Black) Rouse born in 1869, died in 1916, Frank Black born in 1872, died about 1930, Charles Black born in 1876, died in 1918, and Vernon Black born in 1878

William R. & Margaret’s daughter, Rachael (Black) Ragsdale married Lewis Ragsdale in April 1857 at Todd County, Kentucky becoming the parents of five (5) children: Thomas Lafayette Ragsdale born on September 16, 1859, Lieu Winchester Ragsdale born on October 16, 1862, Unity Belle Ragsdale born on August 26, 1865, Robert Walter Ragsdale born on October 13, 1872, and William Hershel Ragsdale born on October 13, 1872.

As early as 1783, the Black brothers began speculating in land in the Arkansas section of the Missouri Territory and applied for several land grants. By late 1813 the family group had acquired 4,400 acres of land.

Thomas Black’s first land grant was for 400 acres on the Dix River in Lincoln County, dated April 21, 1783; a second grant, Certificate No. 3012, dated March 29, 1799 for 200 acres on the waters of the Little River. John Pyle Black’s grant was issued on June 27, 1804 for 400 acres on the waters of the Trade Water River. William Black was issued Certificate No. 1595, dated March 7, 1805 for 200 acres on the waters of the Little River.

In 1798, the extended Black family group including Hans & Agnus (---) Black and their family, David Sr. & Betty and their family, the family of William Black, and John P. Black relocated to Hopkinsville, Christian County, Kentucky; the trailhead for the mid-continent water courses and the connection to the Mississippi River basin.

David Sr.’s first Missouri Territory grant, Certificate No. 3013 dated June 29, 1799, was for 200 acres on the waters of the Little River located on the southwest side of the Spring River above the mouth of the Eleven Points River.

On January 13, 1803, David Sr. paid $623 for a 400-acre survey of his land grant issued under Warrant No.1015. On March 11, 1813, he & Elizabeth, noted on this particular transaction as “Bette,” purchased 1,400 acres of land on the Tradewater River. Five days prior, Thomas Black had purchased 1,600 acres on the waters of the Pond River. Both purchases were from land listed on the original 1803 Kentucky Survey.

In 1815, the combined Black families sold most of their land holdings and relocated to the Arkansas Territory; settling in the northeastern foothills of the Ozark Mountains on the Eleven Points River, Lawrence County. David & Betty Black Sr. built their home at the end of an upland ridge one-mile north of Black’s Ferry, ¼ mile from the river. There they farmed and operated Black’s Ferry at a narrow point on the Eleven Points River.

On June 24, 1984 and March 5, 1985, the State of Arkansas conducted archeological surveys and excavations of the Black’s original 1815 plantation house site and surrounding upland ridge. Side-notched, corner-notched, and stemmed arrow points were present throughout the study area.

Several sites were excavated, one - most likely a filled-in well, the other - a primary kitchen midden. Numerous artifacts were discovered: local handmade bricks, transfer-painted wares, well-preserved animal bones, stoneware crocks, metal kettles, shell-edged plates, hand blown wine bottles, hand-painted pearlware cups, musket flints, square nails, glass, and some items only described as “prehistoric material.”

Lawrence County was formed on January 15, 1815 from New Madrid County, Missouri Territory. It consisted of roughly the northern half of present-day Arkansas. John Davidson founded the town of Davidsonville, approximately four miles from Black’s Ferry. Davidsonville was located at the confluence of the Black River, the Eleven Points River, and the Spring River. Additionally, the old military road, known as the Great Southwest Trail, from St. Louis, Missouri to the Mexican State of Texas ran by the town.

The town of Davidsonville was originally called Lawrence in honor of Captain James Lawrence, a naval hero; later known as Lawrence Court House, and then, after 1817, Davidsonville in honor of John Davidson. The town was laid out according to a surveyed plan centered on a town square with streets exactly 57¾ feet wide for all of the surrounding eight blocks; each block divided into six lot increments. The town planners expected Davidsonville to grow.

Stephen F. Austin, styled the Father of Texas, presided as Judge of the Lawrence County Circuit Court at Davidsonville from July 10, 1820 to September 1821, initiating the construction of a two-story brick courthouse prior to his departure for Washington D.C., and subsequently the Austin Colony in the Mexican State of Texas which was developed by Stephen and his father, Moses Austin.

David Sr., along with his brothers, sons, and a number of their neighbors transferred ownership to a wide variety of land parcels as new townships and counties were formed from Lawrence County. This was done to minimize taxes. With a good number of surveyor’s benchmarks on various trees which grew, died and fell down, rocks, and other movable land features including the course of the creeks and rivers of the area, the practice of “swapping tax districts” was common and almost impossible to verify.

Even the ferry landing on the west side of the river was included in one such transfer; sold as late as December 24, 1816 to Solomon Huett.

David Johannes Black Sr. died and was buried on November 24, 1817 at what became the Phillips-Reeves Cemetery, Davidsonville, Arkansas. Today, the area is included within the boundaries of Davidsonville State Park. The cemetery is located on the south side of the Old Davidsonville Settlement, Lawrence County, Arkansas overlooking the Black River. Only four (4) of the gravestones are legible: David J. Black, John Davidson, the founder of Davidsonville, his wife, and one other person.

On November 24, 1817, Joseph Janes, John Davidson, Thomas Crabtree, and David Sr.’s sons, John P. Black and Thomas Black provided the securities for Betty Black’s bond confirming her status as administratix of David Sr.’s estate.

Following David Sr.’s death, his children, John Pyle Black, Nancy (Black) Janes, and Thomas Black gave their interest in their father’s estate to their mother. Each heir was given a small cash settlement for his or her consideration: Thomas received $150 on July 8, 1819; John received $113 on July 8, 1819; and Nancy received $113 on November 18, 1819.

On July 28, 1820, Betty Black paid Hezikiah Adams, William Stewart, and Peyton Pin to have a road surveyed and marked from Black’s Ferry on the Eleven Points River to Overton. Betty’s son, William Black, acted as the overseer on the road construction project.

Elizabeth “Betty” (Pyle) Black died after April 1, 1823 at Lawrence County, Arkansas. She was interred at the Black Family Cemetery located near her and David’s home at Black’s Ferry, Lawrence County, Arkansas.

No additional information is available for these ancestors at this time.

Re: David Black

Posted: 2 Jun 2003 10:44PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 3 Jun 2003 1:38PM GMT
I would like to contact Charles Prendergast - the one connected to this message is no longer valid. If anyone knows his new address, please ask him to contact me at wilma.norton@attbi.com. Thanks

Re: David Black

Posted: 28 Nov 2009 9:52PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Younger, Black, Byler, Talley, Walker, Burruss
I am no longer at attbi.com. My new email address is wilma.norton@cox.net
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