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BOYT...BOYET...BOYTE...BOYETT.........

BOYT...BOYET...BOYTE...BOYETT.........

Posted: 29 Mar 2000 8:19PM GMT
Edited: 23 Jun 2001 2:02PM GMT
Have always heard that my Boyt family came from France and settled in Davidson County, Tenn. John A. Logan Boyt was my Gr.Father.
Any info on this appreciated!Thank You!
my E-Mail is: cherosis@semo.net
Posted: 4 Aug 2000 5:03PM GMT
Edited: 15 Aug 2002 12:50PM GMT
My mother's family name is BOYER. A very " frankish" name. They are located mostly in Epernay ( champagne wine country) and you still can find some of them there related also to the Parizot family.

Re: BOYT...BOYET...BOYTE...BOYETT.........

Posted: 24 Jun 2001 6:05PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Boyte, Boit, Boyet, Boyt
Sue,

My Boyte family is also said to have a French connection, with a couple differences. One, I show the name spelled BOIT, originally, and 2, my line came to MS va NC and VA.

I show the name spelled a variety of ways, of course. The 1821 Marion co, MS marriage record for Shadrack is BOYET, then the 1830 Lawrence Co census is BOYT, and so on.

What I was told, the first Boit to come over was Bruce, born in France, ca 1760. He sailed to America in 1780 and in 1797, his son, Carey came to America, looking for his father, whom he found in Charlotte, NC. I have a wife for Carey, PATSY (??) Barker, and children: George, Buryl, Thomas, Shadrack and Bob. Daughter Stella died in SC. I have info that Carey came to MS in a covered wagon, ca 1815, but have been unable to find any trace of him. Shadrack is the first one to show up, in 1821, when he married Sarah Wallace, a widow with two sons.

I doubt any of this will be familiar, but yours is the first post I've seen with a French connection, so I thought I would take the chance. I''m sure the evidence is there, but has been overlooked because there is a Thomas Boyt in Va ca 1704 and assumptions were made.

If you think there is the slightest chance of a connection, please contact me. Digmup41@aol.com

Thanks
Loretta

Re: BOYT...BOYET...BOYTE...BOYETT.........

David Boyett (View posts)
Posted: 29 Jul 2006 2:22PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Boyett
Loretta,

I have some information concerning Boyett from abt. 1500 France to England and then to America abt 1695.

Please contact me directly.

David Boyett
http://bellsouthpwp.net/B/o/Boyt-Boyett/Page.htm

Re: BOYT...BOYET...BOYTE...BOYETT.........

Tony Fuller (View posts)
Posted: 30 Jul 2006 6:31AM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi David

As the time for emigration from France to England is so early, could you post it here so we can all have a look at it?

Regards

Tony Fuller

Re: BOYT...BOYET...BOYTE...BOYETT.........

David Boyett (View posts)
Posted: 30 Jul 2006 11:29AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Boyett Boyt Boyte Boyette
Tony,

I'm researching the Boyett lines through historical records and DNA analysis. At this time the primary Boyett line is Haplogroup G2 with a migration pattern from the middle east. G2 is a rare Haplogroup that started moving out of the middle east about 10,000 years ago. Only 2% of the population are G2.

The first historical record for Boyett in America is abt. 1695 for Thomas Boyte in Nansemond Co VA. This line carries the G2 Haplogroup in America. Recent testing has matched the DNA signature with Boyett/Boyt families in the UK. The UK families have provided some limited information on early migrations from the Alsace Lorraine area to Rouen. Then Rouen to England in the 1500's.

I am currently reviewing military records, looking for church records and attempting to locate any Boyett's in those areas of France to join the DNA Surname Project.

Religion was a primary factor in migrations across France in the 1400-1500 time frame. Several of the American Boyett lines indicate Huguenot religion and could have resulted in migration to England during the mid 1500's from Rouen. (see French religion map)
http://www.pbase.com/daveb/image/40195145

At this time It is difficult to estimate the migration times out of the Alsace Lorraine area but I would place it around 1400. The G2 migration map continues to track the lines back east.
http://www.pbase.com/daveb/image/40194429

As we learn more about Haplogroup G2 we will know more about the Migrations of this Boyett line.
http://www.pbase.com/daveb/g2

For more information and pedigrees on the Boyett lines you can visit the Boyette DNA Surname Project and review the various lines and research links.

Please let me know if you locate any Boyett surnames in your research of French families.

David Boyett
Ft. Lauderdale
http://bellsouthpwp.net/B/o/Boyt-Boyett/Page.htm

Re: BOYT...BOYET...BOYTE...BOYETT.........

Tony Fuller (View posts)
Posted: 30 Jul 2006 1:02PM GMT
Classification: Query
I understand the DNA project in principle but of course it doesn't provide any firm links between the various branches of the family, just that they are descended from the same place.

The French did not really fall under the thrall of Protestantisme until the 1540s so that would preclude your guys from being in England as a result of the first Protestante Refuge and, contrary to your posting, there was little migration between Europe and England on religious grounds before the 1540s.

Additionally, your map is of a much later date when Rouen was surrounded by an area deeply supportive of the Catholic League though the area around Rouen and out towards Bolbec and the coast along the river bank certainly had a lot of Protestantes - I'm working on a database of Rouen Protestantes at the moment.

If you are looking for an Huguenot connection you should really concentrate on the Departemental records for Seine-Maritime, if you think that there is a Huguenot connection, you need to look at the records of the SHPF/Cahiers de CGP.

However, you should also be aware that in the early 16th century there was a large scale economic migration of French and Walloons into England at the behest of the English crown, many of whom were NOT Protestante (too early for them to have been) who were recruited to work in England and then were awarded denization/naturalization for their service.

Hope this helps

Tony Fuller
Huguenot Trails

Re: BOYT...BOYET...BOYTE...BOYETT.........

David Boyett (View posts)
Posted: 30 Jul 2006 3:57PM GMT
Classification: Query
Tony,

The DNA between the UK and American families matches exactly at all 25 DYS markers. This calculates to a (TMRCA) Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor of 97% for a time period less than 16 generations.

It was my understanding that the Protestant Reformation started around 1450 (Social Changes in Strasbourg 1450-1550) and spread quickly throughout the region and into France.

Various regions developed into different teachings from Ana-Baptist to Walloon and many others over time. In the Alsace region the religious movement created different migrations and even different villages of Lutheran vs Catholic during the late 1400's. Migrations to Rouen would after this time period in the 1500's as John Calvin started his teachings in Paris.

I have found a membership in the Walloon Church for the spelling Bouette (which is close to our Boyette spelling).

Please let me know if you find any close names in your database. Do you read French?

David


Re: BOYT...BOYET...BOYTE...BOYETT.........

Tony Fuller (View posts)
Posted: 30 Jul 2006 5:15PM GMT
Classification: Query
David

I do speak and read French well, written is still a bit slow but I get by - absolutely essential living and working in France, which is one of the reasons I relocated to France as most of the UK/US research sources are becoming played out or are becoming rehashed too many times and any meaningful document based research is now in France.

Your dates are rather off I'm afraid:

1517 – Luther, Professor of Scripture at Wurtemburg University published his Ninety-Five Theses of Religion by nailing them to the door of Wurtemberg Cathedral in 1517. Effectively before this time the Reformation was wholly insignificant unless you were born into one of the small dissenting sects. Therefore there could not have been any Lutheran/Catholic conflict in Alsace before 1517 as Luther was not publishing before that date, though there was some religious dissent.

Pope Clement IV then condemned the forty-eight of the ninety-five Theses as heretical, Luther is excommunicated. In typically pugnacious style, Luther burns the Papal Bull in public.

April 1521 – The Sorbonne publishes its first list of banned Protestante books after reports that the teachings of Luther were being received ‘with open arms’

1523 – First Protestante martyr

1509 – John Calvin was born a Catholic in Noyon, in Picardy, originally destined for the church but in 1528 he started studying law in Orleons and Bourges. He is believed to have concerted to Lutheranism around 1533 and was involved in the writing of a Lutheran sermon, given by his friend, Nicolas Cop, Rector of the university after which Cop fled to Switzerland and Calvin went to the south of France.

1534 – French ‘Affair of the Placards’ when Protestante broadsheets were fixed up around France, one even being pinned to the King’s bedroom door in Amboise. Calvin initially fled to Basel (March) where he published his ‘Institutions of the Christian Religion’

1536 – Calvin settled in Geneva and where he stayed until 1564, except for the period 1538-1541.

1545 – First Calvinist congregation in Meaux, France

1548 – Earliest mention of an organised French congregation in London

1551 – Edict of Châteaubriant lead to the first large scale and organised persecution of Protestantes in France and the beginning of the first Grande Refuge. Prior to then, there was some persecution in France and some refugees to England, especially when there were Reform monarchs on the throne - Henry VIII, Elizabeth I etc.

Also Walloon is not a religion. It is a place, now part of Belgium where Protestantisme was practiced. After becoming refugees to England, Walloons formed their own communities which frequently pre-dated Huguenot congregations, for example in Norwich, Colchester, Southampton, Dover and Canterbury.

Hope this helps

regards

Tony Fuller
Huguenot Trails

Re: BOYT...BOYET...BOYTE...BOYETT.........

David Boyett (View posts)
Posted: 30 Jul 2006 6:49PM GMT
Classification: Query
Tony,

This is the link to members of the Walloon Church of Norwich 1595-1752:
http://www.geocities.com/thurlowons/eagdna/Walloons.html
I also see references to other Walloon Churches.

I agree with your time time line but you failed to acknowledge prior reformers such as Jan Hus (John Huss) and John Wycliffe in the 1400's.

You would have to agree that religion has been a primary cause for migrations across and from France in the 1400's. Haplogroup G and J are small populations that migrated to France from the Middle East. Many of these populations were expelled for various religious beliefs during the 1400's and 1500's. King Charles VI expelled the Jews (Haplogroup J) in the late 1300's (for about 150 years). Then the large migrations of Protestants begin leaving France during the 1500's.

Thanks for the time line.

David



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