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The Hopkins House in Marion

The Hopkins House in Marion

Posted: 24 Sep 2012 3:08AM GMT
Classification: Query
I was reading entries about the Edgewood Plantation and the evident marvelous renovation that it has undergone.

It immediately turned me to thinking about my own ancestral home in Union Parish.

Does anybody know what is happening to the old Hopkins House in Marion?
My forebears, the Powell family, were born in this home.

My cousin, Alice F. Farrar, the granddaugher of Mary Alice Hopkins (daughter of Alice Ione Powell Hopkins) was living there and kept the place up when I first visited Marion and I stayed with her for several days.

Then she married, left and rented it out.

Three or four years ago I was there in Ruston visiting Alice and we went out to Marion and visited the tenants ago and the place wasn't being terribly well cared for.

Recently Alice passed away and now I am worried.

Please tell me anything that you folks in the Marion area are able to share.

For those who knew or knew of Ellis (E.T.) Powell, he was my great uncle.

Friendly Regards,
TED STORM

Re: The Hopkins House in Marion

Posted: 27 Nov 2012 1:50AM GMT
Classification: Query
http://files.usgwarchives.net/la/union/history/hopkins.txt

http://www.lapage.com/parishes/union.htm
Union Parish, bordered by Arkansas to the north and the scenic Ouachita River to the east, is truly a nature lover's paradise. With 15,250-acre
listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Town of Marion features the Mayhaw Festival and National Register Hopkins House. For more information, contact: Union Parish Tourist Commission, (318) 285-9333. Credit: Louisiana Office of Tourism.

Re: The Hopkins House in Marion

Posted: 25 Mar 2013 3:34AM GMT
Classification: Query
I live in Farmerville currently but I grew up in Marion. I absolutely love the Hopkins house and I always drive up the driveway when I pass through! It is not in excellent condition but it is still standing and strong. The current owners have installed a metal roof but that appears to be the extent of any current renovations. The grounds are getting a bit shaggy, too. The brickwork and masonry are all still present. It is just a remarkably sturdy structure. My grandmother and I just recently went to Concord cemetery and visited the graves of Rev. Elias George and his family. Rev. George was the original owner and the fellow who purchased the master carpenter slave for $3000 dollars to build the home. Quite a sum for the purchase of a slave in those days. Reverend George was said to have been a kind and jovial man, good to his slaves, seeing to all their needs and having them attend nightly prayer meetings. Let me know if you would like pictures of the home. I recently snapped a few because I love the architecture and I am building a new home (not nearly a grand, though!)

Re: The Hopkins House in Marion

Posted: 4 Jul 2013 10:12PM GMT
Classification: Query
Any idea of what that slave's name was?

Re: The Hopkins House in Marion

Posted: 4 Jul 2013 10:55PM GMT
Classification: Query
I am sorry to say that I have never been told the name of the slave who built that beautiful home.

The Hopkins House in Marion

Posted: 4 Jul 2013 11:25PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Powell, Traylor, Bruton, Bradford, Thompson, Hopkins and others.
Dear Erin... Happy Fourth of July!
Thank you so much for your entries on the Hopkins House.
I was aware that Elias George had originally built the house. Family lore has it that Elias' wife died just after the house was completed and he could not bear to live in the place. He sold the home and the land to my gggrandfather, Lewis Moore Powell where it remained in the family for generations. I have not consulted the land deed to the property to see if Elias' wife's passing coincided with the construction/early moving in.
Another excuse for a visit to Farmerville and Marion. It delights me that the Hopkins House was purchased by somebody who really cares about its history. It will probably cost more to refurbish the house than it is actually worth so I admire the labor of love that the owners are investing in it. To think that the house is now out of the family is a bit depressing. I loved staying there and sleeping in the bed that Lewis M. Powell died in!
Erin, are you connected to the George family line? The Powell's fit in there somewhere with Elizabeth Ann George.

Re: The Hopkins House in Marion

Posted: 4 Jul 2013 11:39PM GMT
Classification: Query
Happy 4th of July to you also. I have no actual family connection to the George's but I grew up in Marion and a good friend of mine lived in the home when we were children. I am interested in all thing history when it comes to Union Parish and I love old houses! I lucky enough to get a good view of the inside of the Thompson house (built in 1900? I think) when it was being renovated. I did read an interesting account by one of George's daughters that he indeed lost his first wife (her mother) when they first arrived in Marion, La. He traveled back to Alabama and married a widow and then brought her & her family back to Marion with him. I think he outlived her also. That may be when he sold the house. He is buried in the Concord Cemetery in Marion. I have visited his grave, it is in the oldest part of the cemetery. There are several family members buried there, including a seven year old son who died after falling from a horse. They are buried in brick vaults which are above the ground and in fairly good condition considering the age of the graves. I have been told that Rev. George was a very kind man who loved his family and treated his slaves like family. I have been told that he held nightly prayer services in his home and the slaves were also in attendance. According to the stories, his first wife contracted probable typhoid while caring for slaves who were sick and she herself also died. I have heard nothing negative ever regarding the family. They all seemed like very happy people!

Erin

Re: The Hopkins House in Marion

Posted: 11 Jul 2013 7:36PM GMT
Classification: Query
For anyone in the future who may want to know, his name was John Thomas.

Re: The Hopkins House in Marion

Posted: 7 Nov 2013 1:09AM GMT
Classification: Query
I grew up in Baton Rouge, but I spent many holidays and summer weeks visiting my grandparents' home a few houses down Powell Street from the Hopkins House.

My mother, Ernestine Gulley Durrett, grew up there. My grandparents, Ernest John Gulley and Fannie Carmichael Gulley, were great friends with Miss Mary and her companion Miss Deedie. Miss Mary and Miss Deedie walked down almost daily on summer afternoons to eat watermelon.

I also remember a Miss Thelma Powell, who visited Miss Mary regularly. At the time (late 50's early 60's), she was teaching school in Arkansas -- perhaps Eldorado -- after having retired from the Louisiana school system. I never heard if she was connected the the original Powells of Hopkins House.

I also have memories of exploring Hopkins House and the grounds with my brothers when we were kids. Great stories from Miss Mary about Civil War battles, and stories about bullet holes still visible -- we never really visually confirmed that.

My mother said that some owner of Hopkins House at some point donated the the land for the Marion United Methodist Church (where my parents were married) on Taylor Street. The church property is adjacent to the west side of the Hopkins property. I remember that Miss Mary and Miss Deedie would walk to the church along a path from the big house.

I hope I've added some color to your memories of Miss Mary's house, and I'd love some feedback.

Re: The Hopkins House in Marion

Posted: 25 Dec 2013 4:26AM GMT
Classification: Query
The original owner of Hopkins House, Rev. Elias George, is my GGG Grandfather. He began construction of the home in 1850 as a way to get his school-aged children closer to "town" so they could attend school, and also as a gift to my GGG Grandmother Ann. While the home was being constructed by John Thomas, an epidemic of Typhoid swept through the servant population. My Grandparents were devastated by the loss of several of their slaves, whom they considered family. Grandmother George was personally nursing and caring for the sick, and one of the servants, named Julia, reportedly put her arms around Grandmother's neck and said, "Miss Ann, join me in heaven" and passed away. Later that night Grandmother wasn't feeling well, and by early the next day, she had joined dear Julia in heaven. Grandpa Elias was beside himself with grief and halted construction of the home. It was not finished until mid-1851.
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