Search for content in message boards

Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Posted: 17 Apr 2006 4:38AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Everitt, Everett, Smith
Once again, for the umpteenth time, I am going over the information collected over the years on the Everitt family (today I found a photo on a web-site of their mill in NJ which is why I am back on them now). No matter how often I look at this "stuff" and especially the Everitt Family Book Committee information, two questions still persist: who came up with the idea that Richard had two wives - where does it say his "first wife" Mary died - and that she "probably' had a son Daniel.... If as reported in this book, Richard had a second wife, s/o Rev. Nehemiah Smith, why hasn't her name ever been found - his other daughters are found and named with spouses and - they are way too young to have married anyone to have a son Nicholas in 1652..... age 10 for motherhood? I found the book referred to on genealogy.com, "Desc. of Rev. Nehemiah Smith" by H. Allen Smith and have looked at it twice this evening - still the same information - nothing to link any of them up to Richard Everitt/Everett. So where did it all begin - how - why - these questions have been bugging me for years and I do not see any answers - what have I overlooked all this time/what am I still not seeing??? The other source used by the book committee is "Everitt Family Records" at Jamaica Library who "had mother of Nicholas and John Everitt as daughter of Nehemiah Smith " - hadn't anyone on the book committe or whoever made up those family records really thought about this before stating this to be so and leading us all down that primrose path? Has anyone seen those family records in Jamaica Library? To me it just does not fit at all - can someone come up with a documented response so I can just put this big fat Everett notebook of mine back on the shelf and let it collect dust?

Re: Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Posted: 28 Dec 2008 7:57PM GMT
Classification: Query
I understand your frustration!
I grew up with most of my father's family (Everitt's originally from Everittstown, NJ) fully versed in a family history story which I not only have trouble proving but I also face alot of people who are firmly convinced that all Americans who spell their names Everitt should be spelling it Everett.
As my grandmother would say "Sorry, that is another family!"

According to our family history a group of Everitts all left Suffolk, England near the town of Groton at the same time in about 1700 or just before. They went to Hunterdon County, New Jersey, probably by way of the area of the present New York City, and helped to form the town of Everittstown, NJ. They firmly spelled the name with an "I" not an "E". According to the family story, there were a number of groups of Everitts that came at various times in the very late 1600's through the early 1700's

Someone back in the early 1960's (I don't know who) told an older member of the family that they could confirm that because they had seen a plaque in the town of Groton, Suffolk that confirmed that Everitts (and perhaps others) had left for the colonies in 1700. Try as I might I have never been able confirm that there is such a plaque. CAN ANYONE OUT THERE IN GROTON, SUFFOLK, ENGLAND HELP ME!!

At the same time there was a man named Nicolas Everitt who settled in Jamaica, Long Island (in the NYC area). In his WILL he bequethed property that he owned in HUNTERDON, COUNTY NJ (That is where Everittstown is.)to his sons who were then living on that land in NJ.

NOW MUCH EARLIER IN THE 1600'S, A YOUNG TEENAGER BY THE NAME OF RICHARD EVERARD(?) WAS BROUGHT TO THE MASSACHUSETTS BAY COLONY BY A WEALTHY MAN NAMED PYNCHENDON AS AN ASSISTANT/AID. EARLY ON HE SIGNED HIS NAME ON AN AGGREEMENT WITH INDIANS BY "MAKING HIS MARK". HE SIGNED WITH AN "x". LATER, HE ADOPTED THE SPELLING EVERETT. HE IS THE DIRECT ANCESTOR TO MANY ILLUSTIOUS ACCOMPLISHED PEOPLE. IT IS NOT SURPRISING THAT OVER THE YEARS MANY AMERICAN "EVERITTS" HAVE ADOPTED THE EVERETT SPELLING.

May I note that I have never found one of the Everittstown "Everitts" sign their own name with an "x", nor have I found them spelling their names as "Everett", or "Everard". Granted officials have made spelling mistakes but the family seldom did.

NOW IN THE 1700'S BEFORE THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR THERE WERE 3 OF RICHARD EVERETT'S (Dedham, MA) SONS (OR WERE THEY GRANDSONS?) NAMED MOSES, JOHN, JAMES (OR JACOB) WHO HELPED TO BUILD OR MAINTAIN FORT EVERETT WHICH WAS ERECTED NEAR LYNNPORT, PA. IT WAS A BLOCKHOUSE 25 ft.x 30ft BUILT ON THE PROPERTY OD JOHN EVERETT, OF THE FAMILY OF RICHARD EVERETT OF DEDHAM. (See "Frontier Forts of PA" in the Newbery Library, Chicago, Illinois.) Now with modern roads and an auto, Lynn Township, Lehigh County, PA is not that far from Everittstown. But in 1700 to 1800 those 2 locations were a considerable distance away from each other.

Now I know that I am answering a query that was written almost 2 years ago. But I am hoping that both the original author and I will find others with more answers.

I do not doubt the the DNA research will find that many of the EVERETTS and EVERITTS were one and the same family in the year 1066 but then we all were the same family at one point.

Re: Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Posted: 28 Dec 2008 8:29PM GMT
Classification: Query
I just sent you a long message but I neglected to ask how do you fit into the family tree?
Sincerely,
Sandy

Re: Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Posted: 28 Dec 2008 10:13PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Everitt, Palmer, Johnson
I read your long message earlier today and it appears we have covered the same territory. My line is: Richard that I queried about having two wives; Nicholas who md. Elizabeth ---; Samuel who md. ??; Abel who md. Sarah Palmer; Sarah who md. Christopher Johnson. My co-researchers and I long ago spent a great dealof time, back in snail mail days, trying to find answers that still have not been foun. When I placed my query two years ago, it was my last shot at trying to find information that I had hoped had been found since that time, years ago. It appears some things will never be known or known for sure.

Re: Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Posted: 30 Dec 2009 9:50PM GMT
Classification: Query
Here's more headache for us. I find Nehemiah Smith born New Castle in 1605 died New London Connecticut in 1686. Hewas married to Sarah Ann Bourne. There first daughter Elizabeth Smith was married to Richard Evritt(prob misspell, s/b Everitt)born Essex England 1623 died Jamaica, New York 1688.
Richard had a brother named John. However this information is coming to me through Ancestry.com and some stories and records found on USGENwebProject. I have looked for them again today and have not been able to find them.

Re: Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Posted: 31 Dec 2009 10:45PM GMT
Classification: Query
My first contribution to this discussion was on Dec. 28, 2008. Since then My only EVERITT male cousin William James Everitt III has had his DNA tested (and retested to a higher level). To our delight we have found that we are definitely descended from Nicholas Everitt and his wife Elizabeth Clare Everitt of Jamaica, Long Island, NY.
I believe that there is evidence that his father was named Richard Everitt (or Everit). I don't think that we can say with certainty that Richard came from the Dedham EVERETTs.
I would appear from the DNA results for the people who are directly related to Nicholas and Elizabeth that they are related to each other but just a little less closely related to other American Everitts/Everetts. The Jamaica Richard Everitt may well have been a cousin or even second cousin to those in MA...but not necessarily a father/son relationship.

This fall, I spoke with a lady who is part of the group who have been cleaning up the cemetery in Jamaica where the Everitt/Everit/Everet family are buried. I doubt that they will do much in the winter. However, I hope that they are able to find more information about Richard Everitt/Everett next spring. Who knows there may be 2 Richard Everitts there.

Re: Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Posted: 2 Jan 2010 2:23AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks. I ran across en excert from a book that list original settlers of the Hampstead N.Y. area. It list 3 Everitt brothers, Richard, John and Benjamin. Benjamin was envolved the settlement and held verious offices and is belived to be the father of all the Everitts of Long Beach N.y. helping to found and settle Jamaca, Queens N.Y.
John moved on to penns. Richard came back to the Duchess county area. I may have incorrect information but I have Nicholas as one of Richards sons. My fathers decend from Richards son Richard.
The Richard I am refering to was born aroung 1623 in Essex England. But I show his wife is Elizabeth Smith. His son, Richard, was born 1665 in Hampstead, Queens N.Y. 1665. His wife Elizabeth Clare. His son Richard born in Hampstead in 1695. His wife's name was Mary and I got that only because it was mentioned when anouncing the wedding of their son Clear, born in Poughkeepsie N.Y. 1717. Clear built the house where the governor of New York had his offices.
This is the line I have found so far. I am still studying and hope to find documents other than stories to support. However, documentation at that time of our nations history is difficult to find.

Re: Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Posted: 2 Jan 2010 8:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hello William!
You referred to Long Beach. I think that you may mean Long Island. Also Jamaca is Jamaica just like the name of the country. --- Yes, it is my understanding that Nicholas's father's name was Richard Everitt. Some of Nicholas's children stayed on Long Island. Nicholas was born about 1652. He died Sept. 30, 1723 and was buried in the Prospect Cemetery, Jamaica, NY. It is very overgrown.(It needs a great deal of work.)
For a completely different project I am researching Ireland 1600s and 1700s and I am finding Everitts but no Everetts.
Curious!!!
Anyhow I will share some of my work below:
I am going to try to "paste" my research on Nicholas in here I hope that it is not to large.

Everit/Everitt of Jamaica
• Name: Nicholas EVERITT --- Town records spelled his surname consistently as EVERIT. But when he wrote his will, he wrote his own name as EVERITT!
• Birth: ABT 1652
• Death: 30 SEP 1723 in Jamaica, Queens, L.I.N.Y.
• Burial: 2 OCT 1723 Prospect Cem.Jamaica,NY
Richard Everit was a Long Island patentee and Magistrate. He first appears on Long Island in 1656 as an original settler of a town called by the Dutch as Rustdorp and by the English as Jamaica. Jamaica was originally settled by a small group of Englishmen from Hempstead, a neighboring village. Hempstead was founded in 1644 by emigrants (headed by a Rev. Richard Denton) from New England, chiefly from Wethersfield and Stamford in the New Haven Colony.” (from the Genealogical Record, Saint Nicholas Society of the city of New York)
• Notes: From the First Town Record Book of Jamaica,Queens, NY.

Town Meeting 14 May 1671; page 59.
Voted that Nichlas Everit should beat the drum to give the town warning to come to the meeting on the Sabath. He shall have 20 shellings. ( He was about 9 years old.)

Town Meeting 21 Feb.1679; page 79.
Division of Little Plains; Northwest Quater; Nicolas Everit

Town Meeting 12 Dec. 1700; page 122.
Voted ---- Justice Nicolas Everit, Jonos Wood, Nathaniel Denton
Which were Chosen before Samuel Ruscoe Clerk.
Town Meeting 3 Feb.1708;
Tax Rate List; Justice Everit (probably referring to Justice Nicholas Everitt)
Book found on Ancestry.com. First Presbyterian Church of Jamaica, New York, 1662-1942 [database on-line].: a narrative history of its 280 years of continuous service. Jamaica NY Page xvii : refers to Rev. James Everitt Clarke, Rev. Nicholas Everitt Smith, and Rev. Benjamin Smith Everitt. Always using the itt spelling. Page 40 of the same book refers to “sheriff John Everitt, a Presbyterian” in relating an incident that happened in July 1710. Nowhere in this book is the name spelled as EVERETT! Nor, have I found it spelled EVERETT in the town records.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>


Abstracts of Wills; on File in the Surrogate's Office;
City of NY; Vol. 2; 1708-1728; Liber 10;

Page 234;
In the Name of God, Amen. June 5,1723, I Nicholas Everitt of Jamaica, in Queens County, being somewhat indisposed of body, but of good and perfect mind, for which I bless God.

I leave to my Wife Elizabeth, my dwelling house,garden,and one third of my orchard where I now live, so long as she remain my widow. But if my wife shall be evicted or turned out of the same while she is my widow, I order that my two sons Nicholas and Joseph shall build for her a house convenient, on the front of the land I bought of Nathaniel Denton, adjoining unto my homestead, and after the death of my wife, it is to go to my son Joseph, and he is to pay to his brother Nicholas one half the cost.

I leave my oldest son Richard, all the rest of my homestead, which is bounded North by the Parsonage land, West by Robert Denton, East by land I bought of Nathaniel Denton, and my dwelling house after my wife's deceased. Also a small lot of Fresh meadow in the furthermost neck adjoining to the meadow of Richard Everitt deceased. (?his father?)

I leave to my son Nicholas, a lot of land which lyes adjoining to his homesetad, and a lot of meadow in the Old Town Neck, and 2/3 of my land on the hills, partly in Jamaica and partly in Flushing, with appurtenances. And he is to pay my daudgters, Mary Wheeler, Priscilla Smith,and Patience Ludlam L60 each.

I leave my two sons Samuel and John both of Hopewell,New Jersey, all of my lands and tenements in Hopewell.

I leave to my son Joseph all that lot of land I bought of Nathaniel Denton, adjoining to my homestead, and one third of my land on the Hills aforesaid, and also a lot of meadow in the further East neck, joing to the meadow of Hope Mills, and he is to pay to my daughter Patience Ludlam, L20, and my daughter Hannah Everitt L50, and my daughter Rachel L30.

My personal estate is to be sold and the money to be divided amoung my children.

I leave to my son Nicholas my Great Bible.

My son Joseph is to have 1/3 of my personal estate.

I leave my daughter Rachel L70 (70 British Pounds).

I make my wife and my son Nicholas and my son in law, Nathaniel Smith, executors, and my friend, Joseph Smith overseer.

Witnesses; J.N.Soolinger, /// Daniel Pontion, Nathaniel Denton, Arthur Smith.

Proved May 26 1724.


This is just a guess:
Nicholas’s Grandfather may have been Nicholas EVERIT, father of Richard Everit/ Everitt That Richard Everitt was born about 1613 in Fulmodeston, Norfolk, England, and there was married to Frances Ziles also of Fulmodeston on Jan 24, 1634 in Fulmodeston.
It is also possible but not certain that Richard Everitt of Jamaica, Long Island and his family were affiliated with a religious group lead by a Rev. Richard Denton.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
According to the Genealogical Record, Saint Nicholas Society of the city of New York, organized February 28, 1835, incorporated April 17, 1841: Volume 1:
“Richard Everit was a Long Island patentee and Magistrate. He first appears on Long Island in 1656 as an original settler of a town called by the Dutch Rustdorp and by the English Jamaica. Jamaica was originally settled by a small group of Englishmen from Hempstead, a neighboring village. Hempstead was founded in 1644 by emigrants (headed by a Richard Denton) from New England, chiefly from Wethersfield and Stamford in the New Haven Colony.”
“The distinguished Everett family of Dedham, Massachusetts, has always believed that it was their ancestor, Richard by name who presumably arrived with William Pynchon, the founder of Roxbury and Springfield on the ‘Jewel’, one of Winthrop’s fleet, which left England on April 8, 1630. When William Pynchon went through the wilderness to found Springfield in 1636 Richard Everit appears to have been his trader and agent. Everit witnessed an Indian deed there in 1636, and appears at various times as a landowner and a town officer, certainly being there as late as June 29, 1643 when he married Mary Winch, a young girl of twenty who had come over with the family of Rowland Stebbins in 1638 on the Frances of Ipswich. ……. It would make Richard who was at Springfield, moving back and forth, between Dedham and Springfield, a considerable distance then, in every year up to the marriage in 1643, sometimes appearing in both towns in less than four weeks apart. Pynchon does not seem to have had any interests in Dedham.” To accept this marriage one would need to accept that that one man owned the pieces of land granted to Richard Everett/Everit/Everitt/Everard in both villages over the same period. And in order to accept the marriage in Springfield on June 29, 1643 to Mary Winch one has to presuppose an earlier marriage to a woman unnamed for six children were recorded on June 12, 1644 (in Dedham). Others followed to make eleven children in all in Dedham. So the second marriage if that it was seems somewhat UNUSUAL.
“Moreover it is decidedly important to notice that almost invariably the Dedham records speak of Richard Evered rather than Everit and that the Dedham Will proved in 1682 was signed “Evered”, while the Springfield records always speak of Richard “Everit”. An early and particularly reputable family history says that Richard Everett of Dedham came over in 1634-1635 with his wife Mary “.This implies a continuity of the relationship. [Note: When the Dedham Richard Everett/Evered died in 1682 he was survived by his wife Mary.] One must then admit that the Richard of Dedham and the Richard of Springfield may be different men.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
One of the first sightings of a “Richard Everit” we have in Massachusetts is in Agawam, now Springfield, MA, on July 15, 1636 when a man of that name witnessed a deed from the Indians which transferred land to Richard’s employer William Pynchon and others. He is described in the History of Springfield as “Mr. Pynchon’s trader”.
*… There is a report of a group of people which included Everitts leaving Goshen, England. Reportedly, there is a plaque there. It was discovered during World War II by a US pilot, a member of the Everitt family. He reported this by letter to his mother. Unfortunately, he was shot down soon after that. We have not found that plaque.
*… Some believe that Everitts may have been among the group that came to the Massachusetts Bay Colony with a Rev. Mr. Richard Denton (b. ca. 1586) a defrocked priest of the Church of England from Halifax, England. (Mr. Denton’s father was a Sir Richard Denton also from Halifax.) They arrived in Massachusetts sometime between 1634 and 1635.
On the other hand, a man named Richard Everitt may just have been coincidentally in the same place with Denton and his followers.
The Denton group left the Massachusetts Bay Colony because of a disagreement over “observance of the Sabbath”. A logical path for them to have followed to get out of the Massachusetts Bay colony and get to Connecticut would have been to go directly west to Springfield where there were already trails and settlers. Then they would go south along the Connecticut River.
A Richard Everit (Yes, only one “t”!) of Springfield could have met them as they passed through Springfield.
By 1636, Denton’s group were first in Wethersfield, CT. In fact, Denton’s name is on a map of that time on a centrally placed house lot.
In 1638, Denton and a few of his followers were invited to settle in what is now Stamford, CT. where a dispute occurred within the church over a proposal by some church members to limit baptism to full church members. Denton opposed this. He and more than one-quarter of the inhabitants of Stamford including most of those who had accompanied him from Wethersfield decided to leave. They purchased a 16 mile plain on Long Island from the Rockaway Indians. This is what is now called Hempstead, Long Island. The deed was signed on Dec. 13, 1643.
In 1644 we find the Denton Group of 28 families in Hempstead on Long Island. They secured a patent from the Dutch administration in New Amsterdam.
In 1657 they accepted the invitation of Gov. Peter Stuyvesant to settle in the newly created area of Jamaica, Long Island. Gov. Stuyvesant was trying to get more Calvinists in his colony.
In 1659 Richard Denton returned to England where he died in Essex in 1662. His group appears to have blended into New Amsterdam and later into New York.
In 1664 the English took over the Dutch Colony.
Between 1620 to 1630 the Governor of the English colony (Plymouth) had to exercise extreme caution in his negotiations with the Dutch, who were at that time numerically stronger and claimed what is now Long Island, New Jersey, Albany and the New York City area. However, between 1629 and 1640 -- 25,000 Protestants crossed the Atlantic Ocean to New England, while comparatively few Dutch crossed to New Netherland.
The English began to reach out into Dutch territory on Long Island. Indeed, in the 1640s; and in the 1650s Dutch power on Long Island was shrinking.
Quakers, Baptists, and other dissenters of towns on Long Island dreaded English Puritan rule, indeed, more than they feared Dutch rule. So in 1664 when they heard that King Charles had given the whole of Long Island to the Duke of York the five English towns resolved to set up an independent government. Their concern about English rule well may have something to do with the action of many of the residents of those towns to move inland into New Jersey.

*… A “Richard Everett” was one of the signers of the certificate of purchase of Jamaica from the Native Americans on Nov. 25, 1656. It is unlikely that this was the Richard Everett/Evered who lived in Dedham, Massachusetts for it would have been an unbelievably long trip to do this deal.

*… When they did the division and allotment of lands in the new Town of Jamaica in 1660 the names of John Everitt and Nicholas Everitt appear in the list of freeholders.
*…In 1661 a “Richard Everitt” and a “Nathaniel Denton” were magistrates of the Town of Jamaica.

*… On Sept. 4, 1668 a Richard Everitt/Everett died intestate (without a will) in Jamaica, Long Island. Children were mentioned but not named.

Reportedly, there was another Richard Everitt who died in Jamaica, Long Island in 1666. This Richard was reportedly born in about 1625 in Springfield, MA. That would have been very early. The Pilgrims only arrived in Massachusetts in 1620.

*… A Richard Everitt married a Miss. Smith in about 1650 on Long Island, New Amsterdam. Some researchers believe that this Richard and the two which I mentioned above may well all be the same person. But we do not know for sure.
This may be, or may not be the same Richard of Springfield who earlier married “Mary of Springfield”. Where and when did Mary of Springfield die? And what were the verified names of her children? Anyhow it would appear that this Everitt and Smith marriage of about 1650 produced at least 2 sons: Nicholas, & John
We descend from Nicholas, b. abt. 1652, - d. Sept. 20, 1723, -- who married Elizabeth.
There is an abstract of Nicholas’s WILL at the New York Historical Society. It is dated June 5, 1723. It names his wife Elizabeth, sons: Richard (eldest), Nicholas, Joseph, as well as, Samuel (our ancestor) and John who were living on their father’s land in Hopewell, Hunterdon Co., NJ. The daughters listed were: Mary Wheeler, Priscilla Smith, Patience Ludham, Hannah Everitt, and Rachel Everitt. -- One of the witnesses to the signing of the WILL was “Nathaniel Denton”. It would appear that Rev. Mr. Denton had both a son and a grandson named Nathaniel in this area.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Nicholas Everitt is on the NJ Census 1772 – August Tax List, as an owner of property in Burlington County, Nottingham Township. (This later became part of Hunterdon County.) We can assume that this is the land that Samuel and John were developing. Nicholas and Elizabeth had five sons:
This is what I know about them:
Richard Everitt (the eldest son) b. abt. 1673-1676, d. 1722 in Jamaica, Long Island - m. Elizabeth Clare who was born about 1670 and was the daughter of Brittain Clare. She was also the sister of John Clare who wrote a very helpful WILL. In that WILL he left property to “Richard Everitt, Elizabeth Clare’s eldest son”. He also refers to Richard Everitt (probably the father) as his cousin. Nicholas Everitt is also mentioned in this WILL. Richard and Elizabeth had at least one daughter Mary born 6-16-1697 in Hopewell, Hunterdon Co., NJ. Mary married an Mr.Oxwell.
John Everitt (b. abt. 1680, - d.abt. 1756 – left a will dated 1756 in Hunterdon, m. Hannah and had at least four sons: Moses, Joseph, Benjamin and John. In his WILL he also mentions a man named Able. I do not know Able’s relationship with John.) - John and his brother Samuel [1st] worked their father’s land in the northwestern sector of New Jersey (Hunterdon County) starting while it was still known as Burlington County.
Nicholas Everitt [2nd] (b. abt. 1684, - d. Sept. 20, 1768 - m. Elizabeth? In 1672)
Joseph Everitt - b. about 1686
Samuel Everitt [#1] (b. abt. 1687-1689) Samuel#1 and his brother John Everitt were both working their father’s land in Hunterdon County starting while it was still known as Burlington County. We descend from this Samuel Everitt [1st].
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
****… Meanwhile, back in Dedham, MA a “Richard Euered” was at Watertown attending a meeting on Aug. 18, 1636. His name was spelled that strange way then and for several years thereafter.
On June 29, 1643, “A” Richard Euered/ Everett married Mary Winch in Springfield, MA. She had come in the ship “Francis” to Ipswich, MA April 1638, age 15 a member of the family of Rowland Stebbins. It is believed by some that Richard Euered was later known as Richard Everett of Dedham. It is my opinion that a completely different Richard Everitt married Mary Winch, that is the Richard Everitt who was in Springfield.
One may also notice that almost invariably the Dedham official records speak of Richard Evered rather than Everit or even Euered and that the Dedham Will proved in 1682 was signed by Richard as “Evered”, while the Springfield records always speak of Richard “Everit”. An early and particularly reputable family history says that Richard Everett of Dedham came over in 1634-1635 with his wife Mary “ This implies a continuity of the relationship between that Richard and Mary. One must then admit that the Richard of Dedham and the Richard of Springfield may well be different men.
The Town Records of Dedham give a complete description of the town offices held by him; together with his church membership; the christening of his children; the amount of his yearly taxes; the date of his death July 3, 1682; inventory of his estate, 277 British pounds, 15 Shillings, and 10 pence. His wife Mary lived for several years after the death of Richard in 1682.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Nicholas Everit / Everitt (1st)……Marriage 1 ELIZABETH
• Married: ABT 1672 in Jamaica, Queens, NY
Children :
1. Richard EVERETT b: ABT 1676
2. Mary EVERETT b: ABT 1678 in Jamaica, Queens, L.I.N.Y.
3. John EVERETT b: ABT 1680
4. Priscilla EVERETT b: ABT 1681 in Jamaica,Queens,N.Y
5. Nicholas EVERETT b: ABT 1684 in Jamaica,Queens,NY
6. Joseph EVERETT b: ABT 1686
7. Samuel EVERETT b: ABT 1687 in Jamaica,Queens, L.I.N.Y
8. Hannah EVERETT b: ABT 1693
9. Rachell EVERETT b: ABT 1695
10. Patience EVERETT b: ABT 1697 in Jamaica, Queens, L.I.N.Y

Sources:
1.Title: Eardley Papers, Long Island Historical Society, 122 Pierreport St. Brooklyn,Kings,NY.
2.Title: Everett Monthly Newsletter by Richard B. Everett
Page: Page 633.
3.Title: Will of Nicholas
Page: Will 5 June Proved 26 May 1724.
4.Title: Everett Monthly Newsletter by Richard B. Everett
Page: Feb.1996 pages 532-533.

Re: Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Posted: 2 Jan 2010 11:27PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hello William!
You referred to Long Beach. I think that you may mean Long Island. Also Jamaca is Jamaica just like the name of the country. --- Yes, it is my understanding that Nicholas's father's name was Richard Everitt. Some of Nicholas's children stayed on Long Island. Nicholas was born about 1652. He died Sept. 30, 1723 and was buried in the Prospect Cemetery, Jamaica, NY. It is very overgrown.(It needs a great deal of work.)
For a completely different project I am researching Ireland 1600s and 1700s and I am finding Everitts but no Everetts.
Curious!!!
Anyhow I will share some of my work below:
I am going to try to "paste" my research on Nicholas in here I hope that it is not to large.

Everit/Everitt of Jamaica
• Name: Nicholas EVERITT --- Town records spelled his surname consistently as EVERIT. But when he wrote his will, he wrote his own name as EVERITT!
• Birth: ABT 1652
• Death: 30 SEP 1723 in Jamaica, Queens, L.I.N.Y.
• Burial: 2 OCT 1723 Prospect Cem.Jamaica,NY
Richard Everit was a Long Island patentee and Magistrate. He first appears on Long Island in 1656 as an original settler of a town called by the Dutch as Rustdorp and by the English as Jamaica. Jamaica was originally settled by a small group of Englishmen from Hempstead, a neighboring village. Hempstead was founded in 1644 by emigrants (headed by a Rev. Richard Denton) from New England, chiefly from Wethersfield and Stamford in the New Haven Colony.” (from the Genealogical Record, Saint Nicholas Society of the city of New York)
• Notes: From the First Town Record Book of Jamaica,Queens, NY.

Town Meeting 14 May 1671; page 59.
Voted that Nichlas Everit should beat the drum to give the town warning to come to the meeting on the Sabath. He shall have 20 shellings. ( He was about 9 years old.)

Town Meeting 21 Feb.1679; page 79.
Division of Little Plains; Northwest Quater; Nicolas Everit

Town Meeting 12 Dec. 1700; page 122.
Voted ---- Justice Nicolas Everit, Jonos Wood, Nathaniel Denton
Which were Chosen before Samuel Ruscoe Clerk.
Town Meeting 3 Feb.1708;
Tax Rate List; Justice Everit (probably referring to Justice Nicholas Everitt)
Book found on Ancestry.com. First Presbyterian Church of Jamaica, New York, 1662-1942 [database on-line].: a narrative history of its 280 years of continuous service. Jamaica NY Page xvii : refers to Rev. James Everitt Clarke, Rev. Nicholas Everitt Smith, and Rev. Benjamin Smith Everitt. Always using the itt spelling. Page 40 of the same book refers to “sheriff John Everitt, a Presbyterian” in relating an incident that happened in July 1710. Nowhere in this book is the name spelled as EVERETT! Nor, have I found it spelled EVERETT in the town records.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>


Abstracts of Wills; on File in the Surrogate's Office;
City of NY; Vol. 2; 1708-1728; Liber 10;

Page 234;
In the Name of God, Amen. June 5,1723, I Nicholas Everitt of Jamaica, in Queens County, being somewhat indisposed of body, but of good and perfect mind, for which I bless God.

I leave to my Wife Elizabeth, my dwelling house,garden,and one third of my orchard where I now live, so long as she remain my widow. But if my wife shall be evicted or turned out of the same while she is my widow, I order that my two sons Nicholas and Joseph shall build for her a house convenient, on the front of the land I bought of Nathaniel Denton, adjoining unto my homestead, and after the death of my wife, it is to go to my son Joseph, and he is to pay to his brother Nicholas one half the cost.

I leave my oldest son Richard, all the rest of my homestead, which is bounded North by the Parsonage land, West by Robert Denton, East by land I bought of Nathaniel Denton, and my dwelling house after my wife's deceased. Also a small lot of Fresh meadow in the furthermost neck adjoining to the meadow of Richard Everitt deceased. (?his father?)

I leave to my son Nicholas, a lot of land which lyes adjoining to his homesetad, and a lot of meadow in the Old Town Neck, and 2/3 of my land on the hills, partly in Jamaica and partly in Flushing, with appurtenances. And he is to pay my daudgters, Mary Wheeler, Priscilla Smith,and Patience Ludlam L60 each.

I leave my two sons Samuel and John both of Hopewell,New Jersey, all of my lands and tenements in Hopewell.

I leave to my son Joseph all that lot of land I bought of Nathaniel Denton, adjoining to my homestead, and one third of my land on the Hills aforesaid, and also a lot of meadow in the further East neck, joing to the meadow of Hope Mills, and he is to pay to my daughter Patience Ludlam, L20, and my daughter Hannah Everitt L50, and my daughter Rachel L30.

My personal estate is to be sold and the money to be divided amoung my children.

I leave to my son Nicholas my Great Bible.

My son Joseph is to have 1/3 of my personal estate.

I leave my daughter Rachel L70 (70 British Pounds).

I make my wife and my son Nicholas and my son in law, Nathaniel Smith, executors, and my friend, Joseph Smith overseer.

Witnesses; J.N.Soolinger, /// Daniel Pontion, Nathaniel Denton, Arthur Smith.

Proved May 26 1724.


This is just a guess:
Nicholas’s Grandfather may have been Nicholas EVERIT, father of Richard Everit/ Everitt That Richard Everitt was born about 1613 in Fulmodeston, Norfolk, England, and there was married to Frances Ziles also of Fulmodeston on Jan 24, 1634 in Fulmodeston.
It is also possible but not certain that Richard Everitt of Jamaica, Long Island and his family were affiliated with a religious group lead by a Rev. Richard Denton.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
According to the Genealogical Record, Saint Nicholas Society of the city of New York, organized February 28, 1835, incorporated April 17, 1841: Volume 1:
“Richard Everit was a Long Island patentee and Magistrate. He first appears on Long Island in 1656 as an original settler of a town called by the Dutch Rustdorp and by the English Jamaica. Jamaica was originally settled by a small group of Englishmen from Hempstead, a neighboring village. Hempstead was founded in 1644 by emigrants (headed by a Richard Denton) from New England, chiefly from Wethersfield and Stamford in the New Haven Colony.”
“The distinguished Everett family of Dedham, Massachusetts, has always believed that it was their ancestor, Richard by name who presumably arrived with William Pynchon, the founder of Roxbury and Springfield on the ‘Jewel’, one of Winthrop’s fleet, which left England on April 8, 1630. When William Pynchon went through the wilderness to found Springfield in 1636 Richard Everit appears to have been his trader and agent. Everit witnessed an Indian deed there in 1636, and appears at various times as a landowner and a town officer, certainly being there as late as June 29, 1643 when he married Mary Winch, a young girl of twenty who had come over with the family of Rowland Stebbins in 1638 on the Frances of Ipswich. ……. It would make Richard who was at Springfield, moving back and forth, between Dedham and Springfield, a considerable distance then, in every year up to the marriage in 1643, sometimes appearing in both towns in less than four weeks apart. Pynchon does not seem to have had any interests in Dedham.” To accept this marriage one would need to accept that that one man owned the pieces of land granted to Richard Everett/Everit/Everitt/Everard in both villages over the same period. And in order to accept the marriage in Springfield on June 29, 1643 to Mary Winch one has to presuppose an earlier marriage to a woman unnamed for six children were recorded on June 12, 1644 (in Dedham). Others followed to make eleven children in all in Dedham. So the second marriage if that it was seems somewhat UNUSUAL.
“Moreover it is decidedly important to notice that almost invariably the Dedham records speak of Richard Evered rather than Everit and that the Dedham Will proved in 1682 was signed “Evered”, while the Springfield records always speak of Richard “Everit”. An early and particularly reputable family history says that Richard Everett of Dedham came over in 1634-1635 with his wife Mary “.This implies a continuity of the relationship. [Note: When the Dedham Richard Everett/Evered died in 1682 he was survived by his wife Mary.] One must then admit that the Richard of Dedham and the Richard of Springfield may be different men.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
One of the first sightings of a “Richard Everit” we have in Massachusetts is in Agawam, now Springfield, MA, on July 15, 1636 when a man of that name witnessed a deed from the Indians which transferred land to Richard’s employer William Pynchon and others. He is described in the History of Springfield as “Mr. Pynchon’s trader”.
*… There is a report of a group of people which included Everitts leaving Goshen, England. Reportedly, there is a plaque there. It was discovered during World War II by a US pilot, a member of the Everitt family. He reported this by letter to his mother. Unfortunately, he was shot down soon after that. We have not found that plaque.
*… Some believe that Everitts may have been among the group that came to the Massachusetts Bay Colony with a Rev. Mr. Richard Denton (b. ca. 1586) a defrocked priest of the Church of England from Halifax, England. (Mr. Denton’s father was a Sir Richard Denton also from Halifax.) They arrived in Massachusetts sometime between 1634 and 1635.
On the other hand, a man named Richard Everitt may just have been coincidentally in the same place with Denton and his followers.
The Denton group left the Massachusetts Bay Colony because of a disagreement over “observance of the Sabbath”. A logical path for them to have followed to get out of the Massachusetts Bay colony and get to Connecticut would have been to go directly west to Springfield where there were already trails and settlers. Then they would go south along the Connecticut River.
A Richard Everit (Yes, only one “t”!) of Springfield could have met them as they passed through Springfield.
By 1636, Denton’s group were first in Wethersfield, CT. In fact, Denton’s name is on a map of that time on a centrally placed house lot.
In 1638, Denton and a few of his followers were invited to settle in what is now Stamford, CT. where a dispute occurred within the church over a proposal by some church members to limit baptism to full church members. Denton opposed this. He and more than one-quarter of the inhabitants of Stamford including most of those who had accompanied him from Wethersfield decided to leave. They purchased a 16 mile plain on Long Island from the Rockaway Indians. This is what is now called Hempstead, Long Island. The deed was signed on Dec. 13, 1643.
In 1644 we find the Denton Group of 28 families in Hempstead on Long Island. They secured a patent from the Dutch administration in New Amsterdam.
In 1657 they accepted the invitation of Gov. Peter Stuyvesant to settle in the newly created area of Jamaica, Long Island. Gov. Stuyvesant was trying to get more Calvinists in his colony.
In 1659 Richard Denton returned to England where he died in Essex in 1662. His group appears to have blended into New Amsterdam and later into New York.
In 1664 the English took over the Dutch Colony.
Between 1620 to 1630 the Governor of the English colony (Plymouth) had to exercise extreme caution in his negotiations with the Dutch, who were at that time numerically stronger and claimed what is now Long Island, New Jersey, Albany and the New York City area. However, between 1629 and 1640 -- 25,000 Protestants crossed the Atlantic Ocean to New England, while comparatively few Dutch crossed to New Netherland.
The English began to reach out into Dutch territory on Long Island. Indeed, in the 1640s; and in the 1650s Dutch power on Long Island was shrinking.
Quakers, Baptists, and other dissenters of towns on Long Island dreaded English Puritan rule, indeed, more than they feared Dutch rule. So in 1664 when they heard that King Charles had given the whole of Long Island to the Duke of York the five English towns resolved to set up an independent government. Their concern about English rule well may have something to do with the action of many of the residents of those towns to move inland into New Jersey.

*… A “Richard Everett” was one of the signers of the certificate of purchase of Jamaica from the Native Americans on Nov. 25, 1656. It is unlikely that this was the Richard Everett/Evered who lived in Dedham, Massachusetts for it would have been an unbelievably long trip to do this deal.

*… When they did the division and allotment of lands in the new Town of Jamaica in 1660 the names of John Everitt and Nicholas Everitt appear in the list of freeholders.
*…In 1661 a “Richard Everitt” and a “Nathaniel Denton” were magistrates of the Town of Jamaica.

*… On Sept. 4, 1668 a Richard Everitt/Everett died intestate (without a will) in Jamaica, Long Island. Children were mentioned but not named.

Reportedly, there was another Richard Everitt who died in Jamaica, Long Island in 1666. This Richard was reportedly born in about 1625 in Springfield, MA. That would have been very early. The Pilgrims only arrived in Massachusetts in 1620.

*… A Richard Everitt married a Miss. Smith in about 1650 on Long Island, New Amsterdam. Some researchers believe that this Richard and the two which I mentioned above may well all be the same person. But we do not know for sure.
This may be, or may not be the same Richard of Springfield who earlier married “Mary of Springfield”. Where and when did Mary of Springfield die? And what were the verified names of her children? Anyhow it would appear that this Everitt and Smith marriage of about 1650 produced at least 2 sons: Nicholas, & John
We descend from Nicholas, b. abt. 1652, - d. Sept. 20, 1723, -- who married Elizabeth.
There is an abstract of Nicholas’s WILL at the New York Historical Society. It is dated June 5, 1723. It names his wife Elizabeth, sons: Richard (eldest), Nicholas, Joseph, as well as, Samuel (our ancestor) and John who were living on their father’s land in Hopewell, Hunterdon Co., NJ. The daughters listed were: Mary Wheeler, Priscilla Smith, Patience Ludham, Hannah Everitt, and Rachel Everitt. -- One of the witnesses to the signing of the WILL was “Nathaniel Denton”. It would appear that Rev. Mr. Denton had both a son and a grandson named Nathaniel in this area.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Nicholas Everitt is on the NJ Census 1772 – August Tax List, as an owner of property in Burlington County, Nottingham Township. (This later became part of Hunterdon County.) We can assume that this is the land that Samuel and John were developing. Nicholas and Elizabeth had five sons:
This is what I know about them:
Richard Everitt (the eldest son) b. abt. 1673-1676, d. 1722 in Jamaica, Long Island - m. Elizabeth Clare who was born about 1670 and was the daughter of Brittain Clare. She was also the sister of John Clare who wrote a very helpful WILL. In that WILL he left property to “Richard Everitt, Elizabeth Clare’s eldest son”. He also refers to Richard Everitt (probably the father) as his cousin. Nicholas Everitt is also mentioned in this WILL. Richard and Elizabeth had at least one daughter Mary born 6-16-1697 in Hopewell, Hunterdon Co., NJ. Mary married an Mr.Oxwell.
John Everitt (b. abt. 1680, - d.abt. 1756 – left a will dated 1756 in Hunterdon, m. Hannah and had at least four sons: Moses, Joseph, Benjamin and John. In his WILL he also mentions a man named Able. I do not know Able’s relationship with John.) - John and his brother Samuel [1st] worked their father’s land in the northwestern sector of New Jersey (Hunterdon County) starting while it was still known as Burlington County.
Nicholas Everitt [2nd] (b. abt. 1684, - d. Sept. 20, 1768 - m. Elizabeth? In 1672)
Joseph Everitt - b. about 1686
Samuel Everitt [#1] (b. abt. 1687-1689) Samuel#1 and his brother John Everitt were both working their father’s land in Hunterdon County starting while it was still known as Burlington County. We descend from this Samuel Everitt [1st].
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
****… Meanwhile, back in Dedham, MA a “Richard Euered” was at Watertown attending a meeting on Aug. 18, 1636. His name was spelled that strange way then and for several years thereafter.
On June 29, 1643, “A” Richard Euered/ Everett married Mary Winch in Springfield, MA. She had come in the ship “Francis” to Ipswich, MA April 1638, age 15 a member of the family of Rowland Stebbins. It is believed by some that Richard Euered was later known as Richard Everett of Dedham. It is my opinion that a completely different Richard Everitt married Mary Winch, that is the Richard Everitt who was in Springfield.
One may also notice that almost invariably the Dedham official records speak of Richard Evered rather than Everit or even Euered and that the Dedham Will proved in 1682 was signed by Richard as “Evered”, while the Springfield records always speak of Richard “Everit”. An early and particularly reputable family history says that Richard Everett of Dedham came over in 1634-1635 with his wife Mary “ This implies a continuity of the relationship between that Richard and Mary. One must then admit that the Richard of Dedham and the Richard of Springfield may well be different men.
The Town Records of Dedham give a complete description of the town offices held by him; together with his church membership; the christening of his children; the amount of his yearly taxes; the date of his death July 3, 1682; inventory of his estate, 277 British pounds, 15 Shillings, and 10 pence. His wife Mary lived for several years after the death of Richard in 1682.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Nicholas Everit / Everitt (1st)……Marriage 1 ELIZABETH
• Married: ABT 1672 in Jamaica, Queens, NY
Children :
1. Richard EVERETT b: ABT 1676
2. Mary EVERETT b: ABT 1678 in Jamaica, Queens, L.I.N.Y.
3. John EVERETT b: ABT 1680
4. Priscilla EVERETT b: ABT 1681 in Jamaica,Queens,N.Y
5. Nicholas EVERETT b: ABT 1684 in Jamaica,Queens,NY
6. Joseph EVERETT b: ABT 1686
7. Samuel EVERETT b: ABT 1687 in Jamaica,Queens, L.I.N.Y
8. Hannah EVERETT b: ABT 1693
9. Rachell EVERETT b: ABT 1695
10. Patience EVERETT b: ABT 1697 in Jamaica, Queens, L.I.N.Y

Sources:
1.Title: Eardley Papers, Long Island Historical Society, 122 Pierreport St. Brooklyn,Kings,NY.
2.Title: Everett Monthly Newsletter by Richard B. Everett
Page: Page 633.
3.Title: Will of Nicholas
Page: Will 5 June Proved 26 May 1724.
4.Title: Everett Monthly Newsletter by Richard B. Everett
Page: Feb.1996 pages 532-533.

Re: Richard (1) Everitt: two wives???? Why/How/Where??

Posted: 22 Apr 2012 12:02AM GMT
Classification: Query
I hope this discussion is still active. This Richard Everit/Everett is so confusing. Is there ANY ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS that give the wife of Richard Everit who died in Jamaica, New York. There seems to be at least two, maybe three Richard Everits in New England in the early 1600s. Possibly Richard moved from one of the locals to another, but it seems unlikely that he took up residence in two locations at the same time. I descend from Mary Everit who married Henry Oxley. Her parents are Richard and Elizabeth Clare Everit. A fellow Oxley researcher found the original reference to Mary Everrit in an Everitt family history that was in the DAR library in Washington DC. It shows that Mary Everitt was the daughter of an Everitt and that her Mother was Mary Clare, The name Clare that shows up in his line in desc. of Henry and Mary Everit Oxley. Richard's father is Richard Everit who married UNKNOWN. Would love some help.
per page

Find a board about a specific topic

  • Visit our other sites:

© 1997-2014 Ancestry.com | Corporate Information | New Privacy | Terms and Conditions