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600 Men Now on Clan Donald DNA Project Tables

600 Men Now on Clan Donald DNA Project Tables

Posted: 8 Jun 2008 12:07PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: MacDonald, McDonald, McConnell, McDaniel
Less than seven months after becoming the first family-based genetic genealogy project to post results for 500 participants, the Clan Donald DNA Project is now the first family-based genetic genealogy project to post results for 600 participants. This Y chromosome DNA project is open to all men with surnames suggesting Clan Donald ancestry and all men who have reason to suspect that their line came from Clan Donald territory. Approximately 370 men in the project have surnames that are variants of the name MacDonald. Some of the most commonly used variant names within the project are:

McDonald, with 142 participants (+1 Mc Donald)
MacDonald, 105 participants (+8 Mac Donald and +4 Macdonald)
McDaniel, 42 (+2 McDaniels)
McConnell, 29 (+1 McConnel)

Early in the clan's history, the clan chiefs took the surname MacDonald, and many MacDonald men today are their descendants, but there are also many MacDonald men who are not male line descendants of that first MacDonald chief. Some are descendants of men who joined the clan upon marriage and took MacDonald as their surname. Since MacDonald means “son of Donald”, and Donald was not an uncommon name, there were many men who adopted the surname MacDonald in honor of their fathers. These are two of the most common ways that families which weren't male line descendants of the clan founder Somerled acquired the surname MacDonald, but there were others.

Because the Y chromosome is passed from father to son with little change from generation to generation, Y chromosome DNA testing allows us to sort out the many MacDonald lines within the project. Right now, there are 30 separate groups of men in the project, and 29 of those groups include men with MacDonald variant surnames. These groups were created by comparing DNA test results, and any man who joins the project will be placed in a group. Generally, the men most closely related to the man will be found in the same group, and there is a way to compare test results using the project tables that makes it easy to find the men most likely to be related to a given project member.

Some men find that they are members of relatively large groups of men that are rather closely related. Generally, these groups descend from kings and clan chiefs whose families have had great reproductive success. Other men find that they are members of smaller groups which may be very closely related. Still others find that their results make it difficult to classify them, and are placed in a catchall group of potential cousins which may be large or small. Some may be placed in a catchall group because they don't have close matches within the project. Others may have results that are ambiguous. For many of those, further testing would make it possible to classify them into smaller groups. Many men in these catchall groups do have matches, and from time to time, it will be possible to form new groups for these men and their matches.

Men using the “MacDonald” spelling have an excellent chance of finding close matches already within the project. 22% of MacDonald men in the project are relatives of the clan chiefs, and these men typically have many matches. The rate of participation among MacDonald men is quite high, and this greatly improves the chances of finding matches. It's likely that the matches among the clan chiefs group have contributed to the high rate of participation among MacDonald men which has helped the project in general.

Another large group in the project is related to the clan chiefs, but men in this group either have test results for a small number of markers which suggest that they are closely related to the chiefs, but are not enough to prove a close connection, or their results suggest a more distant relationship. 8% of the men in the project who use the MacDonald spelling are in this group, and these men also tend to have matches within the project.

The clan chiefs group and the smaller group related to it are both part of a larger genetic grouping called Haplogroup R1a. The men in any haplogroup all descend from a common ancestor. The most recent common ancestor for Haplogroup R1a lived thousands of years ago. Although only 18% of the men in the project are members of Haplogroup R1a, 30% of the MacDonald members of the project are in this group.

The majority of project participants belong to Haplogroup R1b, which is distantly related to Haplogroup R1a. Haplogroup R1b is the most common haplogroup in men with European ancestry, and is especially common in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and England. Approximately 60% of the MacDonald participants in the project are members of Haplogroup R1b. Some of the families from Haplogroup R1b have been placed in their own subgroups within the project, and others have been placed in a catchall group.

The largest R1b family group within the project is related to the kings of an old kingdom called Dalriada. This group has been broken up into 3 smaller groups, and other subgroups could undoubtedly be created from it, but they are all related. Approximately 11% of the MacDonald men are in this group, and nearly all of them have matches.

Nearly 15% of the MacDonald men are found in other R1b family groups, and the men in these groups all have matches. One of the most famous R1b family groups is the one linked to the famed Irish king Niall of the Nine Hostages. MacDonald men are actually less likely to be found in this group than other project members; over 8% of project members and fewer than 3% of MacDonald members are within this group, which is called the R1b Green subgroup within the project.

35% of the MacDonald men in the project are in the catchall group for men in Haplogroup R1b. Many of the 37 men in this group have matches within this catchall group or one of the smaller R1b groups, but there are also some who don't have matches. Some of the men with matches will probably be assigned to new groups the next time project administrator Doug McDonald creates new subgroups. Some of the other men in the catchall group would have better match information and be easier to classify if they were to have more markers tested.

8.5% of MacDonald men in the project are members of Haplogroup I. Nearly half of these men have matches within the project. That proportion increases if you count the two that match another project participant with results for 10 markers on 9 of the 9 markers available for comparison, but those sorts of matches don't tell us very much about relatedness within a genealogical timeframe.

About 2% of the MacDonald men in the project are members of Haplogroup E. These men do not have close matches within the project at this time.

I have only been in touch with a few of the MacDonald men in the project, so I can't say how many of them have made paper trail breakthroughs as a result of their participation. 2 of my MacDonald contacts are in the clan chiefs group, and both have worked on bringing relatives into the project. These men stand to learn more about how their lines relate to others as more men are tested and others are tested for more markers.

I am pleased to say that there is just one MacDonald researcher who contacted me before ordering a test for a male line relative, and so far results for 25 markers have been returned. He has a perfect match with a MacDonnell who traces his line to Dublin, and the matching men are also close to another MacDonald.

Whether a family has matches for their MacDonald line within the project or not, family members may want to ask known or suspected MacDonald male cousins to test. Having results for more than one known cousin can tell a family more about the markers of their most recent common ancestor. Knowing more about the most recent common ancestor's markers can be very helpful when making comparisons with other DNA matches who don't share a known common ancestor.

You can find out more about this project by going to the welcome page of the project website at http://dna-project.clan-donald-usa.org/.

Kirsten Saxe, McConnell researcher
Less than seven months after becoming the first family-based genetic genealogy project to post results for 500 participants, the Clan Donald DNA Project is now the first family-based genetic genealogy project to post results for 600 participants. This Y chromosome DNA project is open to all men with surnames suggesting Clan Donald ancestry and all men who have reason to suspect that their line came from Clan Donald territory. Approximately 370 men in the project have surnames that are variants of the name MacDonald. Some of the most commonly used variant names within the project are:

McDonald, with 142 participants (+1 Mc Donald)
MacDonald, 105 participants (+8 Mac Donald and +4 Macdonald)
McDaniel, 42 (+2 McDaniels)
McConnell, 29 (+1 McConnel)

Early in the clan's history, the clan chiefs took the surname MacDonald, and many MacDonald men today are their descendants, but there are also many MacDonald men who are not male line descendants of that first MacDonald chief. Some are descendants of men who joined the clan upon marriage and took MacDonald as their surname. Since MacDonald means “son of Donald”, and Donald was not an uncommon name, there were many men who adopted the surname MacDonald in honor of their fathers. These are two of the most common ways that families which weren't male line descendants of the clan founder Somerled acquired the surname MacDonald, but there were others.

Because the Y chromosome is passed from father to son with little change from generation to generation, Y chromosome DNA testing allows us to sort out the many MacDonald lines within the project. Right now, there are 30 separate groups of men in the project, and 29 of those groups include men with MacDonald variant surnames. These groups were created by comparing DNA test results, and any man who joins the project will be placed in a group. Generally, the men most closely related to the man will be found in the same group, and there is a way to compare test results using the project tables that makes it easy to find the men most likely to be related to a given project member.

Some men find that they are members of relatively large groups of men that are rather closely related. Generally, these groups descend from kings and clan chiefs whose families have had great reproductive success. Other men find that they are members of smaller groups which may be very closely related. Still others find that their results make it difficult to classify them, and are placed in a catchall group of potential cousins which may be large or small. Some may be placed in a catchall group because they don't have close matches within the project. Others may have results that are ambiguous. For many of those, further testing would make it possible to classify them into smaller groups. Many men in these catchall groups do have matches, and from time to time, it will be possible to form new groups for these men and their matches.

Men using the “MacDonald” spelling have an excellent chance of finding close matches already within the project. 22% of MacDonald men in the project are relatives of the clan chiefs, and these men typically have many matches. The rate of participation among MacDonald men is quite high, and this greatly improves the chances of finding matches. It's likely that the matches among the clan chiefs group have contributed to the high rate of participation among MacDonald men which has helped the project in general.

Another large group in the project is related to the clan chiefs, but men in this group either have test results for a small number of markers which suggest that they are closely related to the chiefs, but are not enough to prove a close connection, or their results suggest a more distant relationship. 8% of the men in the project who use the MacDonald spelling are in this group, and these men also tend to have matches within the project.

The clan chiefs group and the smaller group related to it are both part of a larger genetic grouping called Haplogroup R1a. The men in any haplogroup all descend from a common ancestor. The most recent common ancestor for Haplogroup R1a lived thousands of years ago. Although only 18% of the men in the project are members of Haplogroup R1a, 30% of the MacDonald members of the project are in this group.

The majority of project participants belong to Haplogroup R1b, which is distantly related to Haplogroup R1a. Haplogroup R1b is the most common haplogroup in men with European ancestry, and is especially common in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and England. Approximately 60% of the MacDonald participants in the project are members of Haplogroup R1b. Some of the families from Haplogroup R1b have been placed in their own subgroups within the project, and others have been placed in a catchall group.

The largest R1b family group within the project is related to the kings of an old kingdom called Dalriada. This group has been broken up into 3 smaller groups, and other subgroups could undoubtedly be created from it, but they are all related. Approximately 11% of the MacDonald men are in this group, and nearly all of them have matches.

Nearly 15% of the MacDonald men are found in other R1b family groups, and the men in these groups all have matches. One of the most famous R1b family groups is the one linked to the famed Irish king Niall of the Nine Hostages. MacDonald men are actually less likely to be found in this group than other project members; over 8% of project members and fewer than 3% of MacDonald members are within this group, which is called the R1b Green subgroup within the project.

35% of the MacDonald men in the project are in the catchall group for men in Haplogroup R1b. Many of the 37 men in this group have matches within this catchall group or one of the smaller R1b groups, but there are also some who don't have matches. Some of the men with matches will probably be assigned to new groups the next time project administrator Doug McDonald creates new subgroups. Some of the other men in the catchall group would have better match information and be easier to classify if they were to have more markers tested.

8.5% of MacDonald men in the project are members of Haplogroup I. Nearly half of these men have matches within the project. That proportion increases if you count the two that match another project participant with results for 10 markers on 9 of the 9 markers available for comparison, but those sorts of matches don't tell us very much about relatedness within a genealogical timeframe.

About 2% of the MacDonald men in the project are members of Haplogroup E. These men do not have close matches within the project at this time.

I have only been in touch with a few of the MacDonald men in the project, so I can't say how many of them have made paper trail breakthroughs as a result of their participation. 2 of my MacDonald contacts are in the clan chiefs group, and both have worked on bringing relatives into the project. These men stand to learn more about how their lines relate to others as more men are tested and others are tested for more markers.

I am pleased to say that there is just one MacDonald researcher who contacted me before ordering a test for a male line relative, and so far results for 25 markers have been returned. He has a perfect match with a MacDonnell who traces his line to Dublin, and the matching men are also close to another MacDonald.

Whether a family has matches for their MacDonald line within the project or not, family members may want to ask known or suspected MacDonald male cousins to test. Having results for more than one known cousin can tell a family more about the markers of their most recent common ancestor. Knowing more about the most recent common ancestor's markers can be very helpful when making comparisons with other DNA matches who don't share a known common ancestor.

You can find out more about this project by going to the welcome page of the project website at http://dna-project.clan-donald-usa.org/.

Kirsten Saxe, McConnell researcher
Less than seven months after becoming the first family-based genetic genealogy project to post results for 500 participants, the Clan Donald DNA Project is now the first family-based genetic genealogy project to post results for 600 participants. This Y chromosome DNA project is open to all men with surnames suggesting Clan Donald ancestry and all men who have reason to suspect that their line came from Clan Donald territory. Approximately 370 men in the project have surnames that are variants of the name MacDonald. Some of the most commonly used variant names within the project are:

McDonald, with 142 participants (+1 Mc Donald)
MacDonald, 105 participants (+8 Mac Donald and +4 Macdonald)
McDaniel, 42 (+2 McDaniels)
McConnell, 29 (+1 McConnel)

Early in the clan's history, the clan chiefs took the surname MacDonald, and many MacDonald men today are their descendants, but there are also many MacDonald men who are not male line descendants of that first MacDonald chief. Some are descendants of men who joined the clan upon marriage and took MacDonald as their surname. Since MacDonald means “son of Donald”, and Donald was not an uncommon name, there were many men who adopted the surname MacDonald in honor of their fathers. These are two of the most common ways that families which weren't male line descendants of the clan founder Somerled acquired the surname MacDonald, but there were others.

Because the Y chromosome is passed from father to son with little change from generation to generation, Y chromosome DNA testing allows us to sort out the many MacDonald lines within the project. Right now, there are 30 separate groups of men in the project, and 29 of those groups include men with MacDonald variant surnames. These groups were created by comparing DNA test results, and any man who joins the project will be placed in a group. Generally, the men most closely related to the man will be found in the same group, and there is a way to compare test results using the project tables that makes it easy to find the men most likely to be related to a given project member.

Some men find that they are members of relatively large groups of men that are rather closely related. Generally, these groups descend from kings and clan chiefs whose families have had great reproductive success. Other men find that they are members of smaller groups which may be very closely related. Still others find that their results make it difficult to classify them, and are placed in a catchall group of potential cousins which may be large or small. Some may be placed in a catchall group because they don't have close matches within the project. Others may have results that are ambiguous. For many of those, further testing would make it possible to classify them into smaller groups. Many men in these catchall groups do have matches, and from time to time, it will be possible to form new groups for these men and their matches.

Men using the “MacDonald” spelling have an excellent chance of finding close matches already within the project. 22% of MacDonald men in the project are relatives of the clan chiefs, and these men typically have many matches. The rate of participation among MacDonald men is quite high, and this greatly improves the chances of finding matches. It's likely that the matches among the clan chiefs group have contributed to the high rate of participation among MacDonald men which has helped the project in general.

Another large group in the project is related to the clan chiefs, but men in this group either have test results for a small number of markers which suggest that they are closely related to the chiefs, but are not enough to prove a close connection, or their results suggest a more distant relationship. 8% of the men in the project who use the MacDonald spelling are in this group, and these men also tend to have matches within the project.

The clan chiefs group and the smaller group related to it are both part of a larger genetic grouping called Haplogroup R1a. The men in any haplogroup all descend from a common ancestor. The most recent common ancestor for Haplogroup R1a lived thousands of years ago. Although only 18% of the men in the project are members of Haplogroup R1a, 30% of the MacDonald members of the project are in this group.

The majority of project participants belong to Haplogroup R1b, which is distantly related to Haplogroup R1a. Haplogroup R1b is the most common haplogroup in men with European ancestry, and is especially common in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and England. Approximately 60% of the MacDonald participants in the project are members of Haplogroup R1b. Some of the families from Haplogroup R1b have been placed in their own subgroups within the project, and others have been placed in a catchall group.

The largest R1b family group within the project is related to the kings of an old kingdom called Dalriada. This group has been broken up into 3 smaller groups, and other subgroups could undoubtedly be created from it, but they are all related. Approximately 11% of the MacDonald men are in this group, and nearly all of them have matches.

Nearly 15% of the MacDonald men are found in other R1b family groups, and the men in these groups all have matches. One of the most famous R1b family groups is the one linked to the famed Irish king Niall of the Nine Hostages. MacDonald men are actually less likely to be found in this group than other project members; over 8% of project members and fewer than 3% of MacDonald members are within this group, which is called the R1b Green subgroup within the project.

35% of the MacDonald men in the project are in the catchall group for men in Haplogroup R1b. Many of the 37 men in this group have matches within this catchall group or one of the smaller R1b groups, but there are also some who don't have matches. Some of the men with matches will probably be assigned to new groups the next time project administrator Doug McDonald creates new subgroups. Some of the other men in the catchall group would have better match information and be easier to classify if they were to have more markers tested.

8.5% of MacDonald men in the project are members of Haplogroup I. Nearly half of these men have matches within the project. That proportion increases if you count the two that match another project participant with results for 10 markers on 9 of the 9 markers available for comparison, but those sorts of matches don't tell us very much about relatedness within a genealogical timeframe.

About 2% of the MacDonald men in the project are members of Haplogroup E. These men do not have close matches within the project at this time.

I have only been in touch with a few of the MacDonald men in the project, so I can't say how many of them have made paper trail breakthroughs as a result of their participation. 2 of my MacDonald contacts are in the clan chiefs group, and both have worked on bringing relatives into the project. These men stand to learn more about how their lines relate to others as more men are tested and others are tested for more markers.

I am pleased to say that there is just one MacDonald researcher who contacted me before ordering a test for a male line relative, and so far results for 25 markers have been returned. He has a perfect match with a MacDonnell who traces his line to Dublin, and the matching men are also close to another MacDonald.

Whether a family has matches for their MacDonald line within the project or not, family members may want to ask known or suspected MacDonald male cousins to test. Having results for more than one known cousin can tell a family more about the markers of their most recent common ancestor. Knowing more about the most recent common ancestor's markers can be very helpful when making comparisons with other DNA matches who don't share a known common ancestor.

You can find out more about this project by going to the welcome page of the project website at http://dna-project.clan-donald-usa.org/.

Kirsten Saxe, McConnell researcher
Less than seven months after becoming the first family-based genetic genealogy project to post results for 500 participants, the Clan Donald DNA Project is now the first family-based genetic genealogy project to post results for 600 participants. This Y chromosome DNA project is open to all men with surnames suggesting Clan Donald ancestry and all men who have reason to suspect that their line came from Clan Donald territory. Approximately 370 men in the project have surnames that are variants of the name MacDonald. Some of the most commonly used variant names within the project are:

McDonald, with 142 participants (+1 Mc Donald)
MacDonald, 105 participants (+8 Mac Donald and +4 Macdonald)
McDaniel, 42 (+2 McDaniels)
McConnell, 29 (+1 McConnel)

Early in the clan's history, the clan chiefs took the surname MacDonald, and many MacDonald men today are their descendants, but there are also many MacDonald men who are not male line descendants of that first MacDonald chief. Some are descendants of men who joined the clan upon marriage and took MacDonald as their surname. Since MacDonald means “son of Donald”, and Donald was not an uncommon name, there were many men who adopted the surname MacDonald in honor of their fathers. These are two of the most common ways that families which weren't male line descendants of the clan founder Somerled acquired the surname MacDonald, but there were others.

Because the Y chromosome is passed from father to son with little change from generation to generation, Y chromosome DNA testing allows us to sort out the many MacDonald lines within the project. Right now, there are 30 separate groups of men in the project, and 29 of those groups include men with MacDonald variant surnames. These groups were created by comparing DNA test results, and any man who joins the project will be placed in a group. Generally, the men most closely related to the man will be found in the same group, and there is a way to compare test results using the project tables that makes it easy to find the men most likely to be related to a given project member.

Some men find that they are members of relatively large groups of men that are rather closely related. Generally, these groups descend from kings and clan chiefs whose families have had great reproductive success. Other men find that they are members of smaller groups which may be very closely related. Still others find that their results make it difficult to classify them, and are placed in a catchall group of potential cousins which may be large or small. Some may be placed in a catchall group because they don't have close matches within the project. Others may have results that are ambiguous. For many of those, further testing would make it possible to classify them into smaller groups. Many men in these catchall groups do have matches, and from time to time, it will be possible to form new groups for these men and their matches.

Men using the “MacDonald” spelling have an excellent chance of finding close matches already within the project. 22% of MacDonald men in the project are relatives of the clan chiefs, and these men typically have many matches. The rate of participation among MacDonald men is quite high, and this greatly improves the chances of finding matches. It's likely that the matches among the clan chiefs group have contributed to the high rate of participation among MacDonald men which has helped the project in general.

Another large group in the project is related to the clan chiefs, but men in this group either have test results for a small number of markers which suggest that they are closely related to the chiefs, but are not enough to prove a close connection, or their results suggest a more distant relationship. 8% of the men in the project who use the MacDonald spelling are in this group, and these men also tend to have matches within the project.

The clan chiefs group and the smaller group related to it are both part of a larger genetic grouping called Haplogroup R1a. The men in any haplogroup all descend from a common ancestor. The most recent common ancestor for Haplogroup R1a lived thousands of years ago. Although only 18% of the men in the project are members of Haplogroup R1a, 30% of the MacDonald members of the project are in this group.

The majority of project participants belong to Haplogroup R1b, which is distantly related to Haplogroup R1a. Haplogroup R1b is the most common haplogroup in men with European ancestry, and is especially common in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and England. Approximately 60% of the MacDonald participants in the project are members of Haplogroup R1b. Some of the families from Haplogroup R1b have been placed in their own subgroups within the project, and others have been placed in a catchall group.

The largest R1b family group within the project is related to the kings of an old kingdom called Dalriada. This group has been broken up into 3 smaller groups, and other subgroups could undoubtedly be created from it, but they are all related. Approximately 11% of the MacDonald men are in this group, and nearly all of them have matches.

Nearly 15% of the MacDonald men are found in other R1b family groups, and the men in these groups all have matches. One of the most famous R1b family groups is the one linked to the famed Irish king Niall of the Nine Hostages. MacDonald men are actually less likely to be found in this group than other project members; over 8% of project members and fewer than 3% of MacDonald members are within this group, which is called the R1b Green subgroup within the project.

35% of the MacDonald men in the project are in the catchall group for men in Haplogroup R1b. Many of the 37 men in this group have matches within this catchall group or one of the smaller R1b groups, but there are also some who don't have matches. Some of the men with matches will probably be assigned to new groups the next time project administrator Doug McDonald creates new subgroups. Some of the other men in the catchall group would have better match information and be easier to classify if they were to have more markers tested.

8.5% of MacDonald men in the project are members of Haplogroup I. Nearly half of these men have matches within the project. That proportion increases if you count the two that match another project participant with results for 10 markers on 9 of the 9 markers available for comparison, but those sorts of matches don't tell us very much about relatedness within a genealogical timeframe.

About 2% of the MacDonald men in the project are members of Haplogroup E. These men do not have close matches within the project at this time.

I have only been in touch with a few of the MacDonald men in the project, so I can't say how many of them have made paper trail breakthroughs as a result of their participation. 2 of my MacDonald contacts are in the clan chiefs group, and both have worked on bringing relatives into the project. These men stand to learn more about how their lines relate to others as more men are tested and others are tested for more markers.

I am pleased to say that there is just one MacDonald researcher who contacted me before ordering a test for a male line relative, and so far results for 25 markers have been returned. He has a perfect match with a MacDonnell who traces his line to Dublin, and the matching men are also close to another MacDonald.

Whether a family has matches for their MacDonald line within the project or not, family members may want to ask known or suspected MacDonald male cousins to test. Having results for more than one known cousin can tell a family more about the markers of their most recent common ancestor. Knowing more about the most recent common ancestor's markers can be very helpful when making comparisons with other DNA matches who don't share a known common ancestor.

You can find out more about this project by going to the welcome page of the project website at http://dna-project.clan-donald-usa.org/.

Kirsten Saxe, McConnell researcher

Re: 600 Men Now on Clan Donald DNA Project Tables

Posted: 8 Jun 2008 12:21PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: MacDonald, McDonald, McConnell, McDaniel
Sorry that my last post repeats itself FOUR times! You won't miss anything if you stop reading after my first signoff.

Kirsten Saxe

Re: 600 Men Now on Clan Donald DNA Project Tables

Posted: 9 Jun 2008 1:12AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks, Kirsten; I was just about to write asking why.
George MacDonald, Colorado

Re: 600 Men Now on Clan Donald DNA Project Tables

Posted: 22 Jun 2008 8:18PM GMT
Classification: Query
Kirsten,

Thanks for posting this great piece in an easy to read and understand form. Over 15 years I established a paper line back to Somerled and two years ago tested for 37 markers to prove it so I would be one of 22% related to the Clan Chiefs.

Tal MacDonald
Mississauga, Ontario
Canada

Re: 600 Men Now on Clan Donald DNA Project Tables

Posted: 22 Jun 2008 10:16PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: MacDonald, McDonald
Tal,

You're welcome, and thank you so much for your response. I know that the new DNA technology can be confusing, so I worked hard to explain what participation in the project has done for MacDonald researchers in general. I hope that MacDonald researchers with questions about the project will feel free to contact me or one of the project administrators. I'm not on the MacDonald mailing list, but anyone with a question should be able to reach me very easily by replying to this post on the MacDonald message board.

By the way, you and others who have already been tested through FTDNA for 12, 25, or 37 markers currently have the opportunity to upgrade your results at a substantial discount. This offer started on Friday and will continue through Monday, June 30th. I don't believe that FTDNA has ever had a sale on Y chromosome test upgrades before, so anybody who was on the fence about upgrading should jump on this offer.

Tal, Doug McDonald, the project webmaster, is also in the group for Somerled descendants, but he doesn't have a paper trail back to the clan chiefs. I'm sure that he would be delighted to have 67 marker results for another man with a paper trail back to Somerled, and that other men in the same situation would, too.

My prior post seems to have encouraged some MacDonald men to join the project, and I hope that others will be encouraged to upgrade. The more data we have in the database, the more we can say about the relatedness of project members.

Kirsten
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