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Records of Soldiers who Died in the War

Records of Soldiers who Died in the War

Posted: 21 Aug 2010 3:05AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: SINCAIR
My Scottish GGGrandfather Alexander SINCLAIR (b. 1812, Glasgow) died sometime between the 1851 and 1861 Census records. In 1851 Census he was staying with his mother-in-law Janet STEVENSON in Dalmeny, Queensferry, near Edinburgh, and his occupation was listed as "Type Founder". However, on his children's marriage certificates (they all married after the 1861 Census) his occupation was given variously as Doctor, Surgeon, Army Surgeon, and Surgeon, Medical Staff Corp and I am wondering if he was a casualty of the Crimean War?
Can anyone help me please, or suggest where I might look?
Note that I live in New Zealand and cannot myself visit local Scottish or English repositories.

Re: Records of Soldiers who Died in the War

Posted: 20 Mar 2011 12:04AM GMT
Classification: Military
Edited: 21 Mar 2011 2:21PM GMT
I’m sure you are looking at two different people as a Type Founder would be unlikely to train as a doctor. You can usually trace the career of Doctors/Army surgeons via the various Gazette publications at http://www.gazettes-online.co.uk/ , although not online [google for sources] you should be able to trace him via the various Army Lists to establish what became of him.

Here’s a few as examples from the London Gazette:

London Gazette 20 September 1839
Hospital Staff
To be Surgeons to the Forces.
Surgeon Alexander Sinclair, M. D. from the 25th
Foot, -vice John Glasco, who retires upon halfpay.
Dated 20th September 1839.

November 1844
HOSPITAL STAFF.
Staff-Surgeon of the First Class Alexander Sinclair,
M.D. from half-pay, to be Staff-Surgeon of the
First Class, viee Francis Arthur Macann, M.D.
who retires upon half-pay. Dated 29th November

London Gazette 9 February 1848 Stamps & Taxes Copy of Banker’s Returns
National Provincial Bank of England

On page 486
Sinclair, Dr. Alexander; Residence: Fort Pitt, Chatham; Occupation: Staff Surgeon.

London Gazette 9 February 1855, Appointments
Page 493
Hospital Staff
To be Staff-Surgeons of the First Class.
Staff-Surgeon of the First Class Alexander Sinclair,
M.D., from half-pay, vice Hart, deceased.
Dated 9th February, 1855.

Re: Records of Soldiers who Died in the War

Posted: 27 Mar 2011 9:20AM GMT
Classification: Query
Dear Jeff
Thank you for your comments & suggestions. I agree with you, the two occupations seem irreconcilable & at present, I am grasping at the fact that men conscripted to war can train & take up occupations different to their peacetime occupations. The 10 years between Census returns is a long time & he could have trained as an Army Surgeon in that time.
I thought that he might have been engaged in the Crimean War effort where many men lost their lives. I am not sure if there were any other wars in that period he might have been engaged in.
Thank you for your suggestions. You have given me a new area in which to research.
Regards
Lindsay Olsen

Re: Records of Soldiers who Died in the War

Posted: 28 Mar 2011 12:24AM GMT
Classification: Query
Lindsay,

I think your missing the key point about the dates. The census dates are irrelevant as far as the surgeon is concerned, the 1st entry from the London Gazette I quoted means that Alexander Sinclair the doctor, was already a qualified surgeon and serving in the army in September 1838 and was still serving in 1855, so the other Alexander the type founder must me a different man.

If you check other Gazette issues you may find a listing of his demise and check Edinburgh papers perhaps you’ll find an obituary for the surgeon. Not sure where Scottish Wills are held but you should also check those out too.

Re wars, for the time frame you’re looking at 1851-1861, in addition to the Crimea war 1853-1856, there were also: North West Frontier 1849-58 & 1859-78; 2nd Burma War 1852-53; Persian War 1856-57; Taiping Rebellion 1856-66; Indian Sepoy Rebellion [Indian Mutiny] 1857-58; 2nd China War 1857-62 and 2nd Maori War 1860-61.

In addition the British Army had posts all around the world and in the West Indies, Middle East, Africa, East Indies and China, more men died of disease than in battle.

Jeff
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