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RAATZ in Wussow, Pomern

RAATZ in Wussow, Pomern

Tom REISE (View posts)
Posted: 30 Sep 2004 7:42PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 1 Oct 2004 2:24PM GMT
Surnames: RAATZ
Searching for church records for Friedrich RAATZ and sons Wilhelm Ludwig (1835) and Gottlieb (1843) from Wussow, Pomern. Polish name of town could be either Osowo-Swidwin or Osowo-Naugard. Wilhelm and Gottlieb both settled in Wisconsin, USA.

Re: RAATZ in Wussow, Pomerania, Prussia

Robert T. (View posts)
Posted: 4 Oct 2004 12:26AM GMT
Classification: Query
Tom, there were FIVE towns in Pomerania called Wussow! One in the administrative district (in German: Kreis) of Belgard-Schivelbein, one in Kreis Lauenburg, one in Kreis Naugard, one in Kreis Randow, and one in Kreis Rummelsburg. Needless to say, before you can proceed with your research, you will have to determine which of the five Wussows Friedrich Raatz was from. Do you have any idea?

Robert

Re: RAATZ in Wussow, Pomerania, Prussia

Tom Reise (View posts)
Posted: 5 Oct 2004 1:16PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: RAATZ, SCHROEDER
A daughter-in-law of Friedrich RAATZ evidently was born (1837) in Regenwalde so I am concentrating my search in the area of the Wussow's (Osowo, Poland) near Naugard and Schievelbein, both about the same distance from Regenwalde. All of my ancestors in the US have been Protestant, yet during a drive through the area east of Stettin in mid-September I noticed nothing but Catholic churches. So I am writing to the Catholic churches in both Starogard and Nowogard asking for help in locating the records for my RAATZ ancestors. Any other suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Re: RAATZ in Wussow, Pomerania, Prussia

Robert T. (View posts)
Posted: 6 Oct 2004 12:30AM GMT
Classification: Query
Tom, if you were driving east of Stettin, then you were in today's Poland, and as you know, 98% of Poles are Roman Catholic.

Are you not aware that following World War II, almost all of Germany lying east of the Oder and Neisse Rivers was given to Poland (with the exception of the northern half of the Prussian province of East Prussia, which was taken by the Soviet Union)? That included most of Pomerania. The 12 million eastern Germans were thereupon expelled from their homes under absolutely horrific conditions. They had to leave everything behind. Close to 2 million did not survive the ordeal. It was hell on earth! The Polish authorities then moved Poles in to repopulate those territories, and of course, the Protestant churches were all turned into Catholic churches. Following the expulsion of the original German inhabitants in 1945/46 and the repopulating of eastern Germany with Poles, all the cities, towns, and villages were of course given new Polish names. You do seem to be aware of that, but somehow I get the feeling that you weren't aware of the expulsion. Hadn't you been wondering why these towns now have Polish names? When you were travelling in the area east of Stettin, weren't you wondering at all why Poles were living there rather than Germans? Weren't you wondering in general why you were in Poland at all, rather than in Germany?

The churches you're planning to write to in Stargordt and Naugard have only been Catholic since Poles were moved in to repopulate the emptied towns in 1946. Prior to that, they were German Lutheran churches. Neither Naugard nor Stargordt ever had a Catholic church. There was a Catholic church in the nearby town of Grünhof (which since 1946 has been known as Swieciechowo), and that was where Naugard's handful of Catholics attended church. I don't think there were any Catholics at all in Stargordt. If you write to those two now Catholic churches in Naugard and Stargordt, the only records they would have now would be of the Polish families who have been living in those towns since 1946. So you would really be kind of wasting your time. The Poles living in those towns today wouldn't have a clue anyway about the original German inhabitants of those towns. The fate of the German records left behind in eastern Germany after the expulsion varies greatly from place to place.

Pomerania was very, very Protestant! In 1939, when all of the people in Pomerania were German, Pomerania had a population of about 2,400,000 people, of whom only about 8% or so were Catholic. Neither of the two Wussows you're interested in had so much as one single Catholic resident prior to 1945. So your ancestors could not have been Catholic. (Regenwalde did have just a handful of Catholics, who also attended church in Grünhof, mentioned above.)

To find out anything about Pomeranian ancestors, you would really have to contact the Pomeranian expellee organization in Lübeck, Germany.

Robert

Re: RAATZ in Wussow, Pomerania, Prussia

Tom Reise (View posts)
Posted: 6 Oct 2004 1:05PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: RAATZ, SCHROEDER
I was aware of the mass expulsion of the Germans from that part of Pommern that is now in Poland. I just did not think, or know, that the churches would have switched from Prot to Catholic.

The only organization that I can find that seems to equate to your Pomeranian expellee organization is Pommersche Landmannschaft in Luebeck. Is that the right place to write?

Re: RAATZ in Wussow, Pomerania, Prussia

Victoria Johanna (View posts)
Posted: 21 Mar 2005 5:53AM GMT
Classification: Query
Robert,this is from the vj that just wrote you,not the other victoria,now I am very confused,what religion was stettin inthe 1850's,reading your messages are very informative,I would really like to talk to yo furthur,as I think you may be able to help me solve a puzzle.
Where is stettin in conjuction to kashub?
thank you
vj
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