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1820 Census and Alabama territory south of Henry County at the time

1820 Census and Alabama territory south of Henry County at the time

Posted: 16 Aug 2006 1:28PM GMT
Classification: Query
The following is excerpted from the introduction to the Henry County US GenWeb site (http://www.rootsweb.com/~alhenry/henryco.htm).

“Henry County was created by an act of the Legislature December 13, 1819 - one day earlier than Alabama became a state on December 14, 1819. Henry County was carved from CONECUH [County] … After the creation of Covington County from Henry [in 1821], a part of Conecuh was left south of Henry which was later added to Henry County.”

Sadly, the 1820 federal census for Henry County was lost, BUT the 1820 Conecuh County census survives. So, ...

If a portion of territory south of Henry County was included in Conecuh County through 1820, then the 1820 census for Conecuh County should include those people living in what later became southern Henry County and eventually became Houston County.

Can anyone confirm that a part of Conecuh was indeed left south of Henry County through 1820? If so, what is the formal definition of where that strip of territory was located?

Best regards,
Jim Chumney

Created list of people in Henry Co. in 1820-1829

Steve Elliott (View posts)
Posted: 26 Aug 2006 2:18PM GMT
Classification: Query
In the excellent resource book, Henry County Records--Cenus Records 1820, 1830, 1840, 1850, 1855, by Helon H. Cutler, 1992, there is a listing of persons living in Henry County taken from many surviving legal documents that covers the years 1820-1829. These include marriage records, election results, death records from family sources, and others.

I have this book in my personal library of 33 different books on Henry County History. Will happily do look-ups for you. This listing is no comparison to an actual census, but lists 400 people. Mrs. Cutlerr makes no claim that it is a census, but calls it properly a "listing". This was an overwhelming task for her I am sure. This is a mixed list including both males and females.

In 1820, there were not many more people than what Mrs. Cutler listed in the vast area called Patrick Henry County. This was a year before all of the carving began on the county. But, remember, this list covers 1820-1829, not 1820 alone.

Very Henry Countily Yours,
Steve Elliott

Re: 1820 Census and Alabama territory south of Henry County at the time

Steve Elliott (View posts)
Posted: 26 Aug 2006 2:49PM GMT
Classification: Query
Jim,

I looking over re-created maps of Alabama from 1820 to 1983, I find that Conecuh County was far to the west of Henry County's western border in 1820. Indeed, it looks like Conecuh roughly covered the area now as far west as the eastern border of present day Escambia County if not ungulfing what is now Escambia all the way to the the eastern edge of Baldwin County just before you reach the "foot" of Alabama that swoops down to Mobile Bay. When Covington was created in 1821, it took a large section off of westen Henry County leaving the original 1818 Conecuh in tact. Thus, from the maps I have alone and from what I have studied through the past 35 years on Henry County, from 1819 until 1903, the southerrn boundary of Patrick Henry County was the Florida state line, the old 1799 Ellicott's Line. Conecuh has never had any territory in what became Henry County through the years, it has stayed basically in the same place just shrinking up to its far eastern location in the State of Alabama today. Therefore, the lands in Houston County were also never in Conecuh. I have a fear that whomever wrote the statement you so generously shared, was incorrect in their facts stated. Sometimes this historical untruths give us great hope of finding new information only to bring us back to the facts that have stood the test of time.

Speaking of Houston County, according to Dr. Hoyt Warren in Henry's Heritage, Volume I, there were three other names presented in Montgomery for Houston County. "Liberty" County, perhaps the echo Patrick Henry's famous speech "give me liberty or give me death." And "Semmes" County in honor of Admiral Raphael Semmes. Another name presented by one Representative was "Rhodes" County to honor Confederate Gen. Robert E. Rhodes. Finally, it was decided to name the county "Houston" in honor of Gov. George Smith Houston, the first governor of the pre-war Democratic Party to hold office after the end of Radical Republican Reconstruction in our beloved Southland. Houston was one of the "Bourbon " Democrats that assisted in the end of the reign of terror being caused by the North in Dixie. "Bourbon" means "redeemer" in French. Many people have the misconception that Houston County is named for the famed Sam Houston formerly of Tennessee that fought for the independence of Texas at the Alamo, as did I as a young fellow.

1822 Map of Alabama

Steve Elliott (View posts)
Posted: 26 Aug 2006 3:22PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Elliott, Ellicott
Jim!!

After responding with all of my goobly-gop, I found an 1822 map of Alabama! In that year, Conecuh County, then west of Covington County that had been carved from the western portion of old 1819 Henry County, did indeed cover the territory in today's Escambia County containing the present towns of Brewton, East Brewton, Flomaton, and Atmore to give some sense of place and location of the area westward that the old Conecuh County covered in 1822.

As stated earlier, Henry County is shown in 1822 with what was then Pike County to the north, Covington County to the west, the State of Florida to the south (Ellicott's Line surveyed in 1799 along the 37th parallel by Andrew Ellicott), and the State of Gerogia and the mighty Chattahoochee River to the east.

Today the Georgia State Line comes far up the banks of the Alabama shoreline to the top of the steep banks where one finds the "high water mark" determined by the U. S. Corps of Engineers. This "high water mark" is indicated by four by four concrete posts buried to just above ground level with a round brass marker on the top the gives the state line and the elevation above sea level. These are scattered generously along the river banks on the Alabama side. I have a farm inherited through the Clan Elliott on the Chattahoochee east of Haleburg along the Old Franklin to Columbia Road (Old River Road), and found this state line business disturbing when I first heard it when the land was in my grandfather's possession. I had always thought the state lines ran up the channel running pretty much up the center of the Chattahoochee, which according to the book, Flowing Through Time, means "painted rock."

Hope I haven't confused anyone with my responses, but sometimes I get , as a dear friend of mine says, "discombobulated!"

Henry Countily Yours,
Steve Elliott

Re: Created list of people in Henry Co. in 1820-1829

Posted: 28 Aug 2006 5:01PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Hutto, Galloway
Steve, all of your postings are extremely informative and much appreciated - regardless of the particular surnames! I have sought for many years info on the parents of George (Solomon?) Hutto (listed in the census first as Jr., later as Sr.; m Melissa Galloway in Henry County, AL - my gggrandparents). I believe his father was Charles Hutto b about 1770 Orangeburg, SC and d Henry County, AL (?). I've been unable to determine his mother. Will appreciate any info you might be able to provide.

Re: Created list of people in Henry Co. in 1820-1829

Posted: 30 Aug 2006 3:33PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Brown, Cawthorn, Cox, Dennis, Devereaux, Farmer, Feagan, Gamble, Halsted, Higdon, Hudson, Hutchison, Johnson, Ledbetter, Kirkland, Martin, Matthews, Moses, Palmer, Pittman, Pynes, Reaves, Stanly, Turner, Wilkins, Williams
Steve,

Your reply and offer of help are greatly appreciated.

I own copies of Helon Cutler’s books HENRY COUNTY ALABAMA RECORDS, VOLUME 1, CENSUS RECORDS and HENRY COUNTY ALABAMA RECORDS, VOLUME 2, MARRIAGE RECORDS. They are excellent and well worth the money. The books have helped me immensely with my family research. I was briefly in contact with Helon Cutler a number years ago, and she indicated that she was working on another Henry County book, but I haven’t heard a thing from her in a few years. Do you know if she is in good health and if a third Henry County volume is still in the works?

Helon Cutler’s valuable “Created List of People Living in Henry Co. in 1820-1829” has been very helpful, but during my research, I’ve discovered a handful of pre-1830 Henry county residents who Helen, despite her diligence, missed. For the record, I’ve appended these names to this posting. I suspect that you and other Henry County researchers have accumulated a few additional pre-1830 names, too, that aren’t included in Helon’s “Created 1820 Henry County Census.” Perhaps, in the spirit of Wikipedia, Linux, etc., we can improve and expand Helon’s important list by submitting additional names for inclusion in a new-and-improved recreated 1820 Henry County Census. What do you think? One obstacle to this project is a universally-available copy of Helon’s “Created 1820 Henry County Census.” A few years ago, I entered Helon’s list into an Excel spreadsheet to make it easier for me to compare it to other lists. I’d be happy to share my spreadsheet with you or anyone else (or post it on the message board), if I can obtain permission from Helon.

I covet your 33 different books on Henry County history. What a treasure trove! And, I appreciate your offer to do lookups, but I would feel guilty consuming your valuable time on my brick wall (determining where my GGGGrandfather John A. Chumney was before 1825 when he married my GGGGrandmother Milly Watts in Henry County). However, … Several of your previous postings were beneficial in identifying early Henry county settlers, and any additional information that you can glean and share from your library on where the pre-1825 Henry County pioneers came from would be greatly appreciated and possibly helpful to others as well as to me. Of course, if you ever bump into specific information on my GGGGrandfather’s whereabouts prior to 1825, that would constitute manna from heaven.

Best regards,
Jim Chumney

==============================================================
The following is the list of names from pre-1830 Henry County, Alabama that I’ve accumulated that do not appear in Helon Cutler’s “Created List of People Living in Henry Co. In 1820-1829.”

Brown, William, July 27, 1826, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 4, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Cawthorn, Josiah D., Henry County State Representative 1828. Source: ALABAMA, HER HISTORY, RESOURCES, WAR RECORD, AND PUBLIC MEN, 1540-1872 by W. Brewer, 1872.

Chester, Martin, June 15, 1823, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 3, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Cox, Edward, One of the 1819 Henry County election precincts was in his home. Source: ALABAMA, HER HISTORY, RESOURCES, WAR RECORD, AND PUBLIC MEN, 1540-1872 by W. Brewer, 1872.

Dennis, Charles A., Henry County State Representative 1826-1827. Source: ALABAMA, HER HISTORY, RESOURCES, WAR RECORD, AND PUBLIC MEN, 1540-1872 by W. Brewer, 1872.

Devereaux, J. W., Henry County State Senator 1822. Source: ALABAMA, HER HISTORY, RESOURCES, WAR RECORD, AND PUBLIC MEN, 1540-1872 by W. Brewer, 1872.

NOTE: John W. Devereaux was also listed as the 1821 Alabama state senator from Conecuh Co. in ALABAMA, HER HISTORY, RESOURCES, WAR RECORD, AND PUBLIC MEN, 1540-1872 by W. Brewer, 1872. If the state senator was elected for a whole district, Mr. Devereaux may not have resided in Henry County.

Faegan, George, October 19, 1824, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 2-3, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Gamble, Robert, Allegedly the first white child born in Henry County AL, 1817. Source: ALABAMA, HER HISTORY, RESOURCES, WAR RECORD, AND PUBLIC MEN, 1540-1872 by W. Brewer, 1872. Sadly, Mr. Brewer doesn’t mention who Robert Gamble’s parents were.

Halsted, D. N., September 4, 1824, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 2, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Higdon, Terrell, Resigned when John A. Chumney was elected constable on April 4, 1828. Source: HENRY COUNTY POLITICAL RETURN 1822-1860 AND AREA CHURCH RECORDS. The only copy of this soft-bound book that I’ve seen is in the Abbeville, AL public library.

Hudson, Noah, September 4, 1824, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 2, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Hutchison, James, Justice of the Peace who resided over John A. Chumney’s and Milly Watts’ marriage in Henry County on August 3, 1825. Source: HENRY COUNTY, ALABAMA MARRIAGE RECORDS 1821-1877, FHL microfilm 1288501 Items 2-3.

Hutcheson, William, July 27, 1826, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 4, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Johnson, Robert, One of the 1820 Henry County election precincts was in his home. Source: ALABAMA, HER HISTORY, RESOURCES, WAR RECORD, AND PUBLIC MEN, 1540-1872 by W. Brewer, 1872.

Kirkland, Moses, Appointed county commissioner circa 1828. Source: Henry County US GenWeb site.

Ledbetter, Isaac, September 4, 1824, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 2, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Matthews, Archibald, 1820 Henry County Clerk of the Circuit Court. Source: HENRY, THE MOTHER COUNTY by Hoyt M. Warren, Sr.

Matthews, William, September 4, 1824, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 2, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Moses, John M., July 27, 1826, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 4, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Palmer, Elisha, October 19, 1824, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 2-3, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Patterson, Timothy, January 15, 1824, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 3, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Pendale, J. W. L., June 15, 1823, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 3, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Pittman, Tesh T., June 15, 1823, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 3, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

NOTE: This could possibly be Timothy Pittman who does appear in Helon Cutler’s “Created 1820 Henry County Census.”

Pynes, James, 1827 Clerk of the Henry County Court. Source: HENRY, THE MOTHER COUNTY by Hoyt M. Warren, Sr.

Pynes, Lussius, Clerk of the Henry County Court who sent notice of John A. Chumney’s election as constable to the Alabama Secretary of State on April 4, 1828. Source: HENRY COUNTY POLITICAL RETURN 1822-1860 AND AREA CHURCH RECORDS.

Reaves, David, Witnessed John Hodges’ will in 1826. Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 4, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Smith, Simon, July 27, 1826, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 4, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Stanly, Axa J., child of Sands Standly mentioned in Sands Standly’s will April 8, 1829, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 9-10, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Stanly, James B. F., mentioned in Sands Standly’s will April 8, 1829, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 9-10, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Stanly, Polly Ann, child of Sands Standly mentioned in Sands Standly’s will April 8, 1829, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 9-10, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Stanly, Sands, Sands Standly’s will, April 8, 1829, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 9-10, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Stanly, Sarah C., wife of Sands Standly mentioned in Sands Standly’s will April 8, 1829, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 9-10, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Stanly, Shad S., child of Sands Standly mentioned in Sands Standly’s will April 8, 1829, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 9-10, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Tarver, Hartwell, June 15, 1823, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 3, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Turner, John, One of the 1820 Henry County election precincts was in his home. Source: ALABAMA, HER HISTORY, RESOURCES, WAR RECORD, AND PUBLIC MEN, 1540-1872 by W. Brewer, 1872.

Wilkins, Tabitha, October 19, 1824, Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 2-3, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

Williams, L. F., Witnessed John Hodges’ will in 1826. Source: HENRY COUNTY DEED BOOK A-C (1824-1844), page 4, (FHL US/CAN Film 1302306)

==================END OF LIST ============================

Re: 1820 Census and Alabama territory south of Henry County at the time

Posted: 4 Sep 2006 3:41AM GMT
Classification: Query
Steve,

Thanks for the information on Henry county’s early boundaries.

Indeed, you are correct. The southern boundary of Henry County was the Florida state line from the county’s formation in 1819. In support of your studies and maps, I found the following in “ACTS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF ALABAMA PASSED AT ITS FIRST SESSION” “Which was begun and held in the town of Huntsville, on Monday, the twenty-fifth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and nineteen, and ended the seventeenth day of December the same year,” page 51.

“Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That all that tract of country lying east of the range line between thirteen and fourteen, south and east of the county of Butler, south of Montgomery county, west of the Indian boundary line and the Chattahoochee, and north of the thirty-first degree of north latitude, shall constitute one county, to be called and known by the name of Henry.”

Since the thirty-first degree of north latitude is the old 1799 Ellicott Line that delineates the boundary between Alabama and Florida, I am totally convinced that NO PART of Conecuh was left south of Henry County which was later added to Henry County.

Even though my great hope of finding new information about my forefathers in the 1820 Conecuh census is dashed, some good came of my diversion. I discovered the marvelous “Alabama Legislative History” web site (http://www.legislature.state.al.us/misc/history/history.html).


Thanks again for setting me straight,
Jim Chumney
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