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Picture of Mary B. Fields Hitch and Elizabeth Parmele Badger

Picture of Mary B. Fields Hitch and Elizabeth Parmele Badger

Posted: 1 Aug 2005 10:17PM GMT
Classification: Query
I have two pictures that I purchased in an antique store in Tucson, AZ. Information written on one picture states that she is Mary B. Fields Hitch grandmother of John Badger, mother of Ellmoore Hitch Badger. The second picture is of Elizabeth Parmele Badger, grandmother of John Badger, mother of Sidney Badger. I am not related to these families. If these are your relatives please let me know. Would like to return the pictures to their families.

Re: Picture of Mary B. Fields Hitch and Elizabeth Parmele Badger

Posted: 4 Apr 2006 9:18PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Badger
I am from the Badger family and those names have come up in the genealogy.
My e-mail now is anitaebw8@aol.com
Thank-you

Re: Picture of Mary B. Fields Hitch and Elizabeth Parmele Badger

Posted: 22 Aug 2009 5:43PM GMT
Classification: Query
I saw your post from 2005 concerning a photo of Mary Beatrice Fields Hitch. She was my great, great-grandmother. She lived on Bayou Teche in LA during the Civil War; met and married Union Capt. Ebenezer Hitch from Mass. and had numerous children - but just 5 lived to be adults. My great-grandmother was one of the daughters, Beth. My grandmother, Beatrice Clark Wharton, used to speak of the Badgers, but I am not sure of the connection. Information on the family is found in Agnes DeMille's book, Where the Wings Grow. (Agnes and my grandmother were first cousins).

Re: Picture of Mary B. Fields Hitch and Elizabeth Parmele Badger

Posted: 15 Jan 2010 3:37AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Badger, Parmele
Elizabeth Florence Parmele was the first wife of Algernon Sidney Badger, who was born in Boston in 1839, educated at the Milton Academy, and in 1861 enlisted in the 6th Massachusetts Infantry, which had to fight its way through Baltimore rioters on its way to Washington, D.C. He participated in the New Orleans campaign, was commissioned an officer in the 1st Louisiana Cavalry Regiment, U.S. Volunteers, and rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, commanding in the field. After the end of the Civil War, he was assigned as Provost Marshal in Austin, Texas, where he was known to keep order. In 1870, he was appointed Superintendant of the New Orleans police and brigadier general of the Louisiana National Guard, which he led in the battle of Independence Square in 1874, when he sustained four gunshot wounds, shattering a leg and an arm. Subsequently, he was Postmaster of New Orleans, Collector of Customs, and Appraiser of Merchandise, executing each post with forceful vigor. His death in New Orleans in 1905 was noted in the New York Times. He was a distinguished American, one of the last casualties of the Civil War.
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