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Single Surname Study (all variant spellings)

Single Surname Study (all variant spellings)

Jerry W. Segroves (View posts)
Posted: 18 Feb 1999 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Segrave, Segraves, Seagrave, Seagraves, Segrove, Segroves, Seagrove
Working a single-surname project. The earliest I have is Thomas De Seagrave who entered England with Wm the Conquerer and was granted land in what is not Leicestershire. I have one report that he supplied the name for the village of Seagrave (but there is another story that a descendant took the family name from the village) what is perplexing is that the descendants all spelled the name Segrave (whereas it is actually spelled Seagrave on all maps)!

I have 5000+ names (some are duplicates), 40+ variant spellings. To illustrate the ease with various spellings may occur: The 1900 census of the Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory lists my G-grandfather (Thomas W.) with the spelling of Seagrove (my G-grandmother Elizabeth (?) was 1/4 Chickasaw. In the 1910 census for the State of Oklahoma, my grandfather James Britton's Surname appears as Segroves. It is interesting to note that all the more than 40 variant spellings I have found are Soundex S261! It's also interesting that a preponderance of those included in the SSN Death Index are shown as Segrove (s).

Another story - this time about Seagrove, NC and Seagraves, TX. Both were supposedly named for a railroad man. In the case of NC city, it is said that he was a man of exaggerated ego, and he painted such large letters on the station sign, that there was no room for the last S. Is it possible that these two were the same man or at least related?

Surname Seagraves

Phil Segrave (View posts)
Posted: 7 Mar 1999 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
A good site for the surname Segrave is found by this link:

http://www.parsonstech.com/genealogy/trees/wpoulsono/d1.htm

Seagrave

P Murphy (View posts)
Posted: 8 Nov 1999 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
My grandfather's name was Michael Sagriff. Do you recognize this as a variation of Seagrave? My ancestors are Irish, although I'm having a time finding Sagriff as an Irish name. Any suggestions?

Seagraves,Segraves

Julie (View posts)
Posted: 15 Sep 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Seagraves, Segraves
My last name is Segraves, whch is also how my father spelled it. Hwever, I have seen it spelled as Seagraves on his sisters school records and my great grandfather's civil war pension records. My cousin tells me we migrated from Ireland though my father said we were from England. My great grandfather is John TR Seagraves who served in the Civil War and died in 1888.

segraves

paul seegraves (View posts)
Posted: 15 Dec 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: segraves
my family fled ireland during the 1600s because of religion his name was francis segraves

Re: segraves

Posted: 19 Dec 2002 9:02PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 19 Dec 2002 9:57PM GMT
Surnames: Segraves/Seagraves
Paul, after years of research on the family name, I have yet to find a reference source which describes the immigration of any of our ancestors, except Daniel Segrave's book on the Massachusetts branch. May I ask about your source for the immigration of Francis? Is he the Francis Segraves who settled in Isle of Wight County, VA in the late 1680s?

Re: Seagraves,Segraves

Posted: 19 Dec 2002 9:32PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 19 Dec 2002 9:57PM GMT
Surnames: Segraves/Seagraves
Julie, it has been a whlie since you posted this, so it may not be of interest, but I have a large data base on the family name and am familiar with your John TR Seagraves. If you are interested, I can share what I have with you.
On he subject of spelling variations, I once wrote a short article on the Genealogy.com site about the variations in the Seagraves spelling. The short summary is that spelling does not matter in this research. All of us with any variant of the name come from the same general source. Our ancestors were not paticularly concerned about or even aware of, in some cases, how their surname was spelled by clerks, census takers and other such scribes. Only in recent decades have we focused on that detail.
Be careful of the "facts" from Jerry W. Segroves. There is no source or reference describing the exact origin of our family name. Neither is there a source which shows a Thomas DeSegrave being part of William the Conqueror's army. He is mentioned in the Domeday Book compiled in 1086 as a landowner in Leicestershire. We do not have a source for any particular immigration from England or Ireland of an early Seagraves. There are three 'branches' of the family dating from colonial times: North Carolina, New Jersey and Massachusetts. Only the MA branch has a genealogy that describes the original family from England.
I have more if you are interested.
Jim

Re: Seagrave

Posted: 19 Dec 2002 9:48PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 19 Dec 2002 9:57PM GMT
Surnames: Seagrave/Seagraves/Segraves
I know this is old, but I just came across it and noticed that you did not get a reply. I have researched the family name for years and have found many interesting variations on the spelling (since only in recent decades have most people been particularly concerned about it). Your Irish Sagriff is a new one on me, however.
It reminds me of the branch of the family that settled in eastern Kentucky from the North Carolina branch. One group of them during the 19th Century started spelling the name Sagraves and their descendants still do.
Since there is a large Irish contingent of the Seagrave family, mostly descended from Englishmen who migrated there in the 12th and 13th Centuries, it is very possible that your Sagriff is a misunderstanding of the name. Generally in earlier times only the small portion of the population that was literate (priests, clerks, scribes, etc.) wrote down names as he thought they should be spelled, causing no end of trouble for modern researchers.
For a detailed discussion of the original English baronial family that had many Irish connections, see the book "The Seagrave Family 1066-1935" by Charles W. Seagrave, London, 1936. It is only available in major libraries now, including the Genealogy Library in Salt Lake City.
Good luck.

Re: Seagraves,Segraves

Julie (View posts)
Posted: 20 Dec 2002 10:04PM GMT
Classification: Query
yes I am very interested, please let me know what you have...thank you

Re: Seagraves,Segraves

Julie (View posts)
Posted: 20 Dec 2002 10:04PM GMT
Classification: Query
yes I am very interested, please let me know what you have...thank you
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