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THRELKELD, CHRISTOPHER

THRELKELD, CHRISTOPHER

Posted: 24 Oct 1999 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Nov 2003 11:47PM GMT
Surnames: threlkeld,
Looking for any info on a Christopher Threlkeld believed to have migrated to the US sometime before 1695 from some where in England.

THRELKELD

Posted: 24 Mar 2001 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Nov 2003 11:54PM GMT
Surnames: threlkeld,
Thanks so much. I would image you could tell us much more. Right? I am another Threlkeld researcher. Mary Kathryn Prideaux Leitner

The surname and village of Threlkeld

Eddie Wren (View posts)
Posted: 24 Mar 2001 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Nov 2003 11:51PM GMT
Surnames: threlkeld, clifford, rutland, vescy,
Dear David (if you still visit this bulletin board!)

I'm afraid I am unable to help you with your specific query but I am appending some information for you on the village from which your name almost certainly originates.

To the best of my knowledge there is only one place called Threlkeld anywhere in the Old World. It is, indeed, my own home village (though I have now been sent 30 miles south, into the wilds of the former county of Westmorland as a missionary... and at least they haven't eaten me yet! LOL)

There were several theories about the meaning of the word Threlkeld but the experts settled on the following:
"The spring (Keld) of the Thralls [Thrall was a Feudal term for ‘a man bound in service to his Lord’]. This is now accepted as the correct derivation of the name and, according to Bouch & Jones, indicates that the Norse settlers [Vikings] brought bondsmen with them whom, it is probable, they 'set up in dependent outlying farmsteads'."

St Kentigern visited Threlkeld in the year 553 A.D.

The Barony of Greystoke, of which Threlkeld was a part, was created about 1120 A.D. by Henry I, being granted to Forne, son of Sigulf, a Yorkshireman. Millward & Robinson, however, state that Forni "was a descendant of the family that held the estate before 1066" and that this was "a territorial continuity which may reflect the times of occupation of the Iron Age Fort on Carrock Fell."

In 1318 A.D., the 11th year of Edward II's reign [11 Ed.2.], "...John de Derwentwater held this vill [Threlkeld] of the Lord of Graystock by homage and suit of court at Graystock; which seems to have been only by way of trust in a settlement."

In 30 Ed. 3. (1357) William de Threlkeld was the owner of this manor under the Graystocks [Greystokes] and in the same year was Sheriff of the County of Cumberland.

In 13 Ric. 2. (1390) William de Threlkeld was Member of Parliament for this county

The actual Threlkeld family apparently moved to live on another of their estates which, if memory serves me correctly, was at Melmerby, some 20-25 miles east of Threlkeld, between Penrith and Alston.

The Threlkelds, though, did have one very notable incident to their name whilst still in their true home village, and that was this:

In 1461 A.D., Sir Lancelot Threlkeld became guardian (and later, stepfather) of Henry, Lord Clifford, 'The Shepherd Earl', heir of the great house of Clifford. The boy's father, John, was the infamous 'Black Clifford' who had murdered the young Earl of Rutland after the Battle of Wakefield in 1460 and was, himself, killed by a random arrow at the Battle of Towton in 1461, after which his son was entrusted to Sir Lancelot Threlkeld who hid the child on his estate in Cumberland disguised so effectively as a shepherd that the boy grew up unable to read or write. Meanwhile, at his inquest, 'Black Clifford' was attainted for high treason, his peerage and his lands were declared forfeit. His widow, Margaret, the daughter of Lord Vescy, married Sir Lancelot shortly afterwards but the young shepherd boy was kept completely oblivious of his true parentage and inheritance until he was 30 years old. Following the overthrow of the House of York, at Bosworth Field in 1485, Henry VII reversed the Clifford family attainder and restored their estates. The 'Shepherd Earl' was created a Knight of the Bath at the coronation of Henry VIII in 1509 and was later to fight bravely against the Scots at Floden in 1513. None-the-less, his country upbringing had made great impact upon Lord Clifford's personality and he spent as much of his time as he could living quietly at his Yorkshire home, Barden Tower.

I know this doesn't help with your Christopher Threlkeld but I hope it is of interest to you, and to anyone else researching the Threlkeld family

Regards,
Eddie Wren (de Threlkeld!)

TAYLOR FAMILY

Posted: 25 Mar 2001 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Nov 2003 11:55PM GMT
Surnames: taylor, eastman, pierpoint, muskgrove,
My George Taylor's Pedigree is from the Taylor family in Grant County, Wisconsin. His parents were Henry and Arminda Eastman Taylor. The Eastman's family go back to Roger Estman and the Taylor family go back to Charles Taylor. The surnames connected to my George Taylor besides the above are: TAYLOR;EASTMAN;PIERPOINT;MUSKGROVE. Search my site and see if we connect there. All were originally from UK. Good luck in your search. Mary K Leitner

TAYLOR

Celeste Taylor Rudberg (View posts)
Posted: 25 Mar 2001 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Nov 2003 11:54PM GMT
Surnames: toylor, hayton, hayden,
I am still looking for information on George TAYLOR who married Ann(e) HAYTON or HAYDEN on 27 May 1822 in Torpenhow.
Any info on their parents, their children, etc.?

THRELKELD, CHRISTOPHER

Posted: 26 Mar 2001 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Nov 2003 11:51PM GMT
Surnames: wren,
Thanks a lot Eddie Wren. I would love to visit Threlkeld, England someday and would love to meet you in person. I have a web site that takes me to the Threlkeld Church in England.http://hometown.aol.com/loudavid/myhomepage/index.html This url is my home page on aol. Thanks again for the info

Re: THRELKELD, CHRISTOPHER

Posted: 27 Jun 2001 2:14AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Nov 2003 11:47PM GMT
Surnames: threlkeld, sanfords,
I am searching for information on Christopher Threlkeld the immigrant who emigrated from Cumberland England around 1695 arriving in Virginia around that time and marrying a woman named Mary about that time also. He had sons that were born in 1966, 1968. The latter was at King George Co in Virginia. His birthdate is around 1660 according to several sources of information on the web. He supposedly died in 1710. I was wondering if there are church records in Carlisle or information existing in a family Threlkeld history. This line of Threlkelds links up with the Sanfords (Elizabeth Threlkeld married William Ransdell Sanford). These would be my great, great grandparents. Williams father John fought in the American Revolution at age 10 - recorded in several volumes of DAR records. I would love to trace the immigrant back - perhaps in Cumberland near Threlkeld. It appears that the immigrant family farmed. They had lands or plantations. There wills are a matter of record. I was thinking that there should be a birth or baptismal record, perhaps a ship record. I don't know if he married before or after his emigration. Any information would be appreciated. I know that parish records are available back to the 1500's. There may have been deeds. Thank you in advance. I would love to visit the Lake District and Cumberland having traced this ancestor back to England.

Re: THRELKELD, CHRISTOPHER

Posted: 27 Jun 2001 5:08AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Nov 2003 11:49PM GMT
Surnames: threlkeld, conway,
Christopher Threlkeld is believed to be the original immigrant. In HAYDEN'S GENEALOGIES, P.565 is a record of Christopher Threlkeld, who was in 1695, a witness to a deed of Edwin Conway to his son Edwin and daughter Mary. It was no doubt this Christopher who made a will in Northumberland Co., Virginia, dated Feb. 10, 1710, and probated Feb. 1711, (Record Book 1710-1713, p.1730), mentionimg his wife Mary and sons William, Christopher, Henry, and James. and daughter Elizabeth.Subj: Christopher Threlkeld (17th Century) and the Threlkeld family
Date: 03/24/2001 2:43:29 PM Eastern Standard Time
From: eddiewren@hotmail.com (Eddie Wren)
To: Loudavid@aol.com




Dear David,

I am writing this in response to your October 1999 query on the Cumbria Family History bulletin board and I hope that you still have the same e-mail address or this is a pointless exercise! LOL
I'm afraid I am unable to help you with your specific query regarding Christopher Threlkeld, but I am appending some information for you on the village from which your name certainly originates. To the best of my knowledge there is only one place called Threlkeld anywhere in the Old World. It is, indeed, my own home village.

There were several theories about the meaning of the placename of Threlkeld but the experts settled on the following: "The spring (Keld) of the Thralls [Thrall was a Feudal term for ‘a man bound in service to his Lord’]. This is now accepted as the correct derivation of the name and, according to Bouch & Jones, indicates that the Norse settlers [Vikings] brought bondsmen with them whom, it is probable, they 'set up in dependent outlying farmsteads'."

St Kentigern visited Threlkeld in the year 553 A.D.

The Barony of Greystoke, of which Threlkeld was a part, was created about 1120 A.D. by Henry I, being granted to Forne, son of Sigulf, a Yorkshireman. Millward & Robinson, however, state that Forni "was a descendant of the family that held the estate before 1066" and that this was "a territorial continuity which may reflect the times of occupation of the Iron Age Fort on Carrock Fell."

In 1318 A.D., the 11th year of Edward II's reign [11 Ed.2.], "...John de Derwentwater held this vill [age][i.e. Threlkeld] of the Lord of Graystock by homage and suit of court at Graystock; which seems to have been only by way of trust in a settlement."

In 30 Ed. 3. (1357) William de Threlkeld was the owner of this manor under the Graystocks [Greystokes] and in the same year was Sheriff of the County of Cumberland.

In 13 Ric. 2. (1390) William de Threlkeld was Member of Parliament for Cumberland

The actual Threlkeld family apparently moved to live on another of their estates which, if memory serves me correctly, was at Melmerby, some 20-25 miles east of Threlkeld, between Penrith and Alston.

The Threlkelds, though, did have one very notable incident to their name whilst still in their true home village, and that was this:
In 1461 A.D., Sir Lancelot Threlkeld became guardian (and later, stepfather) of Henry, Lord Clifford, 'The Shepherd Earl', heir of the great house of Clifford. The boy's father, John, was the infamous 'Black Clifford' who had murdered the young Earl of Rutland after the Battle of Wakefield in 1460 and was, himself, killed by a random arrow at the Battle of Towton in 1461, after which his son was entrusted to Sir Lancelot Threlkeld who hid the child on his estate in Cumberland [i.e. *at* Threlkeld] disguised so effectively as a shepherd that the boy grew up unable to read or write. Meanwhile, at his inquest, 'Black Clifford' was attainted for high treason, his peerage and his lands were declared forfeit. His widow, Margaret, the daughter of Lord Vescy, married Sir Lancelot shortly afterwards but the young shepherd boy was kept completely oblivious of his true parentage and inheritance until he was 30 years old. Following the overthrow of the House of York, at Bosworth Field in 1485, Henry VII reversed the Clifford family attainder and restored their estates. The 'Shepherd Earl' was created a Knight of the Bath at the coronation of Henry VIII in 1509 and was later to fight bravely against the Scots at Floden in 1513. None-the-less, his country upbringing had made great impact upon Lord Clifford's personality and he spent as much of his time as he could living quietly at his Yorkshire home, Barden Tower.
I know this doesn't help specifically with your Christopher Threlkeld but I hope it is of interest to you in respect of the overall Threlkeld family.

For some years I have slowly been working on a book about the history of the village and everyone I can ever show to have lived there (like a thousand-year directory) but though I keep ploughing hours and hours into it, there is still a long way to go. My proposed book is the reason that the above information was readily available to be pasted into this reply. I hope you enjoy it.

Regards,
Eddie Wren (de Threlkeld!)MARY THRELKELD'S 2ND MARRIAGE
001 BENJAMIN DOGGETT, son of Rev. Benjamin and Jane Doggett; b. 1665, Hadleigh, Co. Suffolk, England; d. 1723, Lancaster Co., VA; m(1) BETTY (surname unknown); m(2) abt 1711, Lancaster Co., VA, Mrs. MARY THRELKELD, widow of Christopher Threlkeld, d. abt 1737, Lancaster Co., VA.
Children (Doggett):
(children of marriage to Betty)
011 Benjamin m. Mary
012 John m. Mary
013 Elizabeth m. Philip Frond
014 Hannah m. 1718 Thomas Yerby
015 Ann <reeves015.htm> m. George Reeves
016 William d. 1751
01w Margaret
01x Jane
017 Richard m. Ann Ascough
(children of marriage to Mary)
018 Thomas d. 1775 m. Bathsheba
01y Mary
01z Winifret
019 Reuben d. 1772 m. Hannah
The order of the children of Benjamin Doggett, as shown in the above table, is estimated from the best information available. The only thing that can be stated with some certainty is that, based on the order in which they are named in Benjamin's will, the sons and daughters, respectively, are in the proper chronological order. The name of Benjamin, shown as the eldest child, is inferred. As discussed below, it is clear that a son predeceased the subject, and the obvious missing given name is Benjamin. However, this is only speculation and no proof has been seen.

Benjamin Doggett was the eldest child of the Rev. Benjamin and his wife Jane, and the only child born in England to emigrate to Virginia and survive. His christening is recorded in the parish register of Hadleigh, Suffolk, as occurring 9 Jun 1665, and we can presume therefore that he was born in late June or early July of that year. The Rev. Benjamin was curate of the Hadleigh church, but whether he presided at the baptism of his first child is not indicated in the register.

At the death of Rev. Benjamin in 1682, Benjamin, as the eldest son, received the largest portion, 150 acres, of the 350 acre plantation belonging to his father. The devise was subject to the condition that he not marry until he reached the age of 22 years. We can assume therefore that he did not marry until after June 1687. The 150 acres was the portion of the plantation upon which the dwelling house and other improvements was located, and Benjamin lived on that land until his death in 1723. Benjamin was mentioned in two other instances in his father's will. First, he did not receive any share of proceeds of sale of any cattle belonging to the estate, because "he hath a good stock of his own." At age 16, he had begun to accumulate livestock for his future life as a farmer. Second, he is charged with providing "accomodation" on the plantation for his mother until she remarried, and for his brothers and sister "till they are capable to live on their own." Rev. Benjamin had provided in his will for the land devised two his two younger sons to be "seated" or improved with dwelling houses, and for indentured servants to be purchased to work the land. However, as the children were only about 10, 8, and 6 years of age, it would be some time before they would be able to live on their own. We do not know whether the children did in fact live with Benjamin, or whether they lived with their mother and her husband John Boatman.

Benjamin was married twice. The surname of his first wife is not known, but it would appear that her first name was Betty. In 1694, Benjamin and Betty Doggett were named as devisees in the nuncupative will of Thomas Thompson. Thompson resided on the plantation adjoining that of Benjamin. As there is no other Betty Doggett of the proper age, we must assume that Betty was the first wife of Benjamin. Benjamin and Betty had four sons and five daughters. Two of the daughters, Margaret and Jane, do not appear further in the records.

It is not known when Betty died, as she does not appear further in the records, but he married again, in late 1711, to Mrs. Mary Threlkeld, widow of Christopher Threlkeld of Northumberland County. Northumberland County records contain a court order dated 16 Jan 1711/12, showing that Mary Doggett, executrix of the will of Christopher Threllkell, and her husband Benjamin Doggett appeared in court and presented Threlkeld's will for probate. There are a number of variant spellings of "Threlkeld," including "Thrailkill." Benjamin and Mary had four children, two sons and two daughters. No information about the two daughters has been seen, except that which is contained in Benjamin's will.

Benjamin died in 1723. His will, dated 18 Sep 1723, was recorded in Lancaster County records on 13 Nov 1723, when it was presented for probate by the widow, Mary Doggett. His son John was named as co-executor but does not seem to have been involved in the probate proceedings.The will directed that the estate not be appraised, but an inventory of the personal property was filed with the court on December 3. The estate consisted of those things which would be expected to be owned by a middle class planter of the time. In addition to the expected household goods, harvested crops, and livestock, Benjamin was the owner of one female negro slave named Criss.Criss was bequeathed to the widow for her lifetime and on her death to the four children of Benjamin and Mary.The balance of the personal estate was left to the widow, except for nominal bequests of one shilling given to the children of Benjamin's first marriage and to his grandson James Doggett.

James Doggett, named as grandson of the testator, is the only grandson named in the will and is named first in the list of legatees given a shilling "in full of all claims whatsoever." It is clear from this language that James was the eldest child of a predeceased son (who we have speculated was named "Benjamin,"), as otherwise he would not have had any claim to part of the testator's estate.

Earlier in 1723, the year of his death, Benjamin made a gift to his son Thomas of a negro boy named "Mingo," and a gift to his daughter Elizabeth Frond of a negro boy named "Tom." These two gifts appear to be the only recorded transfers of slaves or other property to the children, and why these two children were singled out does not appear in the county records.

Commencing in the year 1686, Lancaster County records reflect a series of civil actions involving Benjamin, concerning the 350 acres of land owned by the Rev. Benjamin and devised to his three sons by his will. In December 1686, not long after reaching age 21, Benjamin petitioned the court for possession of his part of the land. In June 1687, John Boatman, as husband of the widow, Jane, sued Benjamin for the widow's one-third dower rights in the land. The court rendered a Solomon-like decision and ordered that Benjamin divide the land and that Boatman should then select one of the dividends as his wife's dower. In fact, the land was divided by Mr. George Heale, the County Surveyor, as is indicated by a later proceeding brought in November 1687 by Benjamin against Boatman, in which suit Benjamin asserted that Boatman was attempting to usurp his rights to the land and had made false statments to the court in that regard. The court found that the property had been divided by the Surveyor and that Boatman had made a fair selection of a portion as his wife's dower. The court affirmed Jane's lifetime dower interest in the part selected by her husband, and confirmed his possession of the selection in which the three sons of Rev. Benjamin had a residuary interest. Boatman was ordered to pay one-third of the charges of the Surveyor

Benjamin' differences with John Boatman were not limited to rights under his father's will. In February 1687/8, Benjamin brought an action against Boatman on behalf of his fifteen year old brother Richard for a share of corn and tobacco produced by Richard's labor in the fields, according to an agreement with Boatman. The court agreed with Benjamin and ordered Boatman to deliver the share of crops to Benjamin to provide Richard with clothing "in his present necessity."

Lancaster County records contain a few other references to Benjamin.He was a witness to wills in 1709 and 1717, served on several juries, and was listed in tax rolls beginning in 1688. One further item of interest is the appointment of Benjamin as Constable of Christ Church parish in 1710. Constables were appointed by the county court for each parish in the county to assist the sheriff in enforcing the laws and orders of the court and keeping the peace in the parish.

Mary Doggett, widow of Benjamin, died in 1737/8. Her will, dated 24 Jun 1735, was recorded in Lancaster County records on 10 Mar 1737/8. Named in the will were her three sons by her first marriage: William, Christopher, and James Thrailkill; and her daughter Elizabeth, wife of John Pinckard. Also named were her children by her marrige to Benjamin: Thomas, Reuben and Winifret Doggett. No mention is made of her daughter Mary Doggett, so we can assume that she died some time between 1723 and 1735. Her sons Thomas and Reuben were named as executors. Her stepgrandson, James Doggett, and his wife Charity acted as witnesses to her will.
011 BENJAMIN DOGGETT, son of Benjamin and Betty Doggett; b. early 1690's, Lancaster Co., VA; d. bef. 1723, Lancaster Co., VA; m. abt. 1712, MARY (surname unknown).
Children (Doggett):
111 James m. Charity
m. Rebecca George
112 Benjamin
For descendants, see separate page <benj011.htm>.
012 JOHN DOGGETT, son of Benjamin and Betty Doggett; d. 1739/40, Northumberland Co., VA; m. MARY (surname unknown), d. 1766, Northumberland Co., VA. Mary m(2) James Garner, d. abt 1751.
Children (Doggett):
121 Elizabeth m. George Leasure Brown
122 John b. 1732 d. 1804 m. 1767 Anne Garner
123 William b. 1736
124 Benjamin b. 1738 d. 1822 m. Hannah Webb
For descendants, see separate page <john012.htm>.
013 ELIZABETH DOGGETT, dau. of Benjamin and Betty Doggett; m. PHILIP FROND, d. 1745, Lancaster Co., VA.
Children (Frond):
151 Betty
152 Benjamin d. 1746

For descendants see separate page <frond013.htm>.
014 HANNAH DOGGETT, dau. of Benjamin and Betty Doggett; d. abt. 1761, Lancaster Co., VA; m. 1717/18, Lancaster Co., VA (MB 22 Feb), THOMAS YERBY, son of Thomas and Ann Yerby of Lancaster County.
Children (Yerby):
141 Thomas
142 John
143 Ann d. 1794 m. Thomas Brent
144 Elizabeth
145 Hannah m. John Edwards
146 Mary m. Thomas Hubbard

For descendants, see separate page <yerby016.htm>.
015 ANN DOGGETT, dau. of Benjamin Doggett; m. abt. 1718, GEORGE REEVES (RIVES), son of John and Grace Rives, b. 1695, VA, d. Pr. William Co., VA.
Children (Reeves):
151 Thomas b. 1719
152 Benjamin b. 1721 m. Sarah Wright
m. Sibbell
153 George m. Mary Eppes?
154 John
155 Moses
156 Elizabeth m. Mr. Haggard
157 Asa b. 1739 d. 1822 m. Sarah Lambert
For descendants, see separate page. <reeves015.htm>
016 WILLIAM DOGGETT, son of Benjamin and Betty Doggett; d. 13 Mar 1750/1, Northumberland Co., VA. Wife's name unknown.
Children (Doggett):
161 Sarah b. 1722
162 Ann b. 1725 m. Mr. Whelen
163 Benjamin
164 Hannah m. Mr. Coles
165 John b. 1734
For descendants, see separate page <william016.htm>.
017 RICHARD DOGGETT, son of Benjamin and Betty Doggett; m. ANN ASCOUGH, dau. of Thomas Ascough.
Children (Doggett):
141 Thomas b. 1731
For descendants, see separate page <richard017.htm>.
018 THOMAS DOGGETT, son of Benjamin and Mary Doggett; d. abt. 1775, Caroline Co, VA; m. BATHSHEBA (surname unknown).
Children (Doggett):
181 Reuben b. 1739 d. 1826 m. Mary Browne
182 Thomas
183 Benjamin
184 Presley
185 John
186 Bathsheba m. Thomas Merreman
187 Elizabeth b. 1747 m. Mr. Young
18x (dau.)
18y (dau.)
18z (dau.)
188 George
189 William m. Jane
18A James b. 1759 m. 1788 Ann Brown
18B Nancy
18C Judy
18D Lucy m. John Brown
For descendants, see separate page <thomas18.htm>.
019 REUBEN DOGGETT, son of Benjamin and Mary Doggett; d. 1772, Lancaster Co., VA; m. HANNAH (surname unknown). Hannah m(2) abt. 1777, William Wiblin.
Children (Doggett):
191 Reuben d. 1789 unm.
192 Jeremiah d. 1818 m. Mary Overstreet
193 Judith m. Mr. Chitwood
194 Sarah m. Mr. Light

Re: THRELKELD, CHRISTOPHER

mary eisele (View posts)
Posted: 25 Jul 2001 9:46PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Nov 2003 11:50PM GMT
Surnames: threlkeld,
Mary:
I have extensive info on the Threlkelds. Will be glad to share it with you.
My e-mail wft4157@alltel.net

Re: The surname and village of Threlkeld

Posted: 2 Oct 2001 2:36PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Sep 2004 2:13PM GMT
Surnames: wren, forne, fitz sigulf, fitz forne, d'oilly, beauclerc,
Dear Eddie Wren,
Just came across your interesting info on Threlkeld, while researching my Great Great Grandfather David Forne who lived in Nebraska USA and had my Great Grandfather Edward Thomas Forne b. 1856, he ran away to Australia at a young age and ended up in New Zealand. The early research of the Forne name produced a Forne Fitz Sigulf (Baron de Greystoke) son of Sigulf Fitz Forne. he was born about 1048 & died 1129, his daughter Edith FitzForne married Robert D"Oilly II Baron Norton of Oxford Castle, who was also the 3rd Concubine of Henry I of England (Henry Beauclerc) A Little more background info.
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