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REEVES

REEVES

Jacque (View posts)
Posted: 24 Sep 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: REEVES, BRANT, LEE
Searching for great grandfather Henry R. REEVES, his son Claud Jackson REEVES and daughters Mrs. John Lee and Vashti REEVES BRANT. Henry would have been born between 1860 and 1875. Claud was born in 1890 or 1893. Henry R. REEVES born in Oklahoma, children born in Texas

REEVES in Oklahoma

Kenneth W. Jenkins (View posts)
Posted: 27 Oct 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Jenkins, Reeves, Pittman, Bulla, Abshire, Campbell, Thor, Snow, Parks
I have a search that may interest you, although I do not have a connection that is obvious with your line. My grandfather Grover Cleveland Jenkins, Sr. was born in Springfield, Mo 1887, but his sister Johnnie Vida (Jenkins) Reeves was born in Indian Territory Oklahoma, 30 January 1890. She was with her family Cleveland Co Oklahoma, 1900 census. This family included her natural mother Anne J. (Campbell) Jenkins - Pittman, her step father George Francis Pittman and various step siblings. My grandfather G.C. Jenkins was living in Ft. Worth Texas with his father's sister (his aunt) Emma (Jenkins) Bulla in 1900. The possible connection with your Reeves is Johnnie married "Charles" (Tobias Charles Bain) Reeves who was born "somewhere in Texas" - His parents were James Franklin Reeves Sr and Elizabeth Caroline (Abshire). I have all their children and more. The Jenkins line is supposedly Cherokee and I have a Grover Cleveland Jenkins from the Dawes Rolls, but the age is 14 years off and the mother is incorrect. My grandfather stated he was one-half Cherokee, but this is not proven. His father (and Johnnie V. 's) was John G. Jenkins who married Anne (Campbell) in 1883, Dunklin Co Mo. Her Father was Merril P. Campbell, Randolph Co. Arkansas, and probably born in Alabama. Her mother was Mary J. (Thor), her grandmother was Mary (Snow) all from Obion Co. Tenn. If you trace a straight line going west it goes through Obion Tenn, Dunklin Mo, and Randolph Ark all within 200 miles. The family was in Oklahoma 1890 - stayed there for 20 years - my grandfather's step-siblings were in Pottawatomie Co Ok. - my grandfather was married there to his first wife (Mable Parks) in 1910. Do you find any Reeves connections here?

Allie Beatrice Campbell

J Carmiencke (View posts)
Posted: 9 Aug 1999 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Campbell
My grandmother's grandfather John Campbell was married to an Eliza Holt. Her mother was Elizabeth Hicks and her father was Eliphus Holt. Elizabeth is supposedly cherokee and my grandmother made reference to being part Cherokee.

m. Lauderdale Co. Al in 1825.
Posted: 2 Mar 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 29 Sep 2006 1:20AM GMT
Surnames: Holt, Hicks, Campbell
Your information is correct. Elizabeth was the daughter of Nathaniel Hicks ("white") and his full-blood Cherokee wife, Nan'Ye'Ha (see "History of the Cherokee Indians" by Emmet Starr)

Elizabeth Hicks was a half-blood and the sister of Charles R. and William Hicks, both of which were Principal Chiefs of the Cherokee Tribe at different times.

I am a descendant of Charles

Jerri (Rogers) Chasteen

False stories!

Janice Youngpuppy (View posts)
Posted: 4 Aug 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Just in case you really DO believe this story (!!! VERY DOUBTFUL!!!) and for other people's benefit--, there isn't a word of truth in it!!!! The Cherokees NEVER (in recorded history) inhabited ANY PART of KY and the entire state was cleared of Indian prior to 1830. In addition, this story is SO old that it has whiskers on it!!! We hear it (and other variations) on all of the Cherokee mail lists, forums, and even through the mail!

I've never in my life seen so many people who were so crazy to claim to be something THAT THEY ARE NOT!!!!

BREEDEN

Calvin Stucker (View posts)
Posted: 4 Aug 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: BREEDEN
MY GRANDFATHER WAS A FULL BLOODED CHEROKEE INDIAN. WHILE STILL A VERY YOUNG BABY HE WAS TAKEN TO SOME MISSIONARIES WHOSE LAST NAME WAS BREEDEN. MY GRANDFATHER'S VILLAGE HAD BEEN BURNED TO THE GROUND IN KY AND A SOLDIER FOUND MY GRANDFATHER SOMEWHERE IN THE RUINS AND TOOK HIM TO THIS MISSIONARY FAMILY TO RAISE.

I AM TRYING TO DO A GENEALOGY ON MY FAMILY AND TRYING TO LOCATE INFORMATION CONCERNING MY GRANDFATHER AND HIS ANCESTORS. MY GRANDFATHER'S NAME WAS GREENBRIAR(FIRST) AND THE BREEDENS GAVE HIM THEIR LAST NAME WHEN THEY TOOK HIM IN.

MY MOTHER'S MAIDEN NAME WAS YOUNG AND MY FATHER'S NAME WAS STUCKER. MY MOTHER WAS FROM KY AND MY FATHER FROM IN.
ANY HELP YOU COULD GIVE ME ON THIS WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED. MY EMAIL ADDRESS IS calvinstucker@hotmail.com
Posted: 4 Aug 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 13 Mar 2004 9:21PM GMT
Surnames: holt, rogers, ryan
My gggrandfather, Joseph Ryan, maried Martha Holt, dau of
Drury Holt & Elizabeth Rogers, supposedly of the Cherokee
indians. Not for sure who Drury's father was, maybe Nathaniel that m a Clanton? Thanks

REEVES in Oklahoma - update

Kenneth W. Jenkins (View posts)
Posted: 9 Aug 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 27 Feb 2009 6:24AM GMT
Surnames: Jenkins, Reeves, Bulla, Campbell, Thor, Snow
Cherokee Genealogy -

It is a year and one half since I posted and I am no farther in finding any connection on this line - alas. But I read with interest some of the more recent comments under my posting. I really have mixed reactions to the more heated comments, but I can see frustration on both sides.

To have a relation claim American Indian heritage is just about typical in EVERY family, especially in the Southern states. When selecting a "tribe" - "Cherokee" seems a very popular choice - I suppose because they played such an unusual and tradgic part in North American history, and because of the highly respectable reputation the Cherokee and other "Civilized Indian Nations" had as a cultural group. I imagine that most family stories are bogus or half truths when it comes to claims of "Indian" or "Cherokee" heritage. How many people could possibly have intermarried?!!!??? Certainly not as many as claim - look at the different "Indian Rolls" and all the rejections.

On the other side of the coin, American Indian research is extremely difficult and is a real challange for those with paultry facts on their supposedly American Indian heritage - those without a starting place. Hummmm - been there - done that! But it is inconsiderate for ANYONE to write to ANY messageboard without providing sufficient information on their personal line (most researchers are not mindreaders, nor magicians able to pull a family connection out of the hat!) My suggestion to newer researchers (and older, too) is to read everything possible on the history of the American Indian - especially those whose genalogical line is suspected to be in the southern states of North Carolina, Georgia or Tennessee. (OOPS dont forget - Florida is a fascinating area for American Indian history (Seminole and others), as is the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley for the associated Cherokee tribes). Not only will it be informative but it will open your eyes to what REALLY happened! (Forget what was taught in school). Many people forget there was a great dumping of different American Indian groups snd cultures in Oklahoma.

Personally, I am not 100% sure of American Indian heritage - and may never answer the question one way or another - BUT - what a fascinating study!.... My tenuous research, like many, is based upon family legend - but (bear with me here) also on observation. I remember my grandfather Grover Cleveland JENKINS, Sr. as a short, dark man. The cliche' is a "red" skin, but my grandfather was defiantely 'ruddy' in skin color his whole life. Even as an old man in bed, away from the sun for years, he was dark. He was rather short - 5'7' - and had very little body (I didn't check everywhere!) and facial hair (like me). Of course, we all in my family have black (dark-dark-dark brown) hair - no baldness - but so does my mother's side of the family.

BUT - this seems significant - rather than boast about his American Indian heritage, my grandfather seemed to hide it - by changing the subject (I was justa kid...) - perhaps because he was born in a time of severe racial prejudice. He indicated his mother and his aunt never wanted to talk of family history (his father died young - John G. JENKINS - musta been a murderer or something as I cannot find him after 1883!). Strangely, my grandfather (and my father) had hazel-green eyes - striking effect with the dark skin.

My father was so dark that when he was in North Africa during WWII the natives thought he was Arabic.

Now that proves absolutely nothing. Still, I have photos of my grandfather - rather good looking man - but I swear he looks ethnic American Indian - but more the Iroquois than the Cherokee in the photo books - not Plains Indian Oriental, but not WASP at all. Hummmm.... But, it is easy to fall into that trap. What does a Cherokee Indian look like? You might as well ask what does an Irish or Mexican heritage person look like, ha! Appearances vary greatly - in any group.

I ramble - my only question is this: my mother finally remembered she had asked her husband's grandmother (Anne CAMPBELL) what her American Indian name was and with what tribe (clan?) she was associated. Fifty years had passed when my mom and I spoke and she was not clear on what Anne said, but she seemed to remember the reply was that the name translated to "Little Feather" or 'Little Bird" - but more telling, she said she was from a group "like the Cherokee but different", and my mother said she said the name but it was unrecognizable. I have always felt it might have been an associated group to the Cherokee, but I cannot prove that. I wish Mom could have remembered more - or better - written it down...

As Anne's THOR and SNOW families suddenly showed up in Obion County, Tennessee (cannot find them earlier - SNOW may have been from North Carolina) - and as her CAMPBELL family was from the top of Georgia, that these lines, if American Indian at all, hid their origins really well. They did have prosperous farmsteads and land - did not appear to be without money. They were definately not in the first (semi-forced/voluntary) American Indian migration (1815 and later if I remember correctly) to the Arkansas River Vally, although they did eventually settle in Randolph County, Arkansas 1840s. They were not in the Great Removal - but did end up living in Indian Territory by 1890 - but the less fertile area of Pottawatomie and Cleveland Counties.... My grandfather and all his people lived in Shawnee for years, Grover Sr. moving to Texas only after WWI. But living in Oklahoma doesn't automatically make you American Indian...

This is speculation, but if my family were indeed American Indian, they slid under the relocation efforts of the United States government by passing as white. If this happened, they must have been fairly well intermarried with the locals, so any claim of American Indian bloodlines would be distant.

I am too old to follow "New Age" fads, and I don't like to claim heritage to American Indian (or Irish or Mexican or whatever) without proof. (I remember there were other less than subtle comments - but not the context). I feel this is a great site - please hang in there...

I can see where more full-blooded (excuse the phrase) American Indian researchers would be tired as hell of the sometimes frivolous claims to "Indian" heritage by the same "white men" that almost destroyed that heritage less than 100 years ago. But - I would think the main goal would be more toward uniting the true descendants of the Indian Nations.

In closing, I find it amazing that in today's world - where being an ethnic or part Amerind (I still wonder if that is a good phrase - Amerind - awkward, or is my ear unused to the word?) is now "fashionable" - my grandfather (dead these 44 years) would be proudly telling me everything he knew about his family - instead of hiding his heritage, like he did.

He passed away too soon and now I am having a devil of a time tracing his (my) line! Auuuuggggh...

One final comment and I will shut up (I hang on to these few family tidbits like a bull terrier with a bone)- there was a time in the 1900s when my great-aunt Johnnie (JENKINS) REEVES wanted to apply for the Cherokee enrollment - possibly for compensation - more likely for land. Her aunt Emma (JENKINS) POLLACK-BULLA would not let her do it. A distant relative (we think this is right) Elizabeth SNOW of Lawrence County, Arkansas did apply and was rejected. There was also a THOR(E) family application that was turned down.

Hummm... is all that really true?

Just a few thoughts on a hot August night. Comments are welcome - nasty comments tolerated... whatever. Thanks.

Ken Jenkins

Yahoo Falls

Laura Brown McKenzie (View posts)
Posted: 10 Aug 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
THANK YOU!!!! I had forgotten!

http://www.fortunecity.com/greenfield/porton/73/yahoo.html

Folks are also are ignoring the fact that if you claimed to be Indian in some states (Alabama or Georgia ... correct?) you couldn't hold land OR vote. And that law didn't change until the 1960's. There was plenty of reason to hide who you were if you could. One of my grgrgrandmother's (not a Kentuckian but also not enrolled) wasn't allowed in school and her mother (a white woman married to an Indian) homeschooled her children. This same grgrgrandmother lived with me until I was 8. Not only did she tell me this but she also taught me how to treat others.

My grandfather on vacation one year made my grandmother lay down on the seat of the car as they drove through Alabama and Georgia to get to Florida after having trouble the previous year. How's that for hiding?

There ARE human stories outside of Indian Territory.

KY Cherokee

tari (View posts)
Posted: 10 Aug 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Watch our. Although there is a likely hodd the "story" is untrue, do not add more untruths to it. There was something of great immportance and sadness that happened to the Cherokee in KY. Do not lets us forget Yahoo Falls. My ancestors fell there. Friday August 10 1810. There were CHerokee villiages all the way to the Cumberland River in KY. The Chief Beloved Woman- Cornblossom. So Cherokees did live in what is now Kentucky.
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