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WWI military abbreviations

WWI military abbreviations

Posted: 8 May 2012 2:27PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi - can someone help me figure out what the abbreviations beside my great-grandfather's name mean? He's listed on a ship manifest in September 1918 returning from the war with "reason for returning" as "RES. VET. STUDIES".
Does anyone know what that means?
thanks!
Jo

Re: WWI military abbreviations

Posted: 8 May 2012 8:12PM GMT
Classification: Query
I believe that means "resume vetrinary studies. He was being sent back to school. Vets were important in that era. They still had horse calvery, mules still pulled wagons etc

Re: WWI military abbreviations

Posted: 9 May 2012 3:33AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 9 May 2012 3:38AM GMT
What country did he fight for and do you know anything about what he did in the service. Where did he serve. RES. as well as VET. can stand for many things. I don't disagree with the other answer that was given; but what he did if you know it. Could hold the answer.

Re: WWI military abbreviations

Posted: 9 May 2012 4:37PM GMT
Classification: Query
He fought for Canada, in the 107th Battalion, which saw action in France, I understand. He was a farmer and certainly had a background in raising cattle, etc before the war. But no formal training as a veterinarian as far as I know.
Thanks for any help you can provide.

Re: WWI military abbreviations

Posted: 10 May 2012 3:02AM GMT
Classification: Query
If he had the background at the farm and raising animals. It would stand to reason that he probably had some proficiency in taking care of a lot of different animals. I would imagine that he might have pursued a veternarian career. He probably took advantage of some sort of schooling or certification programs if there was such a thing.

I would have to have more info. to do some kind of search. If you want that done. His name, ETB, Rank and general info; unless you have done a search already. I would like to know at least his name. I have a couple of ideas.

Re: WWI military abbreviations

Posted: 10 May 2012 5:33AM GMT
Classification: Query
I suggest if he were in the 107th Batallion. That was the Pioneer Division. You should try the following: (1.) www.collectionscanada.gc.ca (2.)Canadian Expeditionary Force Study Group (3.) 107th Batallion Canadian Army and look up the War diaries of the 107th.

Re: WWI military abbreviations

Posted: 10 May 2012 12:19PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Doubleday
I agree, it doesn't seem out of the realm of possibility that he did animal care of some sort while overseas. I just know that he remained a farmer all his life and there was no mention of veterinary training. However anything's possible!
His name was John Richard Doubleday, born in Denton, Lincolnshire, England in 1889. Lived in Manitoba, Canada for most of his life. He was a lieutenant, regiment # 718102. I got that information from the ship manifest when he was returning in 1918 on the Olympic.
I notice he came back in September, before the war ended - do you think that means he was wounded, or was he just done his service? He signed up in 1915.
Thanks for any help you can provide - I'm new to Ancestry and just trying to figure everything out!

Re: WWI military abbreviations

Posted: 10 May 2012 2:29PM GMT
Classification: Query
If he was in the 107th Pioneer Batalion. I suggest you go and look at the Diary they have that I listed. It is very interesting.

They list the daily actions that were happening. It gives you a lot of info on just how they did the amount of fox holes or trenches. They list the daily count for deaths, wounded, etc. by name and rank.

I looked at every day for the listing for about two to three years up until they were bisbanded, reassign, etc. I didn't see his name; but I was looking for an enlisted person; but I looked at every name just in case; but that is a seperate list from the day to day operations and probably a lot is missing; because there was not as many days as it should have been. I am sure with what was happening and they caught hell according to what one officer had written in some correspondence to the commanding officer Lt. Col. Glen Campbell. I think he said I am sorry to see the pounding you are taking; that is not his exact words; but was my translation. The list of the dead and the casualties were sometimes very high; but it might have been a collection over a period of time.

You should visit the sights I suggested. They will give you a better idea of who he served with and an account of what really happened if you have not already.

Looking at the diaries and I must admit. I have not read many at all; but they give you a closeness to the war. The day to day activity. They are not by any means a tiny novel; but more like a morning report with some comments and correspobndence added; but like I say I have only seen and read little or almost none.

I intend to read more of them as I continue with the Boards. I will see what else I can come up with. You seem like you have done a good search already. I hope I can add to it for you. God Bless and God Speed.

Re: WWI military abbreviations

Posted: 22 May 2012 11:48AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks for that tip- really interesting reading! No one in my family knew he had served overseas, so it's wonderful information to have; a new understanding of the man.

Re: WWI military abbreviations

Posted: 22 May 2012 4:47PM GMT
Classification: Query
You say you obtained his details from a ship’s manifest, so I assume you don’t already have his attestation papers from http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/cef/001042-100.... or his full service record.

With two numbers it looks like he enlisted as private soldier and was promoted to Lieutenant later, probably due to his animal husbandry experience.

You can see his record in person or obtain a copy from the Canadian Archives, go to the page with his attestation paper and click on “How to consult a file on-site or order a copy of a complete file” for details.
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