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Icelandic Immigrants

Icelandic Immigrants

Cathy Josephson (View posts)
Posted: 20 Sep 2002 10:54AM GMT
Classification: Query
I live in Vopnafjörður in Northeast Iceland. Most of the people who left Iceland after 1873 left from this area. I am part of a group here that is interested in re-establishing contact with the descendants - our cousins and (we hope) new friends.

Before I left Minnesota to live here, I did a lot of research, collecting what information I could find about people who were born in Iceland and their descendants. I grew up in SW Minn., among the Icelanders who settled there. My father´s parents were born in the Vopnafjörður area.

I have quite a few resources here, and can help with questions on this side of the water. Research on the internet is expensive, because we pay for every minute on the phone (no free local dialing in Iceland).

Any one who has information to share, or has questions, please contact me.

Re: Icelandic Immigrants

Heather (View posts)
Posted: 11 Dec 2003 9:18PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 13 Dec 2003 9:32PM GMT
I am looking for information about Icelanders immagrating to America in the late 1960's. Any information about customs kept and discarded for new American ones will be greatly appritiated. Thank you

Re: Icelandic Immigrants

Cathy Josephson (View posts)
Posted: 17 Dec 2003 3:11PM GMT
Classification: Query
If you mean 1960, then this is a later-emigrating group I am not much in contact with. If you mean 1860, then most of these people were part of the Mormon Church and settled in Utah. The group I am most familiar with left from 1875 to about 1914, settling in mostly Canada and the U.S. (north central and west coast).

Most of the customs still in practice revolve around the Christmas holidays. Not many of the descendants of the immigrants still speak Icelandic, except for older "Western Icelanders" in Canada. I knew of Christmas foods and customs, and of some of the Icelandic foods still prepared at other times of the year, like rolled, smoked lamb or liver. These meats were sliced very thinly and served on buttered bread (still are, in Iceland).

This is not a very complete answer, but I can perhaps provide you with better information if I know the years you are talking about. Most of the 1960's immigrants would likely be college students (many in North America for their college years, and of course some staying on due to marriages or jobs), and those already in a profession - diplomacy, university professor, medical, etc.

Re: Icelandic Immigrants

Dan Callahan (View posts)
Posted: 14 Feb 2004 10:13AM GMT
Classification: Query
Cathy,
We're doing follow-up stories for Jason Davis, and we're wondering if you still run a bed and breakfast there.
Dan Callahan
KSTP-TV

Re: Icelandic Immigrants

sheila beha (View posts)
Posted: 1 Apr 2006 10:35PM GMT
Classification: Query
I have run across people at the Scandinavian Cultural Centre in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada who still follow the Icelandic customs. A few have Icelandic as there first language. Ones that had both parents being Icelandic, they did follow the customs. They can be found at www.scandianaviancentre.ca Also Gimili, Manitoba, Canada is mostly Icelandic.

Re: Icelandic Immigrants

Posted: 11 Dec 2006 8:55AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 31 Dec 2006 10:41PM GMT
Surnames: Hoff, Huff, Hough
Have you seen this Rootsweb site
http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&...
It has an amazing amount of information. I am interested in finding my great grandmother Emma Hoff or Huff who was born in Iceland in 1872 and emigrated in 1882 to Minnesota. I believe she lived Southwest Minnesota with her parents at some point, but have not been able to find any link. She married Ole A (Iverson) Trana (Norway b 1867), son of Tobias Trana (Norway 1835) who at one time lived in Nordland, Minnesota. they lived in Clarissa, Minnesota in Todd County. She died sometime between 1902 and 1908. Iceland is recorded on the census record from 1900 as her birthplace.

Re: Icelandic Immigrants

Posted: 17 Apr 2009 4:27PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Jonsson, Sigurdsson, Olafsson, Eymundsson, Gudmundsdottier..
Greetings from Canada!

Many of my ancestors emigrated from Iceland, to Canada, via the US in the 1800`s and early 1900`s..some names are: Sigurdsson, Olafsson, Eymundsson, Jonsson, Gudmundsdottier..
we have much genealogical information..
I don`t know if I have any living relatives in Iceland, I do not speak, or write Icelandic, unfortunately..and haven`t had any success with Ancestry.com searches to date.
Of course, it doesn`t help that surnames have changed over the decades.
Is it still a practice in Iceland for a son, or daughter to adopt their father, or mother`s first name, and add son, or dottier to the end
Looking forward to hearing from you at your earliest convenience.
Best regards,
Stefania Eymundson

Re: Icelandic Immigrants

Posted: 6 Feb 2010 5:33AM GMT
Classification: Query
Yes they still put son or daughter at the end of the name. I wrote to this person and got all the information I needed and more. http://www.halfdan.is/vestur/vestur.htm

Re: Icelandic Immigrants

Posted: 7 Feb 2010 7:52PM GMT
Classification: Query
Cathy, I welcome the idea of working with you. Please contact me at gfreeman@gra.midco.net. George Freeman

Re: Icelandic Immigrants

Posted: 15 Feb 2010 12:21AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Eymundsson, Olafsson, Einarsdottir, ...
Thank you, and thank you for the link..much appreciated!

I am attempting to learn Icelandic, and Norwegian...my sister Michelle and I hope to visit both countries within the next few years. Moreover, we wish to be able to speak and write the language(s) of our ancestors, so that we might pass our heritage onto our descendants..God willing.

Bless

Stefania







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