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Faloons/Falloons of Ballinderry

Faloons/Falloons of Ballinderry

Nathan D. England (View posts)
Posted: 21 Feb 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Faloon, Falloon, Spence
I visited County Antrim, Northern Ireland this past summer. My ancestor was Joseph Faloon, born in 1789 in
County Antrim , Ireland to William & Jane(Spence) Faloon.
He emigrated via Belfast to North America ~1808-1809. He
was a Scotch-Irish Presbyterian. I have found through old
census records that My Faloons were probably from Ballinderry, County Antrim. There were also a considerable number of Fal(l)oons in Aghalee, Aghagallon, Crumlin, Doagh,
Dundrod & Dunadry, and Ballymoney, County Antrim, as well
as in Cos. Londonderry(Coleraine), Tyrone, Armagh, Down, and
Monaghan. As for Spences, these were probably from the
Magheragall/Lisburn area. I found various graves of Faloons in the Ballinderry Middle Presbyterian Church(1668) churchyard(Upper Ballinderry), as well as in Aghalee. And there is a Mrs. Rosaleen Faloon(who is Catholic) who runs
a Bed & Breakfast @ 9 Crumlin Road, Lower Ballinderry, where
I spent 3 nights whilst on my trip. I believe that the surname Faloon traces back to Scotland, and as evidence have
found via the Web that variations of Faloon exist in Ayrshire, Lanarkshire, and Fifeshire, Scotland; these being:
Falloon, Faloon, Fulloon, and Fulloun. I also have connections with County Down: Philpots and Morrows from the
Hillsborough/Annahilt region, and Quails from Downpatrick.
Again, all were Presbyterians of Scottish origins, and these
intermarried with the Faloons of Antrim. Any additional info
or thoughts would be much appreciated.

Joseph Faloon of Ballinderry

Nathan D. England (View posts)
Posted: 22 Feb 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Faloon, Falloon, Spence
************I negated to mention the other day that Joseph
Faloon was an Orangeman. This may be due to the circumstances of the 1798 Rebellion in Southern County Antrim, as well as the Battle of the Diamond in Loughgall/Lochgall, County Armagh in 1795.

Joseph Faloon of Ballinderry or Aghalee.

Nathan D. England (View posts)
Posted: 24 Feb 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Faloon, Falloon, Spence
***********In addendum to my post, I need to clarify a
critical point. Prior to my visit to Northern Ireland,
I assumed that the surname Faloon was an indigenous Ulster
surname, as according to various surname and Irish surname
dictionaries. It lists that Fal(l)oon is a variant spelling
of the more numerous Fallon, from the Irish Gaelic
O Fallamhain or O Falluin, meaning Chief Warrior. However,
I have also discovered that there is an English Fulloon, deriving from the Anglo-Saxon le fulun, meaning a fuller of
cloth. And, since many Lowland Scottish surnames are of Anglo-Saxon origin, I tend to suspect that the ancestors of
my Joseph Faloon were Lowland Scots who came to south Antrim
in the early 1600s in the great scheme of the Plantation of
Ulster, in which James I of England, Scotland & Ireland settled many thousands(250,000) of Lowland Scottish Presbyterians and their lairds in Ulster. In England, there seems to have been a concentration of Fulloons in the environs around London, as well as in Yorkshire and Northumberland, but this surname has virtually died out in England today. There seems to have been a much larger concentration of Fulloons/Fallouns/Fullouns in the Scottish
Borders--namely Galloway, Ayrshire, Lanarkshire, and in certain parts of Fifeshire; as well as in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen & Dundee. I believe that the possibility
that the surname of Faloon could have originated in Lowland Scotland has been overlooked by the famous Edward MacLysaght
and other Irish surname historians. I do believe, however that there is also an Irish Faloon, derived from O Fallamhain, which would help to explain why some Faloons in
Northern Ireland and America are Catholic and others are Presbyterians of primarily Lowland Scottish descent. This hypothesis has been drawn by others with Ulster surnames--
Neely, Mellon, Hoey, Loughlin and Kennedy to name a few. In the end, however, I guess that we probably will never really know, since the histories-- and to a certain extent even the blood of the Irish and Scottish people have been intricately
intertwined in Ulster, as in the fibers of the Irish Linen that was woven by my Scotch-Irish ancestors from the flax grown in the Lagan & Bann valleys in County Antrim & County Down.

Joseph Faloon of Ballinderry or Aghalee.

Nathan D. England (View posts)
Posted: 25 Feb 2000 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Faloon, Falloon, Spence
***********In support of my hypothesis that the surname of Faloon is of dual origin--both Irish & Scottish, is the fact
that some Faloons(male & female) chose spouses with undeniably Scottish surnames in Ulster(Co. Antrim), while a
few others chose spouses with native Irish surnames. I have
found this to be quite true from old census records on the Web. Proving this point, my ancestor Joseph Faloon's mother
Jane's maiden name was Spence, a Lowland Scottish surname which is a sept branch of the Scottish clan MacDuff. Over half of the Spence families in Ulster today are in County Antrim. In support of my claim that the origin of my Faloons
was Scottish, I have found that the surname Fal(l)oon is only found in Ulster--what is today Northern Ireland; that is, mainly in Counties Antrim, Down, Armagh, and to a lesser
extent Tyrone & (London)Derry. And again, apart from a few Faloons in Dublin(it is said that nearly every surname in Ireland--of every origin, exists in Dublin to some degree today), the Faloon surname seems to have been confined to Ulster. The famous Edward MacLysaght, noted Irish surname historian, has even stated that Faloon is 'peculiar' to Counties Armagh & Down. This is further proof that Faloon seems to have been brought over from Scotland in the early seventeenth century. And even on Irish heraldry scrolls and in volumes of Irish heraldry, Faloon is nowhere to be found.
Thus even further proving my point. Make no mistake, however, that even though my Joseph Faloon(1789-1864) was a
Scotch-Irishman, he most likely considered himself an Irishman, a native son of Ireland. And quite rightly he was at that. Even the people of the Republic of Ireland(Eire)are
descended from various peoples: Celts{Gaels}, Vikings, Anglo-Saxons, Normans(Anglo-Normans:essentially of Viking origin), the sixteenth & seventeenth century English of the Pale(Dublin & Leinster), and the Scots of Dublin, Donegal, Leitrim, Sligo, Monaghan & Cavan, and even a few Welsh in Leinster, Co. Wexford and Ulster. So it can best be put that all of these people in Ireland today, even the Protestants(Presbyterians & Anglicans) of Northern Ireland have lost most of the cultural elements of the Vikings, Anglo-Saxons , Normans, English, Welsh, Scottish and Hugeonots, and are truly one Irish people of the island of Ireland today; which will hopefully one day be united in peace and tranquility.

Re: Joseph Faloon of Ballinderry

Posted: 30 Sep 2002 10:45PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Aug 2003 7:41PM GMT
My surname is Faloon we have a farm in lower ballinderry
now into its 3rd or fourth generation. we are catholics, I am curious to know if we have always been catholics or did we convert along the line?
all the best mick.....

Re: Joseph Faloon of Ballinderry

Nathan England (View posts)
Posted: 1 Oct 2002 12:40AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Faloon, Falloon
>>>Michael, My name is Nathan England from Ohio, USA, and we stayed at your B&B in June 1999 on a trip to Northern Ireland & Scotland. We loved it [Oakfield]! My Faloons were Presbyterians but my best guess from what I can ascertain is there was an intermarriage way back in my line with a Protestant spouse. There was a William Faloon in my line who married a Jane Spence pre-1750 so I assume the Spences were Presbyterians were Presbyterians of Scottish extraction and the Faloons previously were Catholics, as Faloon is definitely a native Irish surname. Good Luck in your own genealogical endeavors, and I hope to get back to Antrim and hopefully your B&B one day soon!
Warmest Regards,
Nathan Daniel England
P.S. Are you still a librarian at the Lisburn library?

Re: Joseph Faloon of Ballinderry

Posted: 3 Oct 2002 10:02PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 18 Aug 2003 7:41PM GMT
Nathan
Good lord how weird, thanks for posting a reply, I,ve been so busy lately I,m on Ballinderry residents commitee which is great for posterity for those of use with sense of history.. I,m
renovating a small house in Belfast as well as tinkering about the farm. I,m now the local mobile Librarian for the borough but I,m based in a library called Laurelhill also in Lisburn.
Lisburn was granted city status by the queen this summer so its now a city borough which is quite an uninteresting point but there ya go.. anyway I,m glad you enjoyed your stay I wish I could have spent more time with you..maybe see you again.. All the best michael @ oakfield.

Re: Joseph Faloon of Ballinderry

michelle wright (View posts)
Posted: 24 Jan 2003 4:44PM GMT
Classification: Query
My ancestor was Margaret Falloon, a protestant, born somewhere near Armagh about 1815/16. She came to Australia against her will in 1836. Any information gratefully accepted.

Re: Joseph Faloon of Ballinderry

Bob Rushton (View posts)
Posted: 5 Nov 2004 6:53PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: EDEN
Mike;
I saw your posting and being a believer in miracles I'm sending this inquiry to you.
My G-G-Grandfather was born in Ballinderry in either 1802 or 1806 (gravestone is worn) and emigrated to Canada sometime prior to 1851. His name was Francis EDEN. He was well educated and took the position of postmaster in his new locale. Family lore has him connecting to Sir Anthony EDEN's family, but I have no proof at this time. Since this is not a common Irish name (English) I was wondering if you might know of any EDENs still living in your area that I might be able to contact? Keep me in mind if you stumble across any EDEN headstones in the Ballinderry area.
Thank you...

Bob Rushton
Canada

Re: Joseph Faloon of Ballinderry

Posted: 8 Feb 2005 12:39AM GMT
Classification: Query
My great grandmother was Annie Falloon from Armagh. Her father (and several generations before him) were all called Joseph Falloon, and had farmed in Co Armagh. One was known locally as "the little Frenchman" so presumably he was the original Huguenot refugee. I believe they were all involved in a Church of Ireland congregation around Richhill.

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