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EARLY METHODISTS IN ALABAMA, 1808-1845

EARLY METHODISTS IN ALABAMA, 1808-1845

Nancy Bell (View posts)
Posted: 8 Feb 2004 2:33AM GMT
Classification: Query
EARLY METHODISTS IN ALABAMA, 1808-1845

Source: "160 Years of Methodism in South Alabama and Northwest Florida, 1808-1968" by Franklin Shakelford Mosely, pp. 6-7


1808 Jan. 2, Matthew Parham Sturdivant, being the only volunteer, was appointed by Bishop Asbury at the South Carolina Conference in Charleston, as the FIRST MISSIONARY to the Tombigbee Settlements, and is said to have preached at St. Stephens, McIntosh Bluff, Lake Tensaw, Fort Stoddart, Wakefield and Wood's Bluff (Fort Easley). (Lorenzo Dow, a roving Methodist, preached the first Protestant Sermon in Alabama in 1803 in the Tombigbee and Tensaw River Settlements).

1808 Dec. 26, Sturdivant reported no members or congregations to the S.C. Conference at Liberty Hall, Georgia, but on Jan. 1,1809 was re-appointed by Asbury and McKendree to the Tombigbee, with Michael Burdge as his junior preacher.

1809 Dec. 23, Sturdivant and Burdge reported seventy one white and fifteen colored members to Bishops Asbury and McKendree at the S.C. Conference at Charleston. Methodism's "Endless Line of Splendor" in this area began with these unknown Methodists. Michael Burdge and John Woodson were assigned to Tombigbee Dec. 28, 1809 for the year 1810.

1810 Bassett's Creek Settlement was founded by John Dean and others, about two and a half miles southwest of Suggsville, says Anson West, who says that John and his family were Methodists and that there was an organized Society there in 1810. On Dec. 22,1810, Burdge and Kennon reported one hundred and two white and fourteen colored Members.

1810 Dec. 29, John Woodson Kennon and John S. Ford were appointed to Tombigbee by Asbury and McKendree, and reported one hundred and twenty-six and fourteen colored members at end of year.

1811 Oct. 1, at the Western Conference, Asbury and McKendree, appointed William Houston and Isaac Quinn to Tombigbee, and Dec. 6, 1811,the S.C. Conference sent Richmond Nolley and Drewry Powell to Alabama. The end of the year report showed one hundred and ninety-seven white and fifty-four colored members.

1812 Nov. 12, at the Tennessee Conference, Asbury and McKendree, appointed Richmond Nolley an John Shrock to Tombigbee. The past year's membership figures were reported again. (Fort Mims Massacre August 30,1813).

1813 Nov. 1, the Mississippi Conference, with Samuel Sellers presiding, appointed John Ira Ellis Byrd and Peter James to Tombigbee, and their Nov. 14,1814 report showed a decrease of thirty-five white and thirty-five colored members.

1814 Nov. 24, the Mississippi Conference, Samuel Sellers, presiding, sends John S. Ford and Thomas Owens to Tombigbee.

1815 Nov. 16, the Mississippi Conference, Samuel Sellers, presiding, sends Ashley Hewitt and Alexander Fleming to Tombigbee.

1816 Oct. 14, the Mississippi Conference at Pine Ridge, Sellers and Bishop Robert Ritchford Roberts, presiding, appointed Elisha Lott to Tombigbee. Bishop Roberts travelled the Natchez Trace (thru Northwest Alabama) and was the first Methodist Bishop ever on Alabama soil. West (page 178) tells of Bishop Robert's visit to Vernon, Autauga County, in Dec. 1822, so he appears to have been the first Methodist bishop ever within bounds of our Conference.

1817 Nov. 7, the Mississippi Conference, McKendree presiding, appointed John McLendon and Thomas Owen to Tombigbee, and Oct. 30, 1817, the Tennessee Conference and Ebenezer Hearn to Flint River Circuit, North Alabama, and in June 1818, Hearn travelled down to Tuscaloosa, and a few weeks later to Greensboro and Marion.

1818 Nov. 1, The Mississippi Conference, McKendree presiding, appointed Thomas Griffin and John Murrah to Tombigbee and on Nov. 17,1819 they reported 968 white and 172 colored members. On Dec. 24,1818 the S.C. Conference sent Alexander Talley as Missionary to Alabama where he preached in Autauga and Montgomery Counties in 1819.

1819 John French built French's Chapel in what is now Clarke County, where he had moved to near Barlow's Bend in 1811, after serving in the Virginia Conference 1805 -181l.

1819 Apr. 21, James King, Methodist local preacher, moved to Montgomery and preached the first sermon ever heard there. Nov. 17, 1819, The Mississippi Conference under Bishop George, appointed Nicholas McIntyre and Thomas Clinton to Tombigbee and Thomas Nixon to the new Alabama Circuit, mostly in Autauga and Montgomery Counties.

1819 Dec. 19 Alabama became the twenty second state of the Union, population 107,000, with the Methodists well on the way in their "amazing march through Alabama and West Florida.

1821 Alexander Talley appointed Missionary to Mobile, Blakely and Pensacola.

1824 Henry P. Cook appointed as first Methodist Minister in Mobile and was succeeded 1825 by John Russell Lambuth.

1829 John Russell Lambuth moved to near Kirkpatrick's Landing near Forkland, Greene County, where his son, James William Lambuth was born March 2, 1830. James joined Ebenezer Church near his home in 1837. The family moved in 1843 to near Pearl River in Madison County, Mississippi. James was a Missionary to China 1854-1886 and to Japan 1886-1892, and was the father of Bishop Walter Russell Thornton Lambuth 1854-192l.

1829 Sept. 16, Britton Capel presided over a meeting at Smith's Ferry, Perry County, out of which came the Alabama Methodist Protestant Church.

1832 Dec. 12, First Session of the new Alabama Conference at Tuscaloosa, with Bishop James Osgood Andrew presiding. The Conference included what is now the Alabama-West Florida Conference, also Tuscaloosa, Talladega, Blount, Shelby, Pickens, Jefferson, etc. Counties in Alabama, and Macon, Columbus, and other places in Mississippi.

1841 Jan. 2, Centenary Institute at Summerfield, Dallas County, incorporated and served until 1886.

1845 May 1, The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, organized, of which the Alabama Conference became a part.

Re: EARLY METHODISTS IN ALABAMA, 1808-1845

Otis Fuller (View posts)
Posted: 9 Feb 2004 7:47AM GMT
Classification: Query
Looking for information on my 2 Great Grandfather, REV. JOSEPH THOMAS ABERNATHY, (Methodist Episcopal) b. 1823, TN, d. 1859 in Coosa County, AL. He was admitted in 1855 at Eutaw, AL Conference.
I believe his father to be David Abernathy, b. 1790, NC, seen in 1820 Giles Co., TN census,1830/40 Jefferson Co., AL censuses, and 1850 Macon Co., AL census.(I am seeking confirmation of this.) Rev. Joseph's son, David Nathaniel Abernathy,b. 1853, Macon CO.,AL, was also an M.E. Minister, and served in Coosa Co. Rev. David's younger brother, Joseph Robert, was my G Grandfather.
Otis Fuller

EARLY METHODISTS IN ALABAMA, 1845-1968

Nancy Bell (View posts)
Posted: 9 Feb 2004 5:03PM GMT
Classification: Query
EARLY METHODISTS IN ALABAMA, 1845-1968

Source: "160 Years of Methodism in South Alabama and Northwest Florida, 1808-1968" by Franklin Shakelford Mosely, pp. 7

1845 May 1, The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, organized, of which the Alabama Conference became a part.

1856 Jan. 26, Southern University at University incorporated and in 1918 joined with the North Alabama Conference College to become Birmingham--Southern College.

1857 Feb. 1, East Alabama Male College at Auburn incorporated by the Methodists. Operations were suspended

1862 -1863 and on Feb. 26, 1872 the Conference deeded the college to the state and it became the Agricultural and Mechanical; in 1.899 the Alabama Polytechnic Institute; and in 1960 Auburn University.

1867 Oct. 17, The Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference, was organized at Talladega on an interracial basis.

1870 Dec. --, The Colored Methodist Episcopal Church was organized, into which went most of the over 78,000 colored members of the Southern Methodist Church. In 1954 this church changed its name to the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church.

1870 Dec. 7, The North Alabama Conference was organized and took in the northern section of the Alabama Conference, and at the same time The North Mississippi and the Mississippi Conferences absorbed the parts of the Alabama Conference in Mississippi.

1878 Dec.--, The Woman's Work organized in Alabama Conference. This in1912 became the Woman's Missionary Society; and in 1939 The Woman's Society of Christian Service and Wesleyan Service Guild.

1881 May 25, The Alabama Christian Advocate appeared. It was re-named The Methodist Christian Advocate in 1857. The New Orleans Christian Advocate served Alabama 1851-1881 and the Southern Christian Advocate served before that.

1890 Jan. --, The Alabama Methodist Orphanage opened at Summerfield in the old Centenary Institute building. It moved to Selma in 1911 and in 1939 was re -named the Methodist Children's Village.

1893 Anson West's History of Alabama and West Florida Methodism appeared, covering the years

1904-1870. 1905 Dec. Alabama Conference History Society organized.

1923 The Alabama and North Alabama Conferences accepted ownership of the Montgomery Memorial Hospital, the latter only briefly. The Hospital closed in 1931.

1939 The Methodist Protestant Church, the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, united as The Methodist Church.

1947 Home For The Aged approved (1947 Conference Journal, page 71).

1949 Blue Lake project approved (1949 Conference Journal, page 73).

1956 The Alabama Conference, covering South Alabama and Northwest Florida, became the Alabama-West Florida Conference.

1958 Nov.14, Mrs. Wesley Sellers Price (Margaret Louise Bassett) was licensed to preach at Glenwood by the Troy District Conference, being the first woman licensed within our conference.

1960 Marion Elias Lazenby's History telling of lithe amazing march of Methodism through Alabama and West Florida, appeared, edited and indexed by F. S. Moseley.

1966 April 21-24, American Methodist Bi-centennial at Baltimore, to which Lester Spencer rode on horseback, sponsored by the Conference Historical Society.

1968 April 23, The United Methodist Church, of which our Conference is a part, was born by the uniting of the Evangelical United Brethren Church and The Methodist Church.

1968 This volume: 160 YEARS OF METHODISM in South Alabama and Northwest Florida, appeared under the sponsorship of the Conference Historical Society, with Franklin Shackelford Moseley as editor of same.

Re: EARLY METHODISTS IN ALABAMA, 1808-1845

Nancy Bell (View posts)
Posted: 9 Feb 2004 5:07PM GMT
Classification: Query
I posted the 1845-1968 timeline, and that's all I have. I didn't see their names but you may want to contact Huntingdon College in Montgomery, which houses the archives of the Ala.-West Fla. Conference. The phone number is 334-833-4413; fax is 334-263-4465.

The address is:
Franklin S. Mosely Depository for Methodist Records
1500 East Fairview Ave.
Montgomery, AL 36106

Good luck.

Re: EARLY METHODISTS IN ALABAMA, 1845-1968

Posted: 20 Apr 2004 12:51AM GMT
Classification: Query
My great grandfather, John Henry Allen Smith, was a Methodist preacher. One of the places he preached was Friendship Methodist Church, Gardendale/Morris, Jefferson County, AL. He was born in 1857. If anyone has information on him please email.
Thanks!
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