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Transcription of 1860 Marriage Record

Transcription of 1860 Marriage Record

Posted: 3 Oct 2012 12:10AM GMT
Classification: Query
In this record, marriage book Dalesice 10184, Snimek 17, first record on the left,

http://actapublica.eu/matriky/brno/prohlizec/6329/?strana=17

what is the groom's surname and village? I am not following this line forward (the bride is a Coufal), so I do not need the entire record. But I am very puzzled about the groom's surname and village.

Thank you.

Re: Transcription of 1860 Marriage Record

Posted: 3 Oct 2012 5:05PM GMT
Classification: Query
The groom’s surname is Dusík. He came from Stříbrnice (district Uherské Hradiště). He was a common soldier of k.k. Erzherzog Karl 3ten Linien Infanterie Regiment.

Re: Transcription of 1860 Marriage Record

Posted: 3 Oct 2012 8:06PM GMT
Classification: Query
Thank you, Kamil. I would never had guessed. I seem to have run into a few of these, right? Now I can enter this marriage in my database, if future Coufal researchers want to follow forward on relatives. Thanks again.

I am also going to have to get out my map and look up this village. And wonder how these two met. But my great grandfather and great grandmother have a similar story; they met after he got out of the army, when she was working as a maid in his home village.

Re: Transcription of 1860 Marriage Record

Posted: 3 Oct 2012 8:38PM GMT
Classification: Query
I see the letter that looks like an f but is really h. So is he Dušík or Dusík? Or is that letter just s?

Re: Transcription of 1860 Marriage Record

Posted: 4 Oct 2012 8:23PM GMT
Classification: Query
In this 1860 record spelling is Dussik, but in the indices of parish books of Stříbrnice spelling Dusík prevails.

Re: Transcription of 1860 Marriage Record

Posted: 5 Oct 2012 2:38AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thank you again. A German lady gave a presentation at our genealogy meeting about two months ago about the rules that prevailed, when the s became double s, etc. I guess the generalization is that one consider all possibilities, and just be aware of the different symbols for s or esset, etc. It's sort of like my Hruskas being Hrusska in the old spellings.

Coufal seemed to have been Czaufal, Zaufal, Czoufal, Čoufal, and finally, Coufal. And then there's the first names. Latin: Joannes. German: Johann. Czech: Jan. And that's the easy one. As I learned from you, Vavrinec is Laurentius, and I have no idea what it is in German. Ludwig? Louis is Ludovico in Latin, Alois in Czech. At least in my family. In my home parish in Kansas, one day I needed 4 languages. The German priest would translate the English or Czech or Hungarian mentally into German, then into Latin. I had to be able to trace his logic. But when they recorded my grandfather Vaclav Sramek as Jakob, that was a surprise. Someone said that many Vaclavs went by the name James, and that Jacob was Latin for James.

Again, thanks.
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